35 Burst results for "Fifteen Twenty Years"

Security awareness: How to influence others and change behavior

Cyber Work

05:08 min | Last week

Security awareness: How to influence others and change behavior

"So I WANNA. Let's let's get into it then. So the main meat of your podcast and book rethinking the Human Factor Cetera. Cured awareness behavior and culture. So I kind of your inspire presentation, you know several interesting things I that organizational culture and security culture are often treated as two separate things and others work can be done in linking the two and second that improvement squareness applications comes down not to I should be doing this but I wanted to do this and is my spot to do it. So I, WANNA get into some Specific case. If you have any in mind like where where organizations were able to tie security and organization culture together effectively. And also you can. You sorta like give me some examples of where people are companies were able to move from I should do I want to. So obviously about organizations that I work with and you is that will. Company Yeah Yeah. I'm sure there's a company Kodak's. Yeah, oh. Yeah. If there is now. So where do we want to start so I think the first point you make there is about a culture. So as an industry, we talk about security cultural law. Butts. At an I think eight it's a, it's a developing a culture is is A. He's GONNA help change behavior, but also helps with. It also helps when you're site in front of you know you get. Instant and in front of a regulator. and. More often not what we reported in the media is. A toxic cope culture in relation to cyber security mass resulted in this breach. So actually focusing on culture is really important because eventually we all have a bridge and we don't want to be in that Casa vacation in front of you know, a the the judiciary in regulators the courts the Senate whatever we want to be caught up in front of the committee and then basically be. Told you go talk coach so. Very, very. The one thing that came to my own research when I studied culture in some death a look to Organiz. Ation culture will McCullough birthday. Is the I think the first point is. Establishing, embedding an organizational culture trying to influence on organizational culture. Is Very very hot. It takes a lot of time in a lot of resources applied to most organizations are already. Either very proactively or Off Still. Kicking off. So pushing through projects, which takes three years, five years, ten years, fifteen, twenty years and culture. Why would we want to try and develop a separate culture with all the cost? Nova. Heads that come with that, you take it to To the board and say, Hey, you know we've got this organization culture. We want to develop a security culture in many ways what you're sorta doing saying we want something that's different. Now something potentially very difficult that they're just gonNA. Roll their eyes at and go come on. We can't even the other. Yeah. We haven't finished this one and you want to do this. The second point is I think he's quite well recognized among security profession the. One of the challenges is that are. We won't security just to be the way things are done. We don't want it to be something special. Because make something special people after respond to it, they have to you move towards it whereas if it's just part and parcel how everything's done within this organization, the values which most important to. Dak Crates. Lot less resistance. So by CREIGHTON security culture and making separate to the organization culture but sort of his country in to do what we generally know journey one, which is for it just to be called everybody does yeah I think that's the thing is you know? Catering to to to try and descending labeled completely separate potentially these are just Not Saying coach wrong I'm just saying these are things I think about. Yeah we're doing, we're just starting to sort of understand these sort of things, a separate things, and then how to integrate them. So of course, there's going to be lexical these. Security coach. You, know it's not unheard of what people is not my concern. It's the responsibility of the security team and they T- or the set in information in it. It somebody else's responsibility. Assume as you, label it. It combines people the opportunity to say that's not my problem. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely.

Kodak Mccullough Organiz Senate Judiciary
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 3 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Desperately Seeking Garifuna

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:53 min | 5 months ago

Desperately Seeking Garifuna

"Roof. How are you? I'm very well. How are you good? I went to the river cafe. I don't know fifteen twenty years ago and it took quite a while to there on the tube from downtown London but it was a marvellous location and a marvelous dinner. But you started really as a a sandwich place. I guess a commissary in your introduction to your new Book Thirty Years River Cafe. The quote is the River Cafe and his clientele are seriously diminishing the tone of area. What do you want to just explain what that meant? When we started the river cafe really it was a site of what used to be An oil refinery in London on the river with votes outside and at my husband who's architect was we were lived in Paris for five years when he was doing the Pompidou Centre. When we came back to London. We wanted to find a place that could be a community so that he could set up his architectural practice again. In place through there was a mix so it was a outside space as I said. We were on the river. They converted these warehouses into rather beautiful studios and offices are picture frames model makers dress designers and always. We always wanted to have a place where people could eat and I was working as a graphic designer. And Ed Always Cook but when the applications came in we thought you know what why are worse than not having a restaurant would be not to have a very good one and I just said I think I'll do it and I'll do with rose gray. Who's an old friend and had also come back from New York? I'm wanting to do something. So the two of US came and looked at the the site and it was tiny. It was enough. Maybe a bar tiny little kitchen and six tables. But the real restriction was that we're only allowed to be open for lunchtime because the neighbors who actually had oil warehouses here up in arms about the idea of a small restaurant so the planners that said we could be open Monday to Friday. We could only be open for lunch and only open to the people who worked and these warehouses. So that's where the sandwich bar. That's where the inexpensive very tiny little place started. But I think Rosen. I always had the ambition to be an Italian restaurant to be a proper restaurant. We just had to do it gradually. Here's a question. Sometimes you just leave something allowed like in your book very often. You don't add a lot of strong. Flavors is something that has a wonderful flavor to begin with you have a Dover Sole Rescue Capers in Marjoram Dover sole is often serve which brown butter and butter something very simple olive oil but capers in March. Very strong flavors is that how do you know as a cook when you? WanNa add strong flavors to something and other times? You don't is that something just whimsical. Or I think it depends. Well first of all depends on your mood. Sometimes I come into the river cafe because you know we changed the menu twice a day and if I have Dover sell on the menu I bite think well what am I going to put with the Dover so I might just put lentils with it today and therefore might like something interesting on the top like capers. I think as a cook the first thing I think about when I write the menu is what what do I feel like eating today. What would I want to eat? And that's one of the joys of working in the river cafe or I think I hope coming here so I think as you know the same thing we say. If you're cooking at home what what do you feel like eating and also not go shopping with a recipe in your head but go to the market. Go to the supermarket go to shop. See what's there and then you know the home and cook you know. A lot of chefs. Do a lot of different things. Jose entrees has twenty three restaurants Jeremiah Tower obviously you know moved around started things enclosed things. You've been doing this thirty years or so. Alice waters has been doing her GIG for forty years. Do you have a feeling about people like yourself who stick with it who start something and just keep getting better at it forces people who move around. Did you think one is better than the other widely? You love for thirty years doing this one thing. It obviously still excites you. By the way you're you're talking about your restaurant that's a good question. I think that it depends for me. It's about ambition and control. You know so I really. I've been asked to other restaurants. I've looked at other sites. We came very close to doing another restaurant. A couple of years ago and Mayfair and I'm always thinking about how to grow how to how to be better and sometimes I think that for me. It's about being better where we are. It's about everyday come in with a set of problems or or thinking about what to cook how to make the restaurant. Beautiful and how to make the waiters more knowledgeable in how to work with the chefs. Who want to learn more about ingredients in how to make our pastry kitchen know. There's so many so many things to do in the restaurant here that would it be possible to do it and have more. Some people really can do it for me. It would be really just so important to know that I if I did another restaurant that it would be as good as this one and this one. Wouldn't you know get less good because I was distracted by another one so I never thought of it as sticking with it because for me I have the best job in the world and I come in and I work with brilliant people and it's exciting

River Cafe Years River Cafe London Dover Sole Rescue Capers Dover Marjoram Dover United States New York Pompidou Centre Alice Waters ED Paris Rosen Mayfair Jeremiah Tower Jose
A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 8 months ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:42 min | 8 months ago

Hope for Alzheimers and Dementia

"And today we're going to discuss with you a very sensitive subject. Many of you have a family loved ones out there. That have had this experience. And you're hoping to avoid it as well because of watching them it is called for Alzheimer's and dementia and Doctor this is going to discuss with us today. Many ways that we can start recognizing if we're headed towards one of these terrible diseases down the road Natural products that we can do in supplementation. That could help. Slow it down and I don't know about reversing it. He's GonNa talk to us about that also and we have lots and lots of questions to get to. The you guys have been kind enough to send to us and we're going to make sure we try to answer as many of those as we can as long as we can remember right. I with that being said Dr Lewis. Can You Tell US exactly what you want to tell people today about Alzheimer's and dementia and give them some hope. Y- you know. I always write about two or three hours worth of notes in bullet points for this thirty minute show so please forgive me for not getting around everything First of all. It's a very devastating disease and mark my words what you're going to see in the very near future like ten fifteen twenty years is we're going to lose a great amount of America's workforce because You know how wonderful insurance companies are. They're going to say well. You know we're going to quit covering this and this and this and this and so you're gonNA have to take one of the two workers from your house. The male female to stay at home take care of mom or dad with dementia Alzheimer's So that's GonNa really hurt. America's workforce the the town to treat something. You know. I'm a contractor. We can't treat anything with with supplements but where did we lose our faith in God to realize that our if you put in something really really good your body's going to work within do good so the time to deal with it is before you get it now. I saw dementia slash Alzheimer's and you need to go to a neurologist. If you suspect you have this I love medical profession and you should be doing our program also in addition to I all coming in my mother when she was entered. I guess mid Sixty S and my brother Dr James Lewis who's incredibly brilliant contractor so we started giving my mother lots and lots of stuff and she was a willing participant and we put off dementia slash Alzheimer until. It didn't really kick her but she got around eighty eight to ninety to ninety two. It really got her but That's better than letting it progress in her mid sixties and have ever in in tiger down that terrible road when she seventy so we put it off about twenty five years Here's the problem and again. I'm not a medical. I go to medical doctors I love. Medical doctors had the greatest respect for their knowledge and their commitment to helping people get well but there was an article in the paper the other day. This is drugs. Fail to slow decline inherited. Alzheimer's disease now inherited would imply that. It's genetic but as you know if you've listened to me there's so many of our genes that will not express bad things if you get rid of environmental toxins and increase nutrients and you know to a thinking man or woman you say well. If you increase no chance you're gonNA automatically Detox Bango. You just won the prize. That's true so it. That article talked about the fatal drugs. Fail TO PREVENT OR SLOW. The mental decline They were trying to remove harmful protein. That builds up into Brian to these people leading to you know. Bad dementia The problem with that is and I'm not anti-drug but it's like you've got eighty holes in your roof and it's about to come a thunderstorm and you're trying to patch one. That's what you're doing with the drug. You're not getting to the underlying. Cause will you talked about your mother going into that at a later stage I remember her being much younger. And we thought she was going into dementia and Alzheimer's and they had just put her on an an acid reducer. So that right. I hadn't even forgot that story. Which is one of the signs of dementia Alzheimer's but sometimes it's just dress Yeah My sister called me and says you know Steven my mom. You Know Mamas making coffee with no water into pie. She's turned it trying to turn on the gas stove can't get it going. And she's looking in the mirror and talking to herself thinking she's talking to someone else and she's urinating freely and cannot have a bowel movement. I said Oh good. Lord I'm booked up and I said I'd never mind. I'll cancel everybody on the books and I went to see your well. They just put on a new acid reducer and not that. Those things aren't necessary and appropriate but I said well she's not going to get any B twelve you know out of her mate and we'll get further into that during the questions but I said if you've got to take it for feeling good understand that and I gave her medical doctor the all the research about you know B twelve deficiency and how that can decrease brain function and I said at the very least place. Give her a shot over. Wake well her cute little. Md She. I guess got offended. She wouldn't do it so I had to put Mamo massive doses of B. Twelve. You can't put somebody on the RDA because you're not gonNA absorb it. You gotta put them on massive doses and has got to be the good stuff and she popped out of it in about two three weeks. She has a brand new woman and that was many years before she actually did develop dementia. So sometimes it can be drug induced and you think that they're going down this slippery slope open at something they're taking And and blood pressure medicines and other one that that does that it. It'll make them be like they're somewhere else you know. We had them walk in our office that way. And they don't know what's going on and it turned out to be their blood pressure medication so it could be several. It can be statin drugs. We see that very very often and again. I don't interfere with medical. You know what the what they do. So we'll talk to your md about this. Here's the book. Here's the research. Read that One of the worst insults from a hormonal point of view is one of the worst insults to the Bryant stress. Because then you're adrenals get stressed release. Cortisol we see people with super-duper High Cortisol than it you know eventually gets battalion. Whereas craps out goes down to. Oh we had one in here. Yesterday had five on his cortisol. So we'll no wonder you feel like hack. And you have anxiety on top of that and can't remember and he runs a multimillion dollar business. This has a very bad effect on the hop. Thelma's and they're somewhere in my notes. GotTa hope we get to it. I'll just mention it now. You have to feed the hippocampus. That's not a college for Hippos. That's part of your brain and I did a little research and there's a specific type. You know we always sell the methyl. B twelve the good stuff but there's only one company on no that makes Olympic acid and auto Janet. I said I know I know I keep asking you to buy all these supplements. I started remembering things. I remember the code to our Condo in Branson for months before and went on and on and on it's called T. M. G. which is trauma thylacine. Which is a major methyl donor which means major detoxification? But it has a violin acid which feeds the hippocampus which helps tremendously with short term energy. So for those of you that walk into the next room and have a senior moment because we laugh about it because it's easier to laugh about it and saying Oh crap Mg Are you have to strategically place all of your items? You can see him again when you get in the room Engine twelve flashlights. Hanging around. Because I forgot where I left last seven but I've always got one somewhere except they migrate like wildebeest. I may all be an RV. And I have to bring them back into the house but so stress. You know you've got to deal with that Hypo methylated which lack of be complex. And I've got notes here somewhere. It's be twelve it's B. Six and has to be activated. Be Six it has to be five. M T H F met foul in or Quadraphonic plus that for Lennick. Acid is little bit different than the folic. So you got to be very very careful. Janet can you hand me that the one over there that that bottle is says Omega? Yes you're okay. Here's what I'm GonNa Tell You folks. One of my patients came into the day. She says well I'm taking this. This is from a famous doctor and my Amigas which is very very incredibly important critical for good brain function mine. One Gel caps has several times more. Epa in Dha than this A Megan from a famous doctor. But this name is doctor put in B twelve as Sino Kabbalah mean if it says sign Kabbalah mean. It is junk. Throw it away. I don't care if it comes from a famous doctor and then you know he put in some other cheap stuff It's not good. Just because it comes from a famous doctor. He put info late instead of the five of 'EM T H F.

Alzheimer Dementia Dr James Lewis Cortisol Janet Alzheimer's Disease America Mental Decline Mamo Brian EPA Statin Thelma Bryant Omega Steven
Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

Monocle 24: The Menu

09:59 min | 9 months ago

Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

"The collective is an exciting body. And it's exciting. Because I wish it when I was starting my business. There Wall such a thing in existence. Where a group of restrictors on people in the food and beverage industry who are telling our story in a way. That's going to inspire that whole scene of entrepreneurs to be courageous enough to have a go within this industry. You look at the industry and you hear. There's lots of doom and gloom at the moment for various reasons but certainly with hospitality. You know that the rate is always being ninety cents restaurants failing in the first year. So I think it's really important to have a variety of role models who speak positively about how it can be otherwise and how to build a business in a way that's going to have legs and stamina and scalable and that's what the. Cobra collective is about his group of normal people like US telling those out there who are wondering how it can be. It can be very sunny place to be. Let's talk about your own story dozen interesting one so I know you worked as a barrister for twin two years before you took that leap into hospitalizing. It's an unusual route. Isn't it sized child? Protection burst of twenty s and that's very typical of many Indian immigrants. My parents were doctors and I was born in this country and I was raised to be a professional. Because that's the only thing that you can be otherwise you fall off the face of England in their view so I was raised to be a doctor or lawyer and I became a lawyer. So it's very good girl and I absolutely loved my job and my job was about meeting people at the lowest point of their life and giving them hope in some ways that this was child abuse and this was about children being removed etc and business and particularly hospitality was something that I thought was probably quite reprehensible because you look at media and you look at the way that restaurateurs and restaurants portrayed unless seen as these hotbeds of testosterone driven aggression that you have to be brutalized anti brutal to succeed in hospitality and so for me as a woman as a woman who was in my forties. When I started the restaurant it was not something that was in any way beckoning but I had a passion for food. A real burning passion to show liberal. Show my city. How Indians actually eat in their own homes? In a way that hasn't really been shown on the High Street and this is entrepreneurism. It starts to come alive. The idea comes alive and I had a brilliant job in brilliant salary and great prospects that this creature came alive in the shape of moberly and it would keep me awake at night until I gave birth to it. And that's when I started my best restaurant only five years ago now. What kind of support would you have needed back in the day when you look at? That's rather stressful period. Five six years ago when you were about to launch a restaurant. What kind of support would you have needed? Well you know I. It's not a small alt-right thing to say that role models are extremely important. Because for me as I said you look at the industry and you can't see people that look like me. That are the stage of life that are doing it with their own money. I had no financial backing at all. This was all of my savings. Was the roof over my head. We're going to have to sell the house and moving to my Auntie's bungalow. It was so risky and unwilling to take those risks by goodness. It would have helped if I could have seen people that have done it. That were talking about Watson all sharing their journey so I knew what to expect and it must inevitably be the end of home. Life must inevitably be that you are one of those ninety percent of the fail. And that's what I could have really done with. The other thing is banks are not that willing to lend to a forty year old woman whose career and comes to them with an entrepreneurial idea and that is the truth you are seen as somebody's having a midlife crisis and so- financial backing would have been great. I was given in the end enough to buy one grill by bank. I'm not with them anymore. And that's all. Yeah so Nisha. You're giving your most gloss later this month. What kind of lessons I got to be sharing their must all about how to build a scalable business. This is about building a business and having the ambition to think it might go beyond one small high street store and so the lessons are how to take that product and craft it in a way that you can replicate it with complete consistency. One of the most important lessons is to understand why you're doing this you know. Why are you building this business? Why are you risking everything and then articulating? That reason. Why right the way through Your Business? Former you know for me. I build me to enrich lives primarily of my stuff because if my chefs happy. The food is amazing. Give my stuff a happy. The the environment is joy filled and so it really is important to in some. Why is you get out of bed every morning and have that permeate through your business model said that every one of your employees Hsieh's zeal? I think it's interesting. How you mention how important is to keep your stuff happy. So what do you actually do in practical terms to make sure? They aren't content with where they work. Well many things. She's priority in my job. So for instance I have a wellbeing officer that is dedicated solely to going around. And I've got five hundred members of staff going around speaking to every member stuff and find out how they are doing. How is it to work for Moseley to enrich their lives? Are we doing that? We do things like you know the first day of school for the children they have. They have their birthdays off. I fly forty members of my team every year to India to work in villages on female entrepreneurs projects on lund management projects. We pay them to do that. I need that life to be punctuated by things that just lift their head out of the mire and make them think about why they're working and so that if it's your passion and it's my passion. Lubi an eternal source of stimulation as it is for me sauce. Amazing how do you see the British sociologists out the moment it seems that we are living turbulent times that I don't know what your take is being based in Liverpool how big of an effect thus brexit have already. It's interesting because I think brexit is not the reason that we see so many heads rolling at the moment. Honestly I think maybe a small factor is the kind of factor that would push you over the edge if you're a business though struggling anyway. What's really rather marvelous is not marvelous. But one picks over the bones of what's happened with these businesses that have gone down and one actually thinks was. The last time I ate there will took the ones I loved to go and eat there. The answer would probably be not for many many months and that is key. It is your product. The day I eat in my restaurant twice a week on my day off me in the family go neat in my restaurant. The day I stopped doing that. And it's not good enough for me as the daily need to get off the high street. So that's one of the factors is constantly looking product thinking you'll food addictive is it priced reasonably and you can do all of those things when your rents are not killing you so it's really important as a CEO to take sites that are not going to punish you and your guests because of how expensive it is so you've got to be moderate in that way and that's why. I'm not in London yet. An outcome to London when I find a cheaper that site but right now I've got thirteen restaurants all of them outside London. I took Ed Maria today. Which is a couple of Scotland? And I'm not in my own capital yet and I just need those prices to come down because what I never want to do is to have to put my prices up the my clients because that is the beginning of the end now the concern of Brexit. Is that a London. Bubble thing do think impacts is strong obviously many restaurants in London in particular. I have a lot of European staff. How do you feel about this? What does the what looked like when you're outside of London? When your asset of Lyndon Free Staff Statistic is twenty three percent European staff twenty-three as opposed to ninety percent inland? And so you can see that in terms of stopping is very different. The pressures are different in fact sorry. Let's just brave enough to say. The pressures are much reduced. If you're outside of London in terms of the supply chain. Who knows who knows what's going to happen. We've got a year to negotiate something. That should really take three years negotiate. So that's a conversation to have perhaps next December but in terms of personnel it hasn't affected it in the way that may affect other businesses. That London centric so as I mentioned already. You're giving a master class later this month. I'm wondering having been a very successful Batali. See Orange but What are the things? You'd still like to learn what I would still like to learn as you look at these brands that have stood the test of time. You look at the non. Does the Pizza Express is the Waga Mama's these giants of industry that had legs to last fifteen twenty years? And it's that it is. What is the secret? Where does that confidence come from? One of the things that I've realized is you don't need to keep changing your menu today. Non Does Change. Think it's their lyman. Something chicken to a mango and passion fruit. It was the headline in the Liverpool Echo. This morning that the clients are absolutely destroyed. Not going to numbers anymore because it changed one dish. And it's little things like that. Where does the confidence come from? Do you need to constantly change them and you you know? I am the Sea of Muggy in the founder of Morgan will be for the foreseeable medium term future when the next CEO comes in because there will be some point in the future which reigns in my hunting ever want. Must I look to in the next person to make sure that the culture remains the same and the way I learned that by fraternizing with those that are far better than me. And that's what's great about the hospitality. Industry is Great. Sorority of people share their secrets. Share their journey so that I can learn from the giants upon whose shoulders I stand in the beginning of this interview. You mentioned that coming from an Indian background. You felt the pressure of actually going. For example to become very students of thinking of force battalions extra as an option and. I think it's not only your background. I think it's a wider thing in this country and internationally that hospitality sector jobs are not as appreciated us. They should what do you think should be done to actually raise the profile of talented jobs and make people understand that they can be for the whole life not to something to as a student. You are absolutely right in. This is my passion and I think it's telling stories like this. That will let I gave up a fantastic career. A professional career as a barrister. I was taking the exams to become a judge and I gave that up for hospitality to run food on the floor and to me. It is one of the most dignified professions that there is to serve is the best that we can do is leaders. It really

London Brexit Liverpool United States CEO Testosterone England Watson Hsieh Moseley Officer India Ed Maria Lyndon Free Scotland Sea Of Muggy Morgan Founder
Michael Phillips on Brad Pitt's 2020 Oscar Chances

Filmspotting

01:13 min | 9 months ago

Michael Phillips on Brad Pitt's 2020 Oscar Chances

"Michael you are on the record here quite vociferously. Yes as generally liking once upon a time in Hollywood except for the last twenty minutes. Yeah hate it. The second time through hater two more. Okay where do you stand on the performance of one Brad Pitt. He seems to be the front runner. Do you think he will win. And do you think he should wait. absolutely will win. I think it's one of the surest bets you can make you know if you're if you're trying to get a coworker a little tipsy so you can start saying things like well let's make it interesting. Let's make the I think it's a real sure thing partly just because it's it's a really engaging performance. It's a great Brad. Pitt is one of these movie stars and this is. This is an idea that cuts completely cross gender and every other thing where you know he he was a movie star and then fifteen twenty years later he became came a good actor and that that can happen. Only if you're a lot lucky and a little bit smart and pick the right roles in the right director actors and push yourself enough that you become a better version of yourself and as an actor and I think that's absolutely happened with him He's certainly one of the chief satisfactions of Tarantino's film

Brad Pitt Hollywood Michael Tarantino Director
Cruise unveils Origin, an electric driverless vehicle designed for sharing

Tech News Today

06:04 min | 9 months ago

Cruise unveils Origin, an electric driverless vehicle designed for sharing

"So you may have heard some news bubbling about last week about New Thomas Vehicle called the cruise origin seven at Dan Amman. WHO's the CEO of crews posted a lengthy background piece to medium the details the story of origin? It was time to the big launch party in San Francisco joining us to bring some expert insight to this vision of the origin. Is Sam Abell some from the wheel bearings podcast. Welcome back. Sam's great to have you. Hey guys good to see you again. Good to see you there. It is and before I forget Happy Birthday to Lisa. Oh Nice all right because I of course she's listening she she watches every episode technically So comex she should be. That's right amazing. If she has the time to watch every single hour of of every single show on the network but somehow she makes it happened So you were at this event. This was last week right. You're at the event. What did you expect going in and There was no big surprises for me. I did Pretty much expect what we saw and which is A. It's a purpose built autonomous vehicle that's been in development now for a little over a year by GM and Honda in collaboration with the team that cruise so crews For those that don't no no cruise. Automation is a San Francisco. Start up the GM bought in two thousand sixteen to help develop their production. Automated driving system and In twenty any seventeen twenty. Two Thousand Eighteen They got some additional investment as well from Softbank and from Honda so since the late twentieth eighteen Honda and GM. We've been working together in his vehicle and cruise has been doing their development so far with a fleet of modified Chevy Bolts which are small mall? Electric cars enter finder. Nice little cars but For when you when you're talking about doing rubber taxi service autonomous ride hailing service any kind of traditional vehicle that we have today is not really that well suited for it. Because if you think about it you know you got an autonomous vehicles just driving around and this applies you know the same thing applies You know to what Elon Musk has been talking about for Tesla with having you know model threes rubber taxes. You know he wants to have a million threes as rebel taxes but in this year and vehicles like that whether it's the Baltic model three or anything else are not really well all suited to a robot taxi application. Because if you don't have a driver in the vehicle you know today if you hail a lift an Uber you get out of the car. If you don't close the door properly cadaver can get out or reach over slammed the door shut or closed the truck. Whatever it might be but for an autonomous vehicle? And there's no operator in there you need to be able to do things like make sure those doors are actually closed before the vehicle pulls away to go pick up next passenger You know to make it easy for people to get in and out quickly So what they've done what. Gm Honda have done is Developed this vehicle which is conceptually similar to some other Autonomous Shuttles that we've seen seen from companies like Navia local motors and We're GONNA see something similar in the next few months from Another Bayer is start up called souks And they've gone on with what we call a carriage seating configuration so instead of everybody facing the same direction facing forwards. You've got seats on other side of the big open space in the middle the power sliding doors on on both sides that automatically open and close and they've gotten rid of things like the steering wheel and pedals and they've integrated rated all the sensors into the the rooftop of this vehicle and You know because if they're able to get rid of things that you don't need for an autonomous vehicle like those steering wheels pedals battles and others than windshield wipers. They were able to reduce the cost of this thing done. They're not saying exactly how much it's going to be. But it's not a vehicle that you're ever going to be able to buy. It's only four. autonomous mobility services and transportation services. So you know. They showed a rendering of one from setup for package delivery You'll be able to have versions of this. That have a ramp on the side so people in wheelchairs can get in and out that sort of thing okay. So there's a lot of flexibility as far as the design is concerned too to tailor different uses and that sort of stuff. There's also some interesting kind of like high tech and air quotes features inside the vehicle. Talk a little bit about that. Like what does it offer for people who are writing. Yeah so there's a couple of screens inside you know. It's actually fairly simple because it's designed mostly for fairly short ride so there's you know there's not a lot of really fancy INFOTAINMENT stuffers for you know things like you know. VR glasses or anything like that which has been shown us some concepts massage or anything like that but Because of the way this thing is planned to be used you know the typical individual personally owned vehicle. You people drive maybe twelve fifteen thousand miles a year. The vehicles are designed to last ten. Mm Fifteen twenty years or more For something like this. Because it's going to be operating round the clock and getting pre preferably high utilization allegation. That's the whole point of it and so they're not sitting around parked They're gonNA be maybe accumulating maybe a hundred thousand miles a year or more and if it was designed the way traditional vehicles are it might wear out to three or four years and so what they've done is instead of designing this thing in the usual way where they would have to scrap it but at the end of that time period. They've designed the structure of the thing and the chassis to last a million miles. And then they've made it very modular so that they can because because this technology is still evolving they can replace things like sensors and the computers and the software and even things like the battery every two or three years As a AH they wear out and get replaced with with more advanced and hopefully less expensive versions of the same

GM Honda New Thomas Vehicle Sam Abell San Francisco Dan Amman CEO Elon Musk Bolts Lisa Tesla Softbank Navia
Stablecoins: The Big Picture with Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

08:15 min | 9 months ago

Stablecoins: The Big Picture with Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire

"Joined today by none other then the CO founder and CEO Circle. Jeremy Allaire Fun facts about Jeremy and his team. I believe one of the earliest applicants. The whole this was back in late. Two thousand thirteen at actually made through one of their board members and As fate would have a gentleman up name unders That I was considering starting a stable coin project with Way Back in two thousand thirteen hundred fourteen interviewed around the same time as I did and basically we came at around the same time and and I told him while they're gonNA make off wrong spot he said No. No no and sure enough. You guys made an offer unders left left and recently that he'll draw sorry recently he recently joined the sorry and you are now now focused on stable coins pretty much exclusively. So the the intersection there. over the course of the last six years of course there's there's been some uh some work in between between Baltimore with DC G. and some of the were yet while I was coined us It's been fascinating to watch circles evolution over time and data and I think the you're in a very good position right now on the US DC front triggered talk a bit about as it is emerging as as you know one of the leading contenders unders for what's going to be the dominant stable especially in the US dollar pegged a stable income to cover a lot of territory right now Or of course the next hour fled Germany. For for starters loved to get the quick background on you. I think some people industry no a little bit about your background Previous to to digital currency. But but let's talk about that just to to start and then the evolution of circle in your own is And then I'll maybe jumping with with a little bit of my thesis as as to where certainly goes from here and then we can talk about that around you can. You can tell me off. I am very often. It sounds fun but number you were you. Were a a a a very sharp early speculator about what we were going to be doing doing good when we were stealth back in twenty thirteen and early twenty fourteen. Yeah that's yeah yeah and You no I I think you even knew some of the internal code names. We had for different things which sort of talked aspirational about where we saw digital currency going and Yeah and we'll get to all that conversation insurance so kind of where things are today but yeah my yeah my background just for for people who aren't aware I've been working being in Internet platforms for a long time since the early nineteen nineties and I I had a background in kind of studying political economy global political economy And that's what actually drew me into the Internet in nineteen ninety and became kind of very very obsessed about what you could what you do with it and worked on multiple companies over the next. You know fifteen twenty years I think what animated those companies was excitement about the promise of open open platforms open networks permission lists access to open protocols what you could do with that information. Communication software software delivery media all these kinds of things. which were you know? I think critical kind of infrastructures built up on on the layers to the Internet from the early nineties through obviously still today And so I you know first. Business was really enabling programmers grammars to build software applications for web browsers which was quite novel in Nineteen Ninety Four nineteen ninety five Really empowering a new generation of developers to create software for new kind of model and to build kind of content applications as. We'd like to call them back Ben and that grew Into a public company and then eventually we merged with macro media one of the dominant Internet designing tools companies. And I was chief technology officer there and worked on FLASH PLATFORM BACK IN. This would have been in. You know. two thousand one two thousand two thousand three and at that time. Flash was the most ubiquitous piece of software on the Internet. Ninety eight percent computers had it. And you we could actually upgrade the runtime of the Internet in twelve of months because we could basically launch a new version of the player it was like a new almost like an operating system had a virtual machine. We were dancing programming language to do a lot more stuff than we had a set of ideas. He is that when you have broadband and Wi fi kind of lighting up which were just sort of happening end kind of user experience. The Internet could could be a lot more rich and we put underlying primitives into that platform for video and And that sort of sparked my my next like major ager passionate in which was in early two thousand and two sort of interested in you know how could you disrupt what is the television and and media distribution the newspapers coming online or magazines coming online but actually television on the Internet and started another company. Let's left macro media. Started another company called Bright Cove which is listed public company. Now J. Took public. I'm a little bit before starting circle and that was again a platform company so basically providing UH platforms for companies in developers. That wanted to you know use video do video distribution not just browsers mobile devices. TV sets all stuff. I'm and bypass the legacy system for media distribution kind of going over the top Which is the phrase that we used with a software in media communications and in a in those generations the Internet? Now you know I sort of think about things like stable coins is like we're doing an over the top Financial System by building it all on open open permission list network so it networks Protocols Deli platforms developers can build on And really trying to create a user experience money. That's really different different. But I'm the sort of a little bit of the thread that runs through it and I think in two thousand and twelve Had just taken breakoff public And like a lot of people around two thousand twelve became interested in and obsessed with cryptocurrency Not Not just you know bitcoin specifically but the broader kind of our that we could see back in early two thousand thirteen. Sean and I were batting around starting circle and Many many of the ideas that sort of animated the founding of the company on things that we imagined becoming possible are actually just just now becoming possible and so it's super exciting time in the industry. It's a super exciting time. I think also circle but it's a very exciting time for the industry where Yup many of the things that got us to found the company and belief systems about what could happen with the global financial system where you can actually start to awesome. That's emerging so that's a little background in a little bit on how I got to circle so we we glossed over Quite a bit of meet in the Middle Right in terms of Aware Circle started in where you've been last few years and when people see the focus today on Uscca the encircle pay is still integral to the wrecked it. Now so circle pay we We ended service on circle pay last year as a standalone service. So and I can talk to you the kind of which which which one of my thinking so so the the the the the current product suite includes USCC and Yes so right now we have the USD service which is available to individuals and institutions and businesses and then we have a whole new set of products that that were gearing up to launch guy. Soon

Jeremy Allaire United States Co Founder Baltimore Bright Cove CEO WI Chief Technology Officer Uscca Germany BEN Uscc Dc G. USD
Where Does Cam Newton Go From Here?

NFL Live

08:31 min | 11 months ago

Where Does Cam Newton Go From Here?

"Jeremy the first line of your story is. He can't go out like this. It's kind of crazy to me that that is even being said about Cam Cam Newton in the first place. If you look at the situation with the Carolina Panthers and Cam Newton a guy that called Superman of former. MVP It is just hard to make sense ESPN NFL writer. Jeremy Fowler has spent the last few weeks reporting on Cam Newton's future going into the season of you to tell me that Cam Newton would potentially be on the way out of Carolina and there will be this big mess I would not by any stretch have believed you before we get into the confluence of factors that led us to this moment. Explain why it's so unusual to even be having a conversation like this about a quarterback like Newton will mean. It is crazy because he changed the game game. This is a guy that was bred to be a winner from his days at Auburn he won the national championship number. One overall pick set rookie records Kurds for total yards on winning. MVP in two thousand fifteen three different seasons of ten or more wins. Everything was lined up for this guy to be a top five top top ten quarterback for the next fifteen twenty years. Just terrible lineup. What an improvisational improvisational play by CAM? Newton he altered the way. We look at the style of the quarterback position. Because we've seen running quarterbacks before but this is a guy. I was flipping into the end zone quarterback. He's making the superman sign with his arms after scoring and and you know he was Such an imposing figure that he looked like a combination of a pass rusher linebacker and a running back coming at you full speed and the whole the mack truck. That was something ended. The League really hadn't seen before goodness isn't this is the NFL. You're not supposed to be able to do that. And then there was the off field appeal. This is a guy who would show up to. His press. Conference was a fashion show. He's got the bedazzled hats glasses being able to be Orally gifted. There's something that I think. A master to a degree. I mean this is a guy that we couldn't take our eyes off of whether whether he was on the field or do you think his style of football in some ways impacted his body in a way that led us to this point it has to be a factor. I mean we're talking about a guy who's taken eleven hundred plus hit since two thousand eleven and more than half of those have been in the last four years since around two thousand fifteen. That's more than Russell Wilson. More than any other guy. Things have piled up on them as a result he was all about power shear power that was part of what made him so great. He did bulldoze you in the open field. He could run for the thirty yards and so just. The pounding as a result has clearly affected where areas now so the first few years of camps career sort of builds towards this magical season in two thousand fifteen. He's the MVP and it all leads up to the Super Bowl and what should have been a high point for him ended up being a low one the pants lose and perhaps unfairly the the indelible memory for a lot of people is the fumble. He failed to recover. Do you think that game changed perceptions of him roll. It stripped him of his invincibility. One one personnel told me the Denver took his Superman Cape. They took it away and he was never the same after that. And that's probably unfair because it's one game on the the biggest stage but you know. Denver played a certain way where they kept hitting them. The seven six rushing four-ball comes out of the hands on the ground still on the ground picked up by the yard line. And since then cam sense of some really good moments but it's been a little hit or miss even on the field when he is in the lineup and so it was a turning point for a career that was at a wildly high trajectory at that point you're talking about not only an MVP season but he could get into the end zone. Whenever he wanted that year it was just? He played a pretty much flawless season. And then it all SORTA changed after that game so that super bowl will is kind of a turning point for Cam than what happened last season in two thousand eighteen well last season he was a potential. MVP candidate after the first eight or so weeks. The panthers are sitting at six and two Newton looks great. He's got nineteen total touchdowns you know he's rushing but he's also being patient the pocket making throws so this was a team That was on the rise and was sort of recapturing. Maybe the magic. They had a couple years earlier for that. Super Bowl run so it was nothing but promising at that point an annual in early Donovan. Where you go to Pittsburgh you go to Heinz field? You're thinking this'll be another turning point for your season and then TJ comes the blindside. He knocks Cam. Newton he runs right into that right right shoulder into the turf and he had already been on the injury report with a shoulder injury. They didn't think it was serious at that time but watts shot clearly reaggravated things to the point where by by the end of the year he was struggling to throw the ball. Forty forty five yards. I mean it was pretty ugly out there right. I mean he wasn't pulled but I remember number. They stopped using him for Hail Marys I N. It became apparent that something was deeply wrong. Throw by CAM. It didn't reach. The end zone landed fifteen yards short of the goal line. This is a guy that could throw sixty five yards on a rope. And so they're taking them out putting Taylor Heinecke of all people to throw a deep ball. I mean there couldn't have been a deeper foreshadow for maybe the problems that were rising with Cam Newton's future alright so he ends up shutting it down for the last two games of that twenty eighteen season and in the off season. He has some shoulder surgery but by the time this season starts it seems like he has recovered and things are looking optimistic again for Cham. How does the twenty nineteen season actually began for him throwing the ball? He looked pretty tentative. No touchdown passes in the first two weeks. He didn't really look as comfortable normally. Does you know that you can win games with them but certainly not an MVP level that. They're there used to so after the panthers second game against the Bucks. It's revealed that Cam has some kind of foot injury but nobody really knows what's going on right. There's a lot of mystery around the injury and all of a sudden campaigns out this fifteen minute youtube video go here we are just record. I want to be brutally honest. The video was him. Basically Chilin in a hat and glasses passes and he's in like this leather black chair and he opens up about his foot injury as I'm about to jog around realize okay. Uh I feel like in the game but it's like something missing. There was a bit bizarre. But it's it. It was good that he came on spoke about it. And try to provide some clarity and in that video basically said got hurt. preseason hurt the foot against the Patriots this is where I got him away because automatically. I got play we go. I can't let fans down. He basically told coaches. Hey I'm good I'm all good. You know I'm Superman. I can continue to play. And then once week two-headed reaggravated the injury. What happened offended with this footage metatarsal bones and they separate from the base of the? That's a list rank injury but if it's a really bad separation or some sort of break then usually need surgery. Cam has not had that yet which pretends everybody to believe. He's got a sprain but a pretty bad one just hasn't healed yet but he doesn't want to have surgery. I'm able to get the time off for me to. He'll get back to one hundred percent then. I have no doubt in my mind everything everything that we won't as a team can still be accomplished. He made clear in the video that they need to go away and get back to what I was. and that's significant anytime. A player says that that means they're out that doesn't mean they're going to rush back to play and so he basically new I think at that point I was GonNa shut it down

Cam Newton MVP CAM Cam Cam Newton NFL Panthers Carolina Panthers Jeremy Fowler Auburn Heinz Field Russell Wilson Espn Carolina Denver League Football Writer Pittsburgh Donovan
Where Does Cam Newton Go From Here?

ESPN Daily

08:31 min | 11 months ago

Where Does Cam Newton Go From Here?

"Jeremy the first line of your story is he can't go out like this. It's kind of crazy to me that that is even being said about Cam. Newton in the first place if you look at the situation with the Carolina Panthers and Cam Newton a the guy that called Superman of former. MVP It's just hard to make sense of it. ESPN NFL writer. Jeremy Fowler has spent the last few weeks reporting on Cam Newton's future going into the season. If you told me Cam Newton would potentially be on the way out of Carolina and there will be this big mess I would not by any stretch have believed you before we get into do the confluence of factors that led us to this moment. Explain why it's so unusual to even be having a conversation like this about a quarterback quarterback like Newton. It is crazy because he changed the game. This is a guy that was bred to be a winner from his days at Auburn he won the national championship number. One overall pick set rookie records for total yards goes on to win and MVP in two thousand fifteen three different seasons of ten or more wins and everything was lined up for this guy to be a top five top ten quarterback for the next fifteen twenty years the lineup. What an improvisational play by Cam? Newton he altered the way. We look at the style of the quarterback quarterback position. Because we've seen running quarterbacks before but this is a guy who's flipping into the end zone quarterback he's making making the superman sign with his arms after scoring and you know he was such an imposing figure that he looked like a combination of a pass rusher linebacker and a running back coming at you full speed and the whole mack truck. That was something that the League really hadn't seen even before my goodness this is the NFL. You're not supposed to be able to do that. And then there was the off field appeal. This is a guy who show up to his press conferences like it was a fashion show. He's got the a bedazzled hats glasses being able to be orally gifted something that I think master to a degree. I I mean this is a guy that we couldn't take is off of whether he was on the field or off it. Do you think his style of football in some some ways impacted his body in a way that led us to this point it has to be a factor. I mean we're talking about a guy who's taken eleven hundred hundred plus hits since two thousand eleven and more than half of those at been in the last four years since around two thousand fifteen. It's more than Russell Wilson. More than any other guy. Things Ziff piled up on them as a result he was all about power shear power that was part of what made him so great. He did bulldoze the open-field he could run for the thirty yards and so just the pounding as a result has clearly affected where he is now so the first few years of camps career sort of builds towards this magical season in two thousand honey fifteen he's the MVP and it all leads up to the Super Bowl and what should have been a high point for him ended up being low one the panthers lose and perhaps unfairly the indelible memory for a lot of people is the fumble. He failed to recover. Do you think that game changed perceptions of him will it stripped him of his invincibility one personnel exact told me the Denver took his Superman Cape. They took it away and he was never the the same after that. And that's probably unfair as it's one game on the biggest stage but you know Denver played them a certain way where they kept hitting them. The seven secs comes out of the hands on the ground and still on the ground picked up by. Jj Line and since then came sense of some really good moments elements. But it's been a little hit or miss even on the field when he is in the lineup and so it was a turning point for a career that was at a wildly high trajectory. At that point you know you're talking about not only MVP season but he could get into the end zone. Whenever he wanted that year? It was just. He played a pretty much flawless season. And then and it also changed after that game so that super bowl is kind of a turning point for Cam than what happened last season in two thousand eighteen last season he was a potential. MVP candidate after the first eight or so weeks. The panthers are sitting at six into Newton. Looks Great Nineteen total touchdowns. You know he's rushing but he's also being patient in the pocket making throws so. This was a team that was on the rise and was sort of Recapturing maybe the magic. They had a couple of years earlier for that Super Super Bowl run so it was nothing but promising at that point an annual in early November. You go to Pittsburgh go to Heinz field. You're thinking this'll be another turning point for your season and then Tj Awa- comes off the blindside. He knocks Cam Newton. He runs right into that right shoulder into the turf he had already been on the injury report with a shoulder injury. They didn't think of a series of that time but watts shot clearly reaggravated things to the point where by the end of the year. He was struggling to throw the ball. Forty forty five yards. It was pretty ugly out there right. I mean he wasn't pulled but I remember. They stopped using him for Hail Marys N. It became apparent that something was deeply wrong saw. I saw that throw by CAM it. It didn't reach the end zone. landed a good fifteen yards short of the goal line. This is a guy that could throw sixty five yards on a rope and so they're taking them out and put Taylor Heinecke of all people to throw a deep ball. I mean you know. There couldn't have been a deeper foreshadow for maybe the problems that were rising with Cam Newton's future all right so he ends up shutting it down for the last two games of that two thousand eighteen season and in the off season as in he has some shoulder surgery but by the time this season starts it seems like he has recovered and things are looking optimistic again for Cham. How does the twenty nine thousand nine season actually begin for him? Throwing the ball. He looked pretty. Tentative no touchdown passes in the first two weeks he didn't really look as comfortable as he normally. Does you that. You can win games with them but certainly not an MVP level that they're used to so after the panthers second game against the Bucks it's revealed that Cam has some kind of foot foot injury but nobody really knows what's going on right. There's a lot of mystery around the injury and then all of a sudden can't puts out this fifteen minute youtube video here. We go here we we are just record. I want to be brutally honest. The video Was Him basically chillan in a hat and glasses. And he's in like this leather black chair. He opens up about his foot injury. As I'm about to jog dog around. I realize I feel like I'm in the game but it's like something. Something's missing bizarre. But it's it was good that he came on spoke about it and try to provide some clarity and in that video he basically said got hurt in the preseason Kurt the foot against the Patriots this is where I got him away because automatically. I thought I got play we. I can't let my fans down. He basically told coaches. Hey I'm good I'm all good. You know I'm Superman I can. I can continue to play and then once we to hit he reaggravated injury injury. What happened is with his foot? Is You have metatarsal bones. And they separate from the base of the FA. That's a list rank injury but if it's a really bad separation or some sort of break than usually need surgery cam has not had that yet which pretends everybody to believe that. He's got a sprain but a pretty really bad one and it just hasn't healed yet but he doesn't want to have surgery if I'm able to get the time all for me to heal and get back to a one hundred percent is it. Then I have no doubt in my mind everything that we won't as a team can still be accomplished. He made clear in the video that I need to go away and get back to what I was. And that's -nificant anytime a player says that that means they're out that doesn't mean they're going to rush back to play and so he basically new I think at that point I was GonNa shut it down

Cam Newton MVP CAM Panthers NFL Jeremy Fowler Carolina Panthers Espn Newton Carolina Russell Wilson Heinz Field Denver FA Writer Football Auburn Jj Line
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:10 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Independent thoughts independent life this is Chad Bentsen still the guys over the weekend I watched and wizard of oz still an amazing movie play is awesome the colors just POP said it's just I need you go when you ever go like wikipedia like what it cost me because like two million dollars to make and it took him like fifteen twenty years to make a dollar on the movie because our first came out it was like critics thought is pretty good there crowds were really into it but then they re released it like ten fifteen years later and it just exploded and then it ended up making money but I mean why do you know what that movie cost to make but now we're looking at movies it costs you know two hundred fifty three million dollars I mean you you look at the they're talking about avatar filming two three at the same time it's gonna be near a billion Bucks since saying but you go look at those old days you know it's like a million dollars for Cleopatra three two three five three twenty four twenty three at seventeen shows your Twitter for minutes we at may love hearing of well you know for each and everyone I love and hate was good this week about the fight with people thanks I I enjoyed is like I like it and I don't like fighting a war is far we have differing opinions sometimes people they just they love their motions to just cold just overboard knowing they start saying things and because there's no real you know repercussions and social media this is not the yellow I didn't scream it's like I've never met you and I never will but I hate you what okay that's weird it is what it is but over the weekend some stuff that happened London terror attack new details surrounding the brave bystanders who helped take down a terrorist in London video showing heroes fighting back one of them even using the tusks of a novel way will they use fire extinguishers used says their determined there wasn't gonna go on it and they did exactly what they had to do hundred seen fleeing the area as the incident unfolded.

Chad Bentsen Cleopatra Twitter London two hundred fifty three millio fifteen twenty years two million dollars ten fifteen years million dollars
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

08:52 min | 1 year ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Trump administration today about technology and how Whoa doesn't understand. Its potential to reshape the economy. Yeah so I can't speak for the White House So I think Alexander Titus was the gentleman who you are referring to spokane Zimbabwe. I Alexander was involved in the bio calm the day and he was also with us during the congressional as well so I can only speak to what we've learned and what we are speaking on and educating legislators and policy-makers around And I will tell you that. This effort has largely been bipartisan. We met with science technology and Space Committee And and the representatives that appeared were equal sides of of of the aisle. Everybody sees this as as a huge focus for For the United States and making sure that we drive this economic development so I can't speak specifically to wear the White House or you know individual congressional leaders stand on the issue. I can say from our experience. We've received very positive feedback including the White House visits but also on the hill as well. I know in two thousand twelve. The Obama Administration had published a national bio comic blueprint. This included a set of strategic investments intended to lay the foundation the nation for a future bio Konami is that roadmap still being used in any way wasn't executed on wasn't successful. Yeah IT'S A. It's a great question and I you know again speaking personally. I was living in Germany at that time so it wasn't. I wasn't too involved in in the creation nations that the documentary that process. I am familiar with it I have reviewed the documents. I will say that it definitely aligns. Too much of the initiatives that that we feel are important important to ensuring that the bio Tommy doesn't forward You know there is current legislation that is under consideration There's a bill. Hr Four three seven. Three which is the Engineering Biology Investment Bill. And so this has been In Committee for an extended period of time and I'm happy to share air that passed out of committee Right before the The recessed now back in session the prior to the recess they pass out of committee and this is one of I legislative priorities. The bottom line is to ensure that. Hr Four three seven three. which is the engineering? Biology Investment Act Get sponsorship and we're looking to really drive have this Into both the House and we've got good one site to support on the house and then finding sponsors in the Senate of driving across the line but again this is a perfect good example of of how we feel. We can be active and really advocating for these types of bills. which really look at? How are we allocating funds and infrastructure picture to support the development of our economy infrastructure being basic science training all the way through to it and computational signs of a shorter required to really orange biology? Maybe you can touch on some of the other policy issues of concern. Are you focused on. Issues of regulation workforce in public investment in our D-. What are the big issues driving the concerns of industry right now? Yeah I mean so many of those things that are important to us so so you know. Regulation is important elements of the industry and you feel that. Proper regulation comes from proper education. So our focus now is really educate h Regulators and policymakers around the opportunity as well as areas where regulation may be required Investment is a huge area that we're looking at and I you know I use similar. We know that. NIH funding has significantly increased over many many years Below we've seen as we've seen a reallocation of funds ends with an age and so on colleges become a huge area funding. And if you look back ten fifteen twenty years ago it was a smaller area. Funding overall financing hasn't changed significantly. We've had ones. We are trying to drive much of that again by autonomy alliance to look at areas where we feel incremental investments or require player and perhaps it can be a real alignment of of internal funds and resources but it's not exclusively through an age you mentioned. Dod Darva Department of Energy Number of entities are actively engaging in creating the Viacom in manufacturing and bringing more through biology but other owners for Russell important as well you know workforce issues is important that we have access to the smartest most driven best trained scientists on the planet. And you want them to you come to the United States and working business established business and want to ensure that those who are here in the United States have a have a line of sites who in education that will enable for them to move into the workforce that is a biological workforce versus perhaps a industrial base workforce. So all of us topics are very important. Join US are there big challenges that need to be addressed through precompetitive issues that need to be solved by public private partners ars. So it's it's it's a great question you know I'll say the have you know we have great examples incredible public private partnerships such as the first genome. Don't project right To sequence I I Hema Jim was was the joints between age and genome sciences and different commercial entities. is in fact when I was on the hill. I kind of preface my comments with me just think about what is the next moonshot project for our vile economy or biological thinkers in the country. You know the the Human Genome Project was one of those moon shots and we've got a lot of others out there that we should think about you. Know from fundamentally a trying to sedate the operating mechanism for biology and understanding what biological components can be put together into organisms to due to drive a new paradigm and manufacturing to really get into understanding Inter Cellular Communication Nation. And how do we look at creating environments of microbes that can communicate with each other respond to stimuli responsive wind. Listen to different response. which may again from a manufacturing process produce a compound or remediate? Something that's happening in the nature So a lot of big challenges could be put on the table and this is one of the kind of I'll say the thought experiments we've done Tommy Lines. What are some of the asset we could go for? And that's what we're working together positioning papers when you think about the biggest barriers to realizing the potential of the opportunities force today what you said they are scientific holocene economic or something else. Yes so so I believe eight largely at scientific at this point and I say that because you know as we've seen scientific innovation and come online we see the economics around that scientific innovation come together quite quickly and we can all that pretty pretty routinely as we look at you know you know go back to the example precision. Helter you know the advent next turner she sequencing sequencing targeted sequencing Really enabled us to lose today. The biology hav driver mutations within tumors which then of course informs which therapies are are prescribed to the individual. I think we're at a similar precedence. Right now and understanding biology from a manufacturing perspective of food due to feed materials perspective. Where you still fundamentally don't understand the rules to biology and I'll say that this is the largest challenge around synthetic biology synthetic biology being a interesting blend in biology and engineering and computational science you know from engineering perspective if you understand hand all the principal components you can build anything and I think when we initially went down the road of synthetic biology thought? Well we'll figure out what the parts are living organism that we can combine those into a new organism and we've learned that biologists complex and we don't really understand those principal components hence we need the new tools to loosening those components. Soon we do. We'll see those economic models fall in line so to your question. I I do believe that way now. The scientific challenge is the largest challenge. which is what we focused on through? The vital COMU- lines and ensuring that funding is flowing to the proper areas of research to enable that elucidation the principal components to enable development of the Diakonie. Jason Ganic Chief Commercial Officer script at a founding member of the bio combines. Is Jason. Thanks so much for your time. Today it was a pleasure. Thank you so much.

United States White House Principal Tommy Lines Alexander Titus Space Committee Jason Ganic Konami Zimbabwe Spokane Germany Obama Administration NIH Inter Cellular Communication N Dod Darva Department Of Energy
Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

The Bio Report

15:57 min | 1 year ago

Shaping the Emerging Bioeconomy

"Jason. Thanks for joining us. It's my pleasure to be here. We're GONNA talk about synthetic biology the emerging bio economy the effort to give voice to industry on policy matters related to it. I think what we talk about biotechnology people still. We'll have a furry narrow view around human therapeutics when we talk about the emerging bio-economy. What does that envision? How significant is the Dan? How far is it extending beyond healthier so this is a really great question that we could probably spend the entire time? He's talking on that one on topic so let me let me try to break it up a bit and make it a little more bite size so the way bats that we think about the bio economy today today is is a very different view than what we will be thinking. Five ten fifteen twenty years down the road as we look at how the economy develops but but fundamentally finally the the concept around the Bio Connie is as we know all all things world have cycles and economic cycles exist as well and there are macro economic cycles such as the industrial revolution which really drove development hardening of industrial processes. All the way from you know the concept of assembly line nine and manufacturing of course the economy continues to transition. We've moved from very much of an industrial economy to a knowledge. It and service based economy that we releasing blossoms through Silicon Valley and of course Kendall Square in Cambridge Massachusetts and very identifiable You know areas where we see. Okay that's that. It knowledge say service continental where we fundamentally believe that the next iteration economy is really going to be powered on biology. Had I'll say that some of the concepts that will throw out here today during our conversation might make your head spin of it because you'll think how does biology really get involved in say transportation Or how does biology get involved in computing or how does biology. Of course we think about biology from a healthcare all care perspective but how does that healthcare view of biology change as as a function of time and I always brings back to one thing I think is interesting about the violence is it. It's real and people will see especially consumers were now starting to see translate to true consumer product. So so you know if I would have told you. Ten years ago that you'll have a protein source that tastes like these can be put on a barbecue and put between two vons on Patty. And you think you're eating beef. You'd would probably laugh at me because they're used to those horrible soy solutions that existed ten years ago whereas like cardboard with a little bit of softness. Well now of course we all hear about impossible burgers and beyond meats and and you know truly plant tasting proteins. That's a great example of how this economy is really going to change and it's going to be very visible able to see everybody in the country and not just the folks who may be involved in say the IT industry where we service a knowledge economy of all so Valerie's incredibly powerful and we know that things we manufacturers today will be manufactured by Washington in the future. And I think you know food. Roddick's is a great example of that with kind of novel foods and beyond beats but you'll see a transition to materials. We hear about Adidas Pudding outs tennis issues. Now that are manufactured from synthetic spider silk. And you're starting to see these fruit. Innovations really accelerate into the commercial markets. Advances isn't synthetic biology are enabling the engineering microorganisms to replacement processes that would previously have been conducted through through chemistry. What's it a case for using biology rather than traditional chemical processes? That's a great question I mean so there's obvious Syria around things like sustainability So many chemical processes require hydrocarbons or require organics to to manage those chemical processes disease and hydrocarbons Gannex largely come from trillium products. And we know that there's a limited duration of accessibility to fossil fuels in Detroit. Him and there's obviously a very vigorous debate on the impact of those compounds and chemicals on the environment and we know that biology has existed for billions of years and has continued need to add to the diversity of life and the ability to harness biology to start manufacturing products that previously were manufactured through chemical processes has as I mentioned before huge Say Environmental Sustainable aspects. There's also economic drivers associated with that as well and I'll use a real world example The there is a strong corpus of knowledge that can have annoyed how long or pubic properties and within cannabinoid Avenue. It's you have to largely active compounds you have. THC which is the compound that makes us feel high when people use marijuana and then their CD which is the compound that people people believe how the majority of the therapeutic properties well to truly enable CD DVD used and research purposes and political purposes isn't eventually therapeutic purposes. It doesn't economically make sense and you can't physically grow enough of the material the crop to having reliable reliable sustainable Say Pharmaceutical quality great product in existence. That has huge thing bill. The issues is a lot of water. A lot of land and It's you know. Obviously like all crops is is accessible to drought and infestation. So the focus now is is to take cbd and take the pathways that express the enzymes that manufacturer CD and explosives in say East. You can then transfer that to a for mentor in your now working on an industrial scale from attention where you can ferments either. CBD as a whole or the enzymes is that are used to create CD in a synthetic process. So you just like you said to sustainability issues. There's this huge economic drivers that really we will will push to biology because we found that biology in many cases is very clean very efficient very economical way to drive manufacturing. Where are we in this effort? What's enabling us to do this way now that we haven't been able to do before well that's a that's a great question question And quite honestly that Is What brought me to the company I work for a company called inscription Scripted we fundamentally believe that biology has unlimited potential to truly improve the human condition. And the reason why we haven't seen the advancements through engineer biology or synthetic biology that we he fundamentally believe the tools are not yet developed a truly exploited the richness of violence and for us at At scripted you know working with our partners who started the bio economy alliance around all other similar view that similar to how we Jim Smart develop from the first team genome sequence to now being able to routine musicals even genomic a day or so on the sequencer that chains that seachange which enable precision medicine. Addison and a lot of the standard of healthcare today. We feel the single invention of that next generation multi parallel sequencer has opened up an entire Tiger area of applications which has fueled a huge industry in precision healthcare and other areas associated. That rely on it you know but read out. We believe conscripted on our partners the bio economy alliance. That's that's saying. Level of innovation is happening now that feeling the bio economy and there are various tools unscripted. We utilize a very powerful thing. You find her to Christopher sue precisely engineer and change the genetic makeup of microbes onto ought to create new fina types that or used to move into bioprocessing manufacturing foods nutrients materials and so on so anyway anyway the the key and as you think about other economic kind of changes in cycles you know the industrialization and the development development of of tools you developments of assembly lines. We moved to the. It and service world is development of the Internet the standards associated with the Internet to be able to transfer information back and forth And again we see this same developments happening now within the world with the next generation generation of tools to allow us to truly explore biology as you understand. Biology is incredibly complex. You know we are just starting to scratched the surface of for knowledge and understanding biology and the next generation of tools. Such as what we're bringing forward and swift does is we firmly believe one of those inflection points to enable bowl biology driver commie. Let's talk about the Bio Comedy Alliance. How who makes it up? What is it and what's it aiming to do? Oh yeah that's a question for the economy in Lyons is is a new entity As a matter of fact we're actually going through the work right now to establish five. Oh one three C I to actually set up a a true nonprofit that we can then use to engage policymakers regulators. Legislators and help understood help educate them and understand the power of violence and how the economy is if you transition so you know. This started about a year ago when John Covers. WHO's the CEO? Syn Bio Veda. Syn Bio Veda is a a trade group batches. Moving John over the years is a tremendous job of bringing together. The mobile fought meters and synthetic biology and through discussions. I had with John. I said you know we need to move beyond a conference and move to be an advocacy group and we need to make sure that we educate the people who are making decisions that impact economic developments and decisions around how we're spending spending funding from basic science research perspective. You know what are the infrastructure issues that will intact dullness violent comedy. So through a couple of months of conversation We solidified around the concept of for me the Bio Konami alliance and it's now Has small group of love of initial Organizations joins including RIPTA twist biosciences Gingko by works perfectly lights And we've we've come together really with a common view that education in policy are going to be critically the importance who are industry but also very important to the development of the economy and so As I said the group was formed about a month ago and we're going through the process. Awesome Sabrina Paperwork together. Although in that short month we've had some great engagements including the invites the White House. They're one's a events about two weeks ago at the White House where they're trying understand the power via academy and that was followed the next day by discussions with specific congressional leaders and their staff not educate them on on the bio. Tommy let me and I'll say something for me personally that was so say reassuring and encouraging about this process is you know. The bio comedy is a non partisan issue. You know we spoke to folks who represented the left side of the aisle and we spoke to folks that represented the right side of the aisle and this is a unifying message we understand. I'm from the United States to maintain global competitive advantage. We need to transition technology and we saw again with industrial revolution. Two Services on T.. And now we know that biology is going to the next driver. So how do we do your comedy to succeed in. Biology is the main driver the other elements elements about the bio economy. That is truly a unifying element is that this is an economic opportunity that can benefit the entire country. You know as we saw the industrial revolution. Certainly benefited the entire contract. Factories going up from Boston to Los Angeles but we did see when we had to transition the the economic drivers in the country from knowledge and service based business or economy rather that it didn't necessarily represent the entire United States. Let's we certainly saw centers of excellence pop up on the cups and that economy largely I mean of course. It benefited the United States but in largely benefited certain regions of the United States. And we now see this with large economic disparity between different regions in the country. Biology has the opportunity to be that that say fair equity across the country. Is We think about how biology moves the manufacturing the ability this up large manufacturing Russillo in the midwest where we haven't traditionally seen it and service industries. Pop up too much is a unifying message so when we were in. DC Our message assiduous well received because it is a message that isn't partisan as a message about US economic security about US leadership In what we need you to do to ensure that likely led the world in the last kind of economic term with it knowledge and service. Based how do we lead that charge large from a biology perspective the biotechnology innovation organization as long included industrial and agricultural biotechnology gene. Its purview along with healthcare. Why the need for another entity presence on the policy front with biotechnology agenda hat? Will Your work differ. Yeah it's actually it's a it's a great question and you know it's it's interesting because Sitting on our border directors at inscriptions Roger Weitz Roger also sits on the board of directors. The Bio. And I've actually engaged with Roger quite a bit around the topic of of you know what is the by line's going to drive. That's perhaps that's different than what bio does and so I will say service is a great organization. It's a large organization represents a lot of voices and for us as a nascent recent industry. That's really driving. You know. Synthetic biology or engineer biology. The focus of bio is so large involved that we need a specialty voice. Because we feel that this next iteration in science is going to have significant economic impact. And there's a different investment thesis that's required for that to manifest become reality so actually you bio as a complement to what we are doing We support bios positions uh-huh matter of fact they submitted a paper today and support of An Office of Technology and science Proposal we also support that to the Bio communites. There's many areas where we work together. But there's some very focused areas that we have more more Desire to drive more decisions And Bio as larger entity has other priorities. That may not completely ally but they're complementary to where we WANNA go so we both organizations operating really in common with each other. You mentioned the meeting at the White House. Summit on America's by accommodate. I know the Department of Defense. The Department of Energy have long been engaged in funding working working biotechnology. But I was surprised during symbolic Beta when there was a representative of the Office of Science and Technology Policy addressing addressing the conference who was trying to make the case for biotechnology but basically saying it was not a top priority of

United States White House Engineer John Covers Bio Comedy Alliance Roger Weitz Roger An Office Of Technology And Sc Massachusetts Silicon Valley DAN Jason. Department Of Energy Kendall Square Tennis Office Of Science And Technolo Konami Patty Marijuana
4 'Extremely Dangerous' Inmates Escape From Ohio Jail After Overpowering Guards

Bill Cunningham

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

4 'Extremely Dangerous' Inmates Escape From Ohio Jail After Overpowering Guards

"A search continues in Ohio four four men who escaped from the galley a county jail the sheriff's department says the inmates were over power over power to female corrections officers using a hand made weapon and then forced open secure door share of Matt Champlin says the facility is not up to the latest security and safety standards problem that's existed for at least the last fifteen twenty years he says the department's been working on upgrades and improvements the sheriff in the meantime says this was the second time the matter of weeks at one of the inmates was able to escape the escapees he said should be considered armed and extremely dangerous

Matt Champlin Ohio Fifteen Twenty Years
Searching For a Lost Maya City

Science Magazine Podcast

14:33 min | 1 year ago

Searching For a Lost Maya City

"We have contributing correspondent lizzie wade and she went on a hunt for a lost city high lizzy hazara. Can you talk a little bit about your journey of course so we met up in a city called kami thanh in campus and then we drove about seven hours to part of the mexican guatemala border order. That's a little corner that we were staying at this eco lodge. We had guides from that eco lodge who took us into the reserve montessori so we went up i in a motorboat for a few hours when we set up a base camp but basically from there we were kayaking and hiking in the jungle and it was extraordinarily difficult. If there is no trails carved the guides would michetti through through the jungle but everything has fines. Everything is so different from each other. There's so much information and all the plants are so yeah heterogeneous and there's just like so much stuff around you that it's hard to even interpret individual things who is very easy to grab onto a tree that was covered in spines and not really even realize until your hand was also covered in spines they had to cut every out of the way every step i've been in some pretty remote places before but never a place where humans really hadn't been for for decades or potentially centuries and that was very very hard and it felt like the environment was just pushing us pushing pushing us out you know and making it impossible in the rivers were also completely covered in in brush and had to be the machete from the kayaks and late. It was really intense okay. Should i spoil it. Say whether or not you found missing city yeah i mean i think it's hard to talk about it. If we don't say what happened yes so spoilers. You did not find a long last jedi. Wha- what were you looking for. I went to chapas mexico wisdom archaeologist gal just who were looking for a city called sock belong which was the capital of the condone my there's two groups named <unk> condone one one exists today and one is pre columbian maya group when we were looking for this previous maya groups last capital sok-bom means the white jaguar and the lacandon built it basically to hide from spanish invaders which say successfully did for over over two hundred years. Wow what what's the timeline here and i guess i should ask. What century are we him. Yes so the spanish i come to mexico coach central mexico in the early fifteen twenties so to not mind which is now mexico city the aztec capital falls in fifteen twenty one and that's a pretty straightforward holmquest story aztecs were an empire the spanish also empire or wanted to be so they over that all that outland but when you get to the maya world. It's really really different because there's not really a centralized control. Every city is independent of each other and they're all in this elaborate web of allies and enemies. This finished can't come in conquer one city like <unk> or whatever and then everything passes is to them. They have to do it one at a time getting back to this missing city sock belong the lack unknown live there but they didn't always live there. They actually remove their city to this harder define location yeah though i condone lived on this island in lake miramar which is also a a were attacked by the spanish at least once. Maybe a couple of times. I can't quite remember and they had held out but they knew they weren't going to be able to do that forever. So preemptively the late fifteen hundreds they pack up move really deep into the jungle and built this other city called soccer mom but eventually cycle was taken by <hes> the spanish. Can you talk about how that happened by this point. It's the sixteen ninety s the english colonies in the u._s. Are firmly established at this point. I think harvard university has has been founded. This is very much the world we live in now most of the quote unquote conquest that are going on right now are not huge military invasions asians. It's more proselytizing so these two priests are like we have to convert the people of south <unk> devoted to the idea they hire these local maya ed guides who lead them around in circles for five months without them realizing it because the local mayor are so scared of sock belong like the people insect belong have been rating other my <hes> months and months go by of them just like walking around in circles and then finally they realized some things going on and they hired the leader of another local niagara and we don't really know what his motivation was but if you think of the condone being scary and potentially having attacked this town. This guy may have been like whatever ver- enough with this he takes a spanish. They're it's mostly diplomatic. They're not immediately killed. As previous spanish visitors were they convince serve a retinue of the lacombe leaders to come with them to sit in guatemala for more diplomacy basically but on the way they are on the way back almost all <unk> die get sick and die and it sort of clap says and there's not like a big battle this vantage descend on this town of a couple left one hundred thousand of their soldiers and their allied mike holders cycle. I'm gives really easily at that point and then it is is a spanish town for another fifteen twenty years and then everyone is relocated to closer to the pacific coast of water malla which was part of the the spanish colonial policy of it's called reducing might communities so murray by out of where they've always lived in make them live in his new communities where they easier easier control was surprises me then after all of those events is that the location of sack llamas not known yeah. No it surprised me too because it is done some spanish maps. I mean these are like seventeen hundred maps or not satellite abs- you know it was connected to the spanish world for a while but only only for pretty short time so they didn't really have a huge investment in the place when they move people out the jungle stays the jungle like there's not a huge amount of clear cutting so today the location of sucked plum is within this national park in mexico monsoon ways and it's considered an extremely extremely remote part of mexico. There are no trails no roads. Nobody's allowed to live there while you went with a group of archaeologists to try and visit this lost city what what made them think that they could find it and be what would they get out of finding it despite them existing for overlapping with the spanish colonial state for a couple of centuries. There's really no information about what it was like to live in sok-bom or any of the other independent my capitals that existed existed around this time sochua wasn't the only one was but it was the second to last two to be conquered. They wanna know who they were trading with. How connected they were to the outside world. How not connected they were headed they do this. How did they live in such isolation for so long so the reason they thought they could find it is or the method breath <unk>. They used was looking at the spanish documents from the time. After sokolow had been conquered. 'em spanish visitors would go and then they would go other places they would record their roots and how long it took them to travel to different landmarks lakes or rivers or another town's so you can construct a possible zabul arc of locations of the city and basically we were trying to get as close to that as possible so you have your starting point and then they ceo we traveled for seven days you know about how far they went in a circle exactly he's going to be on size herbal and not the other like you can make some inferences and they didn't record it in kilometers or anything that ban measure of distance we would use so you'd have to estimate how far they could walk in a day and it's quite fuzzy but it's a starting point you do have a description of what the spanish a how described cycle on when they arrived yeah it is about a hundred houses which primative adobe so they will not have survived until now there were three community buildings not quite temples but like city halls and those would have had stone foundations and that's what the archaeologists are interested in finding the region today is known for scarlet macaws the sort of iconic red parrots and apparently condone had semi domesticated them in every day at five p._m. They would fly out of the forest land on all the houses and the spanish. I thought that was amazing and so do i do feel like you were able to keep the same pace as the people who had traveled to suck palumbo for you know when you're looking at a previous trips yeah. It's hard to say i mean we weren't hearing oliver stuff. They would have been like did set up base camps. They probably would have been wearing stuff that was really tough to walk around and you know like lots of wool and potentially metal. This is not easy for them either. That was one of the major her things. I was thinking about in the jungle. I don't really care about the spanish confuses blake we i think we pay far too much attention to their experience in history because they're the ones who who got to write it but i was really taken aback by how similar are experience would have been there because of course a lot. Condone knew what they were doing and like we it ends so we we have we were much more similar to the spanish and i felt like if you have a city a few hundred people hiding out in the jungle against a globalizing belies ing empire like it's only a matter of time until they will be found and incorporated into that empire came away thinking that that really wasn't true at all. Oh it was so hard to do this that the conquest of cyclamen basically every other place in the americas was basically the historical accident and a fluke luke. The conquistadors had to rely on locals to help them find the city. Do you think that that's something that the archaeologists are gonna pursue while help was doc vital for the spanish and vital for y'all just now the ones sort of discovery quote unquote that they were able to make on this trip was the classic period read my it ruins which is a thousand years before sock bolom would have been founded but this town in the region knew about some ruins in this little patrick forest that they protect the reserve and they took the archaeologist they are in. It was really amazing. I mean i've seen a lot of unexcavated archeological sites in this was really special one and they never would have known it was there of the local people hadn't been willing to trust them and and tell them about it was tackle on the hard part is that nobody lives in monte. Sicily's there are people who go in there like their firefighters who might know the reserve. There are people who have lived there as refugees like from the guatemalan civil war are a lot of people took refuge there. There are people who know montezuma's ways a little bit better than average person in chapas but because has nobody lives in it. It's just so hard to find those people in it so hard to find the help that you really need to be able to do efficient archaeology. Let's say how far did you travel in all of this. I think we kayaked ninety kilometers in four days. This is a round trip so we went up river forty five kilometers that was already from the base camp. I think a lot of kayaking on in my life the walking was it was really shocking. How slow the walking. It was about a kilometer an hour which you know if i'm walking in a city i go ten minutes. You know the walking. I think it was like eight kilometers things hype it was it was it was not very long but it felt like we climbed mount everest. A lot of archaeology is don don with lighter these days using radar from planes to find hidden structures. Would that be helpful here in this area. It could potentially work. I think it it'd be really great to do it over months away. I know the archaeologist would love to do that to national geographic funded this huge light our survey of a very similar place in guatemala all and it revealed tens of thousands of of structures that archaeologists didn't know about the thing about lighter is that it's pretty expensive <hes> and it takes a lot of coordination and also when you do light. Are you still have to go out to the potential site and see it so it doesn't totally save you from the explorer our jungle adventure that we that we had one of these archaeologists going to do next. Are they going to go back. They are going to go back which i found a little bit mind boggling wing but they're really committed to exploring this area of chapas <unk> swiss and what stood was a give them some information about how how fast the spanish could travel like. Maybe it was a little slower than we thought. Maybe dot com is closer to these landmarks. If you have to go so slow a lot of the information on the satellite maps about the exact routes of the rivers turned out not to be totally right so it made making a more accurate map much easier and i think the most important thing it did probably was bringing these archaeologist in closer contact with the communities down there both the communities who who live in the towns and the guides themselves who know the reserve very well it takes a lot of work to to build a kind of trust you need to have people both agreed to show you what they know especially since archaeology in mexico as in so many places is often connected to the state and official narratives of off the country and potentially land expropriation and things like that people can be very wary of archaeologists for pretty good historical reasons yeah yea so you know you really have to spend a lot of time. They're showing them that you care about these places and you care about the current people's connection to those places in you're going to respect. That's

Mexico Chapas Guatemala Lizzie Wade Kami Thanh Harvard University Soccer Lake Miramar Lacombe Adobe Sicily Water Malla Mount Everest Sok-Bom Sokolow Palumbo
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Right there if you pay your bills on time and keep the utilization low menu gonna killer score item number three in the make up of fight go score fifteen percent of your score is based on the length of history how old are these accounts that you have how long have you had credit old accounts are really valuable people call and say well I'm going to cancel this card I'm gonna do this from a cancel that and and I always think you know someone comes to me in the good cards you know fifteen twenty years old I got a buddy a neighbor of mine who has had the same credit card for like twenty nine years twenty nine years you know what that does to your credit score when you've got a good pay account for that length of time huge just got credit by the way runs you know eight thirty to eight forty five or something like that is just you know top one percent but thirty years or credit card that's fifteen percent your credit history I mean fifteen percent of your grade with geico ten percent of your credit score your flight scores made up of new credit inquiry right that can kind of hurt you if there's too much of it and the last item number five in the make up your ficus for ten percent of your scores made up by the type of active credit the era a lot of people that have you know maybe they have a car maybe they have a home but they don't have any other debt they don't carry credit card the you know subscribe to this Dave Ramsey mentality of I only credit well if you don't have a good mix of credit that her to score if you just have or someone that has nothing on your report but installment loans a car or a home and you don't Kerry credit card debt or anything like that tell her you score it's one of the reasons your score is not going to be up as high as it should be because you don't have that makes have something of some sort I don't care if you use a credit card or not use it once a month to pay it use it instead of using cash but tell me what their accumulate credit card debt I am telling you mix of credit is critical get out there and get a car if you don't have one in use it just sparingly that's all it's a really easy to get started with us if you want help all you have to do is pick up the phone and call us for Texas easy to reach.

Dave Ramsey Kerry Texas fifteen percent twenty nine years ten percent fifteen twenty years thirty years one percent
Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

Science Magazine Podcast

11:17 min | 1 year ago

Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

"We have Andrew Curry. He's a journalist based in Berlin and this week he wrote on inherited trauma. I Andrew Okay so this is about be genetics. It's been around a long time but it's kind of morphing in its definition. Can you give us the latest on that different. People mean different things when they talk about epigenetics with the the basic concept is there are ways in which organisms inherit traits that are maybe not genetic so we have DNA the strict genetic code but increasingly scientists are finding other ways in which traits are passed down through generations and they're trying to figure out what the exact mechanisms are and some organisms. It's really easy and the more complicated the organism that trickier it is figure out how these things are passed on outside of the genetic code <hes> so for example some of the EPA genetic mechanisms might involve modifications to DNA or it might be a different set of molecules altogether that are being inherited through the cells that make up the offspring yes so so it's all modifications a two D. N. A. in the thorough lots of different kinds of proteins in the cell that help when the D._n._a. is telling the cell what proteins to make how to develop and their different ways that these small proteins can signal signal the cell to read more or less off of the genetic code or can turn off gene so to speak so that certain traits aren't passed on or certain traits are passed on in amplified ways. You know it's not something that's in the the D._N._A.. itself it's more things that affect how the cell reads the D._N._A.. Right at the very moment that the cell I divides now that's one of millions of subsequent divisions. If you have a tiny impact after the very beginning right it can have a massive consequence down the loan. Let's talk about when epigenetics this different form of inheritance. I got linked to the idea of trauma. What are some of the early examples of those lakes people started looking at how the environment chain diet exposure to extreme colds or exposure to high level of chemicals could affect what was inherited and then probably about fifteen twenty years ago some researchers? Started looking or noticing other effects during experiments and one researcher in particular who I spoke with Isabelle Swing. She's at the University of Zurich and E.. T. H.. Eric created a mouse model because she wanted to study borderline personality personality disorder and so she was traumatizing baby mice by separating them from their mother at unpredictable intervals and then she noticed that the offspring of those baby mice often hadn't same behavioral symptoms of trauma that the parents Prince two and sometimes those behavioral symptoms went on for several generations. The idea here is that it's not just physical deprivation of food or exposure to a lot of coal. It's there's something about the psychology or you know emotional states of the the mice that are being passed down the ideas that the stress of trauma the stress of being separated from from your parents the stress of traumatic childhood you could be with your parents. Your parents could be neglectful. Those levels of stress caused chemical changes in your body that then affect how your d._n._A. is encoded and that those changes can be so powerful. They're passed on even to your offspring that didn't directly experience trauma right so this this researcher that you mentioned she has looked at this for generations and generations of mice she does some experiments where she's gone out five generations and she still sees behavior in the offspring of traumatize mice that she doesn't see see in control mice and that's even when she does the separation but then like the children are the children of the children have been exposed to separation from a parent. This is kind of the crux of the the question that's that was a challenge challenge for her in terms of the experimental design and it's been one of the main criticisms when people look at humans is really hard to separate what is EPA genetic trauma what is sort of biologically transmitted and what is just the stress yes of living with a parent that has been traumatised because your parents are that are part of your environment so these kids environmental effects exactly so how she the way she controlled for that is she only studied the mail so she would traumatize is male mice and then breed them with females but take the males out but the females the mothers of the subsequent generations hadn't been traumatized so there was no bad parenting so to speak and yet she still found differences teams in the mouth behavior so this is all behaviors you can you know judge based on that that something is being inherited but the biological mechanism is is still is still pretty far away from being understood in mice and in other organisms they've also so found changes in sperm and blood and other tissues of things called small non coding Arnaiz which are these things that help the body re- D._N._A.. And this small all non coding are in a in a traumatized mouse or David looked at traumatize. People is different in specific ways than in non traumatize people okay so there is some and those those are passed down subsequent generations yet outing sees changes in the Arnaiz later as well. The big question is how does it get from for example the blood of the parent to the sperm of the child and later than to the brain of child let alone. Alone the child's child that sort of that whole middle bit is what is still really unclear. Let's turn to the human here for a minute. One of the first places this was talked about was with respect to the Holocaust so can you talk about what what the research has shown with respect to Holocaust survivors a few years ago a researcher named Rachel Yehuda looked at the children of Holocaust survivors and found that they had higher levels of depression but also lower levels of specific stress hormones and different kinds of EPA genetic markers called D._N._a.. methylation than people whose parents had been born in the U._S.. <hes> from sort of similar ages in cohorts and argued that this could be evidence of EPA genetic trauma but that study was criticized at the time for the reasons that that I mentioned earlier you know a lot of people said well. It makes sense intuitively that if your parents survived the Holocaust they might behave differently at home that might be stressful in a different way and so that is solid enough evidence of this biological mechanism that they found in mice. There is an ongoing project that you talked about with <hes> children in an orphanage. How are they looking at that situation and asking questions about EPI genetic inheritance? It's really hard in humans to do ethical L. experiments over multiple generations so basically what they're doing right now is looking at humans who have been traumatized to see if they have changes in these EPA genetic marks and then using those to design mouse studies to understand how that might be carried across multiple generations and in the Pakistan example. This is now orphanage. This is the orphanage in Pakistan so a researcher WHO's part of Isabel Might Matsui's lab is working with orphans in Pakistan whose fathers have died and they were forcibly separated from their mothers because their mothers weren't able to earn enough money to support them and they're put in orphanages which they argue is fairly close to their mouse model that had how they're separated from the mother as children and they see different levels of these are in these kids blood and they're using those kids as sort of a starting point to then design better mouse experiments to understand how that it might be transmitted through different generations but to do a human experiment you would have to look at those kids kids and follow refer multiple generations and so for a whole range of reasons. It's extremely difficult coulter controlled intervention experiments in humans right. We should point out that the children in the orphanage are there's an intention from the people taking care of them to make sure that they're not traumatized. Yeah I mean this is a situation. The already happened this was not they didn't separate them from their mothers for the purpose of the experiment of course and they're being given great care they go to the same schools. This is actually another interesting part of the experiment they go to the same schools as local kids. It's who still live with their parents so they're also looking at the local kids who still live with their parents to see if there are differences and it's voluntary. These kids get good care New York's fridges by there still something about this experience that they. I went through that is really difficult seems to have biological backs. I WanNa ask you what it means what we should do about it but I feel that the really big question you know it's it's a great question. <hes> <hes> I think one of the most hopeful things to come out of the story for me was again something that seems sort of intuitive but has been lost a lot in the discussion of epigenetics because I think a lot of people here this idea that Oh my my grandparents parents were traumatized and therefore have this unavoidable legacy of pain right but there have been some early experiments again in mice where if you intervene with basically sort of happy cages they call them enriched environments governments. You can reverse this biological process. Yeah we actually had I think we had a segment on happiness in in mice and rats and how giving them things to do and making them comfortable in their environment can yeah it can change the way experiments turn out yeah and so one of the arguments that several the researchers made is rather than looking at this as a sort of a stigma and a mark we should maybe you know if we can identify by these things use them to identify people who will benefit from therapy or maybe we should just this is where it's sort of intuitive. Maybe we should just give all children in which are yeah and that this is not <hes> an unavoidable burden but something that we can look at as reversible and that we should be looking at it as reversible not something that we should be working towards. Thank you so much Andrew Thank you Andrew. Curry is a journalist based in Berlin Orlando. You can find a link to his future at science mag dot org slash

EPA Researcher Andrew Curry Pakistan Berlin Behavioral Symptoms University Of Zurich Colds Arnaiz Isabelle Swing Eric David N. A. Berlin Orlando Coulter New York Rachel Yehuda Isabel Matsui Fifteen Twenty Years
Mental Health Month - Raising Mental Health Awareness

Living Healthy Podcast

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Mental Health Month - Raising Mental Health Awareness

"In every five adults in the US experiencing a mental health condition in a given year. We definitely want to talk about some of the ways that we can help de stigmatize mental illness and help people get treatment. But before we do that. We kinda wanna know can you give us a recap of what mental illness what it means to have a mental illness. I mean, I think thinking about it in terms of mental health in general, mental health is just a state of being which takes into account, our cognitive, psychological and emotional health, and there's various forces that work toward that and taking all of those into account or what we think about when we consider mental. Okay. And you know, what we we had that conversation about six months ago for mental illness awareness week. We did a little campaign on social media. And I wanted to share some of the responses that we got from that because we got some really positive interaction with our community. And the question that we kind of pose to people was is working out part of your therapy. And these were some of the responses without a doubt. Yes, it is. I used to be so depressed and take medication. But I started releasing all my stress when I started going to the gym, absolutely true. More people should try it. Yes. The best decompression ever. We also had some other people say, yes, the it's the greatest therapy. I've found outside of the therapist chair. I've also found a few mazing souls over the past few years and have shared who have shared with me some of their darkest moments in an absolute delight to see when I walk in the doors, a simple genuine, high with a smile from the staff members can turn your day around to thank you. Another person said, I just signed up. And if it does what a few people have said here already, I can't wait to begin. When I started working out. I not only gain physical strength. But which also occurred my chronic anxiety. I became more confident and my social anxiety. No longer bothered me. My personal training has been one of the best coping mechanisms Frank Ziobro. Thank you L af. So this just kind of highlighted to us that this is really a big deal to people, and it's kind of a bigger topic. And it's starting to gain notoriety now as well in the media. So can you kind of talk about what you think why you think mental health is becoming so mainstream. I guess to put it that way. Well, I think that we are able to tap into other people more easily now, and that's happening. With social media that's happening with into just the internet in general being able to read newspapers from around the world have different topics at your doorstep that you probably couldn't ten fifteen twenty years ago. So I think we're more knowledgeable of what's going on around us. And then if we just look at domestically here in the United States, what's happened over the last let's say eight to ten years, we have more people insured than ever. And when you have people that are insured. They're going to seek out care, and that care sure, it's going to be some of it physical a lot of it is also going to be emotional and behavioral health care. And when we have that we have more interest driving mental health topics, which I love, and I'm glad to see because I think it's something that, you know, people struggle with reaching out. And I'm glad that you hear all these big names talking about it. Whether it be on, Twitter or various different platforms. Right. I think. Yeah. So in a big component of that is kind of I guess like you said when you're connecting with more people, maybe you develop a little bit more. Empathy for that. But I kinda wanted to talk about that because mental illness. It's so we talked about in our last episode. It's so internalized like you can't really necessarily see if someone is injured mentally so to speak. So it might be hard for everyone. Especially those that don't have a mental illness to kind of empathize with those people that do suffer from it. So how can we of bridge? This empathy gap between those that suffer and those that don't I mean, that's a very important question. I'm glad you brought it up. I think first off is like with most interactions with any human being don't try and fix. We get into a really tough space when we're trying to fix people. No, it's being sad. And being okay are not incompatible. When you when you know that someone you work with or lives in your dorm, whatever it might be is dealing with depression or anxiety. Doesn't mean that they can't have normal conversation with you. So I think that you we should speak as if they belong in the group not met they need to be treated differently or that we have to count for this in some fashion where it would make it very hard for us to be ourselves. I think they want you to be yourself. You wanna be herself? Right. The only way really know how to be. And so that empathy can really come through. If we see it as I don't need to fix the situation. I don't need to change anything. I just need to be who I am. And let this person be who they are are there specific ways, you can engage with someone though that you think suffers from mental illness or like you're saying kind of be yourself. But if if you see some I think. Maybe it's hard for people to see someone struggling with something. And not do something about it. You know what I mean? So how do you kind of judge that or no absolutely so listening? I think listening is the best way hear their story understand seek I understand and you know, reserve judgment. It's really hard for us. Right. We want to judge right from the beginning. Not just people but scenario situations anything going on because it's easier for us as allows us to move forward to do whatever we were thinking of doing anyway. Right. But if we can really reserve judgment at helps to understand and really allow that person to feel like they were heard, which is probably all they really want out of that interaction. Anyways. Right. Yeah. I've I've kind of found that if you can ask the simple question. Why do you feel that way? A lot of times I've seen that kind of had success where it's like you aren't trying to fix them. But you're asking why do you think you feel that way? And then that just opens the door for them to express themselves further, and it sounds like that's what you're saying is kind of the most helpful. Just letting someone express themselves seeking I understand is such a big part of this. And it's something that we don't always naturally do. They may not be our first impulse. Not unlike having a friend who's going through a break up or a friend who's a new parent. Maybe maybe you've had two kids. Maybe you've had four breakup doesn't mean that whatever worked for you is going to work for them. And doesn't mean that in the ninety seconds univac with them at the gym. They want you to fix that issue. It's so true. Why I wonder why we all or maybe it's just the guys I know guys fixers, but why why wonder why we naturally do want to try and do that in that ninety seconds. Because it's so it's so rational with like, no, you're not going to do it. That's not what's necessary. Everyone's situation's different. But yet we still somehow feel compelled and I wonder I wonder if it's just honestly this is gonna go way off. But I wonder if it's just trying to control the chaos of the universe. Maybe to hear from you. Can't is welcome to the show two guys. Well, I actually have a few. Questions for Dr Doshi myself kind of switching topics here a little bit. I wanna talk about the effects of mental illness. Exactly how does mood and emotions. How do they correlate mental health? So right. We were all born with a range of emotions, and we're allowed to have them. I don't think anyone is going to care dry someone based on just emotions at the experience. Now when it becomes an issue is when there's a functional concern. So if you're experiencing everyone has sadness, everyone has excitement everyone has Zayed's, you know, but if it's a predominant force in your life, and it stopping you from doing things that you would normally want to do like going to school going to the gym interacting with family, whatever it might be. That's when we step in and say, hey, maybe there's something that we can do here to alleviate this pain that you experience it is that like would one of the tale signs. This is just an example. But like you just wanna lay in bed all day. You don't even wanna get out to face the world. Is that kind of maybe a sign like, oh, this is something that's impacting the function of your life. Right. And you know, I think some of us, you know, having a day where we lay in bed and don't interact with anything in the environment. Could actually be helpful for us one day, you know? But if you notice that wait a second, it's Wednesday. I was supposed to go to war. Work. I'll supposed to meet my brother for lunch out supposed to go to the gym at six, and I didn't do any of that. And I don't feel good about that. I think that's a whole 'nother level, and that makes sense. How much does your environment affect your mental? You know, can the music you listen to have an affect on your mood. Absolutely. I mean, I think places like here places like the gym where there's, you know, fast music pumping gets your heart rate up that allows you to kind of move to the beat and get going. I think that is it's all designed to certain way. Right. And it makes sense because I think mood can be affected especially in the short term by music. I hesitate to say that it's going to have this long-term effects. You know, the whole we all hear about, you know, play Mozart to a little baby. And he'll grow up to edginess. I don't know how much truth there is to that. Exactly. But you know, if you go to a nice restaurant, you probably going to hear some light classical music from peon on what they're trying to advertise uses, you know, relax Asian. It's all part of the experience. And I do think that our mood is affected by that. And I do think that we can feel calm listening to certain types of music. Now, I, you know, I don't think everyone needs to listen to classical music to feel calm. I think that if you know listening to the Hamilton mix tape gets you going, I think that's great. I think that's wonderful. Totally it's going to be different for everyone. But I think it's more in the moment mood changes rather than super long

United States Twitter Frank Ziobro Mozart Dr Doshi Zayed Ninety Seconds Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Six Months Ten Years One Day
'I'm fighting through it': Alex Trebek discusses cancer battle

News, Traffic and Weather

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

'I'm fighting through it': Alex Trebek discusses cancer battle

"For what it's worth, I'm Sherry Preston. It's been a month since we've heard from jeopardy host Alex trebek's about his battle with pancreatic cancer. But he's opened up GM host Robin Roberts telling her. He's heard from fans who survived ten fifteen twenty years with it for him. It's not been that long. I am now a thirty day cancer survivor says he's encouraged by the strides made in pancreatic cancer research, and he's becoming us to the regimen of chemo somewhat. I'm used to dealing with pain. But what I'm not used to dealing with is the surges that come on suddenly of Jeep gave sadness, and it brings tears to my trebek's says he feels week after his treatments, but he's positive about the future my platelets. My blood counts are steady my weight of steady. The numbers that indicate the cancer the cancer indicators those are coming down taping for jeopardy's now on a break for the summer for jeopardy. Finol James halts sour travek. Says he has no weaknesses for what

Pancreatic Cancer Cancer Sherry Preston Alex Trebek Robin Roberts GM Finol James Chemo Ten Fifteen Twenty Years Thirty Day
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Q95

Q95

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Q95

"Of that song is that was a camp song when I was a kid really fifteen twenty years ago. Two billion hits apparently on YouTube, so dumb guess the toy that is associated with that is now big sellers. So the. So the snails snorting snails seals. Yeah. Checking off never snorter deal. Oh, really? I prefer my ideal smoked. That's the thing smoke deal. That was the most productive thing ever since high anybody ever heard. Again, that was genuine silence on her herring. You could actually hear is trying to figure out the joke. I've heard a smoke. Smoked eel. Shorted he'll before. He'll smoked. I was I was sitting here with some kind of boulder reference to some kind of oral romantic activities smoke. Maybe I deserve the doc in murder. They look. Homerun is nothing there, man. There's no walk like an Egyptian there. That's for. Sure. Now that you got that right. Have you ever blow a seal? No. But I suck the never. Tired you? I'm sorry Kristie. Let's move on. Do you have any woman who very publicly if you'll recall married, the three hundred year old ghost the Haitian pirates? Everybody's having a baby. Have split up. Check you. Twenty six year old Amanda Teague, married. The ghost of a pirate called Jack in a ceremony that took place in international waters earlier, this doesn't exist. Why did she have to do it in international waters? Nobody else. Yes. Oh, I see. So he wouldn't get arrested. They're going to arrest a ghost. She recently wrote on social media that the marriage is over. Pig said, quote, I will explain in all due course. But for now, all I want to say, it is very is be very careful when dabbling in spirituality, it's not something to mess with. Sure, of course, by the way, the split is another blow for pirate Jack after he was purportedly executed for thieving on the high seas back in the seventeen hundreds man pirates of the Caribbean ban. Amanda, previously told the Irish post how she spent four thousand pounds, which is what like eight thousand dollars to look like captain, Jack. Sparrow, Johnny Depp's character in the movie, they're getting divorced. She says they split up. She doesn't say the word. Maybe it's paraded trial separation. Yeah. She get half of his balloon generes. Nothing nothing. Yeah. Well, you keep the parrot. I get my peg leg. I mean, what ridiculous sad. It's real sad. It was really helping those kids with mental health and that anyone would care about us. The most. Lunatic. She might just be heartbroken. And if she's a lunatic. Maybe she needs help Tom rather not help her ever walk the plank. Stop taking up space on earth. Did you read about the wedding now? Well, served smoke deal there. They serve corn. Yeah. But it was like it was like they had you had to pay was a buck near..

Jack Amanda Teague YouTube murder Kristie Tom Pig Johnny Depp Sparrow eight thousand dollars fifteen twenty years four thousand pounds three hundred year Twenty six year
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The next ten fifteen twenty years, just because it's not really an economic possibility right now, the group wants to offer more affordable housing options in west campus, and along with that Harare says they want the city to invest more money into roads and lighting improvements. In a better standard of living overall because they want it that he's dumb dumb ass. Kids calling on the government to make their life better move to a cheaper town. Yeah. Don't go there more on. She can't afford to live there find another apartment. Now, they do need. They do need more lighting in that area. That is a city issue. They do need more. Got that. But it's like me showing up in San Francisco and saying, hey, I can't afford this. What are you gonna do about it? The Todd, Don. Appliances is super clearance sale right now, you can get the lowest prices ever on in stock merchandise. Hi, it's more appliances watched to move their entire stock of refrigerators ranges, dishwashers from their showroom to your home prices. Like, this will not last long. So shop right now, get the best selection of the top name brands, whirlpool, Maytag, kitchenaid and more, and I know based on on personal experience a customer at Depu, you will get exceptional service. That's their tradition since nineteen forty two don't wait until that old appliances breaks down get something brand new from depew five one to four five to fifty seven hundred seven sixty seven seventeen Burnet road the appliances. This phone drives me crazy. Excuse me. I'm the sprinter and from sprint chairman. New iphone ten hour with an amazing liquid display..

Harare depew kitchenaid chairman Todd San Francisco sprint Depu ten fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You need the cash college or wedding fund or Friday refund for each kid. That's probably what I'd call it. Then you can use the cash flow or just sell the house when you have paid it off in fifteen twenty years. Yeah. I think that's phenomenal strategy good friend of mine, and I know a good friend of the show and yours Greg Greg rand wrote a book once in somewhere there. That's chapter called have a kid by a condo writing. And. You have a kid investment property by the time. The kids ready to go to college. You you've got nearly paid down. And there's a lot of you can sell it in that condo or single family property can pay for college. And that's part of my wife, and I we, of course, hope of state for those types of things outside of our real estate investing. But I have always told her since that they want. Hey, we end up running short on something or or there's some sort of issue. We'll sell out we've got a bunch of them. So we'll sell one of those and and take care of that college expense or whatever it says by popping up. And so I think that's a great strategy. That's right. You mentioned good debt and bad debt. Can you elaborate? Yeah, I think well, I talked about good debt is something that you use intentionally in a very smart way to help grow your investment portfolio or to allow yourself to me by more of something. Then you could if you're just using cash, but you have a plan to pay it off over time and pen, and you're still going to have cash flow, even after bringing on that that debt, I think bad debt, the easiest example is of course, credit card debt, right because the interest rates are crazy. You can never get caught up. Then there's no reason you ever use credit cards for something and finance something with a credit card. But a better example is something like an adult on right? Cart cars depreciate. They don't appreciate. So you're paying interest on a loan overtime. And at the same time that asset depreciating value. The reason I think putting rental properties works is. Because generally over time over the life of the loan. They're going to appreciate as well as you're paying down. So your equity gets benefiting both ways you get equity because you're paying loan down. But you also getting equity you're taking advantage of appreciation and to tool. Right. I think if you're applying debt or leverage in a business perspective to grow your. Whether you're going to grow your business, or you're going to grow your real estate portfolio. There's positive death. It could be happy to do more than if you were just trying to pay cash likely there's even good debt scenarios in your personal life that could be considered bad that scenarios like I've actually a big fan as much as I am of having leverage on rental properties. A big fan of trying to pay out my primary hauled the home. I live in that mortgage street simply because then it's yours forever. You live there. It's not investment. It's not a tool, you know. I think too many people look at their primary home. They they've been is their main investment. That's a house, right? Exactly. Richdad in the book rich, dad, poor dad. They talk about that.

Greg Greg rand fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Iheart radio station. John and Ken show, KFI AM six forty to go to the voter guide that we have on the website and have had there for a couple of weeks now, and you scroll down you'll look that we picked out a couple of congressional races weighed in on the are saying you should vote for Dana Rohrabacher to be elected to California's forty eighth congressional district. This is the Orange County coastal district Huntington beach Laguna beach that whole strip they're very nice congressional district. Let's get Dana on because he had a debate. It's a close race. It's one of these seats at the Democrats wanna flip. They believe they have a chance is opponent is a man by the name of Harley Rueda, and they had a debate on PBS something called inside. It's not gonna air though until this weekend. But we heard some interesting things came out of it. Let's get Dana on to talk about it. Welcome back to the show. Dana rohrabacher. Well, it's always great to be with you guys. You've been the chance on so many important issues for the last fifteen twenty years now. You've got my medal of honor. Thank you. Wait. What do you what do you make of this caravan of migrants from Honduras? Well, this is what happens when they think that we're weekend the president steps forward. And he's gonna show the world we are Obama, and and Hillary are no longer in charge. And we are not going to let them succeed. I'm confident that our president will send that message. And because of that there won't be future caravans heading in our direction. Surely now about this debate with your opponent early Rueda. We're gonna play the audio coming up after we talk to you. But we understand. There was a little dust up over having notes for the debates notes in front of you. Yeah. I I, of course, have been in congress now, and I have an advantage in that I have long track records, but it is a disadvantage when you have such a long track record of things that you've accomplished. You wanna make sure you have that list in front of you? Case somebody asks about Bill number involved. Well Harley apparently didn't want me to have that list. Of course, he's never been in public office. He doesn't have a track record. So he doesn't have anything a list of bills accomplishments. So, but he thought he would wild me by taking away by right to have just a couple of notes. So that up on issue came up. I don't remember. We're talking about the best part was he insisted it was part of the rules. But apparently the moderator disagreed and said, I never said that is that what happened. This was another. I believe it was another example of where they were just trying to. Make something up out of whole cloth that Rick reach would just back down, a wonderful journalist. He's a man he's a Pulitzer prize winner sites. He said, no, I never said that I will tell you. I believe him rubber those other guys who are trying to stir things up and end up calling him a hawk. Yeah. I think we had that. Oh, it's low. I think it's a little hard to hear. But we're gonna play it coming up. We'll hear somebody call him a hack. Yeah. Now, apparently, you said one of the big issues to you is immigration, you call down Harley Rueda on the fact that he wants to extend healthcare to everyone including illegal immigrants, and you'd have a good response to that. Did he know impacting keeps claiming blaming I did say that. And of course, we have a videotape of him saying exactly that was we will be making sure everybody gets a chance to hear and Harley ended up running as a leftist in the primaries. The Democratic Party in order to get the votes away from Bernie Sanders. Oh, Bernie Sanders type Canada. So anyway now in that. He ends up. Supporting. Yes. Medicare for for illegal immigrants. Sanctuary status for legal alien criminals. This guy has taken all the radical left Stam's, but the Democratic Party has swung over to these last twenty years. And now he's trying to deny how he's trying to get away from it. And and pay me somebody else. Well, yeah. Elaborate Jen changes spots. So maybe trying to be a chameleon, but Electric's can't change the spots. Well, you know, the pundits believe just because Hillary one year congressional district by a small margin over Trump that your seat is open for the taking. But it really depends on who your opponent is. And it sounds like you pin. This guy has the far out left. Well, you know, he has taken so many of these type positions, but also he has money. He's not a local person. He's moved here about eight years ago after inheriting a bunch of money from his father. And so he comes out here. Any community. So with all the legal sport into our our area. It doesn't affect him quite as does the rest of us. And so he he's trying to say something to everybody that just doesn't work anymore. I'll have to say also he's he's telling million firemen lowest, oh, I'm against the oil companies. And he himself was a has been a major investor in crude oil production and probably people, oh, we want to help the working people and when his own life he took jobs away and sent them to China in a company that he started controlling as well as shutting off a healthcare for one of one of his employees was in a very dangerous situation. So in front of have it both ways and the real router. I think the people know who I am. Right there. I'm a stupid idea. I've raised along the coast, and he's a newcomer narrative a lot of money, and is trying to be somebody that he is. I understand you are in Huntington beach at the air show. Yeah. I just was down there. And I think it's you know, I was on the science committee for alive still I'm on the sides. But I was the chairman of the space subcommittee on the sides too. Many for a number of years and just see our aerospace industry does able to put out such incredible technology. That's what keeps us safe. That's what makes us prosperous ambassador cheapest free as well. So I just admire that I understand you're going to be there tomorrow. Me. I wasn't planning on it. But maybe it sounds good. I recommend it to anybody. Because I understand KFI will be there. Broadcasting all weekend from the air show on the iheart app. I believe well, this is I take great pride, and this will even locally we have developed things seventeen is such an important role. Now in America's defense. It's built right here here in Long Beach and Orange County. So this airshow is very inspiring. All right. Congressman Rohrabacher thanks for coming on again. And you're up there in our voter guide. Forty eighth congressional district reelect Dana Rohrabacher, well, I hope so I hope you get that word out because my opponent is spending millions and millions more from these Bolshevik billionaires. Or loading money in the congressional races around the around the country, but especially just one so he's outspending me five or six to one. But he's a left wing liberal. That's not what my district is all about. We'll talk to you again soon. Bye. Bye. Right. Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, he's Huntington beach. It was just at the airshow and you'll see him on the voter guide. Forty eighth congressional district in case, you don't know. That's Orange County. Coastal Huntington beach is pretty much in the middle all the way down to Laguna beach. But south of there more coming up, John and Ken show KFI, Debra Mark. With a news update. USC says it has.

Congressman Dana Rohrabacher Harley Rueda KFI Orange County Democratic Party Hillary Huntington beach Bernie Sanders John Ken Pulitzer prize president Long Beach California Congressman Rohrabacher Laguna beach USC Obama
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Boy. Why are we here? We're almost in the fourth quarter of two thousand eighteen you realize that we're like, you know, two three weeks away from the fourth quarter five done. My math properly, which means that twenty eighteen has is drawing to a close yet. We got a little bit more time. Now, you know, what you got you got about ten days or less. No, you got less than a week of quote, unquote, summer left. Fall is on the way fall means you got let's see you get Halloween and thanksgiving, which are like date back to back, and then that's just a short leap there to Christmas. And then it's going to be happy new year twenty nineteen. It goes quick it just it's it's unbelievable. And so the reason I mentioned this is because we make tax planning a big part of what we talked about on this show planning is what we do and managing taxes planning for taxes is is paramount in in most financial plans do what you can to manage your taxes overall. So that over the course of fifteen twenty years your. Tax Bill is lower. Paying a little bit more now. So that you can pay a whole lot less later on. I don't know. It's kind of depends on your individual situation. But here's the thing we have a change in tax law at the end of two thousand seventeen you recall that I do change in tax law may things a little different. Made some people pay less released temporarily others, maybe pay a little bit more temporarily. But what does this mean for you? We're going to go over some things. And I know I brought this up here. I don't know what it was a couple of weeks ago. I don't believe it was in this hour. So coming up, I think. In just a little bit. We're going to go over some of the ways you might be able to avoid the tax headache that you're gonna find yourself in potentially when you do your taxes next April or whenever you happen to do next year. So avoiding the tax headache. I might say in two thousand nineteen twenty and nineteen tax year. But actually in twenty nineteen you got some time this year to potentially reduce the tax bite. That's kind of why we're talking about it. Now, we've talked about ways at the end of the year, professor Plum that you might be able to you know, things you might be able to do before the end of the year. But quite honestly, you're pretty limited. Once you hit December. Once it becomes post thanksgiving. It becomes very difficult to really do anything about it. We've still got the fourth quarter to go. We got a couple of weeks left in September. Which means that there is time not a lot. But there is time to make some difference in your tax Bill. So what do you have to look out for? We'll talk about that. What else? Oh, golly. Oh, did you see this professor Plum? I don't know why. You know, I try to make what they call shot and fly to a big part of my day. I don't know what that is. That's that's taking joy in the misery of others. Oh, taken to its logical conclusion. I mean, it doesn't mean that, you know, somebody's lying broken leg to stand there and laugh, but what this is why they broke it. Well, see, that's that's what I mean. You see it depends on the reason for the misery and how bad off they are. Was the the broken lake receded by here, hold my beer. Yeah. More than likely. It was yes. But here's the headline. This year has been worse for crypto currency than who thousand was for the dot com. Bubble. Yes. It wasn't much of a year ago that the only thing people can talk about where these crypto currencies and how you were going to become.

professor Plum lake receded fifteen twenty years two three weeks ten days
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Fifteen twenty years ago, maybe even less was over a million dollars for one. Right? You would buy them on the market because they were limited. It was a monopoly. There were only I think, thirteen or fourteen thousand of them for the city. Yeah, and everybody knows that New York had four too few taxis of so hard to get one and it was. It was just shit, right? But that was it that we're laws, you couldn't do it any other way. This technology gets invented that allows for ridesharing and boom, Uber explodes onto the scene faster than government could regulate. That's the one of the beauties of of what's going on right now is that government takes time to regulate and technologies way faster than way faster significantly faster. And so they can't keep up with it. It's like the toothpaste is out of the tube. Good luck. Right. So Uber comes onto the scene. As soon as it starts making noise and gets getting big governments like scrambling to figure out how can we control this and protect our best interest in the taxi cartels or what right, too late. It's out and people like it. So now you've got a lot of people who've expect. 'cause if Uber never got out and people experienced it, let's say somebody came out and said, hey, I've got this idea for this ridesharing company. It would have got shut down fast because they would have scared everybody. Oh my God, it's dangerous. You're gonna get into a stranger's car. People are gonna get mugged and raped and where people are going to lose jobs and it's gonna be terrible. And people would have said, no, we don't want Uber, but it came out too fast fast when people can regulate it, people loved it way, better service and ratings in taxis. And now they're trying to go and shut it down, but they can't. It's even funny. You talk about governments, but even the taxi industry is fighting right rather than a Daqing. This is what kills me rather than a dappling and saying, oh, here's a model over here that we can learn from that we can grow. Oh, from that we can develop and create a new product or service that's better than before. We're going to try to shut that down. I think Austin, in fact, they shut Uber down. I'm sure Austin isn't the only example, but completely shutdown Uber. I think they've opened it back up at this point because the people want it exactly. You know, I have empathy, right? I haven't Pathy for taxi drivers like now. A lot of these medallions are owned by these large cartels these guys that are worth tons and tons of money and have just monopolize the centers for a long time, but you have individual people who save their money bought a medallion. Now, they've seen in a matter of five years or medallion or whatever, which was which they probably borrowed against over and over again or leverage house and whatever they've seen the value of it go from a million dollars to today. I don't think they've sold one in the last. I just watched a documentary on this. They haven't sold one of the last like couple years at all may think the values less than a hundred thousand dollars. Yeah. If that, and that's a market correction, that's what's happening. But you're absolutely right. You know, here's another great example at blockbuster. Yeah, you had the guys from net flicks literally. Went to blockbuster said, hey, we have this technology. We like to work with you is and blockbuster laughed them out of the room. No, thanks had a business, blockbuster gone. They were a major, but let me ask you this because you pose a really interesting question, and I think I fall into this trap you fall..

blockbuster Austin Daqing New York million dollars hundred thousand dollars Fifteen twenty years five years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Same tim bands twenty bands over and over and over it's a wonderful event for locals part of the reason it works is because people keep moving in and they they come for the first few years and get excited but a lot of people who have been here ten fifteen twenty years bandstand anymore the same it's the same you know i gotta tell you right for the jazz fast and i go for the blues fast but santa fe's still in that small little baby towel mindset where they don't do things like that we don't bring a lot of really national names here we don't have great music senior you know the art scene used to be very special here now it's different i would say worse better it's just different okay it's much more millennial it's much more pop culture it's much more pop art and there's nothing wrong with that but it's outside our brand it's just outside our brand let me ask you real quickly then okay all right because bottom line is tourism will determine whether this town stays alive okay and the tourists traveling now are boomers not millennials having kids boomers and this is moving so far away from a boomtown okay at this point in our history that i think in a few years we're going to see some tremendous dips in our tourism numbers because i just don't think the reason those folks come we'll be sustainable here we'll sustain it forty four minutes after two o'clock our guest is rj lane and we're just talking about kind of current events current thoughts current issues here in santa fe david you want to you want to chime in here and talk twelve sixty one two three seven yeah yeah i've got a good example of how things are changing he the hoa competence where i live well we're gonna allow me to park my pickup truck in my driveway now this is santa fe new mexico right we drive pickup truck more beamers than i do pick ups these days oh no it's all they're all big brand new jacked up hiccup escalades how dare we we're we're we're working people here and we drive pickup trucks right they won't let me drive my and they've got all kinds of other rules and when you look at it it's designed to keep the riffraff out and richard you you're probably right about that david so that that's an example for you homeowners association will not let you park your pickup truck where you want to park your pickup truck in my driveway my own personal driveway i don't understand why they would you know i i understand the other side the other extreme of that david and i agree with you that is that is outrageous but the other extreme is is a neighborhood it's kind of like my neighborhood where there's twelve cars in front yard in the backyard and the side yard and all that none of them none of them run.

ten fifteen twenty years forty four minutes
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"There was this industry of pushback and shaping and you know news with changing and they were trying to controversial is the reporters who are doing the factual reporting on things that the special interest in other news people who are co opted didn't like and i think we just didn't address that we would have had the news industry protect ourselves and take care of this you know fifteen twenty years ago if now so endemic the people we've hired a news organizations who are in our editorial staff reporting on the air that are not you know traditional journalists in my way of thinking that are making decisions that have completely changed what what i think news is all about some of the pointed out to me though that historically news was more like this than it was like i guess in the heyday when i j school where we tried to be unbiased that sort of an anomaly historically in the united states so maybe we're just going back to how it used to be perhaps which i'd be back then they didn't pretend to be unbiased and and you know they said hey did you know the broadsheets would have their their and the tabloids would have their various biases and everybody knew it oh that's the that's the republican newspaper that's the democrat newspaper moving closer to that direction of that model and and it's funny you you just reminded me you to look at ben rhodes you know claim to fame now is that new york times magazine article where he bragged about creating an echo chamber and feeding misinformation a young journalists who didn't know what they were doing nbc news is not rewarded him with a contract i mean and the former intel officials brennan and clapper and serve and i think mike rails working for cbs they've all been hired into newsrooms that's thinkable to me in terms of trying to have an unbiased news organization an intel official i know told me that there's no doubt his mind that that's so that the intel officials are invited in the newsrooms where they can spend you know where they banned their agencies are accused of wrongdoing they can monitor what to do organizations are doing and for news organizations not to have a visceral reaction to that that that shouldn't be maybe have on for commentary if you want to label their commentary but to invite them into the newsroom's these employees is know pretty stunning to me there's still some good ones out there and cheryl atkinson is one of them i appreciate you joining us today cheryl thank you so much for this again hosted sinclair sunday tv show full measure was sharyl attkisson it's sundays at ten am and you gotta go to sharyl attkisson dot com two very important posts that you should bookmark and come back and look at again the fifty let me get the full title here for you fifty media mistakes in the trump era the definitive list and more importantly the collusion against trump timeline that's right you heard me right collusion against trump timeline it is extensive it is well researched it is footnoted is linked and it is constantly updated as we get more information about how there was collusion there was definitely collusion in the two thousand sixteen campaign and afterwards and it appears at least documented collusion was with the media with the deep state players within the government against president trump is three fifty one let's check in now with math is in the carpet cleaning traffic to check in with the southbound virginia ninety five pass quantico at the scene of an earlier accident it's been cleared out for a little while and looks like things are basically back to normal headed southbound to get from the river bridge data triangle it's gonna take you about twenty six minutes really not too bad three ninety five northbound.

fifteen twenty years twenty six minutes
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Around to stay again we're talking about guys that are in their twenties there late to mid twenties jordan spec other and speak for instance last year we did an event in hartford you might remember tori holes out in the playoff out of the bunker great reaction from thirty thirty five thousand fans and and the ratings for that event which is not something that i personally pay a whole lot of attention to though i did see that the overnight ratings which are not the final tabulation with a masters were up fourteen percent and truthfully it's because this year was was very much anticipated tigers comeback till playing great those two guys have carried golf for again this fifteen twenty year time period and the fact that rickie fowler whose another player that could move the needle down the line if he starts to to string together some major championship wins jordan's speed dustin johnson rory mcilroy all the heavyweights were playing well coming in and then you had a compelling tournament to match so weather obviously plays a role in in television ratings larry as you know has been miserable in the northeast over the last month so a lot of people were were hunker down and of course out were you guys are it's been raining for the last week or so so i think a lot of people were indoors this weekend watching and of course the masters is always the most highly viewed golf tournament of the year and and i think yesterday's competition did not support it came down to the last putt on the seventy second hole it was compelling theater and i think a lot of people were intrigued by don as we close out the master's and go into to the us open your biggest takeaway and you kinda reloading this whole thing but the way golf is moving now what is your biggest story that you're going to be looking at in in that timeframe from between now and june.

hartford tigers rickie fowler jordan rory mcilroy don fifteen twenty year fourteen percent seventy second
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"For the free class or again if you're on your cellphone just hip 250 and say ot a know sean you mentioned fees we're not the only people to talk about fees you know warren buffett is is huge on just dealer destroying the wall street the world because of the fees they charge warren buffett's right hand man charlie munger really does a lot of his investing for he even said the same thing he said that the fee structure chairs by active managers today make it almost impossible for them to to succeed and then is delusional for you this is charlie martyrs delusional for you to think that you can succeed when when you're paying high fees the over the last fifteen twenty years the managed accounts these are these fund managers heaven even beat the market heaven even met the index so those fees have had a huge impact on these guys are making millions of dollars a year that's comey from somewhere is coming from you it's coming from your portfolio's and again you you you mentioned that and and warren buffett came out with guess what his shareholders letter this this pat passed saturday to give a little advice and just right there al he's talking about avoid hifi investments he says it american investors pace staggering sums annually to advisers often incurring several layers of consequential consequential costs and the aggregate do these investors get their money's worth no they do not but he used the word staggering and what i what i saw blood that al he used the word advisers to and not fund managers so advisers again all you people out there that 401 k is you advisors you know that's warren buffett he knows a few things to does now you'll eased on okay in in his years and here's a going to use him as an example you're too you know we talk about the strategy we have which is based on supply and demand in the press the that's really based on the fact that the.

warren buffett sean charlie munger fifteen twenty years 401 k
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Use these diff there's really not great terminology to describe these things when you're trying to get into the psychology of somebody that has made such evil choices but he was clearly disturbed or are they going to lock them away forever lock them away tilley's away for ten fifteen twenty years he any better when you let him loose into society i look these are hard questions are at answers to these questions but this would take us in the direction of doing something about these mass killers trying to understand what do we do when we know that we've got a possible school shooter on our hands it was all prevented from getting guns this has been pointed out there are many ways to kill a whole lot of people and uh semi automatic rifle is just one of them what would be preferable circumstance for those law enforcement officers when they show up that they can just say you know what this guy strikes me as a weirdo undertaken we're gonna hold them all for how long imagine for a moment those florida offices and look i understand this is uh slightly contrary in point of view right now everyone's all we must do more there must be more to do okay i agree with it i agree with that feeling but what are we going to do so law enforcement intervenes law enforcement arrests nicholas crews in advance of this event along the hold them for they're gonna have pavement county lock up for a while they're going to press charges homsi ended a prison for for what by the way but let's just assume they could get him on something is going to come out and he the same person who's now spent some time in prison ready this this is where it gets very complicated we we want to believe we have this very understandable need four an answer here for answers for some emotional closure for.

tilley florida ten fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That they reviewed your tax return and offer new solutions not just for this year but how moving forward you can lower your taxes over the next five ten fifteen twenty years if you have not been offered that fire your adviser and find a fiduciary whose credentialed who can help you strategize distribution planning and taxes because what's not the most important thing most likely for you is which mutual fund you should by next or what variable annuity is great with an income writer sure that commissions trying nice for that broker that sells it to you but are you get in tax advice i know because when i a a broker when i was a traditional financial adviser before i started kista wealth partners that's what i was trained to do you know sell you a very able annuities and nontraded read and all the things that were in my best interest i mean yeah they had to be suitable for you and i always try to do the right thing but it was a broken any flawed dynamic so that's why i mean i could go through all these different factors in what you should be looking for in a financial adviser and i've done plenty of shows and i have a podcast by the way called rethinking your money if you're out there looking for you like doing podcast godi tunes rethink your money is what it's called i do 15 20minute quick hitters on things like what to look for an adviser how to reduce taxes but for the sake it today here's a real simple concise question to ask yourself if george trying to evaluate whether your adviser is a legitimate adviser who is truly helping you plan and strategize or if there a commission driven financial salesperson when is the last time they asked to see your tax return if it hasn't been in over a year if maybe you're going i don't been several years i don't know if they ever have ask yourself am i getting the value i should for what i'm pain this person key we do that for clients your accused while partners we understand it's not will you make the matters but what you keep your tax strategy must be fully integrated with everything you're doing from an investment standpoint if you want officiency.

writer george fiduciary five ten fifteen twenty years 15 20minute
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"Just doesn't just stop because they they seemingly have stopped and when we say that you know the thing here is they they have stopped in that area and we can say that for certain the other thing is they have his dna and they have is dna on file somebody crept into somebody's home in the middle night and murdered a family and left his dna there whether it be fifteen twenty years later brain on the other side of the country we're gonna know that this killer didn't stop zama they might have escalated you have a lot of factors to throw in there i think while i think the first factor you throw him as that the lasse quote unquote hammer slayer attack the y'all again bruce put up one a hell of a fight and maybe he may be this murderer said you know what debts too risky i can't take that chance anymore this this hammer thing doesn't make any sense anymore because if i if i'm face with somebody like bruce again i might not come out victor right and so they could changed um young the way in which they uh the weapon they use in the in the murders they could change the weapon that they use or stop altogether uh the the the intruder also may have occurred in injury during that because you're in your right to point out the bennett and i don't think that they're i don't think that that's um i think that there's plenty of proof there that there's good reason why that potentially may have been the last attack or certainly the last known attack.

bruce fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A book about a woman that had a relationship of that sort with then president no lass so that's my novel number two and number three i would say to you something which may be the most important of all europe has now adopted throughout all of us something called a right to be forgotten all right to be forgotten is basically a rule established by the super court that governs all of all of europe which basically says if something has been published an initial take her years before it is personally embarrassing and it is no longer relevant and pause on the word relevant that's the word that you no longer relevant and the person complains to google or another carrier like google they have to take it down or go to court and defend themselves over half a million articles i've been taken down not carried in gogel throughout europe as a result of such compliance and then a quite recent case in belgium someone who drove a car wreck leslie leading to the death of two people but fifteen twenty years ago wrote to google sang take that there's nothing to do with anything it's all private tall over a google said no they went to court and gugel lost the answer was at wasn't relevant to anything any more a here we would say i have no doubt our courts would say in so many words we don't see google from telling the truth about things somebody was in an action somebody went into court there were judicial proceedings a truthful article was published about it we don't start down the road saying you can print that anymore are you you you can carry any more on gogel so there there's a constant up pressure on gogo on its competitors in europe to two lead material which is not deemed to be relevant anymore it's something material about events in court but some years back and determined not to be quote relevant and uh unquote a again unthinkable here we don't have such laws such a law has been proposed in the new york legislature with which they're not going to go on who are now but but it is i think maybe the best example of quite how different the legal systems are even between systems which both karabakh say they care about i think they do care about principles.

president europe google belgium gogo legal systems new york fifteen twenty years
"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen twenty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Number three i would say to you something which may be the most important of all europe has now adopted throughout all of us in europe something called a right to be forgotten the right to be forgotten is basically a rule established by the super court that governs all of all of europe which basically says if something has been published an initial paper years before it has personally embarrassing and it is no longer relevant and pause on the word relevant that's the word that you no longer relevant and the person complained to google or another carrier like brutal they have to take it down or go to court and defend themselves over half a million articles have been taken down knock carried in gogel throughout europe as a result of such compliance and then a quite recent case in belgium someone who drove a car recklessly the to the death of two people but fifteen twenty years ago wrote to google sang take that there's nothing to do with anything it's all private it's all over a google said no they went to court and gogel lost the answer was at wasn't relevant to anything any more a here we would say i have no doubt our courts would say in so many words we don't see google from telling the truth about things somebody was in an accent somebody went under court there were judicial proceedings a truthful article was published about it we don't start down the road of saying you can print that anymore are you you you can't carry any more on gogel and so there's a constant up pressure on gogo on its competitors in europe to lead material which is not deemed to be relevant anymore it's something material about events in court but some years back and determined not to be quote relevant and uh unquote again unthinkable here we don't have such laws such a law has been proposed in the new york legislature with which they're not going to go on who are now but but it is i think maybe the best example of quite how different legal systems are even between systems which both care about say they care about i think they do care about principles.

europe belgium google gogo legal systems new york fifteen twenty years