35 Burst results for "Fifteen Twenty Years"

Bragi CEO Nikolaj Hviid on the Next Frontier in Personalization

VOICE Global 2021

01:47 min | 4 months ago

Bragi CEO Nikolaj Hviid on the Next Frontier in Personalization

"Looking back at the time fifteen twenty years ago when we had newspapers of radio and and the way that we consumed if nation was absolutely not personal like dissociation. Boss have fast. I'm flipping through the newspaper at the age of of nokia of having a single app. That does everything like snake. Was the only game you ever needed. So it's a logical process in the missiles space. You have created personal station. You go to google you search for something you'd be presented with outcome you're being presented with us -ment with things might like and the same process what happened for audio obviously so rather than just having snake of course people to have more games more services more steaming soon as more information and they also want to have information. It's always talk radio. They want the information that they really want to hear. I want to hear about by munich. But i'm not the only one wants to hear about by munich. But it's very limited in the predation wants to about by munich. Someone wants the about chelsea. Someone wants to out american football. And which i don't particularly fancy because i just don't get it and i think that's very mutual football sarah south ables bass anyways but but having a personalized information just means that that it becomes more useful to me and and the same same step from newspaper to personalized information on smartphone will happen from talk radio to order bruce implying. Tom

Munich Nokia Google Football Chelsea Bruce TOM
Why Digital Identities Are All About a Secure Customer Experience

IT Visionaries

01:50 min | 6 months ago

Why Digital Identities Are All About a Secure Customer Experience

"Welcome everyone to another episode of it visionaries and today. We have the ceo of four. Doc fran rush on the show. Fran welcome to the show albert. Thanks so much happy to be here all right right out the gate. What exactly is ford truck. It's got a very strong sounding name. Tell us what for drug does so before. Drug is a digital identity platform though for enterprise and large enterprise. So what the heck is that. Yeah yeah we enable our customers to really create really friction lists and easy identity experiences so that as an employeers a consumer. It's really easy to register. Set up a new account be recognized when he come back and get access to what you wanna do and then move on ossets really that whole process of setting up in your identity to get access to services online so this is a this is a space. That is very hot right now. We know that there are competitors that we've had them on the show so i don't or maybe they're not competitors so for for our audience. I'd love to hear a little bit of what's the difference. What's unique about four rock to give you an example we've had we've had guests from octa from off zero different companies here but i know that typically in software a lot of times people say the same things but they don't actually do the same things curious. What's unique about for drug. You'll let me just before jim. Braude into four doc. I want to take a step back. He said the market's really hot. And i want to kind of explain why yeah. The market is really hot. Right now. And i think some of this ties to the digital transformation that companies have been going through over the past fifteen twenty years where instead of doing business in person or over the phone you know. We're doing everything digitally as employees. Everything we do now online especially in this post covid world where every workers are remote workers

Doc Fran Rush Fran Albert Ford Braude JIM
Investigations Continue as Questions About the Capitol Riot Remain Unanswered

All In with Chris Hayes

03:58 min | 8 months ago

Investigations Continue as Questions About the Capitol Riot Remain Unanswered

"There are still a lot of questions about other individuals involved in the attack on the as well as the organization and planning behind it fbi's investigating whether foreign governments groups are individuals may have funded extremists who helped plan and execute the january six attack fbi sources telling nbc news that the bureau is examining payments of five hundred thousand dollars in bitcoin apparently by french national two key figures and groups in the alt-right before the riot kind of weird also know the fbi collected thousands of phone and electronic records connected to people at the scene of the rioting including many records from the members of congress and staff members. Who were there. That day. Senator sheldon whitehouse and several fellow. Democrats have called for senate ethics committee. Look into the behavior of the republican colleagues. Tech josh hawley. In relation to the events of january six and today democratic congressman. Eric swallow of california actually filed a lawsuit. And it's the second lawsuit on this on these actions. This lawsuit accuses former president. Donald trump his son. Donald trump junior republic rudy giuliani republican congressman mo brooks of alabama of violating federal civil rights law and local incitement laws with their speeches at that rally near the white house in the morning of january six lawsuit. Alleges the capital attack was quote a direct and foreseeable consequence the defendants false incendiary allegations of fraud and theft and indirect presponse. The defendants calls for violence. Gerstein is a senior legal affairs reporter at politico where he has been covering the arrest of trump appointing federico klein and he joins me now. Josh i saw this story and obviously this guy was like particularly high up the state department but it i read the story. I thought he had left. He was working there right like until the end of the trump term. That's right chris. I was told. He tendered his resignation on january nineteenth. So that's two weeks after the storming of the capital and it became effective a couple of days later. So i guess he was wandering around at foggy bottom knowing full well that he had taken part as the video appears to depict in this assault on the nation's capital on the congress. Tell us a little more about this individual. So he's forty two years old He served in the marine corps in iraq. According to his mother. I haven't been able to determine much in terms of a work history. He had a couple jobs on capitol hill about fifteen twenty years ago as an intern briefly working for the house. Small business committee but he seems to have sort of potted around to different Different kinds of posts before fetching up at the trump campaign in twenty sixteen. There are pictures on his facebook page showing him a working at trump tower. I believe on election night in two thousand sixteen with a couple of other young men there and then he managed to turn that into a political appointee job at the state department in this special assistant a position. Exactly what he did. There is also a little murky. I have to say. I spoke to a number of people last night. Who worked in this department at the state department office at the state department and a lot of them didn't know him or said they'd only met him briefly he seems to have ended up an office that handled brazilian and what they call the southern cone affairs. I think those are the andes countries and somebody told me he was eventually transferred a believe it or not chris to the freedom of information act office which is not usually the career trajectory. Most people in government are looking for this quote from his mother. Cecelia klein saying that fred's politics burn a little hot. She said i've never known him to violate the law. I believe is. He said he was on the mall that day. I don't have any neural. Ever ask him unless he tells me where where he was after he was on the mall.

FBI Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Senate Ethics Committee Josh Hawley Eric Swallow Donald Trump Mo Brooks Federico Klein Nbc News Congress Rudy Giuliani Gerstein Small Business Committee Politico Alabama White House Josh California Chris
The Changing Seasons of Our Lives

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

02:48 min | 8 months ago

The Changing Seasons of Our Lives

"Just because you've done something for ken years or twenty years and it's been god the whole time that doesn't mean that god can't suddenly get done with it. I want you to go in a different direction. So i'm just going to tell you a story. Maybe help you understand a little bit about what you don't watch far one. It's time for a change in your life first of all. Let me say when something is changing in your life when it's obvious that there's a change maybe there's a change at your workplace and there's nothing you can do about it. You don't like it but they're changing something and it's gonna affect you. You can either sit there and be unhappy or you can go along with the change. Well i heard this one time. And i think it's very good when something is changing. The first thing you need to do is change your mind about the change. Say because if you're like. I don't like this and i'm not going to be happy with this. If it's going to change anyway then you might as well change your mind and say get used to this. It's going to be okay. you know. Things are changing in our lives all the time. I mean there's how many of you have had really good relationships at some point. Had a friend that you saw a lot for maybe ten fifteen. Twenty years ninety. Don't ever see him even people. There's certain people that are right for our lives and certain seasons and it doesn't mean it's bad when are no longer in your life is just time for a new season in. Maybe sometimes you've been helping somebody for a long long time and that's over god doesn't want you helping them anymore. Wants him to stand on their own. Two feet we had that situation with my brother. He lived with us for about four years. And we've got him all nice and healthy and he got off the drugs. He was addicted to and got his life. Straightened out working for the ministry and my brother was the of guy that he did. he did. Okay as long as somebody was kind of making them do what was right watching over him but he didn't do too good when he was on his own. Well he was a grown man and to be honest. I didn't want to take care of the rest of my life. I didn't think that was would even be good for him. And so the time came when it was time to stop helping him and that's hard to do. Sometimes and to be honest he didn't do very well. We stopped helping him. But i couldn't just keep taking care of him his whole life just so you can't give your whole life up to help somebody else. Stand on their feet. Who won't do their part. God wants us to help people but he never wants us to do so much far somebody else that they never ended up having to do anything for themselves.

KEN
Goals: Write it Down, Break it Down!

Los Compas Lounge: a PSA for Brown Men

04:52 min | 11 months ago

Goals: Write it Down, Break it Down!

"You know wanting that That you know the three of were talking. The other day was You know things that Things that we put on the board. You know What we wanted to accomplish this This year you know. And start thinking about goals man and What exactly are goals and do you achieve them. And then we started asking you know maybe not everyone knows what a goal is you know and and you know we're kicking back in the lounge and usa. Hey man this sounds like a topic you know and So that's where we're going to be talking about today is Are twenty twenty goals so compass. John's like a good topic to get into while for me. I like to think about goal as an idea of future result. Sometimes you put a vision out there. You want to see what would be your preferred south. Were look like or preferred result would look like and now is the best way that i learned about goes and believe it or not I didn't know what a goal and objectives. And how to define that nadia to like high school man. I mean not. I'm sorry into college in highschool shit you know it just didn't click but it was a big eye opener for me in college and i had to catch up right. I do think about this. Okay i got out to start writing down stuff. And i'm breaking it out so a goal is for example. You know an idea or a future something you wanna get like if you want to buy a new car or say you want to lose weight right so you say that's glow i wanna lose weight in twenty twenty for example so if you look at that you break it down further those would be your objectives so one of your objectives is to figure out what your exercise routines gonna look like have a plan for that. Another objective can be. How do you cut back on carbs. A third objective is. I want to lose five pounds week one. I want to lose ten pounds week to i to have these different milestones. That's the kind of example that i always like to use is the big goal and in the little steps and again as you were saying you just triggered or you said a word that i was gonna say that about milestones that when you when you have a goal you have to set out Like a path you know and it's good. It's nice sometimes. You have to have realistic. I mean you have to have realistic goal. But it's good to drink too but those are two different two different things. Yes it can be positive negative. Because i always hear my wife sometimes like there's nothing wrong with dreams. You have to shoot for the stars sometimes or have these your trees follow your dreams and it's beautiful dream To have nice things or whatever it may be and then figure out backtrack were work yourself when when sometimes when you're a little kid and somebody had that you amaze your. Here's a start. Here's the end times. It was easier to start at the work your way back. You know shooting. I don't know if you remember cleaned out with mazes not exactly as little kids i mean this vision visualizing stuff is very important and we shouldn't squash our kids dreams right. Had these really big dreams and then as you get older or if you're able to break down those dreams and you have to break it onto like what's the reality realistically can you do. Is this a far fetched dream that you want to be the best piano player but yet you don't wanna put in the time to learn piano then. Hey come on. that's just you know that's just a false dream where aruban. What do you call those kinds of dreams. Well i'm just going on on on dreams. I think dreams are great man. And i think as we get older we lose the magic of of dreaming big men and we get complacent and we. You know ten fifteen twenty years down the road. You're like ban. i'm still working here. You know what happened to my dreams. My aspirations what i was gonna be you know and And we get caught up in the day to day stuff you know and before you know it. One year two years five years ten years gone down. What wh- has gone have gone by. And what happened to your dreams.

Nadia USA John Aruban
Argentines bid final farewell to Maradona as national mourning begins

ESPN FC

21:21 min | 11 months ago

Argentines bid final farewell to Maradona as national mourning begins

"Welcome into this special edition of espn fc as we pay tribute to diego maradonna. Who passed away today at the age of sixty craig burley with me here in the studio you can clinton joining us a little later on in the program to talk about what it was like to play against him. We also welcome to the show gab. Marcatti and argentine colleague from espn deported. Ricardo ortiz is with us rookie. I want to start with you to try out. Some how important. Maradona was for argentina. Hi guys pleasure to be with all of you. Maradona as the most important figure ever in argentina i. It doesn't matter what where when everybody would always talk about madonna. He's a legend. Now the idol and now a legend. I it's just unbelievable the morning and what people on the streets are doing in the middle of a pandemic they don't care if in argentina right now for example in the stadium of book juniors. There's hundreds of thousands of people probably a lot more tonight gathering where he played and won a championship. There's hundreds and thousands of people gathered around out of junior stadium where it all started and there's hundreds and hundreds of people outside of his house in a very poor neighborhood. Outside of one is ours. Quality fiorito the house where he grew up on with dirt floors lighting candles every street every corner every city. Every town people are out on the streets and tomorrow in the funeral it will be in the government's palace. They're expecting over a million people tomorrow in the center of one side is to say goodbye to somebody. Who's the most famous argentinian for us. And the most famous argentinian around the world ever so people are really suffering something that they knew it was going to happen sooner rather than later. What a player was. Yeah i mean multiple world cups. They played on one one obviously in a sex with not the best argentina site but he was amazing went to spain and eighty two and played in the world cup's twenty one year old a way in his shoulders. One so young at that point got himself sent off from the big game against brazil will even lend from the came back was even stronger delivered and one of the things that were thinking about is up until his death today. If he'd gone to any club to visit and the world the moment be the biggest clubs in germany. spain. Italy england every player. Some of these players are superstars. Everyone of these players would have wanted a photo. We've seen some of the pictures videos during the when he did go and visit Clubs over the past few years and an all these guys all the ones to do a photo. Welcome because everybody just know what a superstar boys and it could walk into any club under beg stars would all be over to say please. Can i have a full. Because that's how much people hold them and respect gap markazi with us as well gabe. Obviously we heard how argentina is hurting in particular as naples today. No question about it. People are out there on the streets in naples. Even though of course there is a curfew going on right now The connection that he made with naples obviously his adopted city and some might look some of the darkness in his life and pinpoint. That is the moment when when things started to go wrong for him by you know you. You speak to his teammates former teammates and dal speak of of his generosity. They speak about how he was always front and center always standing up to be counted. Random people on the street and to this day in the streets of naples. You'll find murals tomato. You'll find shrines to montana. He had a hold over a city city. That was when you arrive was was beaten down was was impoverished had never won a title There's a divide between the wealthier north of italy in the poor south of italy and they won two titles while he was their third one. They let slip away at the end. Still rather murky circumstances and he's the guy who changed all that he changed the inevitability of history. I think in the eyes of the united a lot of people and that's why he resonated so much she loved certainly enables but i think beyond that he loved being anti-establishment he loves speaking his mind. And i'll tell you what. Then i throughout his life you know. He had highs and lows he made enemies and then at times but in the end in the last fifteen twenty years whether whether it was pillay whether it was peter shilton he he came back and he made up with with a lot of the people he he fell out with and i was struck by something i read. I read somebody posted an interview. He gave back Back is a nineteen year old where he talked about how we talk about. Favorite actor was right on which i found kind of random but he talked about what is greatest trait was and he said i wanna be friends with my enemies and and i think in many ways that is how much of the world from a distance viewed him as as somebody who had the good fortune before he passed to go back and and and really rebuild all the bridges and all the relationships and and really leave us on on good terms with good terms with with very much. Everybody out there ricky. Take us through your point of view with regards to how you will remember him. Remember him of one of the greatest ever on the feel and also a personality so strong and controversial of it. Not many great athletes have done that that to be so much in spotlight for his entire life since since he was about seven eight years old when in argentina they started talking about him he used to play for the us and the red star is today's roca. Were people will gather out of nowhere. Because they knew there was a new kid that was unreal and this was way before cable internet and social media and he did all that before those times. Which is just incredible. He was just different than everybody else and that will remember him. Also as a great great captain whether you love or you hate him. He loved that. Argentinian jersey. More than anything in more than anybody. He was a great leader. He would push to the end. And that's why how he won a world cup. That's how we made it to the final and the second world cup. He played injured with his right leg in really bad shape his ankle and really bad shape. If you look at through the years he started at the age of sixteen Playing in first division and he never stopped. I think he could've played ten more years if he would've taken care of himself. I also remember him for that for not being able to really take care of his body and his mind. It just went over his heading. Never control himself. He went into politics and a lot of people hating him for that but he always spoke his mind. He didn't care. What where when and all. These things for maradona are just different. From almost every other athlete maybe with except mohammed ali that in and out of a field or boxing ring he just kept being on the front page of every paper and every newspaper that was ever printed. It's just unbelievable coming from argentina that i was listening to be there. You know you think of italian soccer in the eighties. I think he was one of the first ones who made people around the world. Want to watch league. Like the italian league just because maradona was playing he. He won napoli twice where they could have. Never even come closer to that. And i've been there many many times and it's just unreal today yesterday and thirty years ago for every day you can buy and maradona shirt. A lot easier than you canning. Senior member things ham seek e way. Anybody that played after him. It's just incredible. What those people thought and loved about the madonna to go back to you. What ricky said about. you know. it could've played longer. Potentially i looked after these body a little bit longer and his main but then the game didn't look after the maradona's back in those days and for louis people the younger generation watch lino massi. Do all these things and they are great. And i'm not taking that away. But he was doing that on. ploughed fields. right with pitches where the ball would. Something's wouldn't even bums are bubbled hard to control with defenders who were some of the roughest toughest one and literally wanted to snap them. It's not please legs. Because that was the only way to stop him and he had to deal with that every time we went on the field and still perform and some of the most wonderful and great goals. That will ever see you can imagine ho has body with the bean. At the end of a game ho the game was played and refereed and the eighty s is a complete contrast to the modern game and rightly so the way the current players are protected. He did not have the did not have that luxury and yet were still able to do that. Which is quite amazing. We'll say thank you very much to rookie for joining us Of course we just say out pouring of support. And this is what i had to say on twitter. What's sad news. I lost a great friend and the world lost a legend. There is still much to be said but for now make god give strength to family members. One day. I hope we can play pool together in the sky. Welcome to the show. Now someone who knew exactly what it was like to go. Head to head with maradonna international level in a world cup final and obviously on domestic level clinton's men into milan. When diego maradonna was. That is very best for napoli again. Thank you very much for your time. Just your initial reaction about very very very said moment. I think full entire world of football On monday madonna was Was an absolute exception. He was Probably for to take decades. You know the late eighties to the nineties. The most most Amazing play on the planet. He was a A genius he was i. I called him always artist. There's there's they did degrade football player. And then there's maybe one artist and diego maradona's was an artist. He what he did on the field full of creativity full of unbelievable to take knee was just an her off. And i had the pleasure to play many times against him with club team if it was stood guard and you if a cup final was germany world cup finally if it was Into milan the two games against napoli. And you just simple simply admire this guy and to have him. Passover early just sixty sixty years of age is a very very sad to pull unfortunately reality. You can just take us back to to that time. And just how big walls he while he was on his own level in. Oh they were great players obviously in the late eighties. Early nineties in italy Lauder mateos was one of the best players in the world goalie from boston. Right cut curriculum. Ow before i was maybe blood was was was unbelievable. Great players but he was an another level. He was just someone that that always made the difference and figured things out on the field that nobody else could figure out so you could men mock him. You could mock him his own older. You had no no idea how to mock him because he was just so gifted and so there was so much admiration for him and and outside the field he was just a simple very Normal person in a lot of people thought momma donna. All his Issues then drugs and other things. Li laid on was a very complicated person. He was not. Diego was a very down to earth. Very normal guy that just wanted to be with his friends with his families and What he has brought to argentina you will never forget that in what he brought to his especially to is not believer son of naples That people will never forget that. So imagine today You know how people morning in argentina and in napoli in italy and around the world is just a just a very sad moment. you're what was it like the reaction from the crowds when you were up against napoli and maradona's was on the board. I imagine just that sense of expectation must've being palpable even as a player. Yeah i mean i've been. I heard the news i was. I was really shocked as money. And and i posted something on my twitter side and i rarely actually post things but by posted something that i always thought about. Diego was his warmup routine depending on the music in the stadium started to do his routine with jogging and the ball around and that was made him. I think it has seven million hits by now. Life is live music. Dead really is jay. Go on monday madonna. He just wanted to be in rhythm himself if the music with the game and when you watch him then doing his walmart you you phase him actually as an opponent and you kind of have lost the game because you gave him so much respect you give him so much and because he was such a fantastic football player that your and that kind of transfer to the to the to fans in the stadium you know the even away games for him became home games because the people just wanted to see him. You know if you played in milan in front of eighty five thousand which is kind of standing up giving him standing ovations even if you may be lost a game or other games so so he was just a. It was a sustained unique over almost twenty years. And i always put him on the same pay leeann fronts. Bacon bala prior to madonna and then obviously came the next generations with Mac in our analogy. But but donna izzo in his own way. I simply unique. You mentioned the next generation yorgen and a lot of people may be seen. Maradonna play live the younger generation who are watching. Just talk about the fact that was. That was the protection. Was that from the referees. That maybe have now and you're playing on very different surfaces as well well in in in his days Obviously the fields were not good. The reveries didn't give you any protection. Ended defenders has killers. You know they just ditch us. I don't know how many follows a game run on madonna. Try to stop him all over two three defenders at the same time when all over him and he's still find solutions he's still found found a way out in score and scott incredible goals then so he took a lot a lot of hits And obviously his fame than along side in the spotlight living. The spotlight was not really his his wish. His wish was to be a normal guy playing his game. Making the difference on the field off the field he just wanted to be with friends and family but what he what he achieved because of those circumstances doing his playing days is almost impossible to achieve the interest thing as i saw clip from an of. You're on sky sports in the uk from a couple of weeks ago and it was moretz. You'll portrait was on former tottenham manager of course former argentine international news talking and they were talking about maradona. And he said we know we have all these stories about the off-the-field antics of recent years and even when he was playing but behind the scenes privately when he was with you or with. These teammates. Away from the glare of the media. He was a really genuinely warm individuals that wanted to help people the rest of as all a big story true for the newspapers but it was interesting portrait. He spoke so long layover in another thing. I think about because it's a different era to me but playing against the likes of the brazilian ronaldo the world cup and france ninety eight and seen what he can do with three or four plans around. You thought you had time in the corner on the over sudden four people and he was getting strike goal and we know how good he was. Brilliant for the hair would have been laid to play against off. That's where it was like playing against a great player. Light renowned on the other thing was empty before my oktay jokes. Gian-franco franco zola. He was going to be the air at one point. I believe to diego maradona napoli. No zola was a majestic player. But can you imagine having the way and your shoulders of go in there and potentially replace the quality of maradona. so it's unfathomable. Anybody can do that. But but no yet i think everybody of have over the piece of just we know there's lots of stories. We notice milan. But this was really apart from great. Football was a really genuinely warm guy. Last point again you do fail. That will never be anyone like diego maradonna again. I don't think so. Because i think diego maradona was was so unique because the way he emotionally connected with the people of his people and weren't as iowa's in argentina his people in napoli was so deep it was so warm and it was so i- amazing to see i traveled to and obviously go down to two zero so badly wanted to watch book. Juniors weevil played one eight. My life was when my list. And i walked through. Borka the the area around the stadium and almost every second house wall was a was a painting a tribute to jingle maradonna. I mean it's just what he left there with the people they were one they just just melted into each other and the same. He did in napoli for for napoli august. This is a today is very very sad. Sad day because this is this is her almost lifetime hero. I mean throughout generations. You know what he brought to napoli brought to the city of napoli brought hope he brought a smile. He brought excitement. He gave them pride pride. Because you know those years when he joined napoli was a big big Have kind of a disconnection between the south and off in italy and and he wanted to give these people real a real jojoba real pride. And that's what he did through the game of football. He used the tool of football to to bring these people up and and give them give them a quality of life to give them so much more than just his goals on the field. And that's what you see him. That's why i think devil be not a second minor donna coming up anywhere in the world he was. He wasn't one time off like michelangelo or fun. Goal or all these famous autists. He's he's one of them. You can kinsman. Thank very much sheriff supposed to be an outpouring around the world on social media messy writing a very sad day for all argentines and football. He leaves us but does not leave. Because diego is eternal. I'd take all the beautiful moments linked with him and wanted to take the opportunity to send him condolences to all his friends and family. Alrighty

Argentina Maradona Naples Diego Maradona Madonna Craig Burley Marcatti Ricardo Ortiz Fiorito Espn Italy Peter Shilton Spain Italian League Ricky
Remembering Diego Maradona

ESPN FC

05:27 min | 11 months ago

Remembering Diego Maradona

"Welcome into this special edition of espn fc as we pay tribute to diego maradonna. Who passed away today at the age of sixty craig burley with me here in the studio you can clinton joining us a little later on in the program to talk about what it was like to play against him. We also welcome to the show gab. Marcatti and argentine colleague from espn deported. Ricardo ortiz is with us rookie. I want to start with you to try out. Some how important. Maradona was for argentina. Hi guys pleasure to be with all of you. Maradona as the most important figure ever in argentina i. It doesn't matter what where when everybody would always talk about madonna. He's a legend. Now the idol and now a legend. I it's just unbelievable the morning and what people on the streets are doing in the middle of a pandemic they don't care if in argentina right now for example in the stadium of book juniors. There's hundreds of thousands of people probably a lot more tonight gathering where he played and won a championship. There's hundreds and thousands of people gathered around out of junior stadium where it all started and there's hundreds and hundreds of people outside of his house in a very poor neighborhood. Outside of one is ours. Quality fiorito the house where he grew up on with dirt floors lighting candles every street every corner every city. Every town people are out on the streets and tomorrow in the funeral it will be in the government's palace. They're expecting over a million people tomorrow in the center of one side is to say goodbye to somebody. Who's the most famous argentinian for us. And the most famous argentinian around the world ever so people are really suffering something that they knew it was going to happen sooner rather than later. What a player was. Yeah i mean multiple world cups. They played on one one obviously in a sex with not the best argentina site but he was amazing went to spain and eighty two and played in the world cup's twenty one year old a way in his shoulders. One so young at that point got himself sent off from the big game against brazil will even lend from the came back was even stronger delivered and one of the things that were thinking about is up until his death today. If he'd gone to any club to visit and the world the moment be the biggest clubs in germany. spain. Italy england every player. Some of these players are superstars. Everyone of these players would have wanted a photo. We've seen some of the pictures videos during the when he did go and visit Clubs over the past few years and an all these guys all the ones to do a photo. Welcome because everybody just know what a superstar boys and it could walk into any club under beg stars would all be over to say please. Can i have a full. Because that's how much people hold them and respect gap markazi with us as well gabe. Obviously we heard how argentina is hurting in particular as naples today. No question about it. People are out there on the streets in naples. Even though of course there is a curfew going on right now The connection that he made with naples obviously his adopted city and some might look some of the darkness in his life and pinpoint. That is the moment when when things started to go wrong for him by you know you. You speak to his teammates former teammates and dal speak of of his generosity. They speak about how he was always front and center always standing up to be counted. Random people on the street and to this day in the streets of naples. You'll find murals tomato. You'll find shrines to montana. He had a hold over a city city. That was when you arrive was was beaten down was was impoverished had never won a title There's a divide between the wealthier north of italy in the poor south of italy and they won two titles while he was their third one. They let slip away at the end. Still rather murky circumstances and he's the guy who changed all that he changed the inevitability of history. I think in the eyes of the united a lot of people and that's why he resonated so much she loved certainly enables but i think beyond that he loved being anti-establishment he loves speaking his mind. And i'll tell you what. Then i throughout his life you know. He had highs and lows he made enemies and then at times but in the end in the last fifteen twenty years whether whether it was pillay whether it was peter shilton he he came back and he made up with with a lot of the people he he fell out

Argentina Maradona Diego Maradonna Craig Burley Marcatti Ricardo Ortiz Espn Fiorito Naples Madonna Spain Clinton Italy World Cup Brazil Germany England Montana
Clinton Sparks Introduces Esports XSET

Esports Network Podcast

02:21 min | 11 months ago

Clinton Sparks Introduces Esports XSET

"Well in July you parted with phase and you announced in a big way through the New York Times that you were starting something, New Jersey. With exit so what is exit start us off here introduced me to this brand exit is the world's fastest growing Esports and gaming Lifestyle brand with something like a Culture Club. Right? So I'm going to do everything we did at phase and more because it was like I said because it was differences of opinions. There's a lot of things we couldn't do that. We knew would be great in this space include not being leaders in diversity and inclusion, but also understanding how to implement other sectors in other cultures and businesses into this space and what to do with it and how to put them together and really create something exciting to move the entire culture in gaming space ahead. So we decided to leave and do that because we we didn't want to have to answer nobody else. You know what I mean? It was just kind of like, yeah, we know what's dope. So we're just going to move forward with what's dope and we don't want to have to go through this whole rigmarole of like does he not like it does he not like it has she not like it so it's just like let's just go and suck. This new thing, you know aimed at diversity and inclusion and also being able to implement an Infuse all the cultures that we've been a part of for the past fifteen twenty years, which can really help the entire country. You know what I mean even phase included. So the things that we're going to do will really help lay the path and build a bigger blueprint for other people to walk down and follow to see the possibilities and the things that can be done in this space that one no one's thinking of into no one really has the resources or experience to do it like we do a tech sent. Well, you have an awesome Network and I saw in the press releases you brought on Swae Lee you have all kinds of money from musicians coming in the back the company as well. What games though? Are you guys focused on right now? How many different titles are you across? I think we're I think Eight titles right now wage. I mean, we're touching a lot of things from rocket League to Valerie into college due to fortnite we even have joke. Who's the number one Madden player right now he signed so, you know, we're looking to not only you know off The culture in the industry for but we're also looking to dominate in in the E Sports sector of in in gameplay. So we're looking to do everything that that's possible to get done. And even those things that are impossible to others. We're going to get done.

Culture Club New York Times New Jersey LEE Valerie Madden
The New Science of Why We Get Cancer with Dr. Jason Fung

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:56 min | 1 year ago

The New Science of Why We Get Cancer with Dr. Jason Fung

"Dr fong welcome to the broken brain. Podcast thanks for having me here. I'm really excited. Many of our listeners. Know that my my family like a lot of families out there has been touched by cancer. Mom few years ago about ten years ago was diagnosed with breast cancer had aunts that have been also diagnosed with breast cancer and my grandfather passed away of cancer bone cancer. That was there so. I think i'm representative of a lot of people who have been through this journey supporting family members and are just curious not only for their own health and their families south but curious about what is this thing and i want to first start off by saying you know your books and the way that you approach writing. I really appreciate because you're taking a premise and idea that people seem to hold a true. And you're bringing new contrarian thinking we used to think of fasting as being this restrictive thing potentially dangerous and you highlighted the research around that field. That helped us understood. That fasting is actually central to healing inside of our body with things like diabetes and other diseases. And you're doing it again with cancer by questioning the basic premise. And i want to pull a quote from your book to start off the conversation. Which is you say and you start off in the book you say the most pressing question cancer. Research is the most lucid question. What is cancer. So can we start off there because it's still a question that we're asking today. Which is what exactly is cancer. Yeah that's sort of the most important thing is understan- disease you really have to understand what it is like a causes et what the disease is lily for the of the common Diseases cancer stands virtually alone because we had no idea what this disease actually so you look at other diseases like cove it or you know infections. We've identified viruses. We've identified bacteria. We've figured out fungi. And so these are external invaders for heart disease and stuff. These are you know. Blockages in our blood vessels which starved the heart. Or the brain of blood to get heart attacks or strokes so we sort of understand what the disease how it develops in that kind of thing But for cancer sort of a very very strange disease. So it's it's unlike any other disease we've ever face is not a faster. Disease like heart disease is not an external invasion like bacteria or viruses You know it's not a you know stones and stuff. There's all these other diseases. But what is this strange disease and it's not that it's one of these sort of rare. It's unfortunately extremely comments. Lifetime risk of cancer is somewhere around one ten. And it's gonna you know affect everybody's life in that if you don't get it you will know people who will get it almost. Everybody does but we don't know what this is. This is the whole sort of discussion in the book is. What is this disease. Because it's a disease where the you have a normal sal which is part of your own body as it's derived from your own body and for some reason this normal cell he breaks off and becomes cancerous to the point where it can kill you and it kills of course many many fullest the second killer of people so our concept of what this disease actually is has been changing so you know it's changed throughout history really even in the last ten years. There's been this massive change in the way that we look at disease in this what. I call the paradigms of cancer that is you know not arguing about. Oh this you know this is how to treat cancer like we've done lots of studies on you know. Use this drug. The of these drugs in combination with surgery. Chemotherapy and radiation. You put him in this sort of you can treat cancer. I'm not disputing any of that. But in the end it doesn't help the answer. The question of what is if you want understand what it is then you have to start a starts from beginning. Go through it on say. What is this disease. That's where we really made a bata progress within the last sort of fifteen twenty years and most people haven't even really appreciate that. And that's what i wanted to bring forward. Is that sort of recent research and bring it to the people so they at least understand what this disease is. That data is affecting so many people

Cancer Dr Fong Cancer Bone Cancer Breast Cancer Diseases Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Heart Attacks
"White Sox bring back Tony LaRussa" with Ryan Theriot - Episode 034 - burst 2

The Sportscaster and Her Son

01:21 min | 1 year ago

"White Sox bring back Tony LaRussa" with Ryan Theriot - Episode 034 - burst 2

"You know so. I don't see now if you could get chris carpenter to manage to coach and that'd be a great get car has some really interesting traits. We saw what he did on the field. You know i'm saying. Saudi did eleven in the world series. Great career prior to that but just a leader in every sense of the word players gravitated toward him when he spoke people listening. You know he's kinda got that commanding personality. You mentioned the game changing and get a little bit younger and and a little bit more. Flashy you know it. It's tony gonna have the ability to change. You know if you bring in. Chris rock and they're going to have the ability to change. Because it's not what it was five ten fifteen twenty years ago you know as far as the players expressing themselves differently and and the unwritten rules are starting erase as we've all seen so i think there's gonna be some give and take on both sides. Motorist this marriage to work. But i do think it's environmental higher anytime you can bring on and tony larussa. I think i think he gotta do. Y'all honestly i'm still just before and a few interviews talking about this. He's the greatest baseball mind. I've ever been around and i mentioned some pretty good ones and it's taking nothing away from the guys. I played for because they're all phenomenal managers but he just was excellent in a lot a lot of areas. That's really interesting.

#Sportstalk #Chicagosports White Sox Baseball Tony Larussa Jerry Reinsdorf Aj Hinch Alex Cora Chicago Theriot MLB Age Shaming Chris Carpenter Chris Rock Tony
Security awareness: How to influence others and change behavior

Cyber Work

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Security awareness: How to influence others and change behavior

"So I WANNA. Let's let's get into it then. So the main meat of your podcast and book rethinking the Human Factor Cetera. Cured awareness behavior and culture. So I kind of your inspire presentation, you know several interesting things I that organizational culture and security culture are often treated as two separate things and others work can be done in linking the two and second that improvement squareness applications comes down not to I should be doing this but I wanted to do this and is my spot to do it. So I, WANNA get into some Specific case. If you have any in mind like where where organizations were able to tie security and organization culture together effectively. And also you can. You sorta like give me some examples of where people are companies were able to move from I should do I want to. So obviously about organizations that I work with and you is that will. Company Yeah Yeah. I'm sure there's a company Kodak's. Yeah, oh. Yeah. If there is now. So where do we want to start so I think the first point you make there is about a culture. So as an industry, we talk about security cultural law. Butts. At an I think eight it's a, it's a developing a culture is is A. He's GONNA help change behavior, but also helps with. It also helps when you're site in front of you know you get. Instant and in front of a regulator. and. More often not what we reported in the media is. A toxic cope culture in relation to cyber security mass resulted in this breach. So actually focusing on culture is really important because eventually we all have a bridge and we don't want to be in that Casa vacation in front of you know, a the the judiciary in regulators the courts the Senate whatever we want to be caught up in front of the committee and then basically be. Told you go talk coach so. Very, very. The one thing that came to my own research when I studied culture in some death a look to Organiz. Ation culture will McCullough birthday. Is the I think the first point is. Establishing, embedding an organizational culture trying to influence on organizational culture. Is Very very hot. It takes a lot of time in a lot of resources applied to most organizations are already. Either very proactively or Off Still. Kicking off. So pushing through projects, which takes three years, five years, ten years, fifteen, twenty years and culture. Why would we want to try and develop a separate culture with all the cost? Nova. Heads that come with that, you take it to To the board and say, Hey, you know we've got this organization culture. We want to develop a security culture in many ways what you're sorta doing saying we want something that's different. Now something potentially very difficult that they're just gonNA. Roll their eyes at and go come on. We can't even the other. Yeah. We haven't finished this one and you want to do this. The second point is I think he's quite well recognized among security profession the. One of the challenges is that are. We won't security just to be the way things are done. We don't want it to be something special. Because make something special people after respond to it, they have to you move towards it whereas if it's just part and parcel how everything's done within this organization, the values which most important to. Dak Crates. Lot less resistance. So by CREIGHTON security culture and making separate to the organization culture but sort of his country in to do what we generally know journey one, which is for it just to be called everybody does yeah I think that's the thing is you know? Catering to to to try and descending labeled completely separate potentially these are just Not Saying coach wrong I'm just saying these are things I think about. Yeah we're doing, we're just starting to sort of understand these sort of things, a separate things, and then how to integrate them. So of course, there's going to be lexical these. Security coach. You, know it's not unheard of what people is not my concern. It's the responsibility of the security team and they T- or the set in information in it. It somebody else's responsibility. Assume as you, label it. It combines people the opportunity to say that's not my problem. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely.

Kodak Mccullough Organiz Senate Judiciary
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 1 year ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Desperately Seeking Garifuna

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Desperately Seeking Garifuna

"Roof. How are you? I'm very well. How are you good? I went to the river cafe. I don't know fifteen twenty years ago and it took quite a while to there on the tube from downtown London but it was a marvellous location and a marvelous dinner. But you started really as a a sandwich place. I guess a commissary in your introduction to your new Book Thirty Years River Cafe. The quote is the River Cafe and his clientele are seriously diminishing the tone of area. What do you want to just explain what that meant? When we started the river cafe really it was a site of what used to be An oil refinery in London on the river with votes outside and at my husband who's architect was we were lived in Paris for five years when he was doing the Pompidou Centre. When we came back to London. We wanted to find a place that could be a community so that he could set up his architectural practice again. In place through there was a mix so it was a outside space as I said. We were on the river. They converted these warehouses into rather beautiful studios and offices are picture frames model makers dress designers and always. We always wanted to have a place where people could eat and I was working as a graphic designer. And Ed Always Cook but when the applications came in we thought you know what why are worse than not having a restaurant would be not to have a very good one and I just said I think I'll do it and I'll do with rose gray. Who's an old friend and had also come back from New York? I'm wanting to do something. So the two of US came and looked at the the site and it was tiny. It was enough. Maybe a bar tiny little kitchen and six tables. But the real restriction was that we're only allowed to be open for lunchtime because the neighbors who actually had oil warehouses here up in arms about the idea of a small restaurant so the planners that said we could be open Monday to Friday. We could only be open for lunch and only open to the people who worked and these warehouses. So that's where the sandwich bar. That's where the inexpensive very tiny little place started. But I think Rosen. I always had the ambition to be an Italian restaurant to be a proper restaurant. We just had to do it gradually. Here's a question. Sometimes you just leave something allowed like in your book very often. You don't add a lot of strong. Flavors is something that has a wonderful flavor to begin with you have a Dover Sole Rescue Capers in Marjoram Dover sole is often serve which brown butter and butter something very simple olive oil but capers in March. Very strong flavors is that how do you know as a cook when you? WanNa add strong flavors to something and other times? You don't is that something just whimsical. Or I think it depends. Well first of all depends on your mood. Sometimes I come into the river cafe because you know we changed the menu twice a day and if I have Dover sell on the menu I bite think well what am I going to put with the Dover so I might just put lentils with it today and therefore might like something interesting on the top like capers. I think as a cook the first thing I think about when I write the menu is what what do I feel like eating today. What would I want to eat? And that's one of the joys of working in the river cafe or I think I hope coming here so I think as you know the same thing we say. If you're cooking at home what what do you feel like eating and also not go shopping with a recipe in your head but go to the market. Go to the supermarket go to shop. See what's there and then you know the home and cook you know. A lot of chefs. Do a lot of different things. Jose entrees has twenty three restaurants Jeremiah Tower obviously you know moved around started things enclosed things. You've been doing this thirty years or so. Alice waters has been doing her GIG for forty years. Do you have a feeling about people like yourself who stick with it who start something and just keep getting better at it forces people who move around. Did you think one is better than the other widely? You love for thirty years doing this one thing. It obviously still excites you. By the way you're you're talking about your restaurant that's a good question. I think that it depends for me. It's about ambition and control. You know so I really. I've been asked to other restaurants. I've looked at other sites. We came very close to doing another restaurant. A couple of years ago and Mayfair and I'm always thinking about how to grow how to how to be better and sometimes I think that for me. It's about being better where we are. It's about everyday come in with a set of problems or or thinking about what to cook how to make the restaurant. Beautiful and how to make the waiters more knowledgeable in how to work with the chefs. Who want to learn more about ingredients in how to make our pastry kitchen know. There's so many so many things to do in the restaurant here that would it be possible to do it and have more. Some people really can do it for me. It would be really just so important to know that I if I did another restaurant that it would be as good as this one and this one. Wouldn't you know get less good because I was distracted by another one so I never thought of it as sticking with it because for me I have the best job in the world and I come in and I work with brilliant people and it's exciting

River Cafe Years River Cafe London Dover Sole Rescue Capers Dover Marjoram Dover United States New York Pompidou Centre Alice Waters ED Paris Rosen Mayfair Jeremiah Tower Jose
A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 1 year ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:42 min | 1 year ago

Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

"And today we're going to discuss with you a very sensitive subject. Many of you have a family loved ones out there. That have had this experience. And you're hoping to avoid it as well because of watching them it is called for Alzheimer's and dementia and Doctor this is going to discuss with us today. Many ways that we can start recognizing if we're headed towards one of these terrible diseases down the road Natural products that we can do in supplementation. That could help. Slow it down and I don't know about reversing it. He's GonNa talk to us about that also and we have lots and lots of questions to get to. The you guys have been kind enough to send to us and we're going to make sure we try to answer as many of those as we can as long as we can remember right. I with that being said Dr Lewis. Can You Tell US exactly what you want to tell people today about Alzheimer's and dementia and give them some hope. Y- you know. I always write about two or three hours worth of notes in bullet points for this thirty minute show so please forgive me for not getting around everything First of all. It's a very devastating disease and mark my words what you're going to see in the very near future like ten fifteen twenty years is we're going to lose a great amount of America's workforce because You know how wonderful insurance companies are. They're going to say well. You know we're going to quit covering this and this and this and this and so you're gonNA have to take one of the two workers from your house. The male female to stay at home take care of mom or dad with dementia Alzheimer's So that's GonNa really hurt. America's workforce the the town to treat something. You know. I'm a contractor. We can't treat anything with with supplements but where did we lose our faith in God to realize that our if you put in something really really good your body's going to work within do good so the time to deal with it is before you get it now. I saw dementia slash Alzheimer's and you need to go to a neurologist. If you suspect you have this I love medical profession and you should be doing our program also in addition to I all coming in my mother when she was entered. I guess mid Sixty S and my brother Dr James Lewis who's incredibly brilliant contractor so we started giving my mother lots and lots of stuff and she was a willing participant and we put off dementia slash Alzheimer until. It didn't really kick her but she got around eighty eight to ninety to ninety two. It really got her but That's better than letting it progress in her mid sixties and have ever in in tiger down that terrible road when she seventy so we put it off about twenty five years Here's the problem and again. I'm not a medical. I go to medical doctors I love. Medical doctors had the greatest respect for their knowledge and their commitment to helping people get well but there was an article in the paper the other day. This is drugs. Fail to slow decline inherited. Alzheimer's disease now inherited would imply that. It's genetic but as you know if you've listened to me there's so many of our genes that will not express bad things if you get rid of environmental toxins and increase nutrients and you know to a thinking man or woman you say well. If you increase no chance you're gonNA automatically Detox Bango. You just won the prize. That's true so it. That article talked about the fatal drugs. Fail TO PREVENT OR SLOW. The mental decline They were trying to remove harmful protein. That builds up into Brian to these people leading to you know. Bad dementia The problem with that is and I'm not anti-drug but it's like you've got eighty holes in your roof and it's about to come a thunderstorm and you're trying to patch one. That's what you're doing with the drug. You're not getting to the underlying. Cause will you talked about your mother going into that at a later stage I remember her being much younger. And we thought she was going into dementia and Alzheimer's and they had just put her on an an acid reducer. So that right. I hadn't even forgot that story. Which is one of the signs of dementia Alzheimer's but sometimes it's just dress Yeah My sister called me and says you know Steven my mom. You Know Mamas making coffee with no water into pie. She's turned it trying to turn on the gas stove can't get it going. And she's looking in the mirror and talking to herself thinking she's talking to someone else and she's urinating freely and cannot have a bowel movement. I said Oh good. Lord I'm booked up and I said I'd never mind. I'll cancel everybody on the books and I went to see your well. They just put on a new acid reducer and not that. Those things aren't necessary and appropriate but I said well she's not going to get any B twelve you know out of her mate and we'll get further into that during the questions but I said if you've got to take it for feeling good understand that and I gave her medical doctor the all the research about you know B twelve deficiency and how that can decrease brain function and I said at the very least place. Give her a shot over. Wake well her cute little. Md She. I guess got offended. She wouldn't do it so I had to put Mamo massive doses of B. Twelve. You can't put somebody on the RDA because you're not gonNA absorb it. You gotta put them on massive doses and has got to be the good stuff and she popped out of it in about two three weeks. She has a brand new woman and that was many years before she actually did develop dementia. So sometimes it can be drug induced and you think that they're going down this slippery slope open at something they're taking And and blood pressure medicines and other one that that does that it. It'll make them be like they're somewhere else you know. We had them walk in our office that way. And they don't know what's going on and it turned out to be their blood pressure medication so it could be several. It can be statin drugs. We see that very very often and again. I don't interfere with medical. You know what the what they do. So we'll talk to your md about this. Here's the book. Here's the research. Read that One of the worst insults from a hormonal point of view is one of the worst insults to the Bryant stress. Because then you're adrenals get stressed release. Cortisol we see people with super-duper High Cortisol than it you know eventually gets battalion. Whereas craps out goes down to. Oh we had one in here. Yesterday had five on his cortisol. So we'll no wonder you feel like hack. And you have anxiety on top of that and can't remember and he runs a multimillion dollar business. This has a very bad effect on the hop. Thelma's and they're somewhere in my notes. GotTa hope we get to it. I'll just mention it now. You have to feed the hippocampus. That's not a college for Hippos. That's part of your brain and I did a little research and there's a specific type. You know we always sell the methyl. B twelve the good stuff but there's only one company on no that makes Olympic acid and auto Janet. I said I know I know I keep asking you to buy all these supplements. I started remembering things. I remember the code to our Condo in Branson for months before and went on and on and on it's called T. M. G. which is trauma thylacine. Which is a major methyl donor which means major detoxification? But it has a violin acid which feeds the hippocampus which helps tremendously with short term energy. So for those of you that walk into the next room and have a senior moment because we laugh about it because it's easier to laugh about it and saying Oh crap Mg Are you have to strategically place all of your items? You can see him again when you get in the room Engine twelve flashlights. Hanging around. Because I forgot where I left last seven but I've always got one somewhere except they migrate like wildebeest. I may all be an RV. And I have to bring them back into the house but so stress. You know you've got to deal with that Hypo methylated which lack of be complex. And I've got notes here somewhere. It's be twelve it's B. Six and has to be activated. Be Six it has to be five. M T H F met foul in or Quadraphonic plus that for Lennick. Acid is little bit different than the folic. So you got to be very very careful. Janet can you hand me that the one over there that that bottle is says Omega? Yes you're okay. Here's what I'm GonNa Tell You folks. One of my patients came into the day. She says well I'm taking this. This is from a famous doctor and my Amigas which is very very incredibly important critical for good brain function mine. One Gel caps has several times more. Epa in Dha than this A Megan from a famous doctor. But this name is doctor put in B twelve as Sino Kabbalah mean if it says sign Kabbalah mean. It is junk. Throw it away. I don't care if it comes from a famous doctor and then you know he put in some other cheap stuff It's not good. Just because it comes from a famous doctor. He put info late instead of the five of 'EM T H F.

Alzheimer Dementia Dr James Lewis Cortisol Janet Alzheimer's Disease America Mental Decline Mamo Brian EPA Statin Thelma Bryant Omega Steven
Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

Monocle 24: The Menu

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

"The collective is an exciting body. And it's exciting. Because I wish it when I was starting my business. There Wall such a thing in existence. Where a group of restrictors on people in the food and beverage industry who are telling our story in a way. That's going to inspire that whole scene of entrepreneurs to be courageous enough to have a go within this industry. You look at the industry and you hear. There's lots of doom and gloom at the moment for various reasons but certainly with hospitality. You know that the rate is always being ninety cents restaurants failing in the first year. So I think it's really important to have a variety of role models who speak positively about how it can be otherwise and how to build a business in a way that's going to have legs and stamina and scalable and that's what the. Cobra collective is about his group of normal people like US telling those out there who are wondering how it can be. It can be very sunny place to be. Let's talk about your own story dozen interesting one so I know you worked as a barrister for twin two years before you took that leap into hospitalizing. It's an unusual route. Isn't it sized child? Protection burst of twenty s and that's very typical of many Indian immigrants. My parents were doctors and I was born in this country and I was raised to be a professional. Because that's the only thing that you can be otherwise you fall off the face of England in their view so I was raised to be a doctor or lawyer and I became a lawyer. So it's very good girl and I absolutely loved my job and my job was about meeting people at the lowest point of their life and giving them hope in some ways that this was child abuse and this was about children being removed etc and business and particularly hospitality was something that I thought was probably quite reprehensible because you look at media and you look at the way that restaurateurs and restaurants portrayed unless seen as these hotbeds of testosterone driven aggression that you have to be brutalized anti brutal to succeed in hospitality and so for me as a woman as a woman who was in my forties. When I started the restaurant it was not something that was in any way beckoning but I had a passion for food. A real burning passion to show liberal. Show my city. How Indians actually eat in their own homes? In a way that hasn't really been shown on the High Street and this is entrepreneurism. It starts to come alive. The idea comes alive and I had a brilliant job in brilliant salary and great prospects that this creature came alive in the shape of moberly and it would keep me awake at night until I gave birth to it. And that's when I started my best restaurant only five years ago now. What kind of support would you have needed back in the day when you look at? That's rather stressful period. Five six years ago when you were about to launch a restaurant. What kind of support would you have needed? Well you know I. It's not a small alt-right thing to say that role models are extremely important. Because for me as I said you look at the industry and you can't see people that look like me. That are the stage of life that are doing it with their own money. I had no financial backing at all. This was all of my savings. Was the roof over my head. We're going to have to sell the house and moving to my Auntie's bungalow. It was so risky and unwilling to take those risks by goodness. It would have helped if I could have seen people that have done it. That were talking about Watson all sharing their journey so I knew what to expect and it must inevitably be the end of home. Life must inevitably be that you are one of those ninety percent of the fail. And that's what I could have really done with. The other thing is banks are not that willing to lend to a forty year old woman whose career and comes to them with an entrepreneurial idea and that is the truth you are seen as somebody's having a midlife crisis and so- financial backing would have been great. I was given in the end enough to buy one grill by bank. I'm not with them anymore. And that's all. Yeah so Nisha. You're giving your most gloss later this month. What kind of lessons I got to be sharing their must all about how to build a scalable business. This is about building a business and having the ambition to think it might go beyond one small high street store and so the lessons are how to take that product and craft it in a way that you can replicate it with complete consistency. One of the most important lessons is to understand why you're doing this you know. Why are you building this business? Why are you risking everything and then articulating? That reason. Why right the way through Your Business? Former you know for me. I build me to enrich lives primarily of my stuff because if my chefs happy. The food is amazing. Give my stuff a happy. The the environment is joy filled and so it really is important to in some. Why is you get out of bed every morning and have that permeate through your business model said that every one of your employees Hsieh's zeal? I think it's interesting. How you mention how important is to keep your stuff happy. So what do you actually do in practical terms to make sure? They aren't content with where they work. Well many things. She's priority in my job. So for instance I have a wellbeing officer that is dedicated solely to going around. And I've got five hundred members of staff going around speaking to every member stuff and find out how they are doing. How is it to work for Moseley to enrich their lives? Are we doing that? We do things like you know the first day of school for the children they have. They have their birthdays off. I fly forty members of my team every year to India to work in villages on female entrepreneurs projects on lund management projects. We pay them to do that. I need that life to be punctuated by things that just lift their head out of the mire and make them think about why they're working and so that if it's your passion and it's my passion. Lubi an eternal source of stimulation as it is for me sauce. Amazing how do you see the British sociologists out the moment it seems that we are living turbulent times that I don't know what your take is being based in Liverpool how big of an effect thus brexit have already. It's interesting because I think brexit is not the reason that we see so many heads rolling at the moment. Honestly I think maybe a small factor is the kind of factor that would push you over the edge if you're a business though struggling anyway. What's really rather marvelous is not marvelous. But one picks over the bones of what's happened with these businesses that have gone down and one actually thinks was. The last time I ate there will took the ones I loved to go and eat there. The answer would probably be not for many many months and that is key. It is your product. The day I eat in my restaurant twice a week on my day off me in the family go neat in my restaurant. The day I stopped doing that. And it's not good enough for me as the daily need to get off the high street. So that's one of the factors is constantly looking product thinking you'll food addictive is it priced reasonably and you can do all of those things when your rents are not killing you so it's really important as a CEO to take sites that are not going to punish you and your guests because of how expensive it is so you've got to be moderate in that way and that's why. I'm not in London yet. An outcome to London when I find a cheaper that site but right now I've got thirteen restaurants all of them outside London. I took Ed Maria today. Which is a couple of Scotland? And I'm not in my own capital yet and I just need those prices to come down because what I never want to do is to have to put my prices up the my clients because that is the beginning of the end now the concern of Brexit. Is that a London. Bubble thing do think impacts is strong obviously many restaurants in London in particular. I have a lot of European staff. How do you feel about this? What does the what looked like when you're outside of London? When your asset of Lyndon Free Staff Statistic is twenty three percent European staff twenty-three as opposed to ninety percent inland? And so you can see that in terms of stopping is very different. The pressures are different in fact sorry. Let's just brave enough to say. The pressures are much reduced. If you're outside of London in terms of the supply chain. Who knows who knows what's going to happen. We've got a year to negotiate something. That should really take three years negotiate. So that's a conversation to have perhaps next December but in terms of personnel it hasn't affected it in the way that may affect other businesses. That London centric so as I mentioned already. You're giving a master class later this month. I'm wondering having been a very successful Batali. See Orange but What are the things? You'd still like to learn what I would still like to learn as you look at these brands that have stood the test of time. You look at the non. Does the Pizza Express is the Waga Mama's these giants of industry that had legs to last fifteen twenty years? And it's that it is. What is the secret? Where does that confidence come from? One of the things that I've realized is you don't need to keep changing your menu today. Non Does Change. Think it's their lyman. Something chicken to a mango and passion fruit. It was the headline in the Liverpool Echo. This morning that the clients are absolutely destroyed. Not going to numbers anymore because it changed one dish. And it's little things like that. Where does the confidence come from? Do you need to constantly change them and you you know? I am the Sea of Muggy in the founder of Morgan will be for the foreseeable medium term future when the next CEO comes in because there will be some point in the future which reigns in my hunting ever want. Must I look to in the next person to make sure that the culture remains the same and the way I learned that by fraternizing with those that are far better than me. And that's what's great about the hospitality. Industry is Great. Sorority of people share their secrets. Share their journey so that I can learn from the giants upon whose shoulders I stand in the beginning of this interview. You mentioned that coming from an Indian background. You felt the pressure of actually going. For example to become very students of thinking of force battalions extra as an option and. I think it's not only your background. I think it's a wider thing in this country and internationally that hospitality sector jobs are not as appreciated us. They should what do you think should be done to actually raise the profile of talented jobs and make people understand that they can be for the whole life not to something to as a student. You are absolutely right in. This is my passion and I think it's telling stories like this. That will let I gave up a fantastic career. A professional career as a barrister. I was taking the exams to become a judge and I gave that up for hospitality to run food on the floor and to me. It is one of the most dignified professions that there is to serve is the best that we can do is leaders. It really

London Brexit Liverpool United States CEO Testosterone England Watson Hsieh Moseley Officer India Ed Maria Lyndon Free Scotland Sea Of Muggy Morgan Founder
Michael Phillips on Brad Pitt's 2020 Oscar Chances

Filmspotting

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Michael Phillips on Brad Pitt's 2020 Oscar Chances

"Michael you are on the record here quite vociferously. Yes as generally liking once upon a time in Hollywood except for the last twenty minutes. Yeah hate it. The second time through hater two more. Okay where do you stand on the performance of one Brad Pitt. He seems to be the front runner. Do you think he will win. And do you think he should wait. absolutely will win. I think it's one of the surest bets you can make you know if you're if you're trying to get a coworker a little tipsy so you can start saying things like well let's make it interesting. Let's make the I think it's a real sure thing partly just because it's it's a really engaging performance. It's a great Brad. Pitt is one of these movie stars and this is. This is an idea that cuts completely cross gender and every other thing where you know he he was a movie star and then fifteen twenty years later he became came a good actor and that that can happen. Only if you're a lot lucky and a little bit smart and pick the right roles in the right director actors and push yourself enough that you become a better version of yourself and as an actor and I think that's absolutely happened with him He's certainly one of the chief satisfactions of Tarantino's film

Brad Pitt Hollywood Michael Tarantino Director
Cruise unveils Origin, an electric driverless vehicle designed for sharing

Tech News Today

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Cruise unveils Origin, an electric driverless vehicle designed for sharing

"So you may have heard some news bubbling about last week about New Thomas Vehicle called the cruise origin seven at Dan Amman. WHO's the CEO of crews posted a lengthy background piece to medium the details the story of origin? It was time to the big launch party in San Francisco joining us to bring some expert insight to this vision of the origin. Is Sam Abell some from the wheel bearings podcast. Welcome back. Sam's great to have you. Hey guys good to see you again. Good to see you there. It is and before I forget Happy Birthday to Lisa. Oh Nice all right because I of course she's listening she she watches every episode technically So comex she should be. That's right amazing. If she has the time to watch every single hour of of every single show on the network but somehow she makes it happened So you were at this event. This was last week right. You're at the event. What did you expect going in and There was no big surprises for me. I did Pretty much expect what we saw and which is A. It's a purpose built autonomous vehicle that's been in development now for a little over a year by GM and Honda in collaboration with the team that cruise so crews For those that don't no no cruise. Automation is a San Francisco. Start up the GM bought in two thousand sixteen to help develop their production. Automated driving system and In twenty any seventeen twenty. Two Thousand Eighteen They got some additional investment as well from Softbank and from Honda so since the late twentieth eighteen Honda and GM. We've been working together in his vehicle and cruise has been doing their development so far with a fleet of modified Chevy Bolts which are small mall? Electric cars enter finder. Nice little cars but For when you when you're talking about doing rubber taxi service autonomous ride hailing service any kind of traditional vehicle that we have today is not really that well suited for it. Because if you think about it you know you got an autonomous vehicles just driving around and this applies you know the same thing applies You know to what Elon Musk has been talking about for Tesla with having you know model threes rubber taxes. You know he wants to have a million threes as rebel taxes but in this year and vehicles like that whether it's the Baltic model three or anything else are not really well all suited to a robot taxi application. Because if you don't have a driver in the vehicle you know today if you hail a lift an Uber you get out of the car. If you don't close the door properly cadaver can get out or reach over slammed the door shut or closed the truck. Whatever it might be but for an autonomous vehicle? And there's no operator in there you need to be able to do things like make sure those doors are actually closed before the vehicle pulls away to go pick up next passenger You know to make it easy for people to get in and out quickly So what they've done what. Gm Honda have done is Developed this vehicle which is conceptually similar to some other Autonomous Shuttles that we've seen seen from companies like Navia local motors and We're GONNA see something similar in the next few months from Another Bayer is start up called souks And they've gone on with what we call a carriage seating configuration so instead of everybody facing the same direction facing forwards. You've got seats on other side of the big open space in the middle the power sliding doors on on both sides that automatically open and close and they've gotten rid of things like the steering wheel and pedals and they've integrated rated all the sensors into the the rooftop of this vehicle and You know because if they're able to get rid of things that you don't need for an autonomous vehicle like those steering wheels pedals battles and others than windshield wipers. They were able to reduce the cost of this thing done. They're not saying exactly how much it's going to be. But it's not a vehicle that you're ever going to be able to buy. It's only four. autonomous mobility services and transportation services. So you know. They showed a rendering of one from setup for package delivery You'll be able to have versions of this. That have a ramp on the side so people in wheelchairs can get in and out that sort of thing okay. So there's a lot of flexibility as far as the design is concerned too to tailor different uses and that sort of stuff. There's also some interesting kind of like high tech and air quotes features inside the vehicle. Talk a little bit about that. Like what does it offer for people who are writing. Yeah so there's a couple of screens inside you know. It's actually fairly simple because it's designed mostly for fairly short ride so there's you know there's not a lot of really fancy INFOTAINMENT stuffers for you know things like you know. VR glasses or anything like that which has been shown us some concepts massage or anything like that but Because of the way this thing is planned to be used you know the typical individual personally owned vehicle. You people drive maybe twelve fifteen thousand miles a year. The vehicles are designed to last ten. Mm Fifteen twenty years or more For something like this. Because it's going to be operating round the clock and getting pre preferably high utilization allegation. That's the whole point of it and so they're not sitting around parked They're gonNA be maybe accumulating maybe a hundred thousand miles a year or more and if it was designed the way traditional vehicles are it might wear out to three or four years and so what they've done is instead of designing this thing in the usual way where they would have to scrap it but at the end of that time period. They've designed the structure of the thing and the chassis to last a million miles. And then they've made it very modular so that they can because because this technology is still evolving they can replace things like sensors and the computers and the software and even things like the battery every two or three years As a AH they wear out and get replaced with with more advanced and hopefully less expensive versions of the same

GM Honda New Thomas Vehicle Sam Abell San Francisco Dan Amman CEO Elon Musk Bolts Lisa Tesla Softbank Navia
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Supreme Court in the last fifteen twenty years where they uphold the legality of affirmative action but they they say you can't use quotas for example you can't use racial quotas Sandra day o'connor course is no longer in the court but for a long time she was a swing vote along with Anthony Kennedy but she she moved to a position of of being in support of affirmative action and basically what she said was look twenty years from now we may not want to look at race at all in any respect but we're not there yet we do not want explicit racial quotas but we do want higher institute education institutions and hiring institutions to have the ability to take into account a lot of different factors you got targeted goals you want to have diversity she pointed out the diversity is something that Americans value it can improve the outcome and and work product the people have in in the companies and in institutions and in colleges and so on so that's a reason to take race and other factors into account and also there's the issue of redress of grievances yeah you have historical as slavery then segregation than discrimination and harassment and yet we've made tremendous strides on all those things in recent decades but it is still a problem so this is the kind of thing that is has to be factored into the debate so as to whether the women on the California boards topic is gonna fall within this per view of the U. S. Supreme Court saying we really don't like quotas we're just gonna have to wait to see the outcome of these two suits to twenty the time here on talk radio seven ninety KABC royal oaks in for doctor drew and Lea and tweet and stick with us ABC has dependable traffic right now southbound side of the five CD of white style vehicle clears lane now the right shoulder but expect delays with the left door fifty seven just before that you chance at an earlier big regulations appears that it's now clear traffic for you what is recovering nicely what a grand big Regis clear here as well and west one eighteen widely working with an actor in a few minutes ago that you right lane blocked and.

Sandra day Anthony Kennedy U. S. Supreme Court Lea ABC harassment California
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Independent thoughts independent life this is Chad Bentsen still the guys over the weekend I watched and wizard of oz still an amazing movie play is awesome the colors just POP said it's just I need you go when you ever go like wikipedia like what it cost me because like two million dollars to make and it took him like fifteen twenty years to make a dollar on the movie because our first came out it was like critics thought is pretty good there crowds were really into it but then they re released it like ten fifteen years later and it just exploded and then it ended up making money but I mean why do you know what that movie cost to make but now we're looking at movies it costs you know two hundred fifty three million dollars I mean you you look at the they're talking about avatar filming two three at the same time it's gonna be near a billion Bucks since saying but you go look at those old days you know it's like a million dollars for Cleopatra three two three five three twenty four twenty three at seventeen shows your Twitter for minutes we at may love hearing of well you know for each and everyone I love and hate was good this week about the fight with people thanks I I enjoyed is like I like it and I don't like fighting a war is far we have differing opinions sometimes people they just they love their motions to just cold just overboard knowing they start saying things and because there's no real you know repercussions and social media this is not the yellow I didn't scream it's like I've never met you and I never will but I hate you what okay that's weird it is what it is but over the weekend some stuff that happened London terror attack new details surrounding the brave bystanders who helped take down a terrorist in London video showing heroes fighting back one of them even using the tusks of a novel way will they use fire extinguishers used says their determined there wasn't gonna go on it and they did exactly what they had to do hundred seen fleeing the area as the incident unfolded.

Chad Bentsen Cleopatra Twitter London two hundred fifty three millio fifteen twenty years two million dollars ten fifteen years million dollars
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And work here we're going to pay you extra you know what your wage plus or give you an extra day off or something along those lines Walmart has chose not to sell I mean do you think that companies have any obligation to offer additional pay on a holiday absolutely you right yes Walmart you are not gonna last interview fifteen twenty years I've guarantee you we're not gonna be talk about Walmart here's why what is the last time you heard about the Waltons doing some spectacular well it's so under I was actually in the last year I've now I've never actually purchased anything from Walmart yet and mainly I didn't early on just because I didn't like the way the cat people part time kept people below poverty wages that with the way that they didn't offer benefits all that stuff and then they started rectifying they started raising their minimum wage that they apply the Freddy giving people more benefits they sort of actually doing the things that the public shaming was supposed to entail so I thought all right I'm gonna soften my position on Walmart I still haven't been there just because there's not one right here in Seattle so I don't tend to and I tend to buy a lot of stuff online anyway and so I have kind of stopping by helping him put them the holiday pay thing I don't know maybe I'm back back where I started so you would agree that Walmart is reactive all the time you would agree that everyone at Walmart does seems to be with all we doing it wrong okay sorry is this a P. R. nightmare okay sorry this policy right now they have in place and by the way the fact that they came out with this statement Walmart representative told business insider quote we simplify our paid time off policies in two thousand sixteen to combine vacation holiday sick and personal time in two one bucket as part of that change we no longer offer holiday pay I'm done it's just a five three it's just simplify well the I mean it's it's so much simpler just to pay the same homepage all the time don't you get in each yeah no I I don't end and so do your point I even thought about it for second and I think I was one of the last ones Mike I was one of the last ones to stop shopping at Walmart I used to get a hard time people that why are you shopping at Walmart look at what they do to their employees I'm like yeah but I I get good deals right now probably the last two years I've been like you know what another said now then when I see things like this not only do you not offer holiday pay to your employees okay cool all right we should we should plan well we offer employees an opportunity to get a ten to fifteen percent discount that's almost like the store it's almost more insulting actually that you want to hear that examine them the notion of not being able to pay holiday pay.

Walmart fifteen twenty years fifteen percent two years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"You need to be a million to understand California and impeachment Jennifer hold are you sad about mark Sanford hello I am crying but you know what I started to smile because I heard default Patrick's actually jumping into the race SO one leaves and another jump then right what are these people thinking at I mean Bloomberg okay he's got the money but devol Patrick's gonna jump in now he's telling his friends he's going to get in I don't know and mark Sanford he spent two months in the race to now is getting out of it this is politics in at twenty nineteen it's like the crazy it's not politics as living on planet czar qual I think that is okay we have so much to discuss but I cannot skip the question the issue that you live in shifty shifty district I do let's ignore it did you watch impeachment today sure yeah we carried it live on the morning and so we we can talk about that in a moment but for those who are the queen did with this delightful individual what to tell us a little bit about who Adam Schiff prior to whistle blowers prior to Russian collusion prior to the incontrovertible evidence who is this man well he we came to the great state of California via at Massachusetts he was actually born in at Framingham it and it went to law school I think he went to Harvard law and decided that he come out to California started running for the Senate and was a young hot shot I can remember when he got elected to the California State Senate and everyone had all of these big aspirations for Adam Schiff they kind of marked him as that person who could really skyrocket through the ranks I used to do a lot of lobbying for the cable television industry which you may not know from I believe fifteen twenty years ago and I used to have to call an Adam Schiff and one thing impressed me you have to have work relations with other matters I did it you have to go up to the state capitol and you'd actually be given a list of of of people to visit in the state legislature and he was constantly on my list because I've always lived in and around his district even when he was a state senator and at the one thing about him that I will say he always showed up for the meetings a lot of people would send his aides or their aides but he actually would show up that's kind of where we're at with the cameras in the room is that one there were not at that point but see this is what I think happened because he had it California legislature behind him saying you're the next big thing you're going places I think he really started to drink that Kuwait and I think that he he got elected to the house of representatives in cost I think was price around two thousand and it has been there ever since and it is no secret to anybody living in his district or anybody in the state of California but that the next step for Adam Schiff is that he is desperate to become the next senator in California and he's eyeing Diane find that if I were her it would make me nervous because Dianne Feinstein's eighty five years old and she just wanna another term last time around in twenty eighteen so what will happen now is that Dianne Feinstein at some point probably in the next year or so maybe after twenty twenty settles down she's going to retire and that that means Gavin Newsom our governor will be able to pick a replacement and that the candidates are Adam Schiff or the mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti it's already predetermined and so Adam Schiff right now is totally motivated by the fact that he needs to be in front of every can't a camera making his case so that he will be that chosen one to get pushed into Feinstein see when she decides to sit down for awhile what let let me ask you about that because he was in front of a camera for five and a half hours today yeah and and you know him you've dealt with him in the policies your represent what I mean he is the representative he's the I rather like that I'm you can call me biased but really uncomfortable today did you see the he looks scared in fact that my co host lovable liberal prime witness that he was doing a Rodney Dangerfield impression and he was absolutely right those eyes bugged out of his head he looked this is what he's been wanting for three years and he did not look like he wanted to be in that chair what what's what could be going on what's your potential take Jennifer my take is that he knows there's going to be a backlash anybody with half a brain cell knows that there is going to be a backlash the Democrats have put all of their eggs now in the impeachment basket they did it since day one of the trump administration and they were running out of time and they knew that this is the only way that they're going to be able to beat trump in twenty twenty is to start this narrative with the American people whether or not they are they actually remove him from office and so it's playground politics you know they're they're selling a game of telephone I I mean the witnesses today were absolutely I mean just let let let me play you want one incredible moment from Jim Jordan with quote on quote this doll witnesses a short cut Jim Jordan today the impeachment hearing Cup ten even though you had three opportunities with presents Leschi printed tell you know what we're gonna do these investigations to get the aid didn't tell you three different times never makes an announcement never tweets about never doesn't see an interview so you were on the call were you present he did listen to president trump's called has unless he's call I did not you never talk to staff all they need I never did never met the president that's correct get three meetings it was let's get it didn't come up and two of those they'd never heard about as far as I know and preservation region for presents lets you never made an announcement this is this is what I can't believe in your their star witness your their first witness the.

California Patrick Jennifer mark Sanford fifteen twenty years eighty five years three years two months
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Right there if you pay your bills on time and keep the utilization low menu gonna killer score item number three in the make up of fight go score fifteen percent of your score is based on the length of history how old are these accounts that you have how long have you had credit old accounts are really valuable people call and say well I'm going to cancel this card I'm gonna do this from a cancel that and and I always think you know someone comes to me in the good cards you know fifteen twenty years old I got a buddy a neighbor of mine who has had the same credit card for like twenty nine years twenty nine years you know what that does to your credit score when you've got a good pay account for that length of time huge just got credit by the way runs you know eight thirty to eight forty five or something like that is just you know top one percent but thirty years or credit card that's fifteen percent your credit history I mean fifteen percent of your grade with geico ten percent of your credit score your flight scores made up of new credit inquiry right that can kind of hurt you if there's too much of it and the last item number five in the make up your ficus for ten percent of your scores made up by the type of active credit the era a lot of people that have you know maybe they have a car maybe they have a home but they don't have any other debt they don't carry credit card the you know subscribe to this Dave Ramsey mentality of I only credit well if you don't have a good mix of credit that her to score if you just have or someone that has nothing on your report but installment loans a car or a home and you don't Kerry credit card debt or anything like that tell her you score it's one of the reasons your score is not going to be up as high as it should be because you don't have that makes have something of some sort I don't care if you use a credit card or not use it once a month to pay it use it instead of using cash but tell me what their accumulate credit card debt I am telling you mix of credit is critical get out there and get a car if you don't have one in use it just sparingly that's all it's a really easy to get started with us if you want help all you have to do is pick up the phone and call us for Texas easy to reach.

Dave Ramsey Kerry Texas fifteen percent twenty nine years ten percent fifteen twenty years thirty years one percent
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:25 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We'll get a book if you want a hard copy college if he won to download and copy, you can do it, right. Then right there. It's very, very easy. We have books on hit, and run books in motorcycle accidents. We have books on legal game plan, you must have a legal game plan. We faint explain to you, why. Okay. You know, we're injury attorneys so. We do injury cases all the time. And we formed our law from nineteen Eighty-four with a vision and mission of having injured victims put their lives back together. Again, that would include you, if you want a free initial consultation or and illegal game plan call us anytime now over the years, Brad. And I've got a lot of experience dealing with these insurance companies and dealing with people, and you need to have the information, but one of the things you need to know about your medical records in your claim. You know, your international traumatic event Brad, we see this all the time. It's, it's very traumatic sometimes people don't realize our sense or understand all the symptoms have initially, but the symptoms onset, but what's going to be what's going to happen with their medical records and how important are these medical records, and how do they fit into the picture having done this for a lot of years, a lot of years, I can tell you that at the beginning of my career when we're dealing with this kind of stuff, it was a scene like a defense tactic that I'd say or defense ploy to maybe. Ward off, how much plaintiff wanted to pursue their case, and maybe even ward off pursuing their case. The defense would want all of the records all of the treatment records, all the medical records of a person seeking to enforce their rights for injury sustained for for ten years prior to the day of the crash sometimes even longer than that fifteen twenty years, and they would ask for it and discovery, they'd ask for copies of the of the records, they'd ask for releases to be able to get the records themselves and it took a lot of time, took a lot of effort to reverse that trend that they were entitled those records. So here's what happens here in a crash back back then it's not that way. Now fortunately, we've gotten some changes in the law. But back then you get into crash, and I'm talking as long as I've been practicing thirty years ago or longer, you, you get into a crash, and on the crash occurred, you, you get hurt neck and her back. You'd have headaches and maybe your shoulder hurt. And the defense would turn around and say, we want all your records, mental and physical for the last ten fifteen twenty years in, we're entitled to them, and we're gonna get them and they would and the somewhat allow them to get them. And what happened is, is they would use that as a form of, of, of belittling people. They use that as a form of embarrassment. There might be things in their records that you didn't want them to see the you didn't think should be shown that you didn't want disclosed and the defense related in care. And I think they actually the insurance companies in defense lawyers felt that this was way they could mitigate or minimize the number of cases that would that would be filed against him because if you're good planes attorney would be explaining that to your client, your lies that by filing this lawsuit you're going to have all these records disclosed to third parties that you want to try and get protection over. But still having him go to the. Inside. And having the defense, lawyers know about it, and they're paralegals in all their staff. And everybody know about what your records, are you something you might not wanna had happen. So we've had some case law, and we've had some changes that have occurred that have helped to stop that procedure in giving protection. And, you know, we start with federal laws that came out to protect people from that kind of that kind of abuse. But also, we've had some great state law cases, that have come out that have given a scrape protection. We kind of put it in perspective. View been injured in an Anna crash or any any trauma. We do motorcycle cases, truck cases bike tra- crash cases, bicycle incidents injured on your motorcycle. Slip and fall big rig trucks, commercial trucks, vans, hit, and runs. It doesn't matter. We do it, and we and we've learned over the years. Right. And we learn what's best best for you. And let's face it. We're gonna make an injury claim the insurance companies were going to wanna see your medical records. That's kind of the golden. Rule. That's kind of the bible to them. Of course, we've given you other shows and told you what they do with those records, and we might touch on that a little bit today, but they want you records, they want to understand what your injuries are and his Brad, you said, you know, twenty years ago they wanted everything twenty years, and it was embarrassing to people. And you know what does your broken ankle eleven years ago have to do with your sore neck from the accident of a month ago? It has nothing to do with it. What were they doing asking for these records? So you need attorneys that are going to establish and preserve your records in cert-, the right privileges and protection. Do you have to turn over records? Yes. Of course. Are you're not going to get your claim paid. But you but you have the relevant records. And that's that's a big fight. And it was for a long time. So Bradley, essentially, we arrange returns, you can call us anytime at three zero three seven nine five five nine zero zero seven nine five fifty nine hundred Gary bell. Brad Pollock less go into the case lawns in Colorado because we had a couple of really seminal cases, Alcon versus Spicer wild versus city Dylan. And that kind of change the Plainfield and help the injured victim and their families. They most certainly did. And the, the first thing we want to. And I, I understand the case love of the first thing we wanted to understand is that in nineteen Ninety-six. We got the health insurance, portability and accountability act. It's a federal case army, I'm sorry, federal law, and it's it protects your records from inappropriate disclosure. It's now a violation of federal law to inappropriately disclosure records and, and therefore before your records your medical records can be just handed over. It's got to be done. Normally by subpoena release, if it's released it's been signed by the by the patient, then no, there's gonna be no waiting time by subpoena. There's going to be waiting time to give you chance to object to whether or not those records should be turned over. Now. The, the argument that was placed before the court, the supreme court, the state of. Colorado now versus Placer and will visit versus Dylan was that when you decided to bring a case when you are in a crash and you decided to bring a case and to into into make some kind of claim for physical injuries you or an essence waving your right to privacy of your records. And there was an argument that that waiver right to privacy was waiver rake privacy with respect to all your records, because you were pacing everything. It issue if you were saying that the, the, the, the result of the crash caused you injuries damages and losses and it included within those injuries damage and losses, the urine able to do things that you had continuing pain or that you had some kind of disability or inability to carry out life as you might have. Otherwise carried it out. And so or if you claim a pain and suffering, or if you clean the law. Awesome. Enjoy him to the paramount in loss of enjoyment, and or impairment to the quality of life. And the defense would argue that if you're claiming those general areas of injury that they had the right to go into all your records to see all your records for years and years prior to the crash to, to see what you what might be your medical condition to determine if they could blame pain and suffering loss of enjoyment, of impairment of the quality life on some other event that might have occurred in your life, the cause medical care. And so the supreme court face that those issues in, in, in both outcome versus spicier, while versus Dylan and came out with very favorable rulings on behalf of injured, people who are trying to get recovery. Right. So when they when they ask for your medical records, you're injured you, you go. You go to the doctor, you go to the emergency room, you get treatment. Maybe go to therapy maybe go to conservative modalities of treatment. Maybe the doctor takes an MRI or an x Ray or further MRI or wants to see how you do it therapy. I etc. Those are all medical treatment records. When you go to the chiropractor, same thing when you go to massage therapy. Same thing when you go to physical therapy, same thing. So these records, are created with regard year injuries that you received in this crash. Right. And so the insurance company wants to see those and but they really really want ten years or twenty years of all your records because they're on a fishing expedition. They want to find something to hurt you, legally. They want to find something to says you're not bothered are impaired in your quality of life by this accident. Because you're in you're in bothering are impaired by something happened to twelve years ago, the you haven't treated for in twelve years. So what are you do? There's a way to solve this way to win this war, and the Colorado supreme court ruling on Alcon versus buys said attorneys can make a privilege. Log, what's the privilege, log? How does that protect you? Why, why do you even care is your medical records, right? You've been injured rights insurance covers gonna look. Look at them, they're.

Brad Pollock Colorado Alcon supreme court Dylan Plainfield Ward attorney Bradley Gary bell Ray Spicer
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

09:17 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Into because today every. Okay, should never bring you bagels in the morning. That's all I'm saying. Don't bring cream cheese. This place e one jalapeno that's, that's like crack cocaine almost is almost is so but once every couple of months is fine. Some people like to indulge in drugs. We'll take take. Okay. So what's interesting here, folks is believe it or not. You just lived through one of the best ten year periods for the stock market in US history. And also, one of the absolute worst twenty year periods, and I think there we're going to talk a lot about patients today and patients paying behavioral finance it at this hour, but J P Morgan asset management sent me their little book. Well, they didn't send it to me, but I got it somehow. All right. I think you actually have to be a client to get maybe not. I think it's online, but anyway, I every quarter they come out with these numbers. And this is very, very interesting. So I start with twenty year. Annualized returns by asset class. Yeah. And looking through this. My eyes went right to the standard and Poor's five hundred. What do you suppose the S and P five hundred is done over the past twenty years or already tell you, I'm gonna take a guess, take a guest on five point five percent? Toby already. It's five point six got a bad memory. I wasn't gonna hit me the exactly. Yeah. I know. That, that I was doing a good, well educated, that's seems low to me by. Yeah. It seems low, but it ain't dude because we had a couple of blowups, remember, a couple of them were fifty percent blow ups and it doesn't take much to mess up your overall performance in the twenty years. You're, including nineteen ninety nine to two thousand nine exactly had virtually no growth at all from point to point draws ten thousand nine hundred twenty eighteen twenty year for the first decade. We have a ten year period of virtually nothing and then a ten year period of great. Yeah. And then it proves a couple of really important points is everybody that got freaked out about the dot com. Bubble burst and also the huge financial crisis of fifty-six percent decline. If you got freaked out of the market, then you didn't get anywhere near five point six percent because in order to take you for. From where you were which was probably very near a negative return to where we are today. It's taken fifteen sixteen percent compound returns since. Yep. Yep. Let me go through the whole rundown of these very quickly reits real estate investment trusts, this performing asset class last twenty years since nineteen ninety nine actually, I think if you went back to ninety nine eighty nine seventy nine sixty nine fifty nine four probably every five ten fifteen twenty year period of time, real estate investment trust have been either the top performer or one of the top performers kid why? Well, I can't answer exactly why. But I think it has a little bit to do with the fact that you have leverage and inflation all compounding together. And let's face it real estate is a very very attractive class because most people want to get into the real estate market place, but they don't know how to or they don't want to just go buy one condo out in Las Vegas. Something guy own two or three of you, sir. No, obviously, you can make a lot of money, even if you bought condos in Las Vegas depends on when you bought them, right? Well, of course it's all about timing in that. So, so what a real estate investment trust does. Is it gives individuals? The ability to gain some kind of diversification in an asset class that in many instances have been under served because everybody buys stocks, but not everybody can go out and buy real estate. Well, yeah. You talk about institutional real estate. You can talk about and their dozens dozens if not hundreds of different types of real estate investment trusts. Yes. So we go onto the next one which was also surprising gold seven point seven per cent over twenty years. Yes, per year annualized, total return. Yeah. Because we had that huge runup member big Ribe. Okay. Okay, if you don't. Nothing over the take it up J P Morgan. Could you do that? Okay, call them. So you guys are screwed up. Gold oil was next seven point zero percent. Then the SNP at five point six a sixty forty mix of stocks and bonds. Five point two percent a forty sixty mix five point oh, that's forty percent. Stocks bonds in general four and a half percent. That's twenty year return for bonds, twenty returns ninety nine four and a half percent. And considering that a lot of those years interest rates were on the decline would say many if not most of those years interest rates on the decline that doesn't bode all that fantastic for bonds, either. No. Well, let's see from about ninety nine for sure. Through maybe two thousand nine ten eleven. Yeah. Kind of bottomed out around that right right about that for about twelve of the twenty they until the, the, the craze over the, the, the SNP credit rating crisis. I think it was like August or something of. Twenty was then you've got homes three point four percent. Three point four percent for you. Telling me gold, J, P, Morgan telling me goal was doing better over twenty years in home. Yes. Come on. And inflation was only two point two percent. Here's the scary, part about all this, folks, the average investor over the last twenty years, according to J, P, Morgan asset management, one point nine percent worse than the rate of inflation. And we all know why I'll tell you about the dalbar study in just a moment, but it has a lot to do with the lack of patience. Dear friends lack of patience. Okay. Let's move onto the next one time diversification. Volatility of returns, I love this one because it tells you that if you look at one year, performance, you get really scared if you look at twenty year performance. It's not so bad. The one year numbers for the US domestic stock market is measured by the standard and Poor's five hundred you could experience a minus thirty nine percent return in any given year that how do they, what do you mean you could experience you? Well, you could in the future, if the future could be measured by the past, okay? Pass in the past the worst. One year performance was minus thirty nine. Okay. So that's what it was in the past. It was probably the two thousand. I suspect it was twenty eight I would assume so. Right. And we're talking about the S and P or you could in the future, if the future is measured by past gained forty seven percent in any given year probably two thousand nine so that's a pretty pretty big swing for minus thirty nine to plus forty seven that's over one year. Periods of time now bonds on the other hand minus eight to a plus forty three. For one year for one year. And of course if you went to the fifty fifty mix it's minus fifteen percent to the plus thirty three percent. Then look at that looking at that over a five year period of time, minus three to plus twenty eight minus to plus twenty three and plus one to plus twenty one. So the fifty fifty mix over five year, rolling periods is never hit a negative return least not the last twenty years. Yeah. And then you go the ten year rolling and it's minus one to plus nineteen on which one on the stock one on the bond one it's plus one to plus sixteen. And then the fifty fifty mix, plus two to a plus sixteen. When we come back from the break, I'll tell you what the rolling twenty year periods are so that people that got in late or early might be able to forecast. What they may or may not generate in terms of returns. All about the fixed income sector factor performance correlation. Andy Solomon throughout summer, Fritos, partnering with carry the load to honor the sacrifices made by our nation's heroes as part of that partnership. Fritos producing nearly twenty two million. Specially marked bags to represent the total members who have served in the American military throughout history, including active duty, John watts director of marketing frito, lay North America. There's so many brave men and women who have answered the call.

J P Morgan US Las Vegas crack cocaine SNP Toby J North America Andy Solomon director of marketing John watts Morgan
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

12:26 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Amazing. I did watch trailer for a great what looks like a great Netflix movie coming out in June. I m mother about a post apocalyptic world where there's no humans and a robot takes a little miniature baby embryo out of freezer. Base creates it raises it as its mother, they bond. And then when the little girl grows up to be twenty there is another humans. Hilary swank. She shows up, you said, the robots are evil and the Roma says, no, we're not evil. I don't know. This person is what's going on. Looks amazing Stewart no-interest fifty shades of robot gray stews in post Olympic doesn't mean you think it does do. It'd be your move. We go fifty shades of grey fan. Cool. Go on Twitter. Kobe CBS. I mean welcome to the shows. Denno producer. Loving you this favorites? Do we use that really is between the massage revelation yesterday? Then today everything coming together with why you know he's so into the leather and it turns out that it's a fifty shades thing unfolding this very complex onion. That is still. And it just gets better and better with every layer. Also makes me wanna cry like an onion. And those things. The analogy to who's the because all making sense who's the band that your girlfriend likes. They were leather masks, Hollywood on dead Hollywood. There's just there's a lot to log on. And I dig that about you, man. I specially from three thousand miles away, is nice, but I can enjoy the complexities of Stewart Kovacs from Los Angeles, California earlier in the day earlier in the show, we had, we had Jim Jackson on. And I think Jim's great right now rat twenty five twenty four pretty close game have little frustrated doesn't getting the calls that he wants. I mean there's a lot. It's a it's a it's a hard fought game. They're feeling other out DeMarcus cousins on the floor for the first time since mid April will keep you updated. We talked to Jim Jackson about this series earlier in the day. The former NBA player f s one analyst players only announced broadcaster and I asked him why. Why he thinks he does the warriors inevitably win this NBA finals? Toronto could make it a series. Keep say Durant doesn't play. In the best plays the bulk of his series Durant. Does this think why does this thing. They kind of cancel each other outright. If you look at the second third and fourth best players in both teams who has the Golden State. You got steps. You've got clay mine. And then when you look at from a Toronto perspective, it's Laurie. Baucus siaka. Okay. It even if you take out of the equation and you put stuff in that position. And you look at the next the second and third best player is still skews towards. Golden State, and then other X factors have been Steve Kerr on the bench, kind of been there done that. So that's why tend to lean towards because in the championship series. Your best players got show up and play we have seen with Toronto, the fluctuation of regular season where outstanding but he struggled a bit. Especially in the last, but walkie playing Bach little up down little up, even though they have the experience Danny green wasn't shooting as well consistently. But what you saw Golden State, especially when Kevin Durant went out uptick with the other players, especially grain. And that to me is the difference between a team that has won there before. Team is still trying to figure out how to navigate its way to get to an opportunity to win the championship. I have maintained all along cousins was a net positive for the wars, when it came back, either, they don't play them that they play them, it works, and it's early, he just had a beautiful interior pass to Klay Thompson for an easy easy bucket. Just cool as it's just cool to see buggy out there man. Right. Like Justice to Margaret's cousins out there be vinyls, is of the new behold right now drano up twenty nine twenty six about ten minutes left in the second quarter. Steph curry big part, obviously, of the success, the warriors, but his era the question of where he rings, all time. I find really interesting. And I asked Jim Jackson when he was on the program earlier where he places where he thinks Steph curry is going to be placed when it's all said and done all time why here's here's the thing. And I love I love what he's done. The person is and how he plays. And the championships are one thing in regards. But keep in mind, Steve Nash to MVP. Okay. One year I was playing with at the time. But Steve Nash has to be okay, so a lot of times it's timing not to say the Steph didn't deserve it, but it sometimes from that perspective because Michael Jordan. When he was playing he should have. Got it every year. Okay. But in time, you know with this system. Works can't do it, but in the hierarchy of things here's the difference right now. We're talking about. But the writers, you ten fifteen twenty years from now the young writers that are now growing up that grew up in Steph curry era that top five gonna look totally different because. They didn't see they didn't seek Kareem. You see them sitting in, so it's a sliding scale. The people the writing in the history. It depends on what air you're coming up. It's kind of ugly stretch here in, in the game on the final Samarra balls. Some breakdowns defense easy buckets long long series. It is it is cool to see the raptors. There's all this talk, almost like it's an overdone there in. They made thank God routers fans. Margin the game on mute, obviously, I'm talking to here on the program. CBS sports radio, Bill Ryder. What's up? Thanks for being here and I can feel the energy, just watching it is going to be a really isn't it? Nice. Just a different is not LeBron James versus the warriors. I mean that alone is an amazing even a long time since LeBron James the last time LeBron James not playing in the finals. My son was born which for me is a dad to measure time. It's hard to remember when when things existed before that, but it's been a long run and nothing has lebrons. Glad it's come to an end for a little bit of variety is the spice of life stoop has found other spices. But for me variety, the absolute spice of life. Jim Jackson also, gave us his perspective on who needs to step up for the raptors outside of Leonard in order for them to win. I think I'm not saying play. Lights out but he has to get back to playing during the regular season. He was so active on office so active in transition knocking down shots defensively. He was also say how volley because not just from an alternate perspective. But he, he's gonna have to have some presence, essentially, I thought in the Milwaukee series, a great job audible by getting skill stepping into the passing lane. He's gonna have to have an impact on the game from his leadership perspective, having some kind of defensively when it comes down to knock it down shots some pressure from or he's going to have to be that guy on the perimeter that provide stable support system big on the need to beat Golden State, the other thing that's going to be fascinating about about DeMarcus cousins return is maybe a player in the series and somebody will take a chance but he's not a max player. There's too many concerns about his injury status. It probably makes sense to do what he did. Before you know, maybe do a one plus one if there's the market for it gets a one year deal and then a second year that's his option, but I could see boogied being on this warriors teams next year, but Katie leaves and the wars, find a way to make that work, you know, if to market likes it wins an NBA championship maybe he wants to be there. And I think as soon as the series over there, obviously, going to be a major question, it is the most impactful free zero one of the most impactful for agencies of all time, people have said is the most impactful ever will see it's going to be interesting to be great headlines. I'm not sure that I'm not convinced that quite Leonard and or Kevin Durant, and Kyrie Irving and Chris Middleton, and Kemba Walker are going to be parts of four straight NBA finals and winning two of those. That is what the free agency from two thousand ten led to LeBron, Chris Bosh for my money, and really wait. That was that was the most impactful. Agency ever when that plays out, one of the questions of when the dust settles wherever it settles the warriors without Duran Duran's gone. Are they competitive are they great? I think they will be. I think it'd be a lot more fun. I think they'll be the, you know, one of the two or three best teams in the west, the most likely team to come out of the west pain, how things shake out. But I think it will not be a certainty the way that it is now. And certainly not against whoever emerged in the east. And I asked him Jackson that, that question how good he thinks the warriors can be next year. If Kevin Durant goes elsewhere. Very good team because they have high guys that's you know, we talked about this before a lot of teams wanted to give me late style and pace, which Golden State play, but, but missing particular the key to success of Golden State was that they were able to bring high Q guys off the bench that don't hurt you. That understand how to play. So it may be a drop off from talent somewhat dollars not to say. But these guys, you know. Understand how to play the game. I mean it was one point in the last year against. Houston series or. Series two the first five games bench came in had like ten tunnel. Okay. I mean, having that dynamic with guys come off the bench that don't hurt you is the difference team. You know, Bob. Is that true? Is smart enough to understand how to build out a bench could be a little challenging next year? From the cap perspective, but they have room enough to go out and get some. San antonio. All he looks civic players that can complement the current roster. They Jim Jackson love Jim on the show, Greg. I also David Samson former president of the Miami Marlins. Now MLB analyst for CBS sports, H Q and just give all the cubs game. And just we've seen the last years with Bob balls, injuring fans. I ask David Samson how much of an issue baseball really has with fans safety? Right. Think that it's an issue that faces every team and it's not just in baseball you've got issues with hockey pucks, and it can be dangerous. And it was a nightmare when I watched it last night, it still impacted me this morning. I feel for that little girl, I you'll Mora, and I feel for the president of the Astros, because I know that I talked about it. I'm q- this morning every home game. I worried every single vowel ball everyone eighteen years because I didn't want anyone to ever get hurt and it happens and I don't know how you can eliminate it unless you put nets all the way around the entire field from Florida and the move that they have to do. And then lastly into David Sampson, the rays have a bay where baseball team nobody's going to games. Nobody's going to games. It's an embarrassment of the sport..

Jim Jackson Golden State Kevin Durant CBS LeBron James NBA Steph curry Toronto Stewart Kovacs DeMarcus Hilary swank Netflix Twitter raptors Kobe analyst David Samson Leonard Klay Thompson
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Things are ramping up against him in terms of prosecutors building their case. He's got a court appearance, June six. So it it's there's he's got a lot to face. Do we know if these new counts involve underage alleged victims, we don't because we have not seen a reading of indictment yet. This just filed in the Tribune to their credit is soft pop in the system, but we're all trying to get our hands on the actual documents and get a better understanding of what, what these new charges in the are Kelly case relate to, but it is fascinating to me when you think about how the R Kelly case came back into the Cook County court system, you know, you had gosh, how long has it been now fifteen twenty years since he stood trial and beat the char? Against him. And even though there was videotaped evidence, supposedly of an alleged crime and you have in the in the charges filed in February against R Kelly, one of the alleged victims was supposedly a teenager during the first trial, who had gone out to the courthouse enamored by our Kelly celebrity to meet him. And they struck up a relationship, so it's fascinating. And then you have at least some of the victims in the Kurt cases against our Kelly referred to the state's attorney's office by Michael avenue Audie. Stopped me Daniels fame can't make this up who's down facing his own shirts zone indictments and a lot of a lot of charges. Yes, this is just, you know, people always people talk about fake news. And let me tell you, if we tried our hardest. You couldn't you couldn't make it up. And you wouldn't believe it if we did, I made I if you had said, all of the ways in which the tangled web has been woven across the Cook County criminal courts building twenty six. You wouldn't believe it would you, you totally wouldn't and to think that it was sort of a lifetime movie that summed up some of the what the victims statements really. Years and year. Right. It seemed like it might have gone away. Had it not been for that. That documentary brought new light to his what had people had said had happened in the past and kind of brought a lot of people together saying the same thing about charges against him. And this is where we are today where he's facing eleven new counts on top of the ten other accounts are what, what else is coming up on the WGN, TV news, nine and ten four five six nine ten political reporter Bradley still down in Springfield, which I hear his lovely this time of the year. And he says recreational marijuana one step closer to reality in Illinois, looks like it pass through these States, Senate with some interesting little tweaks to it. Namely,.

Kelly Cook County Tribune WGN Michael avenue Audie Springfield Kurt Bradley marijuana Senate reporter attorney Illinois Daniels fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:39 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTOK

"I mean Email and we love to be in touch, I respond to every Email that I get I and I will actively work with them to get them in touch with their legislators. So I wanna make sure I answer your question. A couple of things one thing we want Washington to, to do. One thing we hope the current administration will consider you know, I'm not a billionaire, so I don't have the same access and opportunity to speak to the current administration and senior advisors in Washington DC as billionaires do. So the billionaires are able to communicate what they think is important, and what they think policy should be the United States, and they don't necessarily always represent or typically actually never represent what's best for the little guy for the middle class American worker. And so I hope that the current administration will listen to some of us and give us an audience and spent some time, speaking to the workers of the United States who are really being harmed, but some of the policy. That are in place today. But one of the things that I'm strongly advocating against is something called OT I wrote a blog on it. OT is not a visa so we, we've had and they included this in my book, we have over a million foreign students in the US. We've had a hundred percent increase number four and students attending American University. They're pushing out American children from the stem majors and OT gives any foreign student here in the US and opportunity to work, so stem graduates are able to work for up to three years, every degree that they get. So we have people who stay in the United States for fifteen twenty years and never become citizens or being a visa if they're going to school here, they get an opportunity to work, Odin workers. P T stand for it stands for optional practical training. Okay. And it's the biggest killer. Miller for American children coming out of college to get job. Is it legit? It's, it's a may not be good. But I mean, is it legit? Or is it a scam? No, it's not a scam if it's the federal government real thing. Okay. Okay. There was something called CPT, which was six months when four and student came to the US, and let's say they were, they were going to be a nurse, and they would be able to go to a hospital and work while they were in school to learn how to give an injection or take someone's pulse. And that turned into OT, which was any foreign students that came to the US could stay in the United States for here for twelve months and, and learn on the job. Right. So that's how we do this knowledge transfer where we're teaching other countries how America and capitalism works, and so they would take jobs in any industry in the United States, financial services or health care, or technology wherever, and they would actually take these jobs, and then with the Obama administration, there was an extension a change, so that anybody who was in the stem major could work up to three years. Than the US. And so, basically anybody who comes to the US as a foreign student on an F one visa can then turn that f one visa into a vehicle for staying in the US and being permanently employed as long as they constantly are being educated. And how many of them do that in terms of percent, lots of ton. There's more PT workers in the US and H one beat there's more. It's outstripped H one B because there's one, a loophole isn't it, it is. Because no one knows about it. No one's talking about it. And nobody in Washington even understand what it is. And so let me explain how it chokes out the American children. Okay. So not only the oak PT's, first of all, there's, there's jobs, they get advertised civically for PT, which is a legal. You're not supposed to in the United States of America. Try to hire foreigners before you hire American. So in addition to that, when a company higher than PT they get. A fifteen percents fight a tax break. So the PT cost less money for the employer and that foreign graduate is he willing to work for less hours. And typically many reports have said that it's like an indentured slave to being a slave indentured slave slavery because they go work for this company for really low wages. They work a lot of hours. And what happens is the American children, never get a chance to interview. So you have these kids spending all this money on stem education. Do you know today in the US seventy five percent of American children, who graduate with a stem degree do not get a stem job percent. I believe that. Cries and the myth of Silicon Valley is that we don't have enough stem workers. We have tons of stem workers is not getting jobs, because they're going to, to people that are not US citizens, and so. Oh, PTA. There's no limits. There is no restrictions where they have to work. They can work for basically three years with every stem to read, I get so they keep working and they get a fifteen percent tax break for, for their employer. So they're the first their employers want to hire OTT candidates before they wanna hire American compromise here, Hillary that you see that could work out. Well, I, I would like President Trump to end PT with an executive order just ended. But I think a good compromise would be to say, maybe six months. Or maximum year. But I would like him to end it because it doesn't do any any good for our country. You know, we, we we're never gonna see our birth rate, go up never gonna see kids getting married and having families living American dream, if they're not unable to find employment when these foreign kids go to school here colleges, who's paying for that. In my book. I don't know if you remember, but I talked about last time, it's on the show. So sometimes we America's best universities, give many scholarships to foreign students over American kids. They do millions and millions of dollars. I think over three hundred million dollars a year last year just the allocate that just for foreign kids. I guess. Right. Not only the foreigners getting the spots. They're also getting money, money that could go to American get your core to that one of the affiliates, they have a newly listed on my website, something called California stem parents. Those are group of parents who've done a lot of research, and they're advocating, and basically, you know, uncovering, the story that in California that children that are here in California. I'm not in California, but here in the United States in California that where the families are paying taxes. They can't even get into any of the US the UC schools. And that the American children are completely being pushed out of the pipeline to get in some of the top universities in the country, with the highest number of foreign students are like UC Berkeley, and UC Davis UC school than the California. And, you know, they also have on their website information about how even even in K through twelve in California, there's something called parachute kids, where foreign parents will bring their children to the US, and let them live in the US to improve their language skills. So they have a better chance of getting into US colleges, and they live with relatives or others and attend American k through twelve education so American taxpayers are paying educate, foreign children. Our taxes are going up to educate foreigners. And then our kids don't even get a chance to go to our own state universities. I mean, it's really horrific and then our kids graduate. Even if we go into debt and we take two mortgages, our and our house. Our kids don't even get the job. I mean it's really sad and something we really need to educate congress about. And that's why we get on the phone with Washington DC legislators to talk to them. One of the other things talking about now is HR a ten forty four. That's a, that's a Bill where they're trying to take away the seven percent country. Cats. For immigration, and what that would mean to countries monopolize, all the immigration to the United States for a decade, and that's really awful. I mean America was founded, it's a melting pot where we have people that are immigrating tonight states from all the countries across the globe. Diversity is something that we pride ourselves on as a country. And to think that we would possibly entertain my Latian in Washington, that would allow immigration only from one or two countries for the next decade into the US is not something that's good for our country. So we're advocating against HR ten forty four. And we're also talking to legislators about legislation that was introduced in twenty seventeen called the grassy Bill. That was a Bill that senators Durbin and Grassley bipartisan introduced to kind of critique. Fail. The H one B in l one visa programs that are so hurting, middle-class stem workers..

United States America Washington American University California UC Davis UC school Miller Silicon Valley congress Obama administration Hillary President Trump executive Durbin Berkeley Grassley three years six months
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I've always grown up with carpeting, and then when I married an Armenian, I will always have carpeting, not only that. But I will always have great deals on carpeting with all my Armenian great. Counterparts and all the various people in our family tree. You know, who you are in short the carpeting was about fifteen twenty years old. All right. So you're thinking you've gotta redo it know went in went over this carpeting this beat up decades, plus old carpeting with my beloved deep carpet cleaner, and with my amateur skills and about an hour's worth of work. We saved ourselves thousands of dollars. The carpet is still very usable. Very doable. Absolutely love it. And it takes a lot less time. When you wanna do a weekend project? There's nothing like throwing in. Oh, let's get the wallpaper professionally scraped off not let's get the carpet ripped out and put new carpeting in. No, thank you. Save yourself time sanity money deep clean those carpets. You've got some weird stain somewhere. You don't even know what it was. You forget how came in there that's worthy well-placed piece of furniture or a little throw rug. You know what I'm talking about? And you know, I pride myself in a gorgeous house. I. I love my house. It's comfortable of family lives here. We don't worry about. We don't tiptoe around. We have really sturdy furniture. We love our house. Make sure your house is one that you're going to continue to love by redoing it in ways that you can live with it. And when you're talking about saving huge money. There's nothing like taking these deep cleaners these deep cleaning carpet cleaners. Holy crap. The the skills that these wonderful pieces of machinery will unleash your home will save you tons of cash. So there you go next up moved a bunch of the furniture around. We kept a lot of the same furniture..

fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Radio. I'm Jay Reynolds. The NFL schedule is out in Seattle. There is a happy Russell Wilson. After of course, he agreed contractors week Wednesday. He met with reporters. I'm just grateful for this opportunity. And when it when it came down to it, it was it was a no brainer for me to be here in Seattle, and I want to see for life. So that was kind my mentality. And the guys that I've always admired in sports. You know, the guys that played at those locations in fifteen twenty years guys like Derek Jeter. You know, I wanna be like that, you know, wanna be remembered that that sense of what we wanna do. Here in Seattle. So we're just getting started. And I'm excited about where we're headed in what we're doing. We've got a great football team. Just starting. You know, that's the fun part about this is that it's been it's been it's been pretty cool for first seven years of my career. But you know, I feel like I feel like the the glasses is still full. And there's a lot more in. Hopefully, we can be on overflow in the sense of where we wanna go on how we want to do it. So, you know, just turned thirty like I'm just beginning. So he'll hope I can hope I can play here for another ten to fifteen years. Rosa Wilson with the new four year extension. That are Adam Schefter reports is worth hundred and forty million dollars case involving patriots owner Robert Kraft continues to unfold judge in Florida temporarily stopping the public release of the craft video surveillance video that allegedly shows the patriots owner paying for sex day spa. A hearing on the matter set for April twenty ninth ESPN investigative reporter TJ Quinn. They were stunned by this announcement, especially because Friday, there was a hearing in this case in which an assistant state attorney from Palm Beach. County told the judge that they would not release it until a judge signed off on it. So this was completely unexpected. There was already a hearing scheduled in the case for craft and the twenty four other defendants for April twenty six, but they the prosecutor's office attach it to a different case case as you said against the two women who are running the clinic the defense team very well paid well-staffed defense team, by the way scramble calling it an end Ron and attempt to to subvert Justice. And they also said going their motions say that it was prosecutorial misconduct, which is very serious accusation TJ. Why is this video become the maker break issue for Robert Kraft in this case, besides the obvious that he wouldn't want video of himself receiving services out there, the bigger the tighter issue is it's the only leverage right now that the state has to get him to accept some sort of plea agreement. They've offered him a diversion deal, which would seal the case seal all the. Evidence expunges record if you'd midst certain conditions, including that he would have lost had this gone to court. He refuses to do that as long as the video evidence there they have leveraged the judge's order temporarily blocking the release coming in response to a motion filed earlier Wednesday by crafts team after prosecutors said Wednesday morning Florida's open records law left them few options than to release the video as soon as possible craft at twenty four others charged with misdemeanor solicitation back in February. Speaking of the patriots posted a video of the recently retired rob gronkowski using the trophy from their Super Bowl win as a bat prior to an on field appearance. The Red Sox home opener last week gronk squared around to bunch a war pitch from Jillian and he left a baseball sized dent in the trophy. Speaking of Boston Celtics, get another win at home their series with the Pacers. It's an eight point come from behind Wayne, Celtics. Take the first two at home Celtics trail by eleven entering the fourth. Quarter four time in the shot clock era. The Celtics have come back double digits entering the fourth in a playoff game. They get the win. Bruins. Also, get a playoff win six four win over the Maple Leafs. That series is tied to also on Wednesday stars a five one win over the predators stars three for six on the power play. They had been one for thirteen in the first three games of the series that series like the Bruins and Maple Leafs tied two games apiece. Also, speaking of Boston Yankees Red Sox..

Robert Kraft Seattle Boston Celtics Jay Reynolds Derek Jeter patriots Maple Leafs Russell Wilson Florida Boston Yankees Red Sox NFL Red Sox Bruins Rosa Wilson Adam Schefter football TJ Quinn ESPN rob gronkowski
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"There is a happy Russell Wilson. After of course, he agreed to contractors week Wednesday. He met with reporters. I'm just grateful for this opportunity. And when it when it came down to it, it was it was a no brainer for me to want to be here in Seattle. And you don't want to be a for life. So that was kind of my mentality. The guys that I've always admired in sports. You know, the guys that played at those locations for fifteen twenty years guys like Derek Jeter. You know, I want to be like that, you know, wanna be remembering that that sense of what we wanna do here in Seattle. So we're just getting started and I'm excited about where we're headed and what we're doing. We've got a great football team. Just starting. You know, that's the fun part about this is that it's been it's been it's been pretty cool for for the first seven years of my career. But you know, I feel like I feel like the the glasses is still full. And there's a lot more in. Hopefully, we can be on the overflow in the sense of where we wanna go on how we want to do it. So, you know, just turned thirty. I'm just getting so hopefully, I can play for another ten to fifteen years. Russell Wilson with a new four year extension. That are Adam Schefter reports is worth hundred and forty million dollars the case involving patriots owner Robert Kraft continue to unfold judge in Florida temporarily stopping the public release of the craft video surveillance video that allegedly shows the patriots owner paying for sex at a day spa. A hearing on the matter set for April twenty ninety SPN investigative reporter TJ Quinn. They were stunned by this announcement, especially because Friday, there was a hearing in this case in which an assistant state attorney from Palm Beach county told the judge that they would not release it until a judge signed off on it. So this was completely unexpected. There was already a hearing scheduled in the case for craft and the twenty four other defendants for April twenty six, but they the prosecutor's office attach it to a different case case as you said against the two women who are running the clinic the defense team very well paid well-staffed defense team, by the way scramble calling it an. Enron and attempt to to subvert Justice. And they also sat into going there motion say that it was prosecutorial misconduct, which is very serious accusation. TJ? Why is this video become the maker break issue for Robert Kraft in this case, besides the obvious that he wouldn't want video of himself receiving services out there, the bigger the tighter issue is it's the only leverage right now that the state has to get him to accept some sort of plea agreement. They've offered him a diversion deal, which would seal the case seal all the evidence expunges record, if you'd midst certain conditions, including that he would have lost had this gone to court. He refuses to do that as long as the video evidence there. They have leveraged the judge has ordered temporarily blocking the release coming in response to a motion filed earlier Wednesday by crafts team after prosecutors said Wednesday morning Florida's open records law left them few options than to release the video as soon as possible craft and twenty four others were charged with misdemeanors. Solicitation back in February. Speaking of the patriots, they posted a video of the recently retired rob gronkowski using the trophy from their Super Bowl win as a bet prior to an onfield appearance of the Red Sox home opener last week gronk squared around to bunt a warmup pitch from Julian Edelman, and he left a baseball sized dent in the trophy. Speaking of Boston Celtics, get another win at home in their series with the Pacers. It's an eight point come from behind win Celtics. Take the first two at home Celtics trail by eleven entering the fourth quarter fourth time in the shot clock era. The Celtics have come back double digits entering the fourth in a playoff game. They get the win. Bruins. Also, get a playoff win six four win over the Maple Leafs. That series is tied to also on Wednesday stars a five one win over the predators stars three for six on the power play. There had been one for thirteen in the first three games of the series that series like the Bruins a Maple Leafs tied two games apiece. Also, speaking of Boston Yankees Red Sox..

Russell Wilson Boston Celtics Robert Kraft Seattle Florida Maple Leafs Boston Yankees Red Sox Derek Jeter Enron Bruins patriots Adam Schefter TJ Quinn football Red Sox investigative reporter Solicitation Julian Edelman rob gronkowski
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"The NFL schedule is out in Seattle. There is a happy Russell Wilson. After of course, he agreed to contractors week Wednesday. He met with reporters, I'm just grateful for this operative. And when it when it came down to it, it was it was a no brainer for me to want to be here in Seattle, and I want to be for life. So that was kind of my mentality. And the guys that I've always admired in sports of the guys that played at those locations for fifteen twenty years guys like Derek Jeter. You know, I wanna be like that, you know, want to be remembered that that sense of what we wanna do here in Seattle. So we're just getting started. And I'm excited about where we're headed in what we're doing. We've got a great football team. Just starting. You know, that's the fun part about this is that it's been it's been been pretty cool for I seven years of my career. But you know, I feel like I feel like the the glasses is still full. And there's a lot more in the hopefully, we can be on the overflow in the sense of where we wanna go on how we want to do it. So, you know, just turned thirty. I'm just getting so hopefully, I can play for another ten to fifteen years. Russell Wilson with new four year extension. That are Adam shut reports is worth hundred and forty million dollars case involving patriots on a Robert Kraft continues to unfold the judge in Florida temporarily stopping the public release of the craft video surveillance video that allegedly shows the patriots on are paying for sex day spa. A hearing on the matter set for April twenty ninety SPN investigative reporter TJ Quinn. They were stunned by this announcement, especially because Friday, there was a hearing in this case in which an assistant state attorney from Palm Beach county told the judge that they would not release it until a judge signed off on it. So this is completely unexpected. There was already a hearing scheduled in the case for craft and the twenty four other defendants for April twenty six, but they the prosecutor's office attached to a different case case as you said against the two women who are running the clinic the defense team a very well. Paid well-staffed defense team, by the way scramble calling it an. Enron and attempt to to subvert Justice. And they also said one of their motion say that it was prosecutorial misconduct, which is very serious accusation. TJ? Why is this video become the maker break issue for Robert Kraft in this case, besides the obvious that he wouldn't want video of himself receiving services out there, the bigger the tighter issue is it's the only leverage right now that the state has to get him to accept some sort of plea agreement. They've offered him a diversion deal, which would seal the case seal all the evidence expunges record, if you'd midst certain conditions, including that he would have lost had this gone to court. He refuses to do that as long as the video evidence there they have leveraged the judge's order temporarily blocking the release coming in response to a motion filed earlier Wednesday by crafts team after prosecutors said Wednesday morning Florida's open records law left them few options than to release the video as soon as possible craft and twenty four others charged with misdemeanors. Solicitation back in February. Speaking of the patriots, they posted a video of the recently retired rob gronkowski using the trophy from their Super Bowl win as a bat prior to an onfield appearance of the Red Sox home opener last week gronk squared around to bunt a warmup pitch from Jillian Elman, and he left a baseball sized dent in the trophy. Speaking of Boston Celtics, get another win at home in their series with the Pacers. It's an eight point come from behind win Celtics. The first two at home Celtics trail by eleven entering the fourth quarter fourth time in the shot clock era. The Celtics have come back from double digits entering the fourth in a playoff game. They get the win. Bruins. Also, get a playoff win six four win over the Maple Leafs. That series is tied at two also on Wednesday stars a five one win over the predators stars three for six on the power play had been one for thirteen in the first three games of the series that series like the Bruins Maple Leafs tied two games apiece. Also, speaking of Boston Yankees Red Sox..

Robert Kraft Boston Celtics Russell Wilson Seattle Florida Maple Leafs Boston Yankees Red Sox NFL Derek Jeter Bruins Enron TJ Quinn Red Sox Adam football investigative reporter rob gronkowski Solicitation prosecutor
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Yeah. Yeah. Your financial planner guys you guys need to write a book on how to spend the money. Okay. Always say say say, but as I close in and retirement here because of the 4._0._1._K's and having funded it through the years, and I can't be the only one in this situation. Glenn? A couple of million dollars. Did you know that this is actually over the last five years, this has been the hottest topic? In all financial advising is the is the distribution principles matter of fact, the guy on the other line with me, my co host Chris O J is probably the guy in my office that studied this concept of distribution and distribution planning using things like money guide pro and other types of analyses and studies Wade fowl who we've had on the air with us and least twice in the last year and a half. And this is the main topic because of judge what you're talking about people have their. And you've got this money. I mean, our parents my, you know, my wife, and I had company funded plan. And that was great. 4._0._1._K? It's on you. It's not that. It's on me. It's just it's all now. Spending principal Glenn on. It's on you to make sure that whatever strategy you put in place it's going to work for your entire lifetime. And if you make a mistake somewhere down the future, it's going to be a serious mistake. Yeah. But that'll be my wife's from. Ninety. Well, we crane that that true Glenn. But hey, Chris, do you wanna give Glenn some understanding of some of the things he can do to study on this? Well, what are the big things? Is you talk about? It's gotta happen. Just as you said that we had a client who came in at sixty one says, I'm retired sixty two my all my all my parents died at seventy one or two. So I'm collecting social security now, I'm only playing for ten years. Well, that's a risky strategy. Because you don't know how long are you gonna live? And that's always the question. How long are you gonna live? But they're saying that, you know, thirty years ago. Well, thirty years years ago fifteen twenty years ago, it was thought of as four percent is is the amount of money. You should think about drawing down from your assets to lift that's just depends on you got pensions. You've got social security you have IRA's whichever's coming in but assets outside of that. But it's not as complicated. I it's more complicated than that those things don't hold true anymore because people are living longer their inflation worry about what kind of person, you know, people. Go different phases of their life. They they spend more between sixty five and seventy four seventy and eighty they start a little less, and then you have the and you have the tax issues too. You have some money that hasn't paid taxes paid on some money than hairs, and maybe you're fortunate enough to have a lot of Roth money, that's tax free. And which do you start drawing on do you draw on this one that you draw now one, and you know, and all these things in there now some sophisticated tax programs Glenn. That. I mean, I'm sorry sophisticated retirement planning programs that we use and a lot of other professional advisors are using to help client zero in on this figure as to how much you and your spouse should be withdrawing to make sure that you have the highest probability of success possible. But there's plenty on this topic, Glenn this is a hot topic. Let me ask you a question with your clients. How many times you see, you know, they retire sixty five seventy now in their seventies. One of them has a health issue. And now the other one has to take care of them, and they don't travel, and they really stop spending by they become more complacent. But sedentary, and that's just the reality. I mean, you see that often with your clients. I know I feel like dying and leave my two knuckleheads a million dollars. I just I don't wanna do it. Let's let's put it this way. Glenn? Let's put. It this way we have what you say, Chris. I think we have a thousand households that we service at this point in time or more ballpark that. Yeah. That's okay. So I love that thousand households and all the clients that we've done financial physicals for since nineteen eighty four going back in that time. I'd say less than five percent of our clients have experienced that type of scenario and in their seventies. We see it to be less frequent in their seventies. We see it to be most frequent when they're in their eighties and nineties so but it does happen in their seventies. And I've had a couple that have been in their fifties and sixties, and we had one just recently about three years ago where the wife came down with early onset, Alzheimer's and still to this day is alive, and it's been about five and a half six years since that started. So it's been a very serious problem for them. But I've only seen that twice in my whole career. But it is a serious risk in a serious concern. It's a great question plan. You gotta have a long term care plan to Glenn. Here's a here's a key. If you want some quite, you know, do a Google search under the name. Wade W A D E foul P F A U P F A U. He's probably the country's foremost expert on distribution planning, and you'll find plenty of things to read about and so forth. All right, buddy. Good question. One. Last thing he has a Facebook group called retirement researcher comes out and does webinars and that sort of thing. So that's just a good place to go. Yeah. Good point. All right. Glenn? As I say, Chris has really spent a lot of time on this topic. I guess I gotta take another pause. So isaac. I hope you'll hold on with us. We're unopened show tonight. If you wanna call him, we should be able to handle at least one more question other than Isaac four one zero nine two two six six eighty you wanna call in right now, I've got to go to traffic..

Glenn Chris O Wade isaac Alzheimer principal Google Facebook researcher million dollars thirty years fifteen twenty years five percent four percent three years five years six years ten years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The version of the song that I know. Yeah. Original version, Lee neighbors in the laws, and it influenced Acis and a lot of the other people that came out of the new British seen Lee never made another record that song is still legendary it's about heroin, by the way there. She goes Poulsen through my brain he continues to threaten to put out records. Journalists music journals continue to go by his house. And he says it's coming out. It's been up fifteen twenty years. It's probably not coming out. But it's important because it relaunched in my mind British music, Mike, you came up with one as well that is an under appreciated one hit wonder, I actually didn't. It's probably isn't under appreciated. It still gets a little bit of radio play. Yeah. It's definitely definitely definitely a one hit wonder. I actually sent it over to Andrew is all I got. I got I got right here. That is. More for overalls than any other song in rock history. And by the way, if you don't know. Spoiler. Small. So if you're mash that up with rain wolf, I mean, then you got something Mike chancellor, I don't know that that's under appreciated. College is for every woman named Eileen. So candy. They have heard all candy came up with an under appreciated. One wonder okay. The reason why I came up with this one. Specifically was because it took only thirteen days for it to hit the number one spot when it was originally released and everybody loved this band. And then said, wait a minute. You're totally over hyped bands head they never released. Well, they released a couple of other songs, but it never got past like number thirty five again that is why it is this one oh this one. I don't have not on my computer. So people who has who has candy song. Kenny, solid, broke it. No, Andrew you have my song. I did not hear. Katie will get it or sing it Sean came up with one to come in and rescue us from ourselves. Sure. Yeah. This song's great. Don't hear too much. Robbie DuPree steal away..

Poulsen Mike chancellor Lee Andrew Robbie DuPree heroin Eileen Kenny Katie Sean fifteen twenty years thirteen days
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Twenty years. She's enforcing America's immigration for fifteen twenty years. We've got a. Patterson refused lucky here by both big government, Republicans and Democrats to refuse to enforce America's immigration laws and Trump said well by God. Enforce the law and all of a sudden. And I just like the American people safer. I believe it was a Harry Reid who lived in the Ritz Carlton in Washington DC. You lived in the penthouse as I recall, that's an all Ritz-Carlton are pretty nice. But that one in DC I've been there a couple of times for a conference or two, and it's it's it's even above average by Ritz Carlton standards now. One of my favorite cuts is Nancy Pelosi saying that the wall is a luxury. Now think about this. The wall is going to cost supposedly five point seven billion dollars. Now tonight, I'm going to the airport to go to Florida. I'm gonna go I'm going to be driving through what's known as the big dig in Boston. You're not much the big dig cost twenty five billion dollars. Was that a luxury that we couldn't afford Nancy Pelosi comes from the status? We'll be a bargain. Yeah. It was quite a bargain will though I if if the big dig was a bargain at twenty five billion dollars for for a series of several connel's. Not just one tunnel. Several tunnels then I would say the wall is going to be a a super bargain at at five point seven billion Nancy Pelosi is from the state of California. They have this thing called the bullet train and the bullet is really aimed at the head of the heads of the tax payers of California and the other forty nine states. It's gonna it's up to one hundred billion dollars one hundred billion dollars. It's the train to nowhere. And it was supposed to be finished by twenty twenty. Now, it's gonna now they're saying it's going to be finished by twenty twenty three and it won't be finished by then. And so so does Nancy Pelosi think that spending one hundred billion dollars on the bullet train in California is a luxury twenty times almost are probably in the end more than twenty times. What the the the wall would cost eight four four five hundred forty two forty two. We're gonna take a lot of your calls this hour. I'm Howie.

Nancy Pelosi twenty twenty Ritz Carlton America California Harry Reid Boston Patterson Trump Washington Florida one hundred billion dollars twenty five billion dollars seven billion dollars fifteen twenty years Twenty years