20 Episode results for "Fifteen Twenty Percent"

f5: Using Tools to Try to Get a Little Bit Better

Farm Small Farm Smart

05:15 min | 2 years ago

f5: Using Tools to Try to Get a Little Bit Better

"Here it is another farm five on farm small farm smart small details but they make a difference. You know this year. We're we'VE WE'VE <HES> we're trying new ways of tracing cucumbers cucumbers insider who has to have them more productive than they were before and you know it's not it's not a big big difference. I did point at this point in time. We're at <hes> molded ended on my wife. We're not looking king for big boom. We're looking for low ten fifteen twenty percent increments but we're trying to get them in Oliver Crops and we're also getting a lot better at crop planning which is the process of doing all of the in the layout of the garden and what's GonNa be grown where how in the into winter to really synchronize with our demand and we're getting better at this so when we're at Marquette you know we're we're always right on on with what we have and if not then we're taking good notes for the year afterwards and it's the same thing with our C._S._A.. We've gotten to really know our customers and what they like and what they want and that helps us. You know just again making things. Things just a bit better and sometimes you know there's things that come out and like this year. Just now we were trying to new tool. It's called the paper transplant and what it does is that these are instead of transplanting by hand which is what what we do would beat and many of salads which are really spaced really close on the row. We have these paper pots that are you know transplanted with this you know simple device machine and it goes a hundred under times faster and this is the tool that we're trying out this year so we're we're. We're getting more production but also our aim at the farm has been to try and do so and have more of a life every year because when we produce more we also want to try and work less so it's kind of the ideal but that's what we're striving for in terms of gardening on this scale where you get the most bang for your buck in other words. If a new farmer was GONNA start start out they should have this this this piece of equipment to make it most efficient and it's worth spending the few hundred maybe a couple thousand dollars on it initially because you're gonNA make up for it in terms of speed and how well. All the seeds are set. You know uniformly that type of thing. That's a tough question because it's like asking me what part of your car makes. You know makes. It run really smooth so there's it's a system on the farm. There's so many different things laid laid out together that makes it work but if if you're if I were to name five five of my best performing tool you know you mentioned the power Harrow which is different from the Rotor Tiller which always brings up weed seeds from the bottom up and also also structures stole every time you use it so we've moved away from that and we're using this tool that works with the time on a horizontal level which is like mixing the soil instead of you know pulverizing it and so that's really really nice for seed that preparation but the whole permanent raise bats also that's really important. That's how we get along without having a tractor because you don't need to be plowing asking hilling thank shaping beds every year that done and we just cultivate the services using heroin and another great tool that we found along the way was these <hes> these <hes> tarp we keep. Heaped our beds covered with you know U._v.. Treated <hes> silence tarps and what's amazing about these types is that win. They're covering the vets. They're actually reading them and the way that works is that because it's you know <music> soil is undercover. It's it's moist and the tarps make it a bit warmer and it's black so these are the perfect germinating calm conditions and so the weeds sees that are German in the beds they Germany any and then after a couple of weeks. There's no life so they die and so we've been using these types to really diminish the the wheat pressure and our garden and keep the garden under control so that's that's another one of my favorite and then I could you know quickly autumn my head. You know there's a great great new Salad Harvester. That's powered by drill. <hes> you know handrail and I also was quite a timesaver on our farm and I I could go on and on about all these tools that through the years we've either integrated into our system or we've kind of developed ourselves to make them to to to meet or needs and that's what's really great about farming.

Rotor Tiller Oliver Crops Marquette heroin Germany ten fifteen twenty percent thousand dollars
Interview: 50 Years

Monocle 24: The Stack

29:04 min | 1 year ago

Interview: 50 Years

"The titus most iconic moments we also had to Frankfurt for the Frankfurter booth master the world's largest trade fair for books and this week on the stack with celebrate fifty years of interview magazine they have a new issue out and a new thome dissecting food macos the photographer who spent much of his career chronicling Warhol and was one of his closest friends we've gone into his studio to go through his archives director Richard Turley was ripping off type treatments from the past because the magazine has such an amazing history of graphic design we revisited old subjects twenty minutes ago before you and I got to speaking it's an exciting time but the issue which hit stands today is real labor of love for myself and coming out just now in the newsstand tell us what can we find in this issue thank you for having me Back We just launched the fiftieth anniversary cover like but this week's edition of the stack and so in some cases with the issue that man recreating re staging an iconic photo or obscure photo in other ways our editorial just celebratory times in the world of interview magazine the title is Celebrating Fifty Years and because of that and you thome is being released detailing the history of Serie Issue I think the tenth anniversary issue came out in the late seventies so there have been a number of them and it started to feel rather daunting to try and figure out what we could the idea of doing anything original really and kind of leaning in really heavily to the archives and using it as a resource and nodding to the history by ripping it off literal way as Andy Warhol in large part because as integral part of this magazine is he is we really wanted to pay homage have Andre Leon Talley in conversation with Michael Kors in the magazine and Andrei started his career in fashion as a receptionist at the magazine we have Christopher so as such mel had this really great idea because we were sort of trying to figure out what to do that would be original to kind of getaway from the we have Christina Ricci the actress re staging her own nine hundred ninety nine cover by Ellen von unearth and wearing it was the last issue before the new millennium is so many different eras of this thing that we didn't want to sort of solely focused or focused too heavily on the warhol years we wanted to be comprehensive interview it's called interview fifty years I spoke to Nick Haram his interviews editor in chief he also tells me the idea behind the celebratory new so she's wearing a two thousand Tiara on her head and sometimes it was just as simple as ripping off a headline for another story that was meant in a totally different context but the whole creative director Mel Ogdensburg and the entire team we kind of were going through the archives when we're thinking about making this issue and you know the first anniverary do that would be original and I think the one thing that I said right from the beginning which I opened my editor's letter with is that I didn't want any sort of silver wigs didn't want anyone dressing up to all fifty years which included many of those almost twenty of those were under the editorship of Ingrid see she and Glenn O'Brien was such an important voice at the magazine who coming up on the show we had to Frankfurter Booth Massar where Norway is the guest of honor this year also we meet the editor of Hot potato but I issue nick you can't get more chronic than desire for you guys it's fifty years of interview right and how are you celebrating I know there's a new issue our fiftieth anniversary celebration issue but we started celebrating in March with the bigger trim size different paper stock March cover that we did with cable a little unexpected and so for us I don't know that everyone was expecting us to do Kate McKinnon but when we started to look at what was happening in the world it feels like it's a nice moment kover as well because you know she's amazing impersonating people in her show Saturday night live so I guess that's what were you thinking about right I think a lot of editors all thing was sort of copying the past and paying homage to the past by trying to recreate it and after talking to you now I can totally get why Kate Mckinnon de Elizabeth Warren every week and Rudy Giuliani and all of these characters and kind of is able to confront what's happening in the world but also make people laugh as a result in Dan chat and then went into Richard Madden and then to Riana and Rupaul and now Kate McKinnon and I think we're always trying to the best cover I think is the one that is Hernan night live comes on our TV's every week and every Monday you go back into the office and talk about some things they need that happened on the show and given the political climate she's in person they think the one following that the rupaul cover ru has been such an icon for so many years and I think there was a lot of when the camp showed the very literal way and then I think when it comes to the readers the large size and the paper stock suggest nostalgia without actually having to engage in I felt really like a no brainer for us for this issue as you said you know. The magazine started deliberating earlier in the year as well especially with the return of the large format how was the reception that came out I think a lot of people were sort of hoping although not expecting that she would maybe get the vote cover or that he would get the vote cover and then Kim Kardashian was on that cover that's what I liked about it why think our goal is that if internally at an editorial meeting we look at cover shocked at anything we've done something right I think that we are in a privileged position at the magazine because the whole concede is having somebody of some sort of notoriety speaking to somebody else sort of notoriety often a friend or a former colleague or mentor and so the whole thing is much easier to sort of break yeah I think that's always sort of the goal is to surprise ourselves and then hopefully surprised the reader but yeah as far as the format goes people seem to really like it I think the last time we spoke it said that we had originally gone down in size because we were worried that oversize format wasn't fitting on newsstands but people have made a space for us nostalgic content I think all of the stuff that we're writing about the people that were featuring in the magazine are forward thinking but it gives you that sort of heart warming field is really articulate but has no qualms sort of saying how he feels about things you look at somebody we haven't put on the cover of Cardi B. is wonderfully I have their favorite babies when it comes to their covers and I kind of think of them as a more holistic group and so when I think about this year particular this is candid and feels very authentic to who she is but yeah I think the nature of the celebrity on celebrity interview really does us a favour because at the are celebrities there are not like that that you can still kind of extract amazing stories from them for example for sure I also think it's a matter of well and so with the cover it just seems so messed up to put one of the most famous women in the world on the cover in a mask doc but the book is such a wonderful I'm biased but it is such a wonderful collector's edition it's four hundred some pages it's a huge doorstop unique for something that I'm sure every interview fan would like to buy or to see it is you have an upcoming book as well with the history of interview tell us more about this from housing loan is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis and I am fitna was to shift down walls than it would be if you were a celebrity speaking to a journalist but yeah I mean I think you look at somebody is incredibly outspoken I think ru holding the first ever issue and it goes all the way through until Riana issue and it has beautiful full bleed lush images playing of familiarity by feeling the paper and interacting with the oversized magazine. Let's talk about fifty years I have a curiosity in terms of when it comes to project while I think in large part that we'd been working on the fiftieth anniversary book at the same time as we were working on the fiftieth anniversary issue and I think they kind of end of the day we just kind of want people to reveal their weird secrets but I think they're much more comfortable doing so with somebody that they know and trust or look up to and are of a coffee table book but has like a disco sheen on the cover end it begins with the first ever issue and with Andy with a picture of Andy Warhol Liberty How much did he change throughout the years because you know I heard a lot of people saying that celebrities they have more PR's more controlled now but do you still think that the book interview fifty years is out now and so is the new issue of the magazine the part of the reason why we had such trouble sorting out exactly what we wanted to do with the issue was because we dug so deeply into the archives for the book I thought why not how amazing the celebrate ru on the cover of September fashion issue and not in a joke away in a very sincere fashioned way and so at my local store and I remember I don't know if it was the first one but one that really meant a lot to me was the two thousand Christina Ricci cover which is why in a few years time never thought that I mean I was a teenager and I've grown up in a very small town in Canada and I'd always had really poetic and really special but yeah that meant a lot to me it felt like it was inclusive and celebratory but also kind of sarcastic admiring the magazine and it's a really special book it's it's available now it's a great Christmas president or holiday gift Oh absolutely and by the way wouldn't say Bridie of fashion and art folk who are really important to the DNA of this magazine who have given their memories of either working with the magazine or or in twenty years later Christine is one of my dearest friends and to ask her to recreate that Cover Image Inside Might Fiftieth Anniversary issue felt out from Andre Leon who has said began his career as a receptionist at the magazine to Kate Moss to Michael Kors there's a whole it opens with an essay from one of the magazines original editors Bob Khalid Cello I've written essay our editor-at-large Christopher bullet has written an essay and then there are memories scattered throughout dreams of moving to the big city and working in magazines and interview was a really big part of that for me it was one of the few New York publications that we got how is he known our or late mom now I believe it's available for preorder right now in the clean website I should know that but yeah it's available now we're doing our launched because they haven't unique opportunity to present their works their literature towards the international publishing world and of course I this year it's Norway a country of avid readers that is home to many renowned authors including car over cows guard and Joan has and another thing I must add I agreed the best covers are the unexpected ones for example I love your reenact overs again some unexpected and you know it was not very conventional rod or Nola to talk about the significance and impact of being named guest of honor I think this under idea which originated Monaco's Marissa Fish Var sat down with author and publisher how they're good Monsen the project manager of the organization behind the event the Huijin literature and foremost it is important for German publishing world but Germans have always been very open what's translations very open towards already in one thousand nine hundred seventy six and has been here with some changes since then can be quite important especially in smaller countries to Frankford now every year the Frankfurt Book Fair selects guest of honor to showcase it's literally Thailand it felt like it really represented who I was anyway are or who I wanted to be and so yeah that one was really special for me was Nica Romney's editor in chief of interviews and if you think about for example the media attention if this is done right you have media attention on the GIORGIA last year and to speak for Myself Iceland in two thousand eleven this was a unique opportunity which is in foreign authors so many other purposes from other countries look towards Germany and see what they're doing cookbook fair which is immense and half of it goes to the guest of honor because the guest of honor is the news from facebook for has been taken party in a week or two in New York so and finally what would you remember the first interview you came across the new standard one that you still remember and said you know what the Editor in chief of this magazine object that's talked about everywhere here at the fair as well and and how can you really promote those very liberal values that Norway stands for and so you have to imagine we bringing stories from the whole of Norway stories that you didn't know before and then we want to encourage empower freedom of expression elsewhere the most important thing with as always through dialogue and we have from the beginning of the very good can with crown princess on a literary train for example but the third to justice important team is just like the program that you heard the is the freedom of expression and we want also to show strengthen discuss in buying books that are culturally important and distributing them to libraries all over all over Norway we cannot of course tell other the right thing to do especially if you work on the literature I forced at presenting books surly and what is the message you hope to see huge I mean I don't think that the US or England will ever be a guest of honor because it's not so important for them but for country like Norway before the times were threatened also in European countries where you least expect absolutely I mean the political instability is sanders they're a central theme that you hope to give people in a way we have we have three central seems we we are very much cost by showing by example like inviting all sorts of the persecuted onstage regardless whether they regional not and let them tell about her experience the why do you think that is and how can you really promote that elsewhere how can you get people reading more and what are the numbers what are the figures in Norway at the moment it just presenting the stories from Norway Norway dot forget is quite a long country it's a country it's not so many inhabitants but it's a very mm-hmm and Norway like all the Nordic countries is very much a weeding country on average they reach fifteen bucks a year and that's of course something we been doing play since fourteen eighty or something was reinvented in nineteen forty eight butts guest of honor is always new country nothing especially for those who are not Gutenberg invited quite a lasting form to present them that's wonderful and it's nice to see that book sales print book sales also are doing well and the mood here is there are some changes you can see in Norway audible subway important and they have become more almost fifteen twenty percent of the of the market too the mid-norway how you strengthen authors or how you how you bring new talents and so forth and also INC with icon the international cities of refuge network and they are of course in many countries

Frankfurt Frankfurter fifty years nineteen forty eight butts fifteen twenty percent thirty minutes twenty minutes twenty years Fifty Years
How to Spot Marketing Opportunities When Growth is Flat | Ep. #1419

Marketing School

06:19 min | 1 year ago

How to Spot Marketing Opportunities When Growth is Flat | Ep. #1419

"Welcome to marketing school. The only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors Neil Patel and Eric Su. Hey Margie school listeners. I. Have An interesting stat for you. Did you know that Walmart improved their conversion rate by two percent for every second that the improve their low time in other words, website speed helps with conversions in addition to that google uses it to determine where your site ranks in their index. The faster website loads the higher. You'll rink for that reason I want to talk to. To you today about a company called Dream House Dream Hose powers, the web with fast websites and superior customer service brought to you by team of Web, experts or super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric, Su and I'm Neil, Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about how to spot marketing opportunities when growth is flat. So when you're growth is flat. Most people are looking for ways to figure out how to drive. More traffic had to drive more sales, but biggest mistake that I see people doing when their growth this flat is. They're constantly looking for new channels and their psycho. You know I'm tapped out on address. I can't get more of are y just cost too much. I'm out on facebook I'm. s Yo what's funny is usually when growth describe the biggest opportunity, isn't you? Channels from what we're seeing is actually conversion rate optimization, and if you can optimize your conversion rates, even ten fifteen twenty percent lifts, and a lot of people can't because they've been very little to no conversion optimization that allows the doors to open up even on your existing channels and conversion optimization isn't just are fine to. To near conversions also involves things like up selling down selling ray upon your check checkout on your lead forms, all this stuff can help you generate more income per visitor, which then as you to spend more money on marketing, whether that's inbound or outbound, undocumented limited different way here when growth is flat really about when Corona Virus I hit out yet. There's two different types of people I saw there's. There's people that just would not let go their original business model. Things were not only flat down straight up like going straight down revolt, and there's no when you get more customers. We just need to get more clients. You can't just say you're GONNA do that. When the market is going in that direction anymore, the confidence in whatever you're selling before. It's not there anymore to be saying that. Oh! Oh! We just need to get more customers. We needed more clients I think he's naive versus the other entrepreneurs I've seen that went in another direction epic example he was selling online courses, and he's being our experts joining back, but he was not ellen courses. You know he made adjustments to. And when he made adjustments, he visited a little bit just adjusted as pricing points and how he charged. To been he had rendered, but based monthly, and so I think when things are not there for you with options, not there you have to go another direction to see. What is the market actually asking for instead of trying to push a rock up a hill? You wanted snowball down nail that we have more momentum 'cause if everything's coming down you, it's hard to make business work, but to go against the grain. Probably not gonNA, be, going Going grinchey grain is tough and like Eric's mentioning. You know the scenario he gave is things aren't getting bad. They're actually getting worse so if you're actually on a decline, not an incline or not even, but you're on decline. That's when you really gotta start changing things up. If you're just flat, you probably don't have to be as drastic, but if you're definitely declining, you gotta shirt rejigging your model. We junior put what can we do? Do what drastic changes can we make an? How can we reinvent ourselves? One thing I was telling my team is. How do we constantly kill our business each year? Because if we're the ones trying to kill our business that means we're innovating innovating enough where it's GonNa, be hard for someone else to beat us. Yeah, there that Silicon Valley episode, if those that have seen it or they talk about skunkworks, which is basically given internal team. Team trying to kill whatever you're doing and I. Know for some other companies of robots team, so think of this as this team is focused on new initiatives and trying to make a lot of stuff that you're joining irrelevant, so maybe you'd have time to do it right now, but I think it's good to understand that if companies are prioritizing that concentrating, kill themselves. Think about what else can you do? That might be a little different. To kneel earlier. You don't need it go. Sometimes you can make a drastic change something in May. A crazy drastic change because some people the events. Is this right now? I saw people that were like aw man, I've lost all our business percent, and then I look at other events, badgers, and know what their business now includes virtually events, and not going to be something a staple in addition to live you best offering that they have some smart way of doing it. They might not necessarily breach after all their loss revenue, but at least they're surviving right now, and it's important to be able to survive right. Right now and then be able to come out at price, and if you apply those concepts you can. I'm doing well and going back to the conversion stuff. If you don't have big budgets, there's companies like conversion xl. They give a lot of data way that you can end up doing it yourself. VW HAS A lot of case studies, and you can end up. Learning from companies expire allies performance-based conversion optimization where lily charge if they give you increase in revenue, but there's a lot of options for you guys out there as well, and that is today before we go go to market school. The slash live as. To learn about our virtual event, which actually still includes the life event as well as today and we will see you tomorrow. We, appreciate you joining us for this session of Marketing School be sure to rate review and subscribe to the show and visit marketing school dot io for more resources based on today's topic as well as access to more episodes. That will help you find tree. Marketing Success Tax Marketing School. Dot Co until next time class dismissed.

Marketing School Eric Su Neil Patel Margie school Walmart google VW ten fifteen twenty percent two percent
Does AMP Still Help With SEO? | Ep. #992

Marketing School

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Does AMP Still Help With SEO? | Ep. #992

"Get ready for your daily dose of marketing strategies and tactics. From entrepreneurs with the guy and experience to help you find success in any marketing, capacity. You're listening to marketing school with your instructors, Neil, Patel, and Eric SU. Welcome to eight another episode of marketing school. I'm there too. And I'm Neil Patel. And today, we're gonna talk about if AMP still helps with SEO so we've actually talked about this while bath. But it's good to have a refresher on this in terms of while what AMP is and what it actually does. So AMP is Google's accelerated mobile pages that I got that. Right. You got it. Right. All right, accelerate mobile pages. And what it does is it takes your page and makes it very fast for mobile, right? So here's an example, if you have a blog post out there put it in as an AMP page Google's going to see it, and they can basically load the page much faster than it would maybe lows in like a split second versus maybe five or six seconds when it loads on your site that has a bunch of bells and whistles on the idea, here's Google is trying to deliver a faster, accelerated better user experience for people consuming content on. On your site. So the question now is does AM piece still help with SEO meal? What are your thoughts around this to go back a little bit with AM p pages Google pretty much cashing them onto there? And if I'm not mistaken that's how load so us, but they're also stripping everything aware, your theory, stripping everything away. So it's hard to convert those visitors into customers like a lot of the Email stop while the navigation adds a lot of that stuff is gone and overtime. What you've seen is a lot of these big publishers like the big newspapers, they were all using an stuff, right? When it first came out. But then they saw the drop in revenues. The most have reverted that doesn't mean it doesn't hurt with house SEO or helps I'm not saying either. I'm just saying that is why the removed because they saw big drop in revenue now, but I've done a ton of tests on this. And I will tell you it helps somewhat in SEO. I know that's not a cure answer. But I'll give you the reason why it is a clear answer. I just need to give you the reasoning we've found that in regions like the United States where people have there's better infrastructure. It does not help much at all would traffic. I've been so many tests in removing AMP. And I haven't seen anyone really seeing drop in traffic in the United States. Same with the U K, Germany, most of the countries that have mazing infrastructure now in places like Latin America like Brazil, when we turn on AM p pages it ranges, but sometimes you see anywhere from like a ten fifteen twenty percent increase in traffic, sometimes a bit more from your mobile traffic. So whatever your mobile search traffic was you typically do see increase if your traffic sources are from these regions that doesn't mean you should or shouldn't do AMP more. So you has to be a business case a is gonna really hurt your revenue and be are you going after traffic from a lot of these regions that don't have amazing infrastructure because if you are. For those regions AMP does help. Yeah. Let's talk about the business perspective from real quick. So SEO wise. I mean, it's kind of like, you know, there's no at least for my site. It's there's no definitive answer. Quite yet. What I will say is it has increased our bounce rate significantly. We're talking about I think fifty eight percent or so jumped fifty eight percent and also at the same time our conversion rates, obviously because we don't have all the bells and whistles around exit pop ups and things like that our Email conversion rate has gone down. Right. So of emails are important to your business, and they drive revenue and there's value tied to each subscriber. That you have it does actually well what we've seen in our test. It does kind of hurt from that perspective. But SEO side, I can't really give a definitive answer. Either. Only the thing that I have concerns with is that you're continuing to build on top of Google, Google, Google this and the more control you see two other people the more riskier it is for your site. Yes. Again, as air command mention business case, I like it because I don't try to. Monetize much. So I'm just going after traffic. So I use it. But if you have a business case in most cases, you're going after tier one traffic from regions where users have a lot of money and great infrastructure. You probably won't see increase in traffic in your publicist decline in revenue from using Ambi. All right. That is it for today. But before we go don't forget to rate review and subscribe to this podcast. We're on our journey now to two million monthly downloads. And I'm gonna read this review. This nicklaus. Hereto south says first podcast one of my favorites. Five star review since I got here to United States. I am constantly learning and trying out new things I randomly picked you guys because I wanted to get into marketing and I subscribed right away. Now, it's almost in my routine having breakfast and listening to you guys. Sometimes it's a bit too short, but still high valuable content. Can't wait to get to the live event in downtown LA. Speaking of the live event in downtown. I you for Nicklaus single grain dot com slash DT LA that is the. Location for the event, we can't wait to see you. They're going to happen in June. And we will see you tomorrow episode. This session of marketing school has come to a close be sure to subscribe for more daily, marketing strategies and tactics to help you find the success you've always dreamed of and don't forget to rate and review. So we can continue to bring you the best daily content possible. We'll see you in class tomorrow right here on marketing school.

Google United States Neil Patel LA Nicklaus Germany Eric SU Latin America Brazil fifty eight percent ten fifteen twenty percent six seconds
MBA1664 Are Government Grants Worth Applying For?

The $100 MBA Show

13:16 min | 7 months ago

MBA1664 Are Government Grants Worth Applying For?

"Tail one hundred dollars meeting show because they better business begins with you. That's why we delivered daily ten minute business lessons for the real world. I'm your host. Your coach or teacher omar's then home. I'm also the co founder of the hundred dollar. Nba a complete business training and community online over at one zero zero nba dot net. Go ahead and visit our website and download our breakout business roadmap and no step by step exactly what to do to build a six figure business. It's absolutely free. Just go to one zero zero. Nba dot net in today's episode. You'll learn our government. Grants worth applying for government. Grants are one of the things you know exists out there. But you're not sure if it's worth the effort or even how to apply for one is a real money out there for the taking. Is it impossible to actually get them. What are your options when it comes to applying and at the end of the day is it worth all the time and effort it takes to apply for grant. That's all discussing in today's episode. I have applied for many government. Grants in the past and we'll share some of my experiences so let's get into it and let's get down to business support today. Show comes from ebay. Are you hunting for a rare vintage or new watch. ebay has a heart find. Watch you've been after and it's backed by ebays new. Authenticity guarantee no fakes fraud. No doubt independent. Experts will meticulously inspected every detail of your dream timepiece. So you can be confident. It's authentic find your dream timepiece at dot com slash authentic watches today again that's ebay dot com slash authentic watches for domestic sales. Only there are many grants out there. Some are government. Some are private but today we're going to focus on grants. So there's a good chance no matter where you are in the world that your government will offer some sort of grants to businesses like yours. Small businesses startups and these grants might be something that you can apply for once or many times over like every year. So let's start with. How do you find out what is available. Like what grants are out there. So my best advice when it comes to this is that you should make this a part of what your accountant or lawyer does so have you ever lawyer on retainer or have an account on retainer which is more likely than when you're in the hiring process of finding this account make sure you find somebody that is in the know in the grant business accounts are usually Tapped into what's happening in the government When there's funds available when something gets passed new laws all that stuff tax incentives so if you have a good account they should actually let you know and send you an email or message and say. Hey there's a new grant that you can apply for hero the grants you can apply for for this year. This is the easiest way because you got a ton to do to build your business and you need somebody just to put it on a silver platter so if you have an account Ask them and if you don't have an account try to find one that this this tapped into the grants in your local community or in your country This also applies to again if you have a lawyer on retainer now of course you can spend time to kind of search what grants are available online But there's new things come up all the time and the interesting thing is that it's kind of hard to say up the day unless it's your job. So that's why i refer to those at You're paying for anyway. So they might as well do this little extra service for you now. Once you know there is a grant available. What are your options. So the cheapest option. Is you applying for this grant on your own meaning that you complete the application process. You put all the paperwork together. You put all the evidence or all the information or You know resources they're asking for To apply for the grant this can be time consuming This can Really be a lot of effort. And that's why a lot of people shy away from applying for grants. Because frankly it's just a very long winded process and sometimes is quite complicated. The forms are never straightforward. And you're just hoping that you're doing it right. The advantage of doing it yourself is of course it's free apply. You can do all yourself and you're going to save the money but you're going to be spending a lot of time other organizations that do play for grants for you and this is something that you can google in your local area. There's ton of these companies because They know how to apply for these grants. They know exactly what to put in these applications that get approved and what to do to greatly. Increase your likelihood of approval so These are great Organizations to work. With now i have applied for. We applied for grants as a company. before without A service like this. And we've applied with services like this and the likelihood of approval is much higher with a service because they know how to felt these applications. They know exactly what makes a good application. What increases your chances and all that kind of stuff. Plus do all the leg work for you. They just basically send you emails asking you for a bunch of information that they can't Come up with themselves about your company. What you do and while you offer and Y you should get this grant. But they do all the paperwork and phil and everything else and make sure that it's You know filed properly and all that kind of stuff now a lotta. You could just find them in your local area and google They have different pricing schemes. some people will pay a flat fee some people pay a little bit upfront and some mortgage just ask for flat percentage of the grant ten fifteen twenty percent of the grant now for many people that are busy and running a business you know if a company takes fifteen percent of whatever grant. They get specific example. The government gives one hundred thousand dollars for the grant. They're going to pay this organization. Fifteen grand which is a lot of money no to do this process for them but It's almost like eighty five grand with minimal effort because you're you're doing about fifteen percent of the work versus one hundred percent of the work because you know you just filling out the information that applies to your business that The organization needs so if we were buddies Having a drink together. And you're asking my opinion i would say go with the organization Because it just saves you so much. Time and time is money and business They will increase your chances of getting the grant because of that the also able to steer you in the right direction for which grants you should apply for You know you shouldn't be applying to everything that you see. Some are going to be more applicable to your business. Some of them are things that you can apply over and over again every year. Like i mentioned so feel free to Of course asked this company or this organization which grants or the ones that you should go for. So if you do work with a grant You know type of company company that helps with grants. This is kind of a two birds one stone if you don't have a lawyer ordered account to help you with this They can actually Loop un when a new grant is available or when you can apply so of course They're incentivized because they're going to get paid or get a percentage of the grant so You're you're definitely gonna get some correspondents from them now. Of course when you apply for a grant guaranteed you'll get approved. You could put a lot of time and effort into putting the grant together and then you just simply don't get approved and that's kind of money down the drain especially working with organizations is asking for something upfront Some organizations will ask for a bigger percentage Because they're taking all the risk and that work for you but he ended the day I think should try to apply for two to three grants a year if they're available especially if they're like standard grants that are every year This increases your chances of getting one or two grants out of the three and it's just a numbers game in my opinion and we've done this. We've gone rnd grants. We've gotten grants to help us with marketing and again. If you're trying to fly for many grants this is why working with a company can really help you. Because you're doing this process over and over more than once and they can use all the information you gave them to apply for. The next one does make a whole lot easier so in my experience it is worth it because It definitely can give you some boosting cash. It also allows you to understand that there are opportunities for you to grow now. Grants take a while they don't they're not like instant where you get cash You know in twenty four hours that you can take months to get approved so should be something that you work towards or that you plan for you putting your calendar and you kind of make it a regular thing throughout the year. I also want to mention that. You know when you're getting a grant from the government times you're going to have to keep record of how you're using the grant. Every grant is different but often grants stipulate. Hey how are you using this money They might check back in later on. Say hey How did you utilize his money. the results all that kind of stuff. So it's not. Actually you know free money and they want to make sure that they granted the people that actually are making use of the grant. And not just you know pocketing the money. I got more on today's topic but before that let me give love to today sponsor support for today show comes from woven. You no longer have to feel overwhelmed trying to keep track of all your work meetings. Doctors appointments could soccer practices and all those plans to get together with friends. Woven is an all in one calendar to helps you blend both your work and personal lives while enabling you to spend time on what matters most. Oh speaking about wolf into my teammates Whether our software company because He was having a hard time. You know ordaining. His personal counter his work counter. He also does some volunteer speaking and he was just kind of fed up with the whole thing john to check wolf. Because it can sink all your calendars in one place including google and microsoft sixty five calendars and the thing. I thought was really cool that you can create an you scheduling links from directly within your calendar and woven. You can use time blocking and you could track your time and gain insights if you're being productive even grieve for podcasters. That are looking at publish links to handle all their guests. For podcast book bookings i always say that. Your time is your biggest asset. Because it's absolute truth. You can always make more money inc. But you can't make more time so you kinda be covetous of your time you got to treat it like gold and one way to do that is to be better with your calendar because if you put in your calendar they usually happen and guess what happens if you don't put things in your calendar. Somebody just grabs that time. Somebody whether it's an email whether it's a call if it's not spoken for you're asking for trouble okay. So one way to take control of all your calendars and all the things you do in life and business is to use woven woven is one hundred percent free to use for several months download. The woven app found across iowa's web ipad and microsoft or visit woven dot com to learn more and get started organizing your life that's w. o. v. e. n. dot com throw up. Today's lesson government grants there a lot of work. They take a lot of time. They require certain language to put into the application. So you can get approved so my opinion get some help getting organization that can help you get approval and it's incentivized to get your grants approved and they'll just go for one gopher two or three in the year and your chances of getting one or two of them or even all three is pretty good. It's a great way to get some cash in your business to take you to the next level and work on. Those new projects even wanted to work on. Thanks so much for listening to the hundred ambiance. If you love here hit subscribe right now. So you don't miss a be run Gas app and it's absolutely free to subscribe. And you get access to over. Sixteen hundred episodes and archives by hitting subscribes to do that right now before we go. Wanna leave you with this. Entrepreneurs are notorious for hating paperwork and forms and things. That just are boring right. We want to create. We want to be excited. You want to be creative right. So if form-filling is not your thing and you're turned off and you're like grants sounds boring than get somebody else do. It doesn't mean that you have to do it. Okay part of being an entrepreneur is understand. Even if you want to get things done specially things that you don't wanna do you hire out. You got other people do it if there's an roi at the end of the day that's all matters. Thanks so much listening. And i'll take you into mars episode qna wednesday. I'll see then take care.

Nba ten minute hundred dollar ebay fifteen percent one hundred dollars ten fifteen twenty percent omar google one hundred thousand dollars one hundred percent one stone phil twenty four hours money inc. un government microsoft wolf soccer
The Most Effective TRICK To Turn More New Subscribers to Money  Ep #6

Dashnex Insider with Peter Garety

16:41 min | 2 years ago

The Most Effective TRICK To Turn More New Subscribers to Money Ep #6

"Welcome back to another episode of the dash since either podcast would mean your host beer Garrity. I'm super pumped about what I'm going to share with you today. But before we get started, I want to remind you the dish show is about providing simplicity speed in the results for your own business. It's about helping you to navigate your way through the exponentially, increasing complexity. So did you can focus on the things that really matter? When it comes to growing your business. And with every episode we bring you a strategy tactic short at or methods that you can instantly apply in your business to significantly increase the R Y on your effort, and deceptions owed is not going to be any different. What you will learn into separate easily generation marketing hack that will help you to convert morph your new subscribers to pay customers and the best part is that it super simple. It's, you know, it you'll be able to implement it right after this episode literally following through putting that in your campaigns that you're have right now in your lead generation campaigns and really start to see that connects. Twenty x or even thirty x results from your existing campaigns without changing anything else, and that the best part. So when I start this episode by saying that it's widely known fact that the Email with the highest open rate is usually, the first Email that you sent after people subscribe to your Email list, it's also known as of welcome Email. Right. And, for example, would my welcome Email campaigns I have seen open rate as high as ninety percent which is almost impossible to replicate with the next emails, but even with this widely known information most businesses that are generating leads online today, don't have a welcome Email at all. Can you imagine that? That they don't have a welcome Email at all, or if they do have a welcome Email. It's basically saying thank you for subscribing. Here's the free stuff that we give you for subscribing to our list. Please go and check it out for some reason, and discount of stupid assume. But for some reason, you know, people assume that just because someone regretted a PDF or video, they are going to actually watch video or going to read that PDF. You know, people are lazy. They don't do that right to they subscribe based on the marketing that you did before, you know, to get them to subscribe, but then they get distracted with something else. And they don't read your PDF, or they don't watch your video, and that's why welcome Email is super crucial. So let me be very clear here. You absolutely must have a welcome Email, that's focused onto. Thanks for. I you wanna build trust that Email is to build trust to really make sure that people see that your real the yield that they can trust you that, you know, what you're talking about or your business knows what they talk about and stuff like that. And the second reason is you wanna make the best possible offer through those who join your Email list right away, because you don't want to wait for them to kind of figure out whether they want to join you're not you wanna make them. Join as soon as possible. And then if it's not something, they wanted, you know, you can refund or whatever, but it's important to close the deal as quickly as possible, and the welcome Email is the best place to start now the cool part for you right now. Is that everything that I just said, was nothing to do with the lead generation marketing hack that I wanted to share with you in this episode? It was just the basic stuff because without sharing that basic staff anything that I will talk to you about right now will not make much sense and that's why I had to share it. But the real hack that I wanted to share with you, and is something that, you know, I see very, very few businesses ever use, and that's called a welcome outta mation. So for you to take a pen and paper right now they take them out and you know, right down unto top. Welcome outta mation. All right. Welcome outta mation in short is a way how to use the same Email the same welcome Email to maximize open rates that you get because the more people will open your welcome Email, the more money you're going to generate is just a numbers game that scowl the generation works in a once you get people or. Your Email list. It's just the numbers game. The more people will open your Email, and see your message, the more money you're going to make therefore what I'm going to show you right now and explain to you right now is a simple outta mation that takes minutes to create yet it can get you ten percent twenty percent or sometimes even thirty percent. More people to see the most important Email that you sent and the message that you have in that Email, essentially, you'll get more people to open your Email, your welcome Email and dad's going to increase result significantly for you. So what I wanna do right now is basically talked to you about the automation. Now, most E mail service providers today provide away, how to create an automation. So if you are using get response active compaign, a Weber, male. Chimp. They all provide a way for you to great anonymous. So what I want you to do right now is take dependent paper and on top of it right down. Welcome outta mation, and then draw a box which says subscribed to E mail list or subscribed to compaign it depends, which also responded or Email Sarah's pride at us. But the first step down our mission is, you know, to answer the question how people are going to get into the automated and usually it happens by subscribing through Email list or by getting attack. So in your case, if you are building an Email list, all widsom often forms online, then, you know, it might be the case that people sign up for an opt in form or it might be a case that they sign up for a specific list, or it might be a case that, you know, they got US Pacific tag, you know, after they completed helped. Form or something like that. So in other words on top of the page ride down welcome subscribed to the Email us. Right. So that's the first box, then you want to draw an arrow pointing to the next box in into next box is essentially a waiting box, and, you know, in that box, you basically wanna before your subscriber so people that subscribe to your Email as before they kind of, you know, receive any next step, you wanna wait for about, you know, five ten fifteen minutes, and so, basically, before you send a welcome Email, you're gonna wait for ten fifteen minutes and the reason being is because welcome Email is generally send out immediately after people subscribe to your Email list, but you don't want to do that. You want people to go through the experience, that you have created for them for whatever happens after they opt-in, maybe you have a thank you page may be. Have a special offer that you pushed to them after they subscribed to get your free. Be. Right. Whatever it is. You want them want to allow them to go through that experience. You wanna show them all those pages. Right. And only after that happens. You wanna send them something else? Right. So you wanna send him the welcome Email? And so, so that's why you want to create that box, which says wait and you wanna wait for you know, ten fifteen minutes before you take the next action, the next action. This is number three, so draw the box number three send the welcome Email. So now, your sending to welcome Email, where as we talked about, before you have to elements, you have an element of building trust. So you introduce to yourself and you, you talked about how you or your business is helping people like the subscriber to get certain results, you know, maybe you have some testimonials from existing customers that you can share. With people to build the trust, whatever you use to build the trust us that in the welcome Email. And then the second part is to make the best deal possible. We will talk in some of the next episodes, we are going to talk about the making the best offer what it is. And what it needs to be. Because there is a lot of confusion about that out there as well. But right now, we will leave it as it is so make the best offer as you understand it and make that into that welcome Email. Right. So send it out. Now. What happens in most part? So this is where for the most part people, and either automation or basically. They're welcome the sedation or the welcome Email and write to there's nothing more happening. But because you are listening to this episode you will not end there. He'll actually expand his welcome outta mation further. You know, they're to maximize resultant get that ten. X twenty x thirty x on your current rate. So what do you want to do? Now. You wanna said the next box, which is the box number, I believe, four than me, check right now in my notes here yachts. Number four. And what do you want to do there with number four is basically, you wanna set the waiting time? All right. One said the waiting time again and disdain, the waiting time, we'll be six to eight hours. All right. And what are you are going to wait for you? Basically are going to wait for the Opitz because not everybody are going to open that welcome Email. Right. Some people will do that. And like generally the rule is that majority will do that right away. But there will be like forty or sometimes you in fifty percent of people that will not open that Email right away. All right, soon, await for six to eight hours. And after the six to eight hours, you want to draw. All the next step or the next action in your automation. And that's called what if right? It's called what if I'm using active campaign for for my automation. So there it's, it's called. What if in others it might be called differently? But the idea is that you basically create what if and that what if depends on this question, whether the people who received the welcome Email open that welcome Email, right? And you will have to actions under that. What if automation rule, and those actions are going to be, yes? They open the Email or no. They didn't open the Email now for those that opened the Email, you know, you have obviously option to expand this further now, but I'm not going to talk about that in this episode. So what we wanna do now. So those who opened your welcome Email, we want to end out a mation for them normal. Yeah. You would expand it further. You would look whether they have opened the particular link that's important in that welcome Email or not. And if they have nod than you wanna send another Email, which would be different Email, but for the sake of simplicity right now, you want to end out mission here. All right. So if they have opened that Email, you end, outta mation right day now for dose, who have not all been the Email, you won the send the welcome Email again, but with the different subject line, so you change the subject line. So it's not like a repeat at Email, but the Email content is exactly the same. Right. So that subject line is different. But the Email content is exactly the same so you send it out. And then you move to step seven were you wait again for six to eight hours? And again, you wait for the same idea, whether they open the Email or not. And again, if they opened you can end automation, if they didn't open you can repeat the process. And every time you will repeat this process for the first, you know, forty eight hours, you will see extra you know, ten five fifteen twenty percent. Albans would every of those emails and the cool op side of all of this process is not just that you get instant kind of leverage in terms of, you know, revenue or trust building. But you also get the higher open rate, which will then improve that following emails that you will be sending later because your Email service provider and also the Email clients, like, g mail, they are all tracking the reputation of you, as a Senator. So I'm now going and kind of more complex topic, which we condemn. We talk about at some point later on, but generally, you wanna get more people from those who subscribe to your lest open your emails, and trust your ma-. Message right, trust your name in their inbox. And that's why this welcome our nation. Not only provides kind of an instant leverage in terms of revenue, because the more people will open the Email. The more people who clicked the links in your Email. The more people will buy from you, right? But also, you will have a longer a fact and kind of engagement higher engagement with your emails, which will then you know, increase the result even further. And that's why this welcome outta mation is so so powerful in this lead generation marketing hat is super powerful and you know, to create this kind of automation is very, very, very simple. Right. And it takes maybe minutes may be few minutes to do since you will be writing just one Email may be to emails indus-, but the upside is so so much greater. All right. So now you have the number one lead generation marketing hack. That you can use an implement today to basically make more money with your welcome Email, and with your subscribers in general and the biggest takeaway, that I wanna give you and want you to remember from this episode. Is this welcome automation is your wants per subscriber trance to build trust, and close the deal and don't neglect it at all because neglecting, deaths once per subscriber opportunity will negatively impact the revenue that you generate and our why did you get from your lead generation campaigns it super super important? So that's it for today's episode. Thank you for tuning in and listening. I also wanted cord you to go to dash Knicks inside their comfort slash episode six where you will get, you know, more insights, and episode six episode and then six the number, Dan. And so for the more insights of what we talked about today in this episode and you will get also the drawing of the automation itself, so you can leverage that in us that and you can see exactly what I talked about in this episode and also don't forget to subscribe, so you get the next episode as soon as we release it because they're always more insights, and more strategies coming your way. So you can simplify your own land business and generate more allegiance. Subscribers and make more money with it. So this is nicks insider, with peer Garrity. Thank you for tuning in talk soon. Bye. For now.

US Knicks Garrity Weber Sarah Senator Albans Dan eight hours ten fifteen minutes ten five fifteen twenty percen five ten fifteen minutes forty eight hours ninety percent thirty percent twenty percent fifty percent ten percent
Ep. 98: Scaling SMBs Through The Power of Social Commerce

Advertising Is Dead

43:13 min | 8 months ago

Ep. 98: Scaling SMBs Through The Power of Social Commerce

"One of the game changes in recent years was small and medium size businesses. smb's gala has been the of social governments to be able to leverage spirit of social content powered by the ability to drive sales has become enabling of accelerated growth for them and their products truly showing that increase digital economy smallest new lodge dig deeper into this as as a broader ecosystem around it Empowerment built upon it and speaking to the director of small and medium businesses at facebook india on the show. Today i'm one gala. The glitch and with back with at his did this to my report. Costlo hey football should presenting football Short by a show about friends discussing our favorite game over sometimes three. Maybe even five. Hi i'm shiva. And with my sidekicks. God of separate category sidekick batmans robin van. Persie robin norm alexis sanchez. But with two more skill than just playing the piano just shows the best players at arsenal amir. Bench warmers. that united. Thank you. Would you oughta fulham supporter. So anyway. you say anything to support me. I questioned my beliefs. Just like policemen would say a vitamin this is your lilia the op giving isn't that banter aside. We've talk metropolitan transferred room. Top controversies fantasy. Football picks and so much more so grab a bill and tune into football should ball every wednesday on the ibm podcasts at website. Over you get podcasts. Welcome back to his dad with hyatt's number. Finally do this if i do this. Yeah he has not this episode for all those who are listening has been in the looks for months now. it has said they've been multiple reasons and and and illnesses than everything has happened to make sure this episode gets delayed. Still happening right. We made it. We made it happen l letter episode number ninety eight. I one hundred more deleted ben. We had a discussion of linebacker At nine one of the things which i was really excited about to do on this episode because amini to answer i have done episodes in the past people can have like. What do i do. If i'm a small business. What do i do. If i'm in a that the ascetic so what can i really do. If i'm if. I'm a small entrepreneurs young entrepreneur. How do i lived social. And what is available to me on platforms and stuff. So what excited will give them a broad-based yet also bit of space fixing bed. So i thought outside of the broad based question it. Start with What do you think the broader affects for a small business Pity the kind of tools platforms like facebook kind of brought on And enforced if you had broadly. What changes have you actually seen them. Going to bring about shows how is not as not always customer first-rate. Let me tell you what the customer landscape change. And then from there we will bridge to how the world has changed for assemblies. I think if you look at it for customer let's get perspective. We have commissioned this devoid with the itchy as when Do you think that was clearly happened right. So there has been an increase in transactions. Did you by fifteen twenty percent rate. that's a given. It's obviously a very large metro train. But it's happening. The second to that is for the people that are transacting online. The intend to continue to do so has extremely hasten. If i were to big apple eliza at degree you know their intent is gone up to nearly ninety percent if i think super-g has got to gideon's could mean for non-food but even if i were to average it out it's between eighty to eighty five and then the next bridge is do the same set of people one to increase the Of spending the answer to that is yes again So across all of these categories of the event to spend more is being expressed by more than forty percent of the people right saying he will want to spend more so i think all of these very very indicated with the fact that the consumer demand has kind of increased like never before and been go to the assembly word. What's changed the assembly. So when released a state of the business. Smb sylvie afford india there a couple of headlines there. There was a headline that said thirty. Five percent of the assemby's In the next few months or now are currently seeking You know capital to just run daily operations thanks. So that's drastically changed. We know that as we As coburn happened in a before after life is religion for us. It is a very very strong woke. Slow capital crunch. That's one the second is what we also seemed is lifted. we've also seen forty one percent of the businesses Saying that digital has become a quarter of the news like you know trends that are happening in isolation but when stitch together tells you how large the aflame to online fortunate these becoming and therefore the headline there really is. it's almost imperative for business to come online Not because of anything is but fairly because consumers consumer demands You know just. The size of card have completely increased host ovid and therefore important for that To translate into the digital. those would be the pieces I think that that's pretty much. They don't want your long drawn answer. One what aspect. Which finding district is that. You look at the marketing side of things straight up. Just generally how you don't you. you need was distribution. The other one was hired market Obviously gormless on one believe helped Not distinguish ability for On the marketing side. You look at it rubio in reading this really interesting because it it. It was almost an interesting picture of it if you look at the water digital marketing things small and medium businesses actually do the most in terms of being able to grow so much more than they would have. Let's say in traditional brick and mortar. Space is so what do they do on on on platforms. Which in many ways the largest to do What is almost giving inherently To someone who is a small businesses someone was a cynical and sick and this is a great tool for us. limits us to market myself muscled and so Let me let me shine onto that questioning to butts read. The first part is clearly the largest. Fortunately these are in the assemblies face. Right two hundred fifty million as newbie do believe india Just based about four hundred million. Which is the number of people. Be joking if you'll make to those bridges together. It's almost natural for a lot of the small business starts to become successful If they have the flexibility to bug the jets. Let me give you an example. I'm sure you've heard of the brand q. Metric so too much was not really an offline during orbit like many other brands they went Completely online and when they did this saw practically phoenix increase in the platform usage And they win. Newly dines on their online business but that's one aspect which is a education when largely offline online. And it was that happened And then maybe just a completely different bridge may be bigger story like Story at home. It's voter base business And like every large retail business metastases eighty thousand square feet from spain's And kuban happens then one day. You just don't hurt people running and that's the truth and that's exactly what happened They moved badger these online. They moved their joe to The family of apps Embiid it just started nearly one point four times the sales during the so i think bridge. That's important to make here is to say that foreign smb's. I think the criticality for them to be in the digital space was increased International a natural criticality. There are successes that are happening. And therefore if increased aggression needed to start thinking these journeys and starts with apple of testing loans. Who don't have to the lodge budget. None get your boss and then take the next step but giannis need to start how you seen this aspect especially change. Let's say over the last four or five years thumbs just did not just the adoption and obviously gorge pushed a lot of stuff ahead but if you looked at almost five years ago -education Across the board don't just practices. And how was your blessing. The tools across the platform trade. I'm in love. I look at. I look at instagram. And and look we're going to see different ways in which leverages how to sell their product and showcase it but how have you seen that evolve especially for fires okay. I think a couple of things have changed right and four. Five years is a is a fairly long window. The two one two years navies enough to let me actually start from The was system as of nineteen really You know was one of the largest years where the maximum number of this funding and show. You have this whole bunch of other Back but the we. I think there was one. The coming in off a really strong investments in the early stocked upstate's to hosted a lot of the brands to turn into uniforms. So that was that was that was happening. The second stream that was happening is performance. Marketing became critical. More than ever so You know this whole journey. I'm saying i want to go across the funnel in wanted to go step by step Just stop right. Everybody wanted all of the final riches. You got to know me You to consider me and most importantly to make a transaction You know very short right so we've had very young but ends That has to become the largest city. Rents today's for example mama trait yours. It took two years for them to get to like thirty plus cities. If you asked me that like five years ago it will be impossible to do in. Cpt straight And predominantly on the back of either digital or their own website So i think that's the that's the second piece that's changed. I think that's changed. Is people become acutely conscious of the value of the donors. there is no valuation and the latest value of the dollar So i'll valuations moving the value of the dollar. Also people have become extremely confident. Also this matter with They know that You know if performances the play then they will pick the right product spencer. For example two years ago three years ago you would not have as aggressive conversations with some of the customers on dining magadan products. Which is you'll catch right now. The use it extensive. And it's a very key driver for them of showcasing their catalog controlling who the audiences that one wondering how demanding off on the managing margins. So i think this old bridge off a digital to profitability has just completely changed right. And it's not a betty wise phone foolish right a of the typically say he added digital. But you know we want to know the last value of the last dollar spent suddenly because digital is the only person who can tell the allows value of the donor spent to ya. Get get your mama flash if you're loving business in I'm happy you said performance because it didn't testing is i'm a check. The on one of the founders of another agency and their focus has has largely been performance. Las medias in us telling me how the budgets have been slashed and rightly so because no manufacturing has taken to seep stone across the board Anything i'm really not i. It is the market said urine. Such a great spot right now because your focus is performance monty and if i had to pick like three to five things which which are literally the future for the Five by four dividing windows was agrees is real alenia. Did about six months now at six months. Six months timeline. Because somebody asked me what happened with the content business over a different perspective than have today but also looking at your focus. So that that's going to be such a core part of every brand thinks markets salvage no longer the low hanging fruit. It's the the prime. They'll need to survive. I think this is what it is. What is what does this one. Doesn't he need business. Need the must be that you need of she outside of a great idea and it being really. Great at not pickers person using. It's a brilliant idea your multi data but because it's a great idea A post the at i think the most critical pieces are get your customers how you do that. You can get your customers. Only this big go global you illegal over this way So i think that's the orientation that's coming which is made it extremely critical but more importantly we also sees across a host of other things right to last year for example. We launched the vc reading beta program And that's part of the program Upscale moved up Nearly one hundred fifty brands early messed advance. Rate starting off learning how to do Online more importantly trying to understand what the facebook family Does them or just a bit that we do around business. Killing which is at advertiser program goes up nearly three thousand advertisers. So i think what stockton happening is on the smb. The need for killing has increased significantly. I think on the platforms the the loosening for the neatest gained up significantly right so why that is one set which is invested in. They leverage the program. I spoke of aren't there is another set that can leverage skilling. We still have of betty on bech like my first ruby. On facebook family of apps and data again seen lake nearly four the customers right or facebook So i think all of these motions are getting triggered together based on the motion as we need to go online businesses online. We need to go global. How do we feel it right. And then every just talks to that you mentioned the upskilling and and the grand species pacific Have there been things that have surprised of the areas that that businesses actually want to focus on up skilling themselves which you would initially have toured. They would want or have been special cases. That were interesting. That people have used those options. Lots of those. Let me take a step back in. Break this into pots drink. Funding is one need for business right now. And so the grants program that we launched which goes out to You know three thousand businesses in india investment over thirty two crows Is for those who need working capital. I really young. Smb's has been impacted by coburn. So that's one part of the second bottle feed is also balance between how do we nibbles Drink than how do we make sure that the consumers are doing what they can cut to enable them much and so for example. I have this trump which is like not even half a kilometer from my house or bulbs coffee. You make coffee love it. Maybe because my days go by whatever it is but I would love to pick a gift card or a small business and support. Bob's coffee inbox coffee needed. And therefore gift cards becomes that product that enables you to do exactly that. So that's really funding side of the peace right don't The story is really baffling are win. businesses come up with extremely extremely different ways in which they they can almost london. Fortunately in how to use the family trade. So for example other chicken is stored in a lot not have any left. Noah's bagels widow And that's where the stories and they suddenly saw eighty percent of their full and immediately moved to igt e to start showcasing that they are now generating nearly team football to digital channels that actually into this into their physical store in life comes back. Yeah that he come back to but it just just switch that they did which is generated really really large revenues for them similarly like occupied woman corporate. Don out of goodra Beverly woven happen. Everybody was hitting within mandatory that they could not sell. They came together home corporate. And now i think some not mistaken just during just after ovid Their district nearly a one point four six on their revenue. So i think it's a lot of learning. These businesses are doing which literally translating into business tons. Which is Literally starting the cycle of people just doing more on digital platforms. Do see them not necessarily going back to everything they did. In the physical world a lot of these businesses it's obama have abundant and businesses. The likes jim. go off. they look at it right. I have a hundred piece to spain. I wanna spend to get a customer And the customers should come at a certain cost so that it doesn't my margin and that realization is so strong in the market now. That was never did. You could say campaign it to wide number of impressions and then you are happy because somebody saw the ad but now just the funnel to the. Nfl has become so important for them. Saying some of the other day. That was that i've heard a lot more in the last six more than i've heard in the last many years was efficiency optimization across every single thing that happens in in this case i didn't hear the word roster like three years ago so i if somebody said arroyo you'd be like bingo man really knows that it was leaked and missile before was impressions clicks before they was usery sound ancient. But that's keeping the judges. I i might ninety nine. We will get hit and be sick. Hundred million hits if you said that they were doing all of that was like what is what does it mean. They cornea some and will tell it comes on the fact that i think that's what i also like about the moment within. That is the fact that we finally come to that point where we truly understood how we can get as much value out of using The platforms and we have our disposal by okay. 'cause he was think of entity fields Really wanted her to have as many lakes and they wanted to have as many of us. And then you heard words leg engagement and then you know you end but i think now you're clearly i am. I am moving product and the day you start moving product. That is the only metric that that he wins. Or look at and and that's where it's really come too. I think the other thing. That's also move. Is this orientation and understanding of people on just customer feedback. Customer reviews right. That's that was very scarce houston to market like india Typically every time a customer said you. she's unhappy. They will get lego. Such people who can be expected to just keep them shut because fifty Nobody would believe that that would be to cycles. It could be smb space now. There are hundreds of smb's that do custom prada on hakin on personal on skin kid like I think it's just. It's getting very hyper competent. Of yes it is getting better performance therefore that's to you for business. The other thing which which i actually wanted to ask As somebody also is is instagram shopping has become. I think. I think i did a lot more on Over the last six months actually than at ended a claude before just generally in a consumption standpoint If i was a i was a business today. The defense and how it can leverage each. I think i would leave. It depends on what the outcome you're looking worry for example if you were looking If you were really starting afresh windy you really didn't know what to do outside of the fact that this is my goal and this is my page I would ask you to genetic and locate automated ads. Once you go in stock peaking within the platform i think You can use both at different points in the journey on your platform for example if you you auto visually have product. It's great to use instagram shopping. Because it brings out that experience Extremely strongly If you're looking at acquisitions in what's on three legal So i think the japanese will depend a on. What are you seeing. Entered given point of no custom rights. Tuesday established that be used agrements. Pepsi's seventy us facebook. I think you'll leave us a combination of all three products including what's happening because their journey is going to be about on acquisition retention Re-targeting humidity shopping optimization of shopping And then all the way to servicing and different points. I'm depending on where you are. I think you should be using a combination of what we've got x. It's not you know at north people. Ask me this question. Make you know. I have a business producer should do Not need a customer yesterday to get a customer on instagram. and you'll get a customer on So i think it's it's just a bounce gently optimizing on on the mixing that sense. That's and therefore that obvious to do it you. Should you know you have an option to big multiple sources and depending on. Hollywood is performing. Then you decide to go ahead. And say i will be used Lead different angle on. This is just fact that i'm a large part of the of the ordinary discuss Starting off the irs early days producting also the big junk cool who started off the pre digital era kind of vanishing into the world has changed around him as well so if i was a marketer today at a brand side agency side etc. What do you think about the things that we often miss. And i believe that agencies are obviously have been far behind branded understanding many of these pieces. A and i've constantly said this but What do you think other meals that. I need to understand which sometimes fail to understand the Will this space but hall hall small businesses and startups. lee leveraging. these spectrums which. I'm necessarily not doing myself. I i disagree with the statement. Partially i think law agencies young agencies agencies that get this right i make because they're losing but i was also tried to get you to say that i wouldn't india agency was system because sometimes agencies e come up with the best ways to use the platform if you hear rowling behind meets needs my dog biscuit screaming Or woken up so so. So that's the fuss by the second. I think specifically is a booth. Smb's any densities right. Have very clear looted to understand what's important for business which is performance. But i think what the miss sometimes is they do particularly about getting the conversion bet. You'd per day. So i bought thousand bucks today. Iran destined on. I suddenly got an acquisition. It'd be buxom. Hypothetically them then the second campaign offering the same campaign Five other changes entirely might survive position Hundred degree bucks. And you're like this doesn't look for what is important for businesses to know. Is any machine learning platform if ending on the objective and the campaign pitcher us. We'll take machine learning some time to get released. Mont about your final objective and therefore horley don't be in this holiday to constantly change your camping because shooting yourself in the foot. I think that's very important. And then that pressure leads to agency saying richly after our big data Experience rebecca so i think agencies are getting smarter because i think that also understanding the five vetted any given point of time consolidating camping's aggregating A lot of the campaign is that they do because thousand campaigns don't mean equal mondo optimization technique literally you may need it If your business structure this like that you may be multi-city within multi-city may be hypothetically assuming needed businesses don't need that and therefore the consciousness to be smart about it. More campaign doesn't mean from And constantly changing your campaign which is more hard. Work doesn't mean that you'll get better. I think that's the most critical. The second part i think that goes a critical You sometimes though cooled for what people are expecting. Also bring a little deeper. But i think it's also keep reaching during the same period. So i'm either re-targeting Then i'm focused on re-targeting right and therefore all efforts to do that in the middle of the campaign. I can switch to doing expecting something expecting the campaign to deliver that results so i think that is the other piece that have bins and most importantly i think is people undervalue creative. I think that's the most critical piece and we've seem like drastic change in banja when they start twitching. Who has creatives than they have. You know stopping the news. I think those guidelines are critical and they tend to get missed but they're very very important to keep in mind being to cold point. Is that his affected how we The the fabric havi actually by has almost become a point does something that we ended up seeing on on feed. That makes us there. That journey over so in in essence. I actually said Said that. I feel like i wanna Window shopping spree and end up shopping in between In life. Like i'm the gordon this episode on a mike which i just bought like a couple of days ago because my earlier make all the works I just had it happened to come I did a couple of just came across this once and then kept coming back to me and said you know you want me to buy. You eventually bought it. I am happy with it. So i'm like good enough. i can. People can see my face fanatic should according to the mother. But i think it's that is is it's a as human beings be intuitively become. It's part of the experience of of of how we are online. And it seamless almost is a seamless ardo of Move it on the internet now. Italy lake distressed or stressed evenings landing into a browsing ten things and then getting into car in the belief that like three days later they'll be accelerated cheaper even if there isn't margin to that it getting cheaper just the joy of it actually cheaper you buying without realizing when you did it in the first place i think it's an ongoing window shopping experience but i think it was betty enabling in many ways right because the ones never been disclosed right By news have never been as important as i think. It's a win. On both sides right consumers spending when they feel like they have more fortunate these they have more selection they have better pricing and watching have the opportunity to take the products to customers as many as possible I think in that sense. it's It's a huge win. It's also in many muslim boating Entrepreneurs who might not have been able to even let's set up show all build Or sell it Guessing fundamental and. This is a broader topic looking women entrepreneurs to be able to do this on. Land is gender. Swim voting for the lot of them will generally not have been able to get out there and do that. It's unfortunate that seem the case But i feel this kind of almost giving them that ability to To do they really wanted to do. And i know. I always kind of frequently energy. Millions comes the woman entrepreneur in general. I i'm had to use it. Because i couldn't think of any other way to say it. I hit that. Like i saw this woman sealed. Not yes oh definitely right man. But i think the important visas luckily stays with. You is just the evolution of this right. So we have a brand corner of ingredients rated question. It is run by women. Unusually that makes it any better And they have just found such a unique way to bring multiple products together and these products that are produced in villages aggregated. A group of people who sell them online Made instagram like a core part of the selling experience Again something like swings british but when you see something like this yet i'm telling you. That solution orton. Invest and loan. And make sure you're not changing your campaign and then he had this brand that is young growing. Does all of these things without any any station. M delivers results. That you and i are talking about here. Right now And so. I think that a lot of these stories that make this Extremely extremely surprising. How snobbism these in be like. I don't know if you've seen this ranch as global. I loved and if you look at their handcuffs to choose on instagram and that instagram live sessions You even if you didn't think you wonder to purchase land approaches and maybe because shop or live but Just amusing to see these journeys to these falling for awhile. Who i feel. I have a relationship with because much on that de shirt brand. I mean i. I've like i literally have survived the dialogue leading much And as soon as he opened up for sailing a couple more was genuinely did something. So nice about a brand that that is also using in many ways. also bringing it to almost a modern spin anonymously. I'm watching idolize but it's interesting to see that entire evolution and yet so we've all building relationships with brands like these amazing like i. I love this rankled. Bamboo india I'm by houston. They ended ended. Obama products like the name indicates. But like they do these organic toothbrushes. They are knock blasting and they come with your name ingraham on this joy in just like you can every morning. Which is which is not because nasa sticking anyway but just like you just a completely changing experience estimated to the way alo- customers looking at buying bridges and stuff look ahead and you can look looking to future gazing healed dumping Video see this entire piece of how business i going to use tom. But also like how we're going to shop just like looking as i said again in that sense. Okay so i think i think a couple of things in theresa may sound deputy but i think The whole journey off products coming online and being betty focused on customer acquisition delivery in fulfillment Is going to be extremely and we will see a lot of young rennes continuing to do that. So i think that's the fun that i see scaling exponentially every and i gave you a sense of how this is part of the beasley to four but that itself is is so liberating to save that If ninety percent of these consumers then these these shopping experiences will happen on all of these platforms. I think that's the that's the first. I think the second thing that's Interestingly changed already. And i i see it getting ready to is. Suddenly there is a social is getting out of people a go system right Social comments in many reason on different. Say you call it social because the outcome you're seeking or you call it social presents a personal out if you into being performance then social performance on a very different because you may well liberty and you may be well looking for people to like All of your content. This is not the thing. I don't want to do like campaign but it could. Just be that right so i think the second bit that's really is to say we know the platforms. We will use them for outcomes. And i think that i would shoot to is. I think increasingly almost experiences that going to be keith for everybody and businesses are as you said. They their lifestyle. They're not distinct from Any behaviors they be. Have outside of that growth. Yes will you will browse will go to shop. You will purchase You get from really return. You'll review all experience are going to happen completely online late so my sense is that i'm extremely bullish of the space but more importantly i'm more bullish about the fact that you'd be a keeble driving some home. We speak about dot dot forget the abilities and it's not the next valuation drought always e. You want to be seeking to grow. The same business does Such a good point because I- electrically finally come to that point where it is startups in companies back. She showed prophet. And obviously betas. There's a unique. Andreas and it is the rufford ability race and those used to be mutually exclusive. That never really a combined for breakfast now for everybody it's a combined for. They have to focus on both towards the end of every episode I do been called the humans of advertising district away from being the The citing mode shop shock focus. Sparta davis or industrial. When that towards the end of it. I thought think the lord shop is actually. I would have much to spins on that especially episode. what can what can get an instant. Bnl the analytic instead. Who's divorced academic kid bullet What are you a huge of a fan of just like a time focusing on which we will be surprised that something that is Is something that you do. a lot of. I am windows dream. they have no control. It is may end of day closing and it is my waking up dime. I can tell you how many brands right now running on my feed and which ones of are currently reading which ambien busy merging of look and life has happened in life i was i left the whole bit about adding something to my art and then Beating to just by latest hawaii. I don't think people would believe i do that. But i do that. They can get released inches. I just had to be there for awhile. Have too many days sheets you earn by slick. I put it in the car. i'm i and i've made the mystical forgetting and it was buying something else in things coming up. I i never autos and are like oh damn would make art. I didn't realize Anything you've you've read or listen to which would recommend in recent times I read a. I don't know like it's it's not the nice question to ask but like most people don't read books any more i steady do Added to lead by reading brown. And i don't know alabama around but the it's an amazing. It's so beautifully talks about and maybe designates with nearly two more and bring gender year is because it talks so beautifully about vulnerability and like you know as we always battling right. Do i come in looking vulnerable. Or should i be that strong person in the room was like any other man Owners ballots right and therefore age. The most beautiful of how you can stay under bill and Lead effectively An and why do you think Day i mean there's not gonna die because i think the availability of platforms that are constantly solving for consumers profitability. A now they drive. I don i think is that a platform said help you drive value. Advertising logged die. I think the other thing is also the fact that as long as it is in ovation in products and that his expedition in people like me who in having guards from our homes at seven pm in the night. Advertising is not good on glad we finally got this finally m.'s. I saw deeply regret. I'm not episode number one hundred The only thing. I would say this. I've already recorded episode number one hundred ninety nine to stoppage me the joy of doing the anyways. Thank you so much. Thank thank sadun and thank you. We don did you know. Seventy nine percent of all. Scientists are indian elite. They call taxes militias here. Everyone is just enjoying free are only interested in partying and enjoying this pretty ni dot com bust shoddy low escape bought though you can enjoy life like anything irish. Tell you were discontinued. This country needs fifteen years of dictatorship. That is the only the only way to become super bowl. Senior chinese how their progress not. What's up for the so. What's common between all of these statements. All absolutely rubbish. Fake whatsapp forward spreads like wildfire and our defy any logic the tutti punk them all well family groups plus night. We're what happens when you read a book. Basically just a bunch of guys want to cut through the bullshit of everyone saying this how it won't be true so the next time someone squeezes out somewhat sabatino bs look them dating. The i'm going. Please join me joel. Every mondays for the fresh new episode of those guys bundle my name. Is ashley for the i team. These are truly challenging times and in these times. We need to hope to daytime. Listen to my podcast. Begin the journey available on the podcasts upside app over ever. You listen to podcasts. There is because there's one life and we are life.

india facebook football instagram robin van Persie robin norm alexis sanch amini fifteen twenty percent forty percent assemby forty one percent five years coburn giannis two one two years skilling magadan six months alenia lilia
Material 226: Pixel-palooza

Material

1:39:25 hr | 1 year ago

Material 226: Pixel-palooza

"The good morning good afternoon good evening this is material podcast episode number two twenty six and I you know I heard Canada just had an election so good for y'all we're going out to vote for those voting rights while you got him the world country I would be really really amused to think exactly what a certain chief executive will do when he feels really really some bureau of like law enforcement or Congress or whatever they're just like they're they're waiting for long distance phone call from whatever and in the brain to come up with other ideas is that I imagined that like in the sixties maybe the seventies some government think tank or maybe even the procedure do we do either send like police and arrested and drag out do we just like gas the room and like host and you're not co Hello Andy Good Day which works for both Australia and Canada also WanNa talk about how freaked out some of these all they're having a good time figuring out exactly the gist of what they do and there's been this like binder sitting on a shelf somewhere where as a joke when there are waiting for hours and then just as a party game they thought coming up with okay we'll obviously never have to use this so we can really speak freely about this -Tario took it or there was litigation involved but good for them colony standing up to say I believe it's called colonization and there is that red binder just just for you know I wonder let's just have I'm right next to the binder full of government coming yeah reach out to other demographic because we're doing really really well and more ambitious no you're right you're right sprint and I was thinking this actually thinking about this this morning and the reason why is because I had a busy morning lots of work to do and that's always the time to be do we have we don't have a procedure for like a pulling the let's say the president has been thrown out of office but he refuses to go love when you get when you get to work into this office like Oh what's this red biter Oh my God you have to read this okay bunch of guys like nineteen seventy one they got like a little drunk and look I've just been we won't we won't discuss this I just but that'd be quite a rabbit hole but I'm it's a if I weren't living in the place names are in Kannada Southwestern Ontario is also home to London but we think there's one in England but it isn't it's in south West when you fair listener listening to this podcast when it goes live it will be the Pixel for release day I think also just as a so speaking of commentary we're GonNa talk a lot about the Pixel for on today's show that's going to be I mean that's been on the hot topic in everybody's minds got that he was forgot to plug in the other end of the USB cable he has he has power strip in his office and he forgot that he wanted to make popcorn in his office so we unplugged just when the Internet was getting started there was still like I'd have a couple of weeks now you get sort of like an interact between talk about myself between twitter and Instagram and my blog and other things you have you get to sort of watch my brain sort of evolve between lots of very very sincere budding social commentary but don't worry I mean look look a woman I'm always GonNa put social commentary and do it just sister I feel about the world have only been using for an hour and I can't figure it out it's getting me mad and as as a professional or purported professional I try not to give any opinions you're right and I'm not GonNa go there there's a there's a there's a lot of news about certain shakeups at the very top of the executive branch a side note I didn't put into the notes but I'm gonNA mention it Amazon's already discounted the Pixel for one hundred dollars so that US however I can get the get that little box of Leftover peeps and get this candy bar and get the Graham crackers and stack them and just got or to to for people to sort of simmer on the sort of thing I'm talking about when I'm writing for newspapers still the if like the the actions of wow that looks cool wonder if that's going to be really useful in wow I can't wait to get my hands on that to look the first time trying it to the first frustration where this is like make the outside of a steak give give her that nice conversation or whatever so a lot of people myself included they have this thing called the sears all which is sort of like a killer it's GonNa it's GonNa be like it's always fun when I started off in this kind of job you really if I was writing for magazines so I had like a month it really worked it worked really really well and the fact that I didn't set anything on fire means that retroactively this was not a stupid danger is something that you're gonNA WANNA consider except when Andy and I start talking about things in their next act because their yacht there's a lot to discuss oh lots of social commentary listen every day I'm thinking about the perils of living sue speaking of the perils of living just kind of bring it back to the Pixel for I do not have on anything because I know that a lot of people are might blow that up into Oh my God Andy Andy says it's impossible to charge the battery like no no andy him out through like tranquilize them and take them out through a service exit and then tell people he left of his own free will and I feel as though there's a red and there was there sitting here just kinda like not just not really getting the same experience Andy has and part of that is because women probably Mitt Romney Shelf anyway moving on so I'm sorry I meant that more as a humorous thing as opposed to I'm an now andy has been dutifully posting on Instagram Ivan senior photos Andy I've been like wow you're and he's doing really well I'm actually a little jealous Andy says I don't have a case for the phone right now because the cases that were given to me were for the XL and not for the baby pixel as it's being referred to as and so compete and so I decided well again I don't have I can't I I certainly couldn't shouldn't build a campfire in the middle of my office I'm waiting right now for review units to come in of cases because remember I was haunted by Marilyn Monroe's ghost and like I'm I think okay well yeah because I just looked it up and it looks like it needs to be used in the outdoors preferably not around dry brush or anything that is flammable you because you've been getting some really nice shots and we'll talk about this more we get to the cameras section of our next act but you know I'm ahead the fixings for just like separately like I bought like we had like one Hershey Bar and then I realized that oh well you have a gram crackers which I kind of like and torching fortunately I mo the I mow the weeds in office regularly so they're not allow them to dry and you are at again we're not talking about a flame handy squad there's London in candidate will anyway sorry to burst everyone's bubble but you know just little history lesson there are stripped put the car in your office really I've Made s'mores in my office because I I had I had the opened it got fixed I will say thankfully my husband set up to five with his google account and as soon as brother my kitchen is made of bricks I'm thinking about living in California and the fact that these days just sorry again here's Mary flame thrower only there's no flame is just it puts you screw it on the top of a of of a little hand held propane tank like you'd have to camp so and there's what's as to why that was happening I was like oh I don't want to deal with it and I just kind of like let it slide but it had been weeks where we weren't getting doorbell notifications or we weren't able he did that You know we had missed some integration between the goal sustain and the nest and I didn't really like I didn't connect the dots tackling which a ghost a vampire or scary monster my husband chose the cackling witch which is okay I was expecting that he would go for the vampires we've already paid literally paid a lot dearly for that and by the way that's kind of why I okay we you know I'm GonNa wait till we get to the for it is like a something you use inside a kitchen maid would you're thinking about all to ask the assistant to do anything remotely with any of the nest devices like I couldn't even usually you can speak out loud to engage the security system versus the door so they'll hear it on there and outside and we hear it on the inside to it's cute it incl- could choose between Ed on a bit of a holiday theme going on here since this is like the ketchup section so everybody remembers last week my account got hacked probably that's probably would have considering Romanian here really we lean into the trope here in my household so but that's okay and they're super cute he found out that will he was like in the APP the other day he he obviously he's not like reading the blogs the way that I do every day so I had known that the has the full sized bars okay these kids are going to say I don't know who this person is but they get me they understand they remember what it's like to be triggered Tello video doorbell is getting seasonal themes obviously this is the perfect time for Google to be pushing this out because we're entering Halloween thanksgiving Christmas here in the United States and I couldn't do that I just I don't know I guess you know I I got so which supplement mind these days whatever turns out that's why it was a working because I'm going all out and we decided we're going to do full size candy bars yes yeah so that's a simple thing it's got other bang have like I think I think peop- side leftover peeps and I have for my Su Vida the cooking like you the one thing that a suveyed bath can't do but ring now as a program with law enforcement in some states and counties so kids if you don't want to get in trouble with local of that whole thing so now that we have it fixed now my husband is all like investigate so he and and just everybody knows you know we're we're moving our last week in this house is Halloween week so see I would advise you to advise you to stakeout who has cameras in the neighborhood and who doesn't and to target those who I'm sorry what I shouldn't act so you know I I just WanNa say this is the positive the positive end of everything that transpired last week on Halloween Halloween the you know just having that spirit and so finally I'm going to like heads out there listening got cameras there's cameras all over now and I hate to tell y'all who are not informed a andy we are getting we we're going to get collapsed by this new generation of children okay they are informed they know things because the kids teepee your house is the new owners problem true but I have to say that can't happen here because kids listen any was like the perfect time to do all this and so now in lieu of Standard Ding Dong Song You can do Spooky ringtones for thirty at the most maybe forty the most and that I can afford to buy a couple of boxes and dislike thinking about I was I was I was in the drugstore today uh when you ring the doorbell they'll be a witch cackling and then all open door and I'm going to be a vampire cats let's let's this timing doc because I'm GONNA explain to you why I am not using the Pixel for as a daily driver just yet Before we get into that I WANNA just set us off a little bit sort of like a funnel with a screen on it that takes the flame it just turns it into this cone of like really really really high on your nest APP just look under the seasonal themes there should be a should prompt in there yes but before we before we go asked me for eight years and been so good to me and my husband so I figure that'll be that's what I wanted to let everybody know that the Nestor lows part of that have been saying because it real I really am I am the sort of person who feels as though you've really can't I really can't have an opinion about this worth sharing until Berlex flammable substance because that just would be evil hey gen z. they are more money than my generation and sorry I have really beaten the hell out of this thing I've had every experience I can possibly have and there's there's nothing that there are few things that annoy me than they're not gonNa run away because Oh no we don't WanNa get caught they will like then like email you say hey you give you send us the video for Insta- or somewhere we did not know at their age so I trust them to know that coding my house an egg is actually better for it in the long term especially because this is another who's around and once once like a fun little I'm going to go out with a bang why not what a great way to say goodbye to this beautiful house that has a box by the door ready to pack all this stuff and we go and I think I wanNA make signed this began to put out by the street and I think I'm GonNa let next door now and put everything out this weekend like all the lights and everything I'm set it all up when have the spooky sound in like would literally moving like two days after Halloween so I'm GonNa just have it saying our tests prove that the iphone eleven is gonna come close to touching the nightside feature you don't know that yet there was only one night as with like Pixel Force of people know that this is a pixel phone and but not commenting on anything the worst that I've been doing has been saying there's a feature to illustrate impeach any weeks anyway so if anybody out there with a nest nest hello doorbell wants to partake in this it's available someone who publishes like after one day they could not have possibly have the for one day and they've got like a thousand word review with some sort of headline exactly or and also of course costumes than they won't they'll get away with aloe what I thought you were going to say is that if they are if they did grow up in this neighborhood where there is is this constant threat of brushfires they're gonNA probably go for egging your house rather than saying instinctively they're going to say I'm not going to be coating this house in this dry reactions last week it's good that we follow that up with our reactions after having we've having these phones for about a week and also rolling in what other people in other people who've published reviews so far for one of my best friends get this delicious grilled chicken club sandwich with sweet potato fries and so something I should have known what would happen I walk home because there's a new apparently this donut place opening somewhere like in town I recognize the streets but it's a it's one of those long streets that could be okay oh well I don't I don't think you understand the psychology of the kids today if they see those ring doorbells treating and to get the box of raisins we would we wanna go out with a bang we figured so but I have to advertise it because the neighborhood has been Kinda or maybe suppress the fact that also chill media is full of sensible people that have their particular likes and their particular dislike onto an ad and then talking about the Pill for just one just another note that we thought it would because we're talking so much about initial response our initial between the time that you got the phone and how do you know that the iphone eleven is not better in every single situation so and I got a reminder of this because the iphone eleven colored it a lot more warm tones than the pixel forwarded as really you can't not notice it I decided to of any of any seven towns but Google Lens told me and disappointed me that no it's the it's far far enough away that no I can't just now take a one I happened to notice there is an address in the if he'd like if you touch the spot and we'll take you to the Google maps for this address which by the way I just use like twenty minutes ago unless you unless you're one of those like mutant neighborhoods this like sort of like a magnet neighborhood for trick or treaters it's like the first time I the first time I realized that I'm only going to get like maybe third but simply for your own Fr- yet I'm not making a judgment yet about Oh my God this was the day after the Pixel event I forgot I ignored the fact that eight like like the integrated lend support were if you're in the in camera where Oh look I didn't have to do anything it just intrusive appointment of being on an airline being boarding airline flight and being hungry but no but when you think about and we're going to you're going to be the house like I said I've been like post because as I normally do I'm taking pictures even when I'm not reviewing phone and posting it to twitter whatever and so I thought well okay I'll tag the people that are looking for reasons to say that the iphone is crap and iphone people they're looking for reasons say the android phones crap and Oh my God my mentioned get delicious fresh hot donuts but so I guess I'm mentioning this I'm not making so God so I'm I'm I'm still New York I'm going out to dinner at a at a diner seconds determined that the plate was white and then I don't make me regret having posted this and then after another half hour like okay I officially and were just like this this meows MMA of stupidity and Dopey Nece as people were saying but the texture but I did it anyway I had the iphone eleven with me I had the pixel four with me took the same picture with the same two cameras and just posted it on twitter and happened to notice that you say owned by the way the plate was white but it's a white plate SOB- not not outright saying that the Pixel for got the colors more correct limiter with me so I use the most apt tool I had which was my humanize and after a glance of roughly point four point four one likes that are respectful of other people's likes and dislikes and but then there is that non zero percentage of people that are of android regret having posted this it's like this this is why I the reason why takes so much time is because by the time him F F S I enter the establishment Sake I did I did not I did not happen to have a recently calibrated color I give an opinion on something like you'll see me you'll hear me at least a the rest of this episode mention things that I'm trying not to say judge conclusion all the reasoning all the evidence behind it and I've beaten myself playing devil's advocate to harden this opinion so that I feel as though I can be all things about because whatever because by the time I come up look conclusion that I'm willing to share I feel as though I have made while alongside that getting a beverage to enjoy during the show and you can get like a Halloween candy that's like many birds many bags of pretzels okay where you're you're training kids for the type quote the plate looked white to me unquote and then follow a follow up and I had a follow up with that the the the colored the lighting was and I just when I put quotes around something that means that I'm trying to make fun of you I'm I'm I'm disappointed in you and I want you to know that so I just absolutely arrogant about it you know where I'm going to say that if if I if I decide that this feature that the this camera is weak with high speed early got a clear shot so yes I I'm glad that you showed me this and gadget review photo of a running person and I'm saying that I thank you thank you thank you thank you dear listeners because I've had this I can't I feel as though I can't have that kind of like I am so or had the number one podcast in this category and or I'm kind of okay with Photoshop either one of those complement and reflects well on this podcast we'll take either one in which we do a web search for a Google search for a podcast about the GimMe Gimme to see how where we are now the number one search result in writing out to southwestern Ontario that's in Canada not in the United States of America I've Lords Ion and I'm joined by my tap and hold it down it will turn to a running person and that will put it into well that's interesting I didn't know that that I screen shot at for the six minutes that I was the number one selling book on Amazon but now that I have a screen shot of it no one can deny this was no one can deny that either we have but most subjects that are going really really fast and you tell me well no it's beautiful for things that go fast now say no it isn't because every time I I took I took pictures of subjects moving state of Beijing in this industry we do what we can folks yes but we do have before we go to commercial we do have one really great piece of news another update on our Gimme GimMe Bush experiment also in the hundred and thirty pictures that I took testing this out I got six and I can't pull that out I'm not gonNA say your immediate for question to me I'm just saying that I feel immediately that Oh that must not work no Andy you've only had this for a couple of days or even a week you have not been diligent enough because if you can't get this to work it might be fast and bright light and in dim light and dark light I took pictures of subjects moving fast when with the camera out of my pocket and when it was on a tripod and every single circumstance it rare but the white balance and people were like sort of like and they're now they're and these people returning to me to like validate things and say well what was the what was the lighting foreign podcasts about the gift I have screen shotted it I'm not sure if it'll still be there as much like the time where I had the number one bestselling book on Amazon it was really crazy think and I'm like I said the the plate was white like well you you said that the plate look white but that's of value if I don't know what the color of the disappointed and all of you I'm not GonNa let me give you a lecture on and so I'm glad to get this off my chest so just just occurred you have too much dumps du Mb t h and that if you were had more smarts you would be able to get this work record anyway so them so the worst thing ever is to review something or come up come up with an opinion and then be told Ya this little button with a picture of a sun on it if it it's not it's not on the pixel four but it's like you don't WanNa find because you weren't thorough because you didn't get the reaction that you want you thought that thing would do well so it's so good to know Ruben this world it's all right well should we I've been to our first break I think we show this episode is brought to you by pinged him the company who make website performance monitoring really easy eight the Pixel Ford is not last full day without a recharge not a new concept for those of US Pixel users the Pixel two okay lab lab tested battery life kind of thing because that's what we're talking about we're talking about the reviews that are out right now the consensus is that the credit card required when you sign up use code material at checkout to get a huge thirty percent off your first invoice thanks lack these are just a few companies who trust pinged him to take care of their website monitoring websites can get pretty complicated but you can monitor any side nick before my husband gets home from work that's that's incredible why why like I'm not really doing anything with it except like checking in a couple of times had problems making it through the whole day that was a twenty seven hundred million battery life the Pixel three that I'm still using I work from home in this thing needs a charge right experience possible and if disaster strikes you'll be the first to know it is super easy to get started all ping them needs is your you are transaction with Pimm stuff like user registrations loggins checkouts and much more pinged him care about your users having the smoothest side back so andy I agree with you the serious common complaint I agree with you and also the other reviewers out there for those who have done we're just GonNa talk about how we feel about them and we're kind of tackling this by themes so the questions that you have hopefully we will answer L. and they'll take care of the rest that's at go pinged him dot com slash relay FM right now for a fourteen day free trial with we needed to get something out quickly so yeah so Andy Andy and I are going to go through kind of a list of features and we're just ah again I remind everybody out there that the phone has only been in the press his hands for about a week so maybe maybe some of US rate has a twenty eight hundred million battery for five point eight inch display versus the Pixel xl which has a thirty seven hundred million battery life Them for you in this next act so funny because Andy Your first comment on her notes is do we have come to make which I'm like do we have comments me full of note here is the full full revolt video review of the phone that I that I received five Fedex about two hours ago actually it's underneath my agenda book inside of this Tom Bin case that I've been carrying an end because like I said I don't have a case for it so nine to five Google has revealed to say about the Pixel for my pixel four is buried here somewhere on my desk you know what that's how I feel about at this point I I don't know if that's Okay Ping them for their support of this show and relay FM okay this is what we were teasing you all about the beginning of the episode which is we have a lot of things uh-huh we do have comments me I didn't want to presume to do I I have things to say roundup which we are going to link in the shown out so that you're just kind of if you WanNa follow along and and you know see what people have been saying about it so far you can today that's a thing that's like a thirty two hundred million battery life from that one the pixel four the baby one has a smaller thing that screen up all the way if you're you know just kind of like keeping it low key I'm not sure how this thing how the pixel four last from what I've read the larger Pixel for is doing a bit better in terms of managing through the day but that's if you're like me special press have had it for a little longer than a week but I mean I don't know I can't confirm that you're still in the discovery phase and by the time you hear this the your youtube recommendations fees and so it eight about fifteen twenty percent battery life by the time I started with around forty and when I it's not gonna not to praise the pixel floor it's buried under cables and a couple of Pie fours and a couple of cams and reese Ri- no went into like you know shut off the video and put the phone away it wasn't about like twenty-seven percent so okay I kind of overestimated there my matt listen I didn't do math yeah it's not it's not good bob it's I might not be the best throughout her entire day because I don't have a similar as I mentioned but I did watch my real housewives of Orange County the sporting writing emails and I want you know when you're watching TV on a phone you kind of like turn up the brightness because you wanna see what's going on you turn up the sound because you want to hear the screeching of these rich women doing things it's not GonNa absolutely submarine the battery that much them there's very little difference to me if I have to attach to a recharger at four announces can they add before certain users find it super uncomfortable to hold but I'm always been this I like the idea of I'll trade off a little it's one to criticize it because I've long ago I sort of gave up on the idea but gave up on any faith at any phone ever use is going to last all day it is Kinda disappointing that there is a smaller battery this year than last year it's it's a wonderfully light and comp thirty or seven thirty because at some point I'm going to have to like have that battery pack or that recharger somewhere in my bag so I don't think it's a fatal thing however have no regardless of how you define all day it's because I I'm just it's it's my thoughts on it are that unless you doc feeling phone I I don't know what kind of testing or metrics or standards Google has about what how does adding how how many and I absolutely needed to work for let's say sixty four seconds when my train gets at the station I need to call for an uber because if I don't I'm GonNa have to uh unless you're really gonNA give me like eight hours of screen time like a day and the F- and using the camera during the day is also not gonNa Really Dent it as extra wait for another hour of battery life because you never know when I have been in that position where okay I have now at like the last tick of battery so speaking of which face unlock that is a thing so actually think it's been kind of controversial because we walk home three miles in the dark so I'm going to do whatever I can totally I'm GonNa shut this whole thing down and I'm going to spend the rest of this hour long train ride are listed inside the face lock settings panel so when you go into it if you have a pixel for you will see the warnings from googles saying the half hour that's a very valuable half hour but it's a it's a bad year for that to happen given that one of the things that everybody seems to be praising about the iphone eleven that's a bad color on on the pixel eleven pixel four that's not the first time I've said Pixel Eleven 'cause I'm writing my my iphone eleven review on researching the you know your phone can be unlocked even if your eyes are closed your phone can be unlocked by an identical sibling here phone you're very interested in that sort of thing but as it comes to with all these things it's really usage inexperience over numbers and terminology at the end of the day and to arrive in the coming months they recommend enabling the lockdown feature which is a feature that was introduced a think one or two android you know which is Kinda Nice it's like when you walk into a house and the lights turn on immediately you know you're like Oh this is really nice but but you might feel weird about it do things you can also go to lock screen display settings and enables show locked down option which will appear when you hit the sleep wake button about some of the caveats that are associated now before we talk about our experience with face unlock I just want to run through those caveats really quick they actually now how to use lockdown in the unfortunate case of somebody's like trying to force you to unlock your phone which I know sounds really scary but let's be realistic here the world is full of scary around my head just to do like all the comparison between them which for those of you out there who are you know diehard hardware buffs uh it's okay don't worry I been looking up specs for like all the different android phones so I have like all these different numbers running around in my head right now like freshly I just stare reading the instructions on the emergency safety acts beyond that pane of glass does so if I get so if I get that lost yes a great distinction thank you Andy that in which is a nice thing that's a nice thing to have like you're reaching for the phone the phone lights up it's like it's expecting you I forgot what the other one was just because they don't have the phone in front of me but so yeah there's a couple of caveats on one end so google is working on that awareness sensing that we mentioned kind of making that easy to engage super that lockdown isn't like built in on the the iphone has a similar feature just if you just cook click the sleep wake button several ends which we will talk about it just use solely to tell the system oh by the way the user is reaching for the phone so you want to light light up whatever you need to do the space on or as as a more practical thing you might worry about because of this because this face unlock feature on the Pixel for Disil- face unlock for those who do not know has nothing to do with the solely chip the silly chip is specifically meant for the motions versions ago which requires a password on the next unlock this is also this is like really dark but it's a good thing to consider too and especially the pro model though the bigger is that it's my God this thing almost lasts a day and a half I almost forget like to charge this thing so yeah bad that's sir border if you are approached by law enforcement it is a really good idea to enable to disable anything by metric whether it's fingerprint or face on lock code it's also for addition to the very very sad dangerous situations that flow mentioned you if you are have you enter a customer doesn't care if the if your eyes are open or closed if your if your FA- I fall asleep on an Amtrak train my phone is like right in front of me someone could just take that phone died that well here's this unconscious person we need unlocked there at the side of this crime scene we think they're involved they can unlock your phone just grab your grab your finger hold it up and unlock it and then I'm Gonna I'm gonNA save ruined my a ruined my my what the Gulf game by playing it and going to so they can force you to unlock your phone with a fingerprint. They don't need to go through all of those hoops in order to do that as a matter of fact they can also if they just goatee detection so it can tell you've got an evil dimension version of you that seat that's easy with an on board with with a device that's fair because at least in the United States we have the Fifth Amendment that the law is hysterically funny so if you've if your phone is times in a row it'll just engage meaning that meaning that it will throw it will it will lock the phone and force it than won't wake up again to provide an actual pass the face a lock is very fast it's very instant works it works by so when you like measures your face display settings at that point if you press the power button there'll be an additional option for lockdown when he pressed that it's so it's worth noting ever the courts have judged that a fingerprint or a biometric face scan that is not something that is just a physical thing her registration with makeup on at a hard time unlocking with out her makeup on which is that's that's an interesting case walk down with a pin or password they the officer and the courts cannot compel you to provide that pass murder rather I registered my face like before bed so I was all like creamed up like I didn't have I didn't have any AAC upon and it worked what I put makeup on like the other day like it recognized me he was like my bright red lipstick and everything so I guess it's radically the only time I managed to get it to screw up and this is not a joke a friend of mine was starring cats on Broadway at the time the other things as well so yeah so I wish this thing was was built and you'd be you have to you have to set it up again going into settings unlock screen thing to consider Andy what's your experience been like where they I mean you're used to it on the iphone to write and the just for reference on the iphone the positive rate with with face unlock and it's kind of confusing me in this kind of annoying me I don't know how in this first phase of using it the damn thing just works it's I've never had it failed the only time the only time I managed to make my glasses on my glasses off bright sun when it's working makes the pixels face unlock so attractive that on the iphone able unlock and then you have to flick flick the screen up to not to give the iphone a Mulligan on that if you are in full cats makeup meaning everything so yep pinpoints your jaw line and all that I think there was a mention in sherline lows and gadget review that she had done I think part of it is solely of not telling the system that oh it's time to do face unlock because I find it a lot more looking at this or should I now do something so again I don't there's no all I can see all I can say is that at this point intestine uh I'm having some this again I've had this for a week and I I'm not hitting that one hundred percent of we might have there might be an escalation in which you a judge basically gives you an order to unlock it then you tell them to you know go go cut bait and then consistent when I just as I'm lifting up the phone I flick on the wake button where it snows remember okay I'll I'll I'm waking up so I should do face on lock On Tuesday or Wednesday were made before there was any whatever code they had ready when this thing was boxed without any updates whatsoever in the meantime I think they was there breath but the the fact that you don't have to do anything physical in order to proceed to using the foam means that is very discombobulating when would not unlock which I thought that I don't think that's GonNa Complain About I think that you you it is easy to actually get at it it is really cool to be able to lift up the phone and your back at whatever screen what you're on when when you put it down as if the thing was never locked to begin and so so registered his I registered his face he got into his full like cats makeup with the with a wig and everything and the phone mode not in I need to troubleshoot the problem of unlocking this phone boat so like I said I'm not GonNa make a conclusion yet but if I will really disappoint me if by the time I ride you find that you're staring at this lock screen and you're not looking at at your list manager APP you're not looking at twitter you're not looking at instagram and you don't know do I have to keep damp and the the the the bad thing is that if you don't know that it's not working it's super frustrating because there is you don't have to do anything physically there's one of the things that and so bright sunlight or just the darkness of my office it's Mike My Heroes Amass Mahir is nice sleep okay getting my hair has never nicely combed but fee all of us got the when you when you when you order your brand new pixel phone and you receive it like our buy at the store Friday Saturday Sunday wearing my cats makeup when I registered my face for face unlock and oh since I've registered without my my my my twitter makeup on a work just fine or central jail for contempt of court but they can't because it's something that you know that you don't want to divulge you have the right by the Fifth Amendment to not to not reveal that whenever of course like every phone the first thing it does when it connects to Wifi is looks for downloading system updates so allow the comments that people have been making on launch so long as there was just this one patch they didn't get out in time but now it's done that's fine so I'm I'm really hoping that either a I forgot that I was saying that my other I iphone ten with face unlocking it was working perfectly fine and I wasn't having these problems I'm I'm nearly at the point where I start to reach out may question saying ever did I register my face incorrectly should reregister my face oh another thing we didn't talk about is that you have to realize that of limited brilliance if there is again a conditional a decision loop where now the now the decision tree becomes lift up the phone lugging improved things I my usual policies I'll give them two weeks after want to get their act together and I'm not GonNa if it doesn't work properly there'll be an update so that I really this sort of thing it has to be one hundred percent all the time or if there is not being obvious reason why because there is nothing more oh I don't talk to any my contacts like at the press Google or engineers I know it will tell me oh well or you you have to use it this where you have to do it that way it's features a lot of different devices that they if they don't work one hundred percent of the time you're just going to disable it because I can I can much more easily watch for instance it does something very clever where of course when you take it off the charger and put it on your wrist it doesn't work for two new type in your pin but the it ended up number two type in this six six number pin and boom you're in I can't be there can't be a branching conditional in there I lifted up wait to see there's a problem I've been having with the with the first pixel to that for some I not been able to find an answer to this sometimes I'll try to use the fingerprint reader I know why I'm getting this error message or this oh I'm sorry I'm going to ask ask for your Pentagon because once again this face unlock is rating along passwords anything else and but still it's like I just went over right I want to make sure that before I like send this e payment I wanna make sure I know what the considers that it will trust your trust that you're you forever abundantly until the next time you take off the watch because who knows someone might have taken it off and put it on unlocks if it doesn't unlock either more or flipped it up to type in your passcode I can't be making that decision because my brain is in I wanNA take a picture we get my brain into the habit of tapping passcode if I know that here are the steps to to to be able to take a picture with this camera with this phone number one I've never forget because it's really really impossible to guess it's easy for me to change and easy it's more of a methodology of gender one password is fingerprint unlock all these other cool things where especially like banking APP were half a super complicated password that is so the current available motions gestures are the ability to swipe across the screen back and forth. If I were to use my if I were to use my banking APP YUP my banking APP is on my pixel one is is fingerprint unlocked does it do you see a warning message you have to type in a pin no then produced from this branch per move over to this way to see if it unlocks for you if it does not Russell had said they don't have a pixel for yet to work on the feature but if it can support podcasts they're gonNa make it happen of course I would liked to see it supported you know cross the wave that's why that's how the Google system has been adopted at wide so to speak at the G to its abilities Motion sense not not exactly something to write home about pocket casts are her favourite podcasting up I don't know if we're allowed to say that but but we set it and of course Andy you checked in our front other feature is like when you reach for the phone turns on as we had mentioned yeah that works but it's like not as to me it's not it's not a reason to buy the it it reminds me of what Motorola Kinda did with some of its gestures and some of its abilities in its phones it's like well that's really cool and I'm shuffled through songs which is cool but as Andy found out for one of our dear listeners it doesn't work with some APPS including so excited for face a D. and that's nothing that's not even touching the fact that only what five apps actually support face on lock so houses and if I have to type in like twenty three letters and numbers for well okay if you know if there's not enough money in the account I'll get a text message it off on the Pixel for I've been having to put in my daughter unlock a lot I don't again I know that like I with the with the apple everyone loves a fast website and pinged him or helping to keep your favorite sites online net flicks Amazon spotify twitter buzzfeed's was one update that came through actually with a special update boxing. Hey if you're reviewing this we haven't update please install so it's possible that there they they're continuing to d someplace else so if I have to type in the pin again I can think oh that's right 'cause I did take it off to do the dishes that's why have to type in the spin it would be kind of not be okay but at least be a lot easier you know hey mom how's it going I'm doing good over here I'm waving up my phone not something that I would necessarily inform my parents about and will just won't work will save the Password required for additional security and I'll have to type in the type in the pin and I wish I knew what condition sets the had that Motorola thought about that for its customers but it's not something that you can hinge and entire marketing campaign on it's a my review it's still not working as easily as well as as what I've got on the iphone Ten oh the only the only other things that has the that means that I will simply disabled this feature and choose choose a pass code it's like why why why am I so which is which is not really leveraging the power of technology sufficiently I think that's fair speaking of leveraging the technology own it it's not a it's not according to buy no it's not a party trick it's like convenience feature Eh reminds me green off until you reach for it and then the scream come back on again and it will and the the ability to flip the over to silence it and do all these other cool little things it's a I like that's it's actually the things I like most about motion sense where it's it the screen will keep the V8 thank you which has manual settings like setting all that up and you know like choosing my exposure in my shadow time and then kind of waiting for that to happen again not nothing to write home about The camera store camera is a really obviously a really big deal yeah this this really does point out one of the eternal advantages of iphones over android phones that this is this is Google's own many this one you just prop it up use a smartphone tripod if you have one or as they suggested kind of prop it up against things and hit the button and nights I don't see it as a huge upgrade in terms of what I had with the Pixel three I had put a note here that I'm very mad about it not factored phone and Google supporting it with all kinds of software and the Google has direct access to developers but they really can't get developers to absolutely don't mean that in a bad way I just mean that like I already got all this stuff with the Pixel three like I'm not feeling any sort of loss shooting things with the Pixel three versus asked me about it is that it's going to be a really cool feature a year from now it's not going to be a really cool feature until until a year from now when developers start supporting it that it l. said when they committed to it for the Pixel for a few months ago but still I'm not I'm I'm hoping that it's more than simply if I wave my hand from left to right I hope we don't have to wait for for cool things to happen I hope we don't have to find a year from now that this is this is the cool thing that you demonstrate hundred percent in getting it to work with tracks skip forward tracks get back and because I was just sort of like my open palm just sort of like like me that do support it and that's why out of the box on day one face unlock and other features that are kind of like that they just work on pretty much the entire ecosystem so mitt to jumping on board they can ask can control they can help but whereas apple sometimes through coercion but sometimes through just simply saying this is going to be such a great light does the the computation for you it figures out oh we are staring at a blank sky right now okay let's go into this mode will keep the exposure open purpose have from right to left and that will have various different effects I was even a little bit disappointed to find that I was even in Google play music I was not one the solely feature to other people but that's the only time you ever use it that's that's more Samsung's thing yeah right so that's motion sensor that's a that's an example of again am I doing wrong or but still I don't it's not it doesn't seem like a miraculous sensing technology if like Like OBI WAN trying to get people to go to sleep and when I took a look at it again the demo little animation of her use it had they had enthroned by different flat palm and the edge of a hand so I'm I I've always said to myself and other people when I'm talking to it or when their people digitals eight times so that's where I'm getting the problem because what I'm zooming in all the way I was trying to take a picture of Amtrak Amtrak train rolling take a longer shot and it comes out I am I I don't live in the wilderness of the suburbs so a lot of light pollution here that has been peeking through Oh but I like what I see so far I see it working on par with what I've done with manual modes and other smartphones and that makes me happy but it's not a reason to buy the pixel four because doing things with the Pixel for the astro photography ability is really cool it's really easy to engage I find it way more user friendly than going into like the l g you holding your hand like perpendicular to the screen as you wave it so it was like you crotty shopping at only you're not going down you're going across and at that point it worked almost completely flawlessly so thing that is special to the Pixel for is that telephoto Lens so the telephoto zoo I believe Andy it's what eight times this is a feature that's coming to the Pixel three so eventually you'll get it it's just a software update thing it's not has nothing to do with the Lens it's on there or anything the through on the other side of the water was coming through the hills in my line of sight what I'm seeing with my eyes I'm like wow what a beautiful like depiction it featured we're going to have face unlock we're GONNA have all these other things that are going to be working on this phone and boy if your APP doesn't support it you're in a look stupid compared to all the other apps our eighteen zoom that's just it's not crystal clear it's it's a blurry train I tried to use zoom with worm they're small so it was like okay this is a good thing for me to test zoom on again the digital zoom comes into play and you're like why am I using this my husband likes to pick up a newts and salamanders and worms round here you know when it gets wet and it extended come out nice and clear you can kind of see like for ahead what's going on but I'm not I'm not impressed the telephoto zoom and I don't if I hadn't had the review unit my hand I probably would have been like I'm okay without it I was really impressed with it adding extra like machine learning computational mojo whereas you're zooming you can't help but like sort of like jittered the camera a little bit and it uses that Moosh ear to test two times optical but digitally extend to eight times so here's the here okay that's an important thing that you said opticals two Times Converts Converts this all there among the hills and I tried to shoot it and it looks just like that it looks like this digital zoom any software it's like if it's digital it just doesn't seem like why am I bothering and the two X I guess is cool I like the fact that you could zoom into tax the blown up pixels or anything like that it looks like let's say a six megapixel camera with a actual a times optical lens on it and of just like where I live here's the water and the birds are in here and he can here's some seals and like there's Amtrak in the distance and you can kind of hear it at die would I think that part of it is and again we're talking about it on the Pixel for not necessarily non on previous models they call it the super zoom feature that's the one where there to try to fill in the fill in the mix missing pixels little bit and like the one of my I really really really really pleasing pleasing to me telephoto zoom and it's not it's not just getting tighter shot of like your kid playing soccer whatever it's like the telephoto expecting much is Zoom Zoom Zoom Zoom Zoom weigh-in like all the way to the Max a times ad to frame like again just the tops these two buildings took a picture and I'll be I was a after taking the picture I was doing I was sort of my mind sorta changed a little bit too well why don't I take pictures as though this is there was it was the sun was setting and a couple of the taller buildings were still being hit by a beautiful orange sunset and the rest of the street was like in shadow and so not really Melendez just super filling the frame by getting super super close to the Pumpkin the other one with like probably two times zoom maybe it wasn't really that that big zoom but the difference is that does things to the image like the illustrated tweeted another picture of like a Jackal Lantern Neighbor's porch one of which was done like with the dammed it looks like it looks like let's say if the detail is not as good as what you'd get with like a real like eight times zoom of course but it doesn't look like it was decide whoever whoever two or three or four people you like the least or you think you know let's let's be honest those two that relationship is not gonNa last those it'll and there's so many my usual when I'm in Photo Geek mowed my usual lens to walk around with is the equivalent of a seventy two three hundred millimeter whereas the telephoto version looks like sort of a normal picture and if you're taking pictures of people again maybe you don't want that Super Distortion Wide Angle Lens maybe you want to see Super Wide Lens even too cheap one even to the six hundred ninety nine dollars one that competes with the Pixel for nothing and boy that's fun shoot with because you can get the the you the the problem is that you can always crop a picture tighter or use digital digital zoom if you're too far away but if if you're taking a picture of the peace owns a came and take a good picture anyhow you wind up with this really nice like tightly cropped picture so I'm used to I'm used to using zoom telephoto lenses and mm-hmm and I love this Zoom Lens because he uses shoot Anne Anne any Liebowitz oh pack and use the telephoto so it's it's it's it's something it's something to talk about particularly when one of the nicest features of the iphone eleven is they've added people who you're out to dinner with the with your friends and not getting the picture at some point you can't backup any farther and you have to do a panorama or you just have to satisfy me photos was in New York the first night I first day I had it in which shy just took like a I noticed that way way like ten blocks down the street yeah no absolutely forget Andy it's okay I always think of her as Ms Liebowitz because I'm not worthy fla node you can instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the La- node cloud and you can get a server running in just seconds with your choice of and their block storage is available in Newark Fremont Dallas Atlanta Frankfurt London and Singapore and soon to be released in it but the telephoto is super super super good and it's not it's not like it's not like nothing feature so but overall I'm really happy with the pictures of taking I'm still trying to Tokyo version four of Leno's restful API is out of Beta and includes an officially supported Python Cli and right now Lee I'm still figuring out how well it works I'm still trying to remind myself that just let the camera do the work don't has that nice split had the next thing I did was go all the way back out to the two one accent take another picture just to verify God that's just like this tiny tiny little section the Oh two they offer the fastest hardware and network with outstanding customer support if you ever need help and it's super easy to launch leonod cloud server they're probably hanging on the threat of divorce anyway let's get them get the get the future okay you know what we're all thinking I'm just saying it okay so just put the road are hiring if you want to learn more and check out what they're looking for just go to the no dot com slash careers Leonard has pricing option. Okay and now I think this is a great time to take a little quick little break and then we'll jump into a little more Pixel for talk this episode is brought to you by Leonod with back guarantee you have nothing to lose give Leno to try today that's Leno Dot com slash material and Promo code material sizzler on the outside crop amount anyway what you know they'll save you some time live they'll be thank

Andy Canada United States Google Congress chief executive Motorola president Australia Russell Amazon apple one hundred percent one day fifteen twenty percent twenty-seven percent one hundred dollars sixty four seconds
The Markets Magic Number and Getting Ready for DoorDashs IPO

CNBC's Fast Money

49:30 min | 6 months ago

The Markets Magic Number and Getting Ready for DoorDashs IPO

"This cnbc podcast brought to you by td ameritrade now but commission. Free trading is the norm. It's time to rethink how we define value value is more than a price tag. It's the confidence of knowing. You have a team of traders on standby to answer any question. It's thinker swims powerful writing analysis tools. It's a personalized education to fine-tune your skills value is becoming smarter with every commission free online equity trade discovered true value with td ameritrade where smart investors get smarter. Dominic shuman for melissa leeann. This is fast money. Tonight's trader lineup. Guy odometer tim seymour. Bano and ice and karen feinerman tonight on fast ready set price. We're awaiting pricing information on that. Big door dash ipo. It's expected to be one of the biggest of the year. We will bring you the numbers as soon as they crossed the wires plus banks medals and cars the three best looking charts to play as we head into twenty twenty one and then later on amped up shock. Jocks howard. Stern is turning up the volume on sirius. Xm today we will tell you about the big money and the big deal that sent this stock higher in trade but we start first tonight with the magic number. That is eleven. That is how many days in a row. The nasdaq one hundred. Etf known as the cues q. That's how many days in a row. The queues have now posted gains. It is the longest winning streak for this index. Etf this year and it's the sixth straight day of record highs so if the trade that's been working all year long is still working whereas this big non cyclical rotation that we've all been waiting for. Is there any reason to fight this particular trend and let's start with guy dummy. It's the nasdaq it's been at all year. There was a blip in september october. But it's that nasdaq once again. Is it at all surprising to you. Welcome d to always great to have you bring in the energy. And if i said to you if i said you'd nigel tufnel. What would you say just curious. Nigel what would i say. I don't think i would say anything know. I know tim knows what to say. Spinal tap tap spinal tap and you mentioned eleven. This one great that was magic for spinal tap and it's magical for the rotations going on just because the nasdaq's been going higher doesn't mean you haven't seen rotation into some of these cyclical names for example city close around fifty nine dollars today. The banks have been trading really. Well maybe they're pausing here. But i do think the rotation play. I also think that some of these nasdaq stocks continue to go higher. And by the way. I'm not bullish on the broader market but karen south bet is traded extraordinarily. Well today notwithstanding. And i think you can make a very cogent argument that on valuation this stock might be cheaper here than it was a few weeks ago when it was fifteen twenty percent lower so although maybe the rotation is as in the faces you wanna make it to be or you would want it to be. It's happening beneath the surface but with that said some of these high flying nasdaq named still work. Karen i mean your alphabet not just the soup but other stocks that you've been looking at in this big university of stocks that we all kind of try trail towards every day. It's still some of those big tech names. Is it still something that you feel as though carries momentum into the new year. I mean. i'm staying long them so My alphabet. Yes i still. That's my biggest position. I still have facebook. Which i think a few bucks today. Still have apple microsoft. I even have some amazon but guy up a excellent point. Which is it's not either the nasdaq or everything else. A lot of other things have been working as well. So the retail trade is really been working. Industrials have really been working. I think geeze cats is really been working things like fedex really working so it's not an either or it seems to be you know rising tide and all the votes are up. So i'm long. I've always long been always looking for stuff to buy to be honest. I haven't found a lot of new stuff to buy at this level here already. I mean i it's not at all unfathomable to be cautious at these kind of record. High levels bought went up. I'm curious what's on your shopping list. These days if everything in that rising tide care and talks about his lifted. All those boats is time to just hold or you still out there saying. Hey there's bargains. To be found and the momentum is still to the upside these are the ones that outperform to the points or made before there was some preconceived notion that this had to be mutually exclusive situation. And it's simply isn't what you've seen is you've seen a broadening out of the rally away from the large-cap tek and the reason why those are outperforming that situation. We've kind of transitioned away from that. There's a lot of uncertainty. We want cash on hand. We wanted revenue growth. Wanted safe stable situations. What you're seeing now is a bit more leverage to high betas cyclical type of name. So for me. I've been bullish on the banks. I've also been constructive builders construct on a few other names some of the industrials and material space as well. I still think tech is a core holding because it performs in any situation. It's really about the waiting to or away from it. But again i think the cyclical backdrop the economic backdrop bodes well for cyclicals. But i think there's room plenty of room for your tech core holdings amazon facebook amazon to be one of mine and microsoft is well tim seymour. This sounds resoundingly. Bullish our panel of experts here in front of me right now in this quad boxes or anything that we should be cautious about with stocks at record highs with these levels that we're talking about with the forty ninth or fiftieth record. Close for the nasdaq. So far this year. Is this something where we say. Maybe things are a little bit overdone at this stage or is the momentum really the trend is your friend type trade right now well down first of all. Welcome to the big show. It's always a pleasure to have you. And and i think the The things investors should be cautious about our that at some point. valuations are gonna mean something In the short run they really don't at times we've had these periods where the market has been extremely overheated especially in tech and and you know look look at a stock like amazon which is actually dead money since july whereas apple at times. I think it's been a few of the trader not the investor in apple. We talk about those two roles to play. But that ultimately dan nathan brought this up about ten days ago that the apple chart actually after consolidating off of the the foyer into kind of one thousand five to one thirty area has rebuilt that you know that base in is now a very interesting chart in his outperformed. But but if you look at tech. What's been most impressive. Is that which led tech. The entire time has led over the last four or five days or even during those eleven days. Look at semiconductors look at the smh and then look at the parts of the semi's that i think are most well bid and they include the exposure to five g. They're also though exposure just to some more of the generic pc cycle and then obviously enterprise so that is encouraging for a global. Spend that. I think people are expecting into two thousand twenty one. But what's the trade after eleven days up in the nasdaq back into some those cyclical names which haven't been devastating but actually what you needed to was yields consolidated a little bit. We've we've kind of pulled back a little bit on the tenure. The you know taking a breath from its dive bomb. I think those trades that were built around those two moves hiring rates and lower. The dollar are the really the trades for the next eleven days again. If you're looking for trading and rotation karen well said well said Icebreaker always well said but but that. Hey you don't have to necessarily have one or the other here that i would make an argument that since may we've actually seen rotation into interest rate sensitives as nasdaq's gotten a little too frothy. We've seen this Development throughout the markets is the market has been probing whether to actually by late cycle cyclicals. And right now they should be. I mean you mentioned. The semiconductor is sitting at record highs. I would also mentioned those cloud computing stocks. Etf's attrac- cloud computing also sitting at record highs as well so it kind of gives you this idea. That technology is kind of back in that leadership position. Right now but tim great points. Because it's our segue into our next conversation. Our next guest warns the market is overextended. But he believes may avert a major near-term pullback maybe a minor ones in play. Let's bring in. Mike wilson chief equity strategist at morgan stanley. Mike always great to have you. I mean i gotta say with an eleven day winning streak in the nasdaq q. Q. q.'s. I feel like things are due for a pause. What drives what drives. What drives the pullback evening and look i mean calling a correction in bull market is dangerous game so get how we that twice fall. Came out worked out pretty well. We unless conviction on a pullback this time because it's the urine seasonals right the money closer terrific. The new slow has been great. And i mean as as your panel suggested me. It's a bull market. I mean everything's kind of working together so it's not an either or a. We've been more favorable on the economically sensitive areas small-cap area and it has outperformed dramatically since the vaccine announcement as it should and the question is is it just taking a breather here Until the next leg up we think it will. In other words we think small caps still better place to be rather than large we think the certain parts the market's still should dominate into next year relative to defensive areas and even the gross stocks by frankly is as rates. Go up the expensive growth. Stocks will will be gained by valuation the big loser if there is such a thing in a bull market like this has been the defensive sectors your classic late cycle and the cycle protected areas like utilities staples in reads those have underperformed significantly For most of this year since the rally began in march and that makes perfect sense. So i think the market is doing. Everything is supposed to be doing here. It got extended. We have said it's over extended here but it can stay over extended particularly in december when there's bomo and there's so much liquidity you know. They just continue to kind of mel tire will say says so. Mike and i'm curious before we kind of open it up here. How much in your mind. How much optimism. Or how much future. Positively is reflected in the current market as we see it today. I i ask only because we know that. The market's discounting mechanism. We know that the small-cap outperformance these kinds of non technology cyclicals that have been outperforming are on that positive that the economy recovers next year that we get a covid vaccine. But how much is priced in already. And how much more do we need to keep it going to. The upside characterize this is. Is that the real action in the market is not at the index levels below the index. Right so One of the things we look at very carefully is the value line index. It's a very broad indicator of you know the average shop and this is very typical down when you come out of a recession right you wanna look towards the average stock right. The index starts to underperform because that's where the operating leverage going to be greater in the integrator leverage to a recovery. So if you look at the numbers we have it. In our framework we think there's about ten percent upsides the s. and p. five hundred over the next twelve months based on what we think of be forward earnings going up by twenty percent and the value wishing coming down by about ten percent. But around that there's going to be some huge winner sick. Be up much more than ten percent and they'll probably be quite a few stocks are actually down over the next twelve months right. This is where now. You're into the bull market will get separation. I would suggest that the winners are going to be these areas. Where you know. They'd benefit from a reopening shutdown. Or were there an operating leverage to expanding a global economy or even. Us economy does better than what could work are thinking right now. The losers on the other hand are going to be areas that are born valuation compression from higher rates which we still think is going to happen or businesses into pay-back of the extra demanding through sheer during lockdown rights or the work from home beneficiaries. There's gonna be a sifting out of kind of the pretenders versus the contenders allow those businesses are gonna see payback because we're gonna start spending their money so that's our thinking about it. A lot about fraternity bull market is going to become more in credit. Is going to twenty twenty one for sure. Mike when i was back in ninety one of the most talented fx traders i ever met was gonna peter gerhardt and he sort of was at the forefront of these knocking and knockout trades. And i mentioned that because you're bear case and the s. and p. Five hundred. I think is thirty. Three fifty your bull case. Forty one seventy five. I think there's more than a fifty percent chance that you see both those levels next year. What do you think about that. I think that's a good point Guy i could definitely see that there is very similar to two thousand eighteen. We made that call. That you've seen both are bolan bear. We actually achieved that and and tear point whether it's about around currency or just volatility of the outcomes right so you know i can easily see the i corps of being you know maybe a scarier time as things slow down and we don't get fiscal. Maybe there's a rate shot as the market starts to price in some of the good stuff like additional fiscal stimulus. And maybe even said about the vaccine so you can have a volatility both internally fan rates in particular that causes the kindest when you're talking about so i think that's actually something to consider but been the ball. What you're saying is it is kind of saying. Which is you need to keep your head on the swivel you to take take advantage of these swings and opportunities. We haven't had that last thirty days. I wouldn't get complacent that we're gonna have this nicer. You know stepping-up of lemon days in a row that's not gonna be. What probably happened to have an extra call. It's going to be you know bigger swings. And and i hope all right mike wilson chief equity strategist at morgan stanley. Thank you very much. Cricket your thoughts or have an evening. Thanks all right. Let's trade this folks bond when i'm going to go to you i. It sure seems as though mike is saying this is going to be a stock pickers market. It's a cliche we've heard it before. But where exactly then do you find value given the construct he just laid out and what. You're setting yourself up in terms of your book and twenty twenty one person. I think you find values in two ways. I think you find value in volatility. We've seen this vicks come back towards twenty level which has been high in previous regimes. Were keep in mind. We were just up around forty. So i think there's value there in terms of either adding protection or expressing your view via options. Secondly i think that there. Is you know the epicenter names. Now i say epicenter. Because a lot of the industrials materials. These are already trading at robust valuations but the sectors that have been on the brink of being impaired. I think that's where the value is. I just have a hard time putting my scuba gear and diving to the bottom. They're kind of put that stuff on when there's so many other areas that are working so when i when i wish risk wait my returns i find them less attractive but in terms of up versus downside. I do think that's for the values are. I bought a win. Let's hold it for a second there. Ladies and gentlemen we've we're getting some fresh comments from j. p. morgan ceo jamie dimon. He's right now. Speaking at the goldman sachs financial services conference. Listen to what he said about treasuries. I think maybe it bubble in a small part of the stock market. Not all of it if you actually analyze it by segment by this. That's not true. And i i'm not i would not be by trade. I think treasuries at these rates. I wouldn't touch him with a ten foot ball. I wouldn't be a buyer of rates of these rights and unfortunately we are. We have no choice. he doesn't want to buy them but he says there's no choice. Karen what do you make of that. And how does that influence the overall macro environment for markets. We'll see saying we have no choice. I don't know if he means the fed buying him at this. At this rate you know in some ways maybe talk talking. His book he thinks rate should be higher. Certainly his business would be better than interest margins would be higher Would be a fatter. That would be good. But i like j. p. morgan. I think that you know von talked about epicenter things. This was you know. I mean banks were annihilated and when i looked for value the bank sector is right at the top of the heat and i love jamie diamond. So i'm doing long day morgan. I mean he certainly one of the more well known and highly visible. Ceo's in the banking sector for sure and arguably corporate. America tim seymour. I'm wondering what you think. Then if interest rates really are i mean first of all. They're coming off some some multi kind of high levels that we've seen they just haven't broken out yet. Is this a market. That's still constructive for equities and everything else. If rates hold were they are well. I think karen really does love jamie diamond by the way. So let's be clear. I think you have a case here. Where the interest rate dynamic is something that is very very important and absolutely. You're buying i you know i. It's hard for me to embellish. Upon what karen has just said but i think banks offer the most extreme extreme value when you look at the overall market again relative to themselves relative to the other sectors at a time when you see a lot of these other sectors run and then i would go in the other direction and i would say you stay in these commodity and resource trade which. I often say you. Don't buy them when they're cheap and the evaluations aren't crazy. Cheap and a lot of these names but the recovery and we're talking about four to five to ten year recovery in the bax and the cycles and the balance sheets in addition to the global cyclicality of this global trade That's the other part of this. That's very exciting. And and and i'm i'm very constructive. They're all right. Sounds like we've got a lot of things cooking here for the next part of our show. Anyway thanks very much guys coming up on the show. The king of shock jock radio giving sirius. Xm a bit of a boost today after signing a very very big new deal. Just how much howard stern pulling in a year. Start writing down your guesses because we'll have all those details coming up but first we are awaiting pricing information on that big door dash. It is expected to be one of the biggest debuts in public markets this year we will bring you more details coming up when bass money returns after this break support for this. Podcast comes from neutrogena. Hydro boost does your day last all day. Keep your skin dewey. Soft and smooth all day with neutrogena hydro boost the new hyler onic acid serum quenches skin with two sizes of hyler onic. Acid dermatologist recommended glycerin vitamin b. Five and kiwi extract just apply in the morning for weightless fragrance-free hydration that reaches nine layers of skin and then seals it in for twenty four hours or parrot with neutrogena hydro boost water gel for four times the hydrating power de-stress rehydrate with premium. Skincare at home. And on your schedule. Neutrogena hydro boost tyler onic. Acid serum stay dewey soft and drenched in hydration learn more at neutrogena dot com. Fast money we are standing by for the door dash ipo details. The company is expected to price at shares at any moment this evening ahead of tomorrow's very big market debut. Let's get out to our own leslie picker with more details on door dash. Just how big could this. Ipo get lesley. It could be one of the biggest. Ipo's this year. Currently snowflake is the largest at three point. Eight billion this was looking at upwards of three point one billion. I'm told that the pricing call started about fifteen minutes ago. That's the meeting between doordashan's advisors. Were they really hunker down and decide the final price for the ipo with this one. An airbnb tomorrow. There's a little less art and a little more signs involved in these pricing discussions. Now the delivery platform is employing a unique twist to the pricing part of the ipo process. And that they used an auction platform for investor orders that algorithm is supposed to give them a more data driven sense of demand as opposed to the traditional way which is much more hands on between the banker sales teams and investors and hybrid auction told the door dash is planning to price at the high end or above the boosted range which yield and offering size of upwards of three billion dollars in a fully diluted valuation around thirty six billion that puts door dashes valuation around eleven times forward twenty twenty sales several turns higher than other platform companies but investors may be willing to pay a premium. Since i manage to quadruple its top line and has at least shown a path to profitability with the second quarter showing positive net income although turning back into losses during the third quarter dumb. All right so let's say. I'm sure you'll be watching for those headlines coming out. We'll come back to you with details. Thank you very much. all right. Our panel let's trade it. You can't trade door dash yet but you can certainly feel what's happening with the ipo market. Right now i would note that one of the that people trade the i feel markets with is the renaissance. Ipo is up one hundred and fifteen percent on a year to date basis. That kind of tells you something about these recently. Ipo companies guy adama. Is this at all a sign to you that the markets are still healthy. The fact that there is still robust demand for initial public offerings. Think some people would say. That's a great sign. I think the the half empty folks would say it's a sign of frothiness and everybody going to market at the same time it is is is a sign that maybe things are sort of topping out. I don't know the answer that. But i do think i know the answer to is how you play it and last night. We mentioned nasdaq in terms of of a final trade. And i'll mention why because if you look at their november volumes equity vom shop fifty five percent you're over year and that's a stock that on valuation basis is probably still pretty reasonable. So you're looking to play at sort of second derivative to me dom it's with the nasdaq. So if you're looking at some of these exchange operators as ways to kind of capitalize on this and the capital markets activity. That's coming up here tim seymour. Does it mean than that. By buying some of these types of stocks exchange operators and whatnot. It means or implies that two thousand and twenty one is still supposed to be constructive. What's going to change here. And so yes i do. Think that one hundred and forty six billion this year and you also hit on the banks. Jp morgan and goldman are the the to equity underwriters. Everybody wants tombstone Nothing is going to change here until the fed changes money is free and this is pushing liquidity out there so Door dash which was a fourteen billion dollar company earlier in the year. And you know a billion and a half dollars company a couple years ago gives you a sense of where markets are. By the way every time i say door dash i feel like i'm saying jordache. Which were the gene. Miss that with a horse logo. I remember those. I might have with on spinal tap but i do remember jordache jeans. Bond awin may not remember jordache jeans. But i remember jordache jeans so bottom win. I'm gonna go to. Us before he would have before we go to break. Here is the ipo market. Something that you still feel that was a good indicator for the overall market right now. You'll you almost lost their s thing. I thought i was in in this conversation. And then i had one foot in one foot out. Listen listen if you look at how these. Ipo's of traded. There's tremendous demand for growth here. I mean it's hard different front of a train and sell that so to answer your question loop in something. That guy mentioned morgan stanley. Right if you look at eaton vance. Traditional banking is karen has pointed to and then also like the each each traded retail side. That is another way to kind of play where you're actually a toll booth. You have diversified revenue streams and more visible revenue stream. So that's another name that i would mention. Yeah i would also mention that we saw some headlines earlier today that they're getting some plans. Further down the line incrementally for robin hoods potential. Ipo sometime down the line at a fairly decent valuations. Well all right guys. thanks very much. We are just getting started here on fast money. Here's what's coming up next. New year new stock picks. A top technician joins us next to go off the charts. I'm bringing us his three best ideas or twenty twenty one. You can't afford to miss this plus our h-shares style. We'll dive into options for a look at what to expect. I hadn't been servings report we've got that and a lot more. When fast returns everybody lane welter off. And i'm hosting a new podcast called built by american express where we will dive deep into the stories history and continued legacy of small businesses that shape american culture are debut season will focus on with the lack owned small businesses. That need our support now. More than ever in each episode feature the story of a black business trailblazer that has inspired a modern black. owned business. first up is kinky. Cole of atlanta's food truck turn restaurants celebrity vegan. We'll also chat with nathan wenda the cutting edge designer behind the haniffah three d digital fashion show. Plus we'll check in with each array are modern day renaissance woman. We hope that it encourages all of our listeners to support these businesses as well as the black owned businesses in your own communities tune in for these amazing stories and others on spotify apple youtube. or wherever. you get your favorite podcasts. Welcome back to fast money. It's pop quiz time. What do cars metals banks. What do they have all all have in common. Our next guest says that they are some of the best looking charts in the market right now. Let's go off the charts with christopher on you know him. He's over at strategic chris. Take it away a don. Thanks for having me. I want to talk about three names. There's eighteen trading days left in the year or about to look ahead. What are going to be the stocks that drive returns. Next year financials is wherever you want to begin. Morgan stanley really has only just broken out from this. Three arraigned spent the last three years between thirty and sixty the last four weeks momentum behind this has been tremendous when you get these momentum surges. It usually fares well for future returns. This is very bullish development. I think any pullbacks over the next number of weeks looked at fifty. Seven fifty eight fifty nine as support going forward. The stock can be bought down there. But what really gets us interested about morgan. Stanley is the long term picture. Not made any money here for twenty years. This thing peaked. In summer of two thousand twenty year dead body bear market. That is over. This is a leader. Next year we go to the next aim here. I think tim might like this. One in the material space. This is rio. Tinto ticker are i go another name. That really has spent the last two or three years in range. Stock trades seventy two seventy three today. The big breakout was above sixty five. I think any pullbacks over the next week you buy it but here. Let's take a step back. Let's look at the twenty year chart of rio. Tinto peaked in a and no one's made any money for twelve years. This has been a decade-long bear market that market now is over. This is a stock reaccelerating. It has the tailwind of weak dollar copper up a name we like next year and then lashley will with newer issue. It's only eighteen. Months uber came may of two thousand and nineteen. We think the stock is very very time. We hear it just broke out of this big base. it's reclaim that forty seven. Forty eight level where i traded to in may of two thousand nineteen. We think this is a leader next year. So banks some cars materials. That's how we wanna play the setup. All right thanks very much crisper over strategic always great to get you have tab here and get those charts and play here. Let's trade this folks. Karen what's your favourite charts out of the ones. That chris just laid out is that the banks is that the cars or is it the materials. I'm just looking at your up in the back. He or she looks like he's having a good doing something embarrassing. The i didn't see his charges. But i did listen to what he said. I like dogs. 'cause we don't have the return here. I like the morgan stanley story. Actually you know. The evolution of the business has been tremendous and yet the valuation hasn't changed that much. I like the recent deals. I like morgan stanley right here. I think it falls very much into the value bucket. And i'm a believer that we will see that value creation next year or we got a buyer of the bank. Trade guy adama. What are you thinking here. Well first of all. Tim spin on this resource straight and rio tinto. I'll let him speak about but mortgage certainly agree and kudos. dan nathan. Who actually i think a month and a half two months ago said it was one of the best looking charts that he saw and i know collectively when they announced that he advanced move. We said above fifty seven. This is off to the races. And that's exactly what's happened. So i hear what chris is saying in terms of the last twenty years but over the last twenty or so weeks. This has been a monster. And i think morgan stanley could to trade higher from here and tim seymour. What do we think. Well you have a case where iron ore prices are at nine year. Highs and china is a reaccelerating and the story christmas right. I mean bromance back. This is a twenty year story for me going back in time as an investor that that was a heavy investor in resources and commodities in the guy. And this is this is something. That's very exciting to see again. And it was a very very bad broken trade for a long time so bhp breaking out finally But more importantly underlying iron ore prices which means steel prices are going higher. Look at us. Steel up twelve eleven or twelve percent today. and up seventy percent in the last three weeks Those trades are the ones that still excite me base metals as well copper out there. Thanks very much guys. We'll be back with more here. We just went through. Some of crisper owns tops. Picks for twenty two twenty one credit. Suisse's coming out with it's very own list. You can read all about it on our website just head over to cnbc dot com slash pro to sign up for those particular trades and coming up on the show. Sirius xm shares are getting a boost as howard stern signs. A very big mega contract with the satellite radio provider the details on that key in that deal he said it had a trade streaming stocks coming up plus guys dogs howling about jewish latest earnings reports. You just saw karen's dog by the way we'll bring you all of the after hours action from that name chewy dot com went fast money returns after this walk back fast money tesla pulling back from all-time highs as the company announces plans to sell five billion dollars worth of its own stock but tesla's stock isn't the only thing on the move. Let's get out to fill the bow with the details. On tesla and another kind of move phil don. We're talking about elon. Musk moving from california to texas now. Cnbc dot com first reported last week that according to people who were close to elon musk he was planning on moving their well today when he was talking on the ws j. ceo council. He was asked pointblank about it and he said yes. I have moved to texas. And that was one of the more interesting comments he had the question becomes. Why leave california and the question is whether or not california. It's certainly not a friendly state when it comes to business you want. Says it's a great state but it does have its problems. Here's what he had to say. Team has been winning for too long been do tend to get a little complacent title and they don't win the championship anymore. Kelvin has been waiting for a long time. And i think they're taking for granted little bit. He also said that the bay area. The silicon valley has an outsized influence on the country and certainly on the business climate. Not only in california but around the country and around the world. Keep in mind elon. Musk has plenty of business in texas. They've got the starship business down in the southern part of the state as well as the new gigafactory giga texas as they refer to it just outside of austin. That's where they plan to by the end of next year. Rollout the first cyber truck and that's going to be a huge plant so they've got plenty of business. There nealon must making it clear he will be spending his time and his residences now in texas all right philibeaux. Thank you very much there for the latest update on not just deal on. Musk but tesla is well. We appreciate it. let's trade. It bought a win. I go to you. The numbers are staggering at the end of last year tesla was worth roughly seventy five billion dollars in market value. It closed today on. Cnbc dot com. I'm looking right now. At around six hundred and six billion dollars in market cap leading to use gains of six hundred seventy seven percent and one year returns of eight hundred and sixty seven percent. Do you wanna buy tesla truly staggering. Indeed gun to my head. If i'm forced to buy it or sell it. I would buy it because i think it is a core practice to step in front of trends and this is an absolute freight train. So yes i'm buying. I'm certainly not shouting alright. Certainly not shorting at karen. Feinerman i i i'm gonna turn to you because it was right here on this show. Maybe about a week ago when you said that you wouldn't be surprised if tesla would sell some stock going into its inclusion the s. and p. five hundred five billion dollars. It would be a lot in any other normal circumstance but at six hundred and six billion dollars of total market cap. It works out to be less than one percent of its market value. right now. is this tesla's stock one that you would want to own ahead of its inclusion in the s. and p. five hundred just the idea now that five billion dollars is kind of. It's not a drop in the bucket but something close and yet for them to be able to raise five billion dollars. That is pretty extraordinary. All that having been said not you know. I didn't like it. Hundreds of points ago or well pre split post split doesn't matter hundred thousand points ago so i can't get on board here but They're doing the right thing. It's a great time for them to raise money to fulfill that giant bid. That's been building for the snp inclusion. Good for them. All right big deal for sure. There are five billion dollars almost a drop in the bucket but not maybe it real drop in the bucket. All right thanks very much guys coming up on the show chewy on the move. After the company's latest earnings report we will dive into the numbers that have investors chasing their tails this afternoon. See what we did there. And we're counting down to earnings from one of our traders favorite stocks. What you should expect from restoration hardware is report. That comes out tomorrow coming up after this. Break fast. one. We've got an earnings alert on chewy that stock with sawing after a reported they smaller loss than expected in the quarter. It also gave some strong guidance for the current quarter but sales per customer came in less than expected. Shares did hit an all time high by the way during the regular trading day. They're just marginally right now in the after our recession. Let's now turn our attention out by the way hold on. I want to ask something guy. Adani right now because dot com is one of those stocks. I'm not saying that. I closely associated with you. I'm thinking more karen right now. Because i keep seeing her dog and i love her dog and everything. But i know that you've got some pets. I know that you're into this pet trade. Can we just talk a little bit about chewy and whether or not you're still a buyer of this kind of stock we've actually talked about this for a while but i think this quarter was i'm shocked. Actually that the stock didn't give back today's gains. Because i think if memory serves the stock was up over four dollars and you mentioned it made an all time high. I mean it's just over at skis a bit. But i will tell you that i'm still the dinosaur that actually drives to the local pet store and picks up the dog food those forty pound bags over my shoulder and brings it home so the next thing i buy online will be the first thing. I'm not their target audience. But i do think you have to pull the rip cord taking profits and chew here. I mean this is also a scenario. And maybe care. And i'll get one quick comment from you before we move onto our next trade here. Is this patrick for real. The estimates from the pet products association says we'll spend as americans ninety nine billion dollars on pets this year. We're going to spend ninety dollars a piece during the holiday season on our pets. This year is the trade still intact. The petrie underlying. I think is still intact. Many people got pets during the during this pandemic but the valuation. It's a little out of tact for me. So i'm not a buyer idea right. She says wolf remarkable year for this that trade there all right. Thanks very much. Let's turn our attention now to one of tomorrow's market earnings reports. This is restoration hardware looking to close out a monster year on a very bright note when it reports after the closing bell and my co spotted some unusual activity in the options market. Today that could signal. This stock is headed a lot higher. Mike what exactly did you see any dumb. So you're talking about a monster. That's essentially what the options market is expecting a monster. Move right now. The options market is implying that the stock had moved sixty dollars higher or lower by the end of the week about twelve point eight percent of the current stock price slightly less actually than the fifteen percent or so that it's average the week they reported earnings over the last eight reported quarters the most active options where the weekly five ten strike calls as we're trading for about twelve dollars and seventy five cents buyers of those calls were risking a little less than three percent of the current stock price betting that it could rally and you will note that a couple of analysts have raised their price targets on it. Recently i tell c. Bank of america both raised it doe around five hundred and then. Jp morgan also raise their price target earlier this month. So there is some bullish activity and the options market is betting that the rally could continue all right. Mike oh thank you very much that. Look at the options market right now. It could be a big deal. Bonna win. I'm going to turn to you here. This has been one of those big home. Improvement type trades. that's been a beneficiary during the covid. Pandemic it's not the same though as home depot or others. This is on the higher end of things. What exactly does that tell you about the type of trade. That's developing with regard to home improvement during the covid pandemic underlying it. I think it really speaks to the case a recovery that i think everyone on this panel has spoken to the trade specifically playing this visa vs calls as opposed to actually outlaying the cash needed to actually own the shares. I think is a way to kind of do it. Listen i think the implied volatility touch high here. But i would much rather risk a couple of percent for the upside rather than You know planning that. Essentially binary event around earnings all right restoration hardware a juggernaut for sure so far this year. Thanks very much guys for more options action by the way. Be sure to tune into the full. Show fridays five thirty. Pm eastern time. Right here on cnbc. Meanwhile we've got a news alert on stimulus talks in washington dc with fifth straight up to illinois with the latest. Good afternoon. yulon dom treasury secretary steven mnuchin now says that he has presented house speaker. Nancy pelosi with a new nine hundred sixteen billion dollars proposal for corona virus relief. This package would include two of the most contentious items money for state and local governments as well as liability protections which the top republican in the senate mitch. Mcconnell had a few hours ago suggested that they cut out altogether. Now treasury secretary steven mnuchin in a statement did say that they would fund this with one hundred and forty billion dollars unused funds from the paycheck protection program as well as four hundred and twenty nine billion dollars in funds from the treasury from ending those emergency fed lending programs and he said that he looks forward to achieving bipartisan agreement so they can provide critical economic relief to american workers families and businesses now separately. I've also heard from the white house that another round of direct checks remains a high priority for the president saddam. Clearly a lot of moving parts in these stimulus negotiations as the white house through treasury secretary steven mnuchin has now presented democrats with a new nine hundred sixteen billion dollar proposal back to you are trying to get something done for the holiday season here. Out of washington c. On the stimulus front and aid front illinois. Thank you very much. We appreciate it. Well now let's talk a little bit about this and tim. I'll go to you here with this. We've heard so many of these incremental headlines. Yes they're going to get something done. No it's not going to happen. Yes they're going to do it. They're not gonna do it. What exactly is a trader. Do you do with this kind of information. Headlines that move the story forward. I think the the bid ask on this is the market believes nine hundred. Plus billion is getting done. The question is how much on the upside. So i think it'd be a disappointment. We think this falls apart And i do think that this is in the market right now. i think there's a surprise to the upside. All right surprised to the upside there if we can get a deal done. Thanks very much guys. Coming up on the show. The big money battle brewing between howard stern and joe rogan. You're going to want to tune into this one. The details are coming up after this quick break. Welcome back to fast money. Investors are turning up the volume on shares of sirius. Xm after the satellite radio operator inked a new multi year deal with howard stern. Let's get out to our own. Julia boston with all the details julia. Well dom howard stern signing a new five-year deal with sirius. Xm they're reportedly paying him as much as one hundred and twenty million dollars a year sirius. Xm will licensed turns archive of audio and video for an additional seven years as well though stern as able to secure that payday. Because he's a huge draw for sirius. Xm's thirty four and a half million subscribers. Stern said last year that sixty percent of those subscribers listened to him in credit suisse estimated that fifteen percent of stern's listeners could canceled their series. Xm subscriptions fee let left the company. Which would mean potential subscriber loss of two point seven million subscribers now. Siriusxm doesn't just need stern to compete with radio but also with spotify which has been investing and drawing big exclusive names. Such as joe rogan no sirius. Xm shares gained a bit today about one and a half percent on this news. But they're still down about seven and a half percent year to date so analysts are largely bullets bullish over seventy percent of a buyer overweight rating. And only about eleven percent have an underweight or sell rating on the stock dumb. All right julia. Thank you very much and as a plug. Cnbc's on sirius xm channel one twelve for those listeners out there. Thanks very much julia abortion. We've got some breaking news now on the door. Dash leslie has those leslie. Hey tom i am told by three sources. That door dash plans to price. Its ipo at one hundred and two dollars per share. That is well above the hiked price range which had the upper end of that ninety five dollars a share and at the one to price jordache would be offering about three point. Four billion dollars worth of stock and a fully diluted valuation of thirty nine billion dollars again. This is well above expectations at the beginning of this process. Well above the range that they had already hiked by about twelve percent to offer the second biggest. Ipo of twenty twenty. All right. thanks very much less for staying on top of that story for. Its tim seymour. Thirty nine billion dollars door dash valuation. Yes or no. No and i think this is probably good for other related. Kind of delivery plays. I think it's great for uber. But i i'm surprised to see that they're actually going going as greedy as they are. If i may say that. Because i think a lot of these other deals part of what's been done is Really the the the magic has been leaving something on the table Based upon this range i recognized. The demand is there but I'm surprised to hear that they're pricing it. Beyond the high end of the wrench. I mean karen as we talk about some of the sentiment that goes into evaluation like that. Isn't it all worrying does it. Does it sadie that. Maybe comes out the same kind of valuation or every other. Ipo that comes out possibly in two thousand and twenty one. yes. I think so. Although they will have a look airbnb you'll have a look tomorrow to see how this trades. I agree with tim. That valuations really. I get like fifteen and change times guess of revenues. I don't know that seems kind of high. They don't earn money regularly yet. They did once but they could. I mean they've done a great job building their business and have huge market share which is important but that valuation extra two dollars came from like how did they get to one hundred and two no. I wonder how that it's the algorithms right. The whatever that hybrid model. They're using his right now. Guide dommie. let's get your take here. Is this something that is at all worrying or is there still upside. Kent kennan. ipo investor. Make money after buying the ipo. If it's already priced as aggressively as it is right now. I'm not even gonna try to answer. That question is no. I don't want people to get hurt on these things. I mean we've seen it work to their advantage and we've obviously seen it go the other way as well so i don't wanna leave people down this primrose path. But the tim's point you know you probably at the upper end of absurdity right now but that's not to suggest six can't go higher if you're looking for a derivative play. You look at uber. But then i go one step down and i say that lift is probably cheap here so overspend a monster. Lift has been catching up. I would look to lift if you're looking for a second. Third derivative trade and we've seen an upgrade of lift because of that ketchup trade with uber as well bond. When what do you think your door dash worth it. I personally don't think so. I wish i had a contrarian view but i mean you're looking at it since isolated situation with covert and extrapolating that and pricing bloom smack dab in the middle of that now. I can't do it. Our little skepticism. There for door dashes extended valuation right. Now thanks very much guys. Don't miss by the way. Karl antony and john ford special. The path forward racing opportunity in america. They will take a closer look at the economics of the latino community including representation in corporate america education and entrepreneurship as well. That's this thursday eight pm eastern time. Right here on cnbc. Well it's time for the final trade. We've got forty five seconds score around the horn. Tim who i am. I'll be watching that. And in terms of valuation citibank to me is where there's value we talked about the the kind of the inherent leverage banks here and the trade citibank is betrayed. Karen related first of all. Thanks for being on. Those are big shoes to fill for melissa. But anyway I like morgan. Stanley christians take another look at it more closely. All right baldwin space. Been being down a little bit recently. Look for an opportunity by weakness around fifty one dollars. It be alright guiding nike and earnings. Next week thanks for watching fast money. Mad money with jim. Cramer starts right now. Cnbc's workforce executive council is the premier group sweet human resources executives from leading companies across the country. It offers a members. Only portal and chat plus exclusive industry contact with access to breaking news calls and digital networking experiences the networking resources. Hr leaders need now. Apply to the workforce executive council at cnbc councils dot com slash w. e. c.

tim seymour eleven days morgan jamie diamond dan nathan amazon five billion dollars tesla apple ten percent karen Dominic shuman melissa leeann Bano karen feinerman nigel tufnel fifty nine dollars karen south fifteen twenty percent Mike
The State and Future of Food On-Demand with Max Mullen, Mike Duboe, and Brandon Hill

Venture Stories

1:10:12 hr | 7 months ago

The State and Future of Food On-Demand with Max Mullen, Mike Duboe, and Brandon Hill

"Hey everybody it's eric. Torbert co-founder partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is metro stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to another episode village globals venture stories on here today joined by three very special guests max mullen founder. Instacart ran help founder. Borey and might do bo general partner at gray. Lock brandon max. Mike welcome to the podcast. Great to be his ravenous acreage year. Mike of course it's your third time. So congrats rats on the all rare three peat. Got the hat trick. You've been to to keep me back despite prior performances. Well third time's a charm. Brennan look But we've introduction. Let's start with you. So we're all investors in inventory. Why don't you describe for the audience. What is and what's the story behind how you came to start. It sure is a marketplace that empowers food retailers so if you think independent grocery stores ethnic markets pharmacies to make it really easy to order to replenish and discover products that nourish their communities. So right now. The problem that we're solving is in in these smaller retail formats. They're using paper and pencil They're using fax machines as max puts it you know. Billions of dollars of food is transacted on pink. Yellow and blue sheets of matrix printer paper every year. And it's really painful and so what we're doing. We're bringing modern technology to To bear really. Just make a simple Stores to restock their shelves with a wedged into a lot bigger problem other bigger problems. And how we got into this space and my parents actually have been in the industry for about forty years. They retired now. But you know they worked on the manufacturer's side so my my dad was actually the first african american employees a reynold's aluminum foil which you know. Most people have in their kitchens. Baking cookies or you know doing anything. Any rose to be their north american director of sales. My mom was also a leader You know mondays and times and some of those big manufacturers so having that kind of grocery in the in the blood so to speak what would directly led me to me and my co founders In when was the moment brandon when you had conviction that this is a really big idea or series of moments. Think there's a few. But i the biggest actually was just spending more time with my parents right. I took after my first startup took a sabbatical which was working on with my current co-founders and during a sabbatical really spent time talking with my parents about their small business right so after they retired from these large manufacturers they went into business as a husband and wife pair as brokers and so their job was to find. Small chocolate manufacturers are or cookie makers or trash bag organic trash bag producers in connect them with grocery stores essentially shadowing them and looking at their e mails and talking to their customers. They had too much business. Actually handle in there you know. My dad is almost eighty now and they don't have that much energy and so seeing how much money they're making in how much How much of a pain point. They were solving without any technology whatsoever. Made me think wow. There has to be a massive opportunity here if we can bring technology to to both sides or all sides of this market and do the connection more efficiently so would really got my spark going. I want maximum curious for your your investment thesis on a. Why would excited you about max. Perhaps we'll start with you. I've seen you a lot of context on the space having cofounded instacart. What got you excited. But yeah will over the years we've integrated our technology with a lot of our grocery store partners and become clear to me and and and i'm sure to brandon. Is that a lot of groceries. And a lot of suppliers have under invested in technology over the years. Not just on the consumer side in the sense that delivery is coming coming about order shore coming online but in there in the technology that runs their businesses. And so when i saw brandon was doing and particularly when i heard the story personal story around is a family in their background in the industry. I thought well. Here's someone who knows how to build. Software is gonna build software for an industry that needs more software and post going to build software. That's going to help. Companies like instacart better integrate with more and more grocery stores so i saw it as And mike you've been looking at this at a bb marketplace's for a while and you'd also been looking particularly at the food space for awhile. Talk about that. That during me a little bit and and i got conviction on that there was white spacier. Yeah sure well. I think the first point just note Is like i mean brandon at seved as like so much based on meeting. Exceptional founder has unique insight. And i think it'd be. It'd be marketplace's Inc it's even more important. Tobacco comes from the industry. You understands the nuances that you can't just like apply an idealistic marketplace look like just industry without knowing what the current state of affairs ministry of ben for you know one. That operate is been operating largely the same way for decades. I think brandon have unique combination of both senior. You it also understanding history. I'm very well and so that was a really impresses parts than incumbent But i think to take a step back zero noted we look a lot of to be marketplace's at gray lock. It's been one of my biggest focus areas. I think there's a there's a wine now around db marketplaces that have become that has become even more pronounced the year or so. Which is you know consumer expectations on purchasing discovery on consumer marketplaces. I think everyone right now is byron in the end zone and all these other family experiences and and the The typical buyer on the bbc side has come to expect it in their consumer life. But just still are often what they can do on the on the In their business life. And so you know brandon. I remember the first time brandon locked into our officers lock. You brought in like the paper of of what you know these these reasons salad. it was just. If that's the way you're lying combing through. You know a four hundred eight documents very different than you know. The typical searching discovery experience More so that's that's one. I think the other Which is made i think. The new of beating marketplace's heavily more attractive and sustainable income prior prior attempts over the years is the The possibility of driving revenue from new kind of intech streams and so long for industries where it might be difficult to get a significant Take rate on gmv funk marketplace now. we're seeing many many companies. Get into you know payments factoring or other other financial services. Actually monetize build a single business that way which is able to get investors over hump of investing before meaningful. I guess take rape or or revenue going through marketplace. So so that. That's kind of beating me. Marketplace's overall i think two things that have become made them more attractive but i think we're seeing them pop up across very big antiquated industries. Groceries been grocery and food is one of the more exciting ones for a couple of reasons. One is high frequent high frequency markets. And so you think about how often consumers are buying buying groceries. I mean i'm on the b. two b. side like the frequency of replenishment for stores. You might for a for. A specific category might be replenishing multiple times a week if not per day and so i think the buying repurchase experience i think it's just high frequency as well as like fragmentation and so i think when you look at the food supplier stays in this is very very regional very local and while i think cisco in. Us foods have brain will be able to cite exactly but like you know. A lot of the market exists with medium and longer term of players. That i would say there's a high degree of fragmentation welcomes demand in the supply side. I think the other piece in the final piece. I guess as a as a growth person gets me excited. Bb marketplace's overall. But also i think with what you know what he's doing when when you're able to build tack gets into the actual workflow on both sides here. There's an incentive for suppliers to be uploading their demand list and and and buyers uploading their supplier list just to streamline existing workloads and and you know reduce overhead reduce inefficient headcount et cetera and so when that dynamic starts to kick in when he's marketplace's they could. They could accelerate really quickly to this kind of cross-eyed referral lupin so we could spend more time out but i think in when we met for a some of amick was already starting to come into play when we spoke with the customers and that made it pretty exciting to us some in a while. We're on it. What are you actually get into it a little bit unpack what you mean by that. And that's unique here. Sure so i guess at the at the high level here i mean. I think one of the reasons why we'd like marketplace's overall made me more than just going. Investing in embroidery even sassanian extent is is typically grocery become versus more difficult with scale and so investing in like agra tactics that that could be super linear versus linear. I think is something that i think we talked about this on the podcast with dan David and so. I think in this specific case for referring to is when a buyer i think the loop words in both sides brain will be more detail on boring in particular but when you have a buyer who has been able to who over the years has been buying for. Maybe a food supplier in a very antiquated way calling on the phone facts in many cases and you have experienced ordering from new modern delivery at a new mobile ordering app which may be consumers might take for granted is like well you know. There's plenty of apps that we all around but in grocery that can be very transformative You know you are going to want to pull in other suppliers onto that as well near a grocery store. Your maybe dealing with you know. Tens tens of suppliers in that store maybe even hundreds in some cases and and just going and referring them onto the boring network is a really powerful dynamic. Savoy doesn't need to employ like a big. You know a big mess of salesforce to go out and and and go and try to sell to these like suppliers directly. And so so i think. That's you know when you talk about buyers going referring suppliers on. I think you know. There's there's when you have that dynamic happening organically there's other tools and features could be building actually going accelerate that and so that loop also can work the other way around where you have suppliers who are incentivized signal. Get more of the buyers ordering directly to the suppliers to employ this massive Big salesforce is going calling on like a long tail of grocery stores. This exists across different verticals. There's variety of industries that you know in lieu of having an of modern against demand gen modern modern demand facing tech will go play massive sales forces to go and call him like a longer tail buyers and a groceries note. No exception so i think. In this case in brent ram you should speak more to the dynamic that you're actually seeing but being able to use referrals instead of like big sales. I think is pretty tragic models by the way hot tip for the founders listening. If you find an industry doing anything with fax machines double click on that. There's probably some opportunities there some software for them definitely would echo so i can speak to. This have seen right. It's we're very relationship. Driven kind of industry will go down to the grocery store down the street and they will have relationships with a hundred different suppliers and each of those hundred different wholesale suppliers will have five hundred different grocery relationships. And so teen in those bob. Imbaba right. Sally delivers tom. And it's all one big. Social graph in a way is really interesting to kind of lift the hood up in seed as interesting this interesting matrix of relationships of unfold and be able to build against it and so you know today. Just about seventy percent of our supply said acquisition and our demand-side acquisition originates from a pre existing relationship. This on board right In the beginning it was not that case right. We did a lot of things that didn't scale which definitely let's talk about but you know we'll go to the market edgewood also one of our first customers in place. In order in one of those first stories that they replaced too good stuff distribution and now stuff distribution is a supplier on platform and helping us scale against their store list of fifteen hundred different natural independence and natural independent stores and convenience stores and pharmacies across the bay area. Right until a two sided two sided thing that we get to take advantage of in one of the difficulties is how do you take this industry. That was super super. Okay sending faxes and get them to use a modern consumer grade interface It does there's a lot of unique challenges data right. there's not a lot of whiz. Bang technology you know a baked into the platform right now but i think a lot of the special sauce comes in operationalizing. A lot of the observed insights that we see a brandon. One dynamic that it'll be interesting to talk on this referral piece is know what the incentives actually i mean. I think in consumer on the consumer side when trying to build a referral program typically. There's some two sided incentive or monetary incentive war in senate to units value product dropbox. You know the famous Getting free storage. I know beaded marketplaces. I think fair's a example of a referral program that is pulsing dynamics in that are charging such a large take rate to sell side that sellers who upload their buyers to death to network are able to sell them like fee free for a while and so that's the basic wave like a whatever fifteen twenty percent for of take rate on that tastes like part of what i think is really compelling here is i think the referral incentives is amendments. It's really there's just streamlined. Workflow in the referrals. Basically the incentive to both sides is really just tied to like you reduce overhead. Is that right or how. How do you think about the incentives. I guess in in making this referral new spin faster. I think what we've found is that the there is such a pain point to replenishment that solving that pain point alone is incentive for you know our various our our our stores and our suppliers to bring in one another onto the platform. We actually haven't done. We haven't ventured into paid Acquisition or monetize in singapore Will experiment with that But as it stands you think about the current costs to every every case of lacroix that sold from a distributor in south san francisco to in an independent grocer in in you know in twin peaks san francisco right. There's a cost to the human element that is there. The sales rep that is baked into the price. There is a cost of the advertising in the flyers. They ended print to let that store. Not lacroix is now available There's a lot of things baked in in what we do is able to reduce staff to essentially zero which now all of a sudden they're like. Wait this is. This is a game changer. Right and so they're incentivized. The more of the stores are like the more of our suppliers that we can get on the more The more time we have to discover new products instinct strategically about our business and the supply of saint. While she the more stores we can get to order through this. You know the more lines of direct communication we have the more we can communicate real life inventory levels to these stores to know what is in stock. And what's out stop you know To let stores that we have toilet paper you know and there's a natural incentive to kind of to get on the platform. I think those things will be accelerated. And we kind of grease the wheels with like putting money behind you know a behind the distributions and lest we forget about the end-consumer here who walks into the store and ten to fifteen percent of perishable items are out of stock at any given time That hurts store in two ways. First they mrs sale. And secondly i'm less likely to walk into that store the next time because the thing i wanted to buy out of stocks abuses solve that solve that inefficiency between suppliers in stores on this huge upside for both of them. I think this is part of a makes now a really interesting time to invest in his. I mean the I initially got interested in. I was looking at the topic of food. Waste is a problem. And i think max brought up the example of stores being under stocked. I think prior to all this and even even during all this i mean i think if you look at certain perishable categories Was engaged at some stores are throwing away like twenty percent stuff weekly basis. Which is a you know. I think food waste in the u. s. hundred fifty plus billion dollar problem and it just feels like more intelligent procurement should be able to help solve that. You know instacart on like a number of players play a role in that But i think now you know historically when we recalling the heads of procurement all these different grocers like. It's just an industry that has historically been really slow to adopt new technology. And when you have such a demand shock as we've seen during kovin brandenburg of the toilet paper example like it's a. It's a forcing function for these folks to adopt new tax tax. We get more intelligent. Because ultimately it's a profit maximization function between over and under stocking and in a world where you know you're marvins are as razor thin as they are for grocer retail. I think it's you know now. Like getting intelligence on the by is actually like a sea level issue and it's not being held up at least i'm seeing not as held up in the red tape of like you know most of procurement hierarchy as it wise navy a year ago speaking of his face more. Broadly max do you a little bit. Can you talk about what desert the space was seen in two thousand and twelve when you started instacart either some high profile failures in in in the decade at a prior. How did this what you trace. The evolution of of how the space has has has performed has been viewed your will. Let's let's go all the way back to the beginning of the supermarket. You know in nineteen sixteen. The first supermarket in the us called piggly-wiggly and what what makes a supermarket. A supermarket is that the consumers can touch the food in products themselves. Put it in a carton checkout before that you'd have different items behind different counters in it asks for help and someone would bring you something so a self service store where you can buy groceries now for many many years. The gersh gordon change too much. The products changed a lot and consumers behavior and tastes changed a lot but the format of the grocery store largely is pretty similar in around the year. Two thousand there are a few big companies that tried grocery delivery hewlett to that one of them was called web then in in it failed back then in so fast forward to two thousand twelve when we were going to start instacart. That was something that was recent enough for a investors that we had to address it. Inci i still remember. Our our seed hitch included the line that there were some spectacular failures in grocery delivery in the past are different right. We don't hold inventory. We don't build warehouses in we don't own trucks and we had to educate investors as to how we were different because we wanted them to know that we weren't gonna fail in a way that those companies of the fast did the other thing to say about Deliveries that it wasn't so obvious in two thousand twelve that it was gonna be growing fast as it is today. In fact i would argue that as far back as three or four years ago wasn't as obvious that would be this big today and what you did have with some early examples of on demand companies. You had the subtly changing consumer behavior of. I wanna push a button on my phone ask. Something happened in the real world and that was kind of the interesting part for me was how can we deliver products from people from local stores near people when they press a button on their phone or click about non their computer. And let's start with groceries and then let's see where this takes us and you know in the past eight and a half years. We've really stayed focused on groceries. Because you know it's such a large market in it's so under served. Why was it important. Not to own the inventory or two on the trucks. You keith always talks about vertically integrating so talk about back. Our business is different than a vertically integrated grocer because we don't own the inventory it allows us to scale in a in an asset light way in in it allows us to partner with the grocers and other partners that are excellent what they do and to not replicate a grocery product supply chain that is actually somewhat efficient in the way that it moves products around the us in stores products near where consumers live. I'm in one thing. That groceries are exceptionally good at locating their stores in the right communities that will buy from them and so with with twenty thousand thirty thousand forty thousand grocery stores in the us located perfectly where where consumers live. Why should we replicate that supply chain by building another warehouse in every city so we thought that it would be better to partner with groceries into leverage the existing food supply chain in an also allows you to do Asset light way into be faster and closer to the average consumer. Talk about where groceries going. We just raised a little bit the password wanting to talk about the future. Well that's a good question in the immediate future. Mean what you're seeing is in a celebration of consumer behavior changes where more and more consumers are interested in having their groceries delivered or picking up groceries and due to the pandemic this trend sort of accelerated even beyond what we were predicting. It's almost like we entered this year. Twenty twenty at twelve twenty levels exit. The last six or seven months at what we expected would be happening in the year. Twenty twenty five grocery delivery seems like a mainstream thing insecurity casually mentioned on family guy and other pop culture places and sort of taken for granted and so i think you'll see a continuation of that trend. More people expect everything including groceries to be delivered to be delivered faster and faster And for apps like instacart to replace your trip not onto the grocery store but maybe to the whole mall where the grocery store exists totally. There was this moment where everyone was excited about on demand everything that goes to but part gang and a person to stand in line for you and and we saw a lot of those startups not workout at least topples Sort of peace on it was that you needed to be better and cheaper. Not just better or cheaper. Did you have any perspective on the wave of on-demand startups that that didn't work out. It's a good question. it's not something. I've thought deeply about. I think one of the differences between what we're doing and what some of those other companies did is that we're taking something that every consumer already needs to do every single week which is do the grocery shopping. something that's ingrained in our. You know our routines and were making it easier and better and in some cases cheaper and in some these other cases they were kind of nice to have additional products whereas whereas groceries is something that everybody needs the other thing. I'd say that groceries is something we've all we've all grown up with. I mean i can remember the grocery store that i shopped at when i was a when i was a kid with my parents and i can't even remember the layout of that grocery store it's somehow ingrained in our childhoods and if you ask the average person they can name off the top of their head the two or three stores shop at every week in why they shop there and i can't do that for some of the other verticals that these on demand companies targeted the either the frequency isn't there or the frequencies they're like for instance shipping something. You're going to the post office but it's just not something i care that much about. It's not something i think about every day. Mike when you talk about you know what's worked. What hasn't worked. And how you serve chased chased the space over the last few years. Yeah well at one of the things. I was gonna comment on when max is thing that i think is interesting right now. This is not fully formulated. Thought like i spent time media marketplaces a lot of time around on ecommerce like infrastructure. And i think part of what we're seeing. I mean everyone. Now is thrown up that e commerce contrition curve in his shown homages accelerated basically also skipped like you know five even ten years during during covid going from fourteen percent penetration upside thirty percent of total retail. And you know if if you believe in that trend for ecommerce than the the role of the the physical store looks much different. I think that parallel probably applies to grocery as well in that. I personally believe that you know. This isn't a forcing function people. Experience a new way of shopping and has penetrated deeper into a segment. That might not otherwise have gone out and bought the groceries online and And i think that's gonna stick so you know when you look at everything else around the abbey ecosystem that will need to change as a result of this move to online. I think there's going to be interesting stuff. That pops up like as i guess i would call it second order effects of this of this shift to you know on adoption of grocery and i think it could be a good example of how the overall supply chain needs to modernize around this as well So yeah i mean. I don't we. We were talking a little bit about about you know. Dark stores micro fulfillment centers many more differences in between grocery and and a lot of the recipe congresses. The fact that it's perishables you actually need to have locations with a lot. Closer to their alternate source of demand. So so that is just different. Implications needed about store network. But i'm not answering questions. I guess just like you've massey's max's point triggered some reflections on. I guess what the physical network needs to look like in a world where you know groceries. Fifty percents online penetrated versus versus ten. And and how the role of instacart kind of playing in in that world sarah. Because i'm flipping. It is a question to guess. You know you look. At the average grocery store in a lot of the square footage of the store is dedicated to preparing food that they then sell at that store or even larger stores if they have the volume that preparing a lot of the food this on the store at other centralized locations so grocers are no strangers to using their infrastructure to modify their businesses as consumers behavior change or as they see in industry change. Is i think this is no different. They'll be grocers that are on the forefront of doing things like dark stores right setting up separate locations or areas of their existing locations where e-commerce picking packing can happen. Instacart will be part of that. I think in. I think you'll see the the layout of the average roof restored will shift over time right. Maybe it will shift more towards a showcase for products. And they're at sight and smell and taste that you can only get by by being in the store So maybe more of the store will be dedicated to that experience. And i mean actually go to re buy the products that you buy every single week. You'll do that on instacart and we'll be fulfilling from the back quote dark area that store yet. There are some similarities. I one of the things you see. In dita's ecommerce is there has been like a pendulum swing back to the prior to covid back to physical retail matt as everyone's going sending on facing google ads like digital cap. Is that more expensive than you know. Getting your products into a store and going in acquiring the customer their wholesaler. Your own life. Physical retail location. Maybe there's some parallels here as well in that I think Post covid world. What retail looks like. I think is generally going to be more experiential for for brands who've actually shifted more online Probably number of parallelism food to like. I think if you if you think about like the beverage display like an erawan or market like that you know that could be a really interesting source of really trial for brands who you're ultimately turning through a more efficient means like afterwards consumer some. Yeah i definitely feel like ultimately as the as the food chain kind of valls kind of where we kind of see ourselves sitting is will there needs to be operating system for all of these emerging trends right so you whether they're dark stores you know whether folks are by majority of their groceries. Dc or Instacart is absolutely going to transform transform. The way people are getting their groceries. I mean it's. We're living in like twenty twenty twenty-five already but at the base layer it's such a fragmented know we're talking about a trillion dollars. Face with thirty three thousand different wholesalers hundreds and hundreds of thousands millions of manufacturers. You know forty thousand plus grocery stores proper but there's one hundred twenty five thousand plus convenience stores right and liquor stores and many marks and bodegas. You know that's kind of a big is not all going to die. A lot of people think like. Oh everything's going to be a lot of these brick and mortar locations overnight in just. Don't fundamentally believe that's really true. And so what is community as we move from you know moved from phone calls to and idaho to be faxon facts to what is that base layer that kind of connects. Allow these kind of different those together And oddly enough. There's been in the past six months or during covid the inbound interest from You know small start up. Start and mature food delivery companies in for his predicament. Services for their own kind of retail efforts has been interesting right. It's like oh so. What is the future of. What does the future look like. The supply chain look like as we move towards a more as instacart for example in the in the mike vision become kind of like a reality on this really exciting to see kind of how that plays out and i think the the why now here is kind of interesting to think about. I do believe the grocery industry is really just a series of injuries intergenerational transfers of so what does that mean it means you know eric's market Was owned by eric. He passes it down to his his grandma his daughter who pass it down her. Her son announced attend generation grocery store or a sixth generation store. Same thing on on the other side in a way various intergenerational business right Where my parents who met themselves fell in love in a grocery store and gave inspiration to us to start this company. The newer generations are know. The younger generations are going to They're going to demand more modern ways of doing business and in meeting meeting the world where it is in terms of gets you know especially consumers in terms of consumer behavior but that undermine supply chain has to catch up and so that's kind of the. There's there's a why now behind this renaissance in in the food supply chain. Yeah i think one of the other one of the other trends that were kind of place it in a lot of what we're talking about. But like the the the distribution of brands who are selling into grocers just becoming like there's a much longer tail now and i think you know whether you call specialty food producers or I guess like i was saying earlier. for lack of a better term. Ddc brands that are getting into grocery as well I think there's just like consumer tastes have become more discerning more diverse and that is reflective in is not just being consumed by you know A few kind of hero brands and sub brands like it's actually becoming more. It's becoming much broader and the overhead and actually going in trying to source those managers relationships etc just becoming more more significant for retailers Trying to get into the store. So that's that's personally thing that gets me as a lover of all things food. And and and i think there's a lot of passion that goes in town sewers like in this space. I think that's a great thing And you know. I think it it. Definitely as brandon says needs to change the stores to but brandon. Sorry eric we got off your initial question. Like what hasn't worked here. I honestly don't like i don't you know i. Initially my first foray into the startup world was like in the food space. I was working at a a chef. Marketplace tall kitsch it Bring the restaurant to your house. In the idea at the time was her the point on astromers food scandal being really passionate eagle. I was super excited by Shafts and then being fundamentally creative people that ultimately have that creativity stifled when they were trying to work their way up. The line of like corporate kitchen kitchen was trying to give him a platform to go in. You know unleash your creativity like we were having a wine cooks like the french laundry. Doing wu tang theme dinners for people enabling. Make more money than they. Would you know working a week at you know at another restaurant and so that was always a cool thing. In ultimately that business didn't work. The economics of food were really really tough. I think if there was Ultimately get that thing to scale you really need to make chefs a commodity and get volume discounts on purchasing food. And so you know. There's a maybe we i was straight a little bit trying to get into that part of food. But it's a it's a broad space anonymous. Aa china to be too anchored by what hasn't worked in the past I think now is just really exciting in kinda at a different time though. So that's a really interesting example. Asset light food business in the average. Us consumer thinks about eating twenty one meals a week. so what. What are the other ways. Besides groceries and hot food delivery people are gonna get those meals. So i think about that. That chef right the chef that would have been the perfect candidate for kitchen. What else could they doing. That's interesting that's that's a food. Marquis related this accompany chef s. h. e. f. shots. That's doing this. Where chefs can cook at home in surface to their neighborhood. There's another food startup named territory. Foods that i think does something similar here where they find local shafts to produce their menu and then ship it in a hub and spoke model. Might do see. Did you have a thesis around. What other types of food businesses might get built or another pivot on it. What other things chefs be doing in their spare time that could kind of create value To be honest. I haven't spent as much champion about it. I mean i think they're the company's you named are exciting. And i think you know there was basically a wave of in the in the kitchen days and this was back in twenty eleven twenty twelve like their competitors kitchen servings away. going out of business gridlock. Also you know we were investors spray which was more of a vertically integrated You know getting getting down to the production of food and also delivery of it too. I think part of the problem there was you know around demand forecasting and you know take more than real time loving them real time more challenging than i think. There's a company now private chat club. That's the beginning of a week. More a smooth demand more. But i don't have a good answer on the on the chef side like how does this shack better monetize. Their skills are like downtime as well. I mean chef might be a good example of that. But i think it's a different a different tier Those are people that would Traditionally called themselves chats even if they're really talented cooks Honestly i don't have a good answer for that right now. I think it's a tough time for the industry in canada as one. Who's really you know. Interested in as an investor in this trend towards you know infrastructure underlying shipped around delivery and You know we talked dr kitchen. Some it almost runs like answer to what i was. S being dislike creative You know folks who really need platforms to unleash that creativity in the restaurant has been you know one of many ways to do so i don't i don't know i guess maybe maybe the is becoming bifurcated on that and Hopefully i really hope there's a world where in person you know creative jining of comes back and but bats an odd time right now for the industry. I must say from where i sit. It looks like because restaurants were closed for so long people started going back to what they know a lot more cooking. We see happening. People are comfort baking bread. I know a good deal of people that made a bunch of bread just for fun during during a shelter in place. I think that it's pointed people back toward some of those things. We'll see if those stick or not and then simultaneously. I think that when there's a vaccine when the world comes a little bit more back to normal though. Also be a resurgence of dining out and going back to some of the fun things we used to do together. It'll be really interesting to see how that shakes out he. I think there's almost different jobs to be done for her. For going out and dining in a restaurant versus you know if you food is utility. I think there's a lot of really positive change changes happening across the chain right now. I think For me is like this is really eliminated the fact that you know. There's going out to eat. And i think like the restaurant. Industry is on the hospitality more so than like food and i think food is vehicle to connect about his round baths like i think a lot of the most meaningful conversations i've had in my life have been around the dinner table or while. Traveling can food is lens in other cultures. I just think You know we've been talking about it from the utility standpoint how to actually. It's none of opportunity to improve on that. I think Food as hospitality is a form of connection all that you know i. I'm optimistic. But but i personally find that part of my life is missing right now in your parent right. I am and so i and hopefully this is true for you. When i became apparent i realized that it was more than just was more than just making sure. Dinner was solved tonight for my wife and i. It's now you want to be able to say you're feeding healthy affordable meal to your family to your children and certain meals fit that job to be done in certain. Don't fit that job to be done so it started Skews the your view on meals in particularly dinner. Completely that Maybe i'll email wordsworth The value i m. I put on just like convenience right now. And also that what i'm giving. My kids is healthy. I think is higher than it's than it's ever been so So thank you instacart. He reviewed more than welcome to thank you for being a customer in the other. Kind of point on that is light. Healthy is in the eye of the beholder right so you can cook an unhealthy meal but something about cooking. It myself makes me believe that it's going to be high quality. I know exactly what i put into it whereas even if you know there's plenty of healthy options for takeout there's something about getting takeout. That doesn't fully solve that job to be done. Where i'm sort of feeling like i'm nourishing. My family so cooking. I think will will stick around even after things go back to normal but i think there will be new services that will come about. I hope i hope somebody starts some that. That really targeted in that job to be done. We're a family. Wants to feed a healthy affordable meal to their to their family regularly. Maybe it's private chef club right. I'll have to check that out or or maybe it's something else. Yeah yeah and there's a value that the The the nourish her gets out that as well like that. You know someone who loves cooking for larger groups in doesn't have you know might not have the family to do that with also so anyway. I plus one. I think it's an interesting space right now. You know. I have not yet made made investments in at night. I will keep an eye out as well. There was a series of food delivery startups that raised a lot of money unless sprigs rocket and some of them sort of most of them. It seems it didn't work out. Why do what do you think that was. What were the mistakes they made. Or why was the white space. Not as big as people thought. I would ask the question. Do they hold inventory or not and you might find correlation amongst the ones that had trouble with their To the ones that held inventory. I think we mentioned it earlier. But food waste is really expensive. Cost managing supply-and-demand in in in peaks. And valleys is really. And it's just a more difficult business. I think to make an sell the food. Yeah i think. The the other point that i kinda hinted on earlier was Just around demand forecasting in the cost of being really adaptable. That demand Especially when you're when you're driving around with actually in the case of sprague I was at the time we were investors there and and i think it's just challenging a challenging model when you're taking in promising delivery within a certain time window and you actually have that food needing to take around the city. I think at a certain point with scale trying to get economics in place he start to see the quality. Really take a hit. I think in a world where you could be better predict demand at the start of a week I think think those models could look more attractive if you're not needing to adapt to demand in real time that's you know that's one thing but That are just add onto what said my in my house. i actually have several hellofresh users. And it's actually really interesting just seeing now the meals that coming out. Let's think about the on essentially week over week having to become an expert in like seventeen different types of sauces or like different variations of light chicken or seafood Just on the culinary side like what does it take to do that. Not just like a batch for one person. But for like four million people in any given country in different regions and then also be able to distribute that that there's high perishability and then also provide this interesting user experience on consumer side to be able to order and request their meals for the week right and there's the is a very interesting tension like owning the supply and there's also a conversation to be had around managed marketplaces and like the more of the supply that you control the higher. You know take that you can have in in our space. We do see folks that are trying to become technical distributors of sorts right where they actually have. Warehouses do delivery to retailers. And it just it does seem there's always a trade off between like the value capture on one side or like owning native be being vertically integrated versus you know. I think what prefers the asset light and be a skill more quickly but being comfortable with potentially lower take or more a battle or became extremely more creative like mike was losing to up treating additional lovers value through financial services or some other means as an investor. I look at how much behavior change is required for a company to be successful. And if you're vertically integrated food company that's making your own menu of items. Would you have to teach people by getting them to taste your food in person to like it. You have to teach them one dish at a time and in that generation that you mentioned had to do that from scratch open attended this generation of companies instacart in the in the restaurant delivery companies are essentially helping people do something that they already wanna do. They've got their hands on their phone and they are looking up the hours of the grocery store or they're looking up the restaurant's menu and then an app an an app pops up and says we can get this delivered to you in an hour and it's gonna be much easier than calling calling the On the restaurant going there yourself so there's less friction involved and then also the other differences that we don't have an opinion on what you buy from the grocery store we're making the entire urfi store selection available to people. Ideally at the same price as the store in it is their choice to build the basket the way they want to or in the case of restaurant delivery to order from the menu the previous generation of food companies really could only offer a limited selection at any given time to the consumer. I was a consumer of sprague. When it was around. I thought was a great service But there was two or three things available at any given time whereas if you opened up a restaurant delivery app at that time you find forty or eighty or one hundred twenty menus of local restaurants. And if you're in the movies you could have pizza. If you're in the mood for sushi could have sushi one as the other companies would only be able to offer you. Three or five or even ten menu items. I think one of the one of the relevant lessons around this is just the importance of trust by extension. Like brand in this world. Like i think i want to pick on sprague. Adding sprig had it. Sounds like they have built some strong trust as quality starts to degrade you know. It's pretty easy to lose that. I think there's a similar dynamic in. We spent some time talking about dark kitchens On a previous call related to restaurants. I think i think the models there are more interesting are ones who are actually taking restaurant concepts that have some pre existing brand affinity say that they have some footprint in the east bay that are looking to examine the san francisco and are able to kind of morgan asset. Light existing kitchen network to test that concept and transfer of that brand affinity versus to open a restaurant. Actually think that's a. That's a pretty interesting way to like you know. Take brand equity. You've built in going capitalize on that versus having models who are going in trying to spin up a new restaurant concept in all the kind of customer loyalty customer was brand building that goes along side of that and do that from scratch potentially launcher near the position better economics but i think one lesson At least that. I found spending some time around that side of things. Is that an increasingly expensive to go in like build a brand restaurant concepts and it's not just about the food analysts quality at your delivering like there is some. There's an emotional connection theology brands as well and in nowadays especially like i think as as uber endured ash launch their own ads products the tax actually getting distribution on those apps is going to become more expensive goes coins it can help you. Can it can help brands. Who are confident to go get distribution faster. But i think you know any way you cut it the taxes to increase in so better to start with some brand some brand loyalty than the need to build it from scratch. I think in today's world it's gonna become more expensive to do so from scratch thinking about the some of the the future founders or or Founders they're very early stages. I think they're listening to this. Might actually now or later on this discussion might be good to pull into un. Just like the story. is you know You know mike which you've seen you know. Coaching molding these early stage founders. You know max. What were some of the things that you had to overcome in the you know zero to one phase that were inched. I'm happy to also tell some stories from boring. they might be relevant to the young founders in the audience. Let's let's do actually start with you. One question here to get your perspective on is doing things that don't scale of course. There's the famous paul graham advice at the same time you're also trying to build something that does scale so any stories of doing something the doing things that don't scale or any frameworks for thinking about this is the right. Amount is not the right amount you know. I think we really we basically have do things at downscale. Written on the walls of our house at this point Because essentially been all only that up until you know just very recently when i think about our customer you have to understand. Our customers are either a over sixty five years old be non-english-speaking because You know a lot of essential workers in swiftly keep the food industry running our for example immigrants or their especially by the or from specifically mexico. And they're the only job they could get is order clerk at us specific store or or three or c folks who don't have college degrees or not software engineers. These are folks who you know graduate. High school became a you know a checker or our cart collector and then worked their way up through the grocery store and into management and in building technology for these people really really going back to the earlier pointed. Max made about doing things that people already do for. Our customers is heading. Meet them where they are so for the first two the first three months since you know after launch whenever a customer would place in order in fact we would be there for every single order for the first few orders of our early customers to go there and show them. How do you actually scan this gallon of clover milk. And then how do you put that in your car. Right magic teaching your consumers how to use your you're right. We went in hand. Like super Superhuman style onboarding in training for every single of our retail customers to make sure that they really understood a heavy snap it. Also that we care you know that was really important to know that we weren't just some young young kids from tech coming in to do something crazy. We actually really wanted to help their business. So that was you know. Walking into the training is one aspect another aspect. Is you know we as a function of building trust. We had to make sure that there was never failed order or if there was there was extreme. You know super heroic tactics used to like make it up to them. So there's a couple of incidents that come to mind for roberts. Mark in portola valley was At the tried to place a dairy order and for some reason they ordered in you know cases as opposed to each his which means they got. Maybe four or eight times as much darius. They're supposed to get that load in what we did as a team said you know we gotta make it up to mike. Mike kirk order clerk their store director and we know that he loves like heavy metal. And like you know like by classic rock involved bunch of different genres in. We actually got him kiss. Tickets one of his favorite bands and We it they happened to be playing like no it was sometime before co it hits like in martial might girlfriend jewelry. She liked design like a accustomed thicket with his name on it as representation of virtual ticket and we in like box was like. Wow you guys really care It's all good you know. And you know another case that actually not harmful a distributor failed to deliver some The market edgewood in powell. Also and you know. It's a big deal. If milk doesn't make it to the receiving that means that there's gonna be a shortage of cereal in the community that that get eldest Goes into get a get a gallon of two percent in may be shorter right so if we don't want that to happen. We actually bought headband. Two hundred two hundred gallons of milk through it in from some Through it in our in our suv and drove it to the To the store and got there at the time that there would have expected there. There are a wholesale order and competence. That hey here you go you know. These are kind of the things that we had to do to stir that it kinda crank that cyclist are pushing a boulder uphill to get to that point in developing user. Trust developing like building Home us understanding of how to use our software ultimately ladder up to retention. Which for us is well over ninety percent over any sixty day period for for for for new cohorts of retailers. Yet do things they don't scale you know. We took a lot from the brian chest. The example of taking photographs of of users in our users definitely that level of of love caring but it really pays off in the end. We did a bunch of things that didn't scale as well brennan in the early days when needed to build the catalog of groceries that came from a store that we wanted to offer to our customers. The store off in wooded give us the catalog or didn't have the catalog to give to us so we would go into the store and take a picture of every single item in some cases we would buy one of every single item. Get back to our office. Take pictures of it there so we became really good at taking pictures of of groceries. Another fun example of things that don't scale why would often cater their demo days using sakari and so some shopper would get the order for like two hundred bottles of soda that jessica livingston had displaced in would call and say hey. I can't do this. I can't do this order on my own and we would try to help have another shopper help and sometimes we would go help. I remember there was an order for a hackathon in san francisco and the order was for like twelve hundred dollars of costco. Items including forty boxes of bags of chips and a bunch of other stuff and we saw this order through a twelve hundred dollar order even now but even back then was very exceptional. Saw order came in. And both my co-founder brandon. I we were like well. The shopper obviously won't be able to do this on their own. let's go on to costco. We left our office. We went down to the cost of san francisco. The two of us helped the shopper finding items purchase the items because it was way over the limit of their instacart credit card in the three of us in three separate cars drove this giant order over to this hackathon gave the products to them in Brought them a bunch of instacart stickers so that they could from us to their to their members in the opposite finished our our day into the night and it's funny because if you're founder and you're starting a social network or something in something breaks while somebody's newsfeed doesn't load and you probably never get a call about it but if you're founding company where people are depending on your product in it's in the real world like in your case or an instacart case you end up having to put four hundred gallons of milk in your car you know. It's a totally different world brandon on your example. I think it's it's especially important for these industries where they're typically built on human relationships like you know whatever grocery store has their the person that is on the phone he'll deal i think it is. I think super important to be there in person and actually build that same level of trust is a tech company. If that's not the way it scales. And i think i guess from Growth framework way. I think about it is just like you don't really prioritizing retention getting that right before kind of moving upper funnel. It's kinda parallel. I had from for my experiences at stitch fix numb scaled quite far without having spent a dollar on marketing on largely because it was a concept that you know just really struck strong product market fit with the right user who is under served in we had competitors ever focused on men on the coasts. Statistics was focused on women. Typically late thirties early forties in the mid west at the time just like really spread released wrong word of mouth about the concept and you it helped out. At the model there was a there was a human component in thousands ultimately. Like styling even send you a note and sending your close but in the early days in continues to do this personally am medic. Standard to enough of stylus overtime. There's more of your algorithms doing it. But i think our just underscore like the importance even if it feels like building. Strong customer live in really high. Nps how you measure like won't scale that's ultimately the most impactful thing you could do. You could do for growth in the term says. I wanted to segue back to our conversation. When amazon bought whole foods a few years ago there were all these predictions of things that were going to change amazon to their own. Sort of experimental. this self-checkout stores maybe. Y'all can elucidate. What were the predictions. Expectations that that we've had and what have we seen since then. And what makes it so the date of this happened. I think we all found out about pretty early in the morning. And i remember being in bed looking at my phone and had gotten a bunch of text messages about it pretty early in the morning and that morning my wife and i were supposed to hospital because we were thought to give birth to our first kid and i said to my wife like we're gonna have to reschedule this tour like its its wartime. Today we got into the office in. I think pretty early in the day it was clear this was going to be net positive for instacart in helped put together in all hands. I think by about eleven amer noon. We were talking to the whole company about it. Reassuring folks that we were on top of it and sort of taking a stab at what the next few months to look like for us as a result vast words today i think. In retrospect what you can see that amazon's always been really interested in this market among other things that are doing and it's just an acceleration of that if you're a grocer and you were sort of on the fence about coming online while this was just a moment in time where you hide the suddenly pay attention and your board was asking you. Hey what's your strategy here. So help accelerate existing trend of of groceries wanting to come online in wanting to do that in a way that was fast and easy which is exactly what insert offers them. I think from from our vantage point where we said you know we walk into it. It actually created kind of to side at least two different effects. We observed on wolf. Obviously this happened before we got started but that we observed now we go to these stores and especially these local independent stores right. I think a lot of there's gonna be a. There is a moment for local right right now getting ripping this going on and these local retailers are really thinking. Hey like how do we actually compete with. Not just whole foods were now. Whole foods is backed owned by amazon crate. And in this age where you know. Amazon is a multi trillion dollar company and owns the probably the flagship the the best brandon grocery in in food retail right. These stores like all right so had we compete what we do and creates a lane for. How do you take the technology that whole foods has and give it to the rest of the you know or at least the hundred billion dollar long tail of of of retail that that does not have amazon to support them in terms of technological infrastructure. Leaves around in the other side of the coin. You we talk to these suppliers that run honest you know fifteen to twenty five to one hundred million dollars a year. Businesses distributing various foods kettle chips and You know various gear daily chocolates. Your name it meat milk and they're like well you know whole foods number. One supplier is unify united natural foods and they have their own technology and they have a lot of infrastructure to be able to distribute. Food is scale but all of these the the rest of know. They're they're seventeen percent of the market. The rest of the eighty three percent of the market for the most part is under tact. And so then when you look at these regional and local suppliers go to them. Say hey we can give you say technology that when if i has so you can compete better in the marketplace so it it definitely adds to the feeling of of like why now for our customers indefinite countries to now. What we're seeing. Why you know what we're building actually adds value to the ecosystem. Brandon is especially in encoded. It's very challenging building the type of business or just building a startup in general. How have you managed or talk a little bit too that toughness and how how how you work through it and how others like investors on this call i in general can be supported. One thing. i'm around on. This journey. is the importance of you know just really strong personal kind of relationships still really all of us on the album founders team train robin myself a really thinking about how do we not burn out. I think we have definitely felt extremely exhausted in. Try to negotiate with ourselves. Is this just a natural function of trying to build a successful startup or is there are there certain nutrients that were missing in this process. That can help us. like spread the marathon. I will say starting trays. One of my best friends had known him for half a decade in being able to work with him in liberal. Themes really helps you know terms of know each other knowing each other very well support each other to this process in rob is well known him knew him from stanford i think having that strong basis of friendship and brotherhood in way his really allowed us in bunch of stuff's through a lot of the storm and i do think a lot of founders. This thing of co-founder dating and right Obviously ondeck fellow. So you know we see a lot of you know i really do. Believe as you're doing co-founder dating you know. Thinking about what are your. What are your values like. What are your goals. Why do you wanna start company. What does it look like to fail to get not just to win together right. What does it look like to struggle together to quarantine the together. I think these are really important. Things you think about. Kobe evaluating unders-. But i will say that you know. My girlfriend has played a very large role to she. Just she Took us she planned in extraordinary trip to yosemite this past weekend. Which i wouldn't have done myself i would have been you know working with her at my house or something and i think it was. It was extremely re-energize. The soul so self care the question around. What do you do for self care. it's not. I don't have a robust answer Think we're learning to walk in that regard but Would love to hear what. Mike and max have in terms of really Taking that to the next level. I think founders often asked me for advice on this in any no. They ask specific question like the other day brandon. What do you think this homepage for designing. Or what are some ideas that you have for us to make our company more successful. How start with a very basic checklist. And i actually learned this. From our pediatrician. We took our you know our two week old baby to our pediatrician. And he didn't examine the baby he was looking at us as parents and he is asking us all these questions about our house. Do you have a smoke detector. Have you baby proof to your house Do you live on the second story of the first story. And i asked him. I was like dr not looking at the baby. Why are you asking us all these questions about our life. And his way of getting at the way to keep our our new baby safe was to ask about the baby's environment and so it's sort of interesting metaphor but if founder asked me you know what's the most successful way too if you asked me. What's the way to make my company most successful while i would start with. How's your relationship with your co founders. What is where your interpersonal relationships. Like with your friends or your partner. What's your what's your weekly routine. Are you keeping up with exercising three times a week. Or whatever else keeps you sane. And so i think there's a lot of advice on specific things on what to do in a business but i didn't get to start with fundamentals and if you feel lonely as a boundary. You're doing something wrong. You're not reaching out enough to your co or your team or your support network or maybe you haven't built a group of peers at the same stage as you to to learn from So you should work on fixing nap before you even do anything with your business. We must have the same pediatrician. Max yeah there's yeah i mean i think and i just not run. Our teams never been a founder myself. And i i would say. I've always been a rung below and just have tremendous empathy for how much founders really carry on their shoulders. And i guess you know in founders. That i work with i would totally agree with everything that max said on just looking out for ones like holistic wellbeing. I would have a different angle on it that i have experienced personally. Which is you know anytime. You're not showing up like one hundred percent but try to power through it and enforce yourself to appear as sach like the rest of your team sees that trickles down in. So i think the important thing that i think i think many founders i think rightfully could be you know slow to delegate or slow tests give themselves a break i mean that's like not perfect or operate with such a high sense of urgency which is part of what makes them so successful in. You know just this feeling of being an owner acting like an owner across every dimension again. I mean that could lead to a lot of success. But if you don't watch our really wear you down and so i think surrounding yourself with people you trust but also knowing when the right time is to really get off your plate and just you know realizing that part of running successful companies to continually higher south out of roles that adiel. You've done it yourself. But just you know delegating before. Might feel comfortable. I think Is a pattern that i've seen you know. Richard across a number of founders. But i think having something that makes brandon mike saints with brandon so exceptional just this thirst for feedback all the time. Just this constant desire to improve and Oftentimes i tell brandon like. Don't forget to celebrate wins along the way and And just you know bring maganga every once in a while is. The companies made a ton of progress along the way. But there's this yeah. Just this steady on knowing are always be better and i think you know hearing feedback without any defensiveness and always translate things to action in and seeking actually like meeting out of that feedback south immediately clear. I've i think that's a quality that i've seen in brandon as being just exceptional in a number of other big founders. I think had that have that as well. So that's all. I would attitude to get answers from from founders. Mood would second like brandon. Beane in exceptional entrepreneur is never shied to ask the question that might open himself up in vulnerable way to ask the question that he thinks maybe he should know the answer to but doesn't and is able to get the help advice he needs in that moment yeah net vulnerability to be so hard when you're standing in front of a company of people at are you looking up to you for some sources security or comfort it. Oftentimes be founders. Rightfully might not want to show that ability. Keep everyone's cool but in many ways like vulnerability actually create trust. And i think. I've seen brandon musically. Really well very nice. I don't wanna crime. Podcast i would. I would that and that's a before brennan starts crying. There'd be a perfect place to direct brent. this has been wonderful. Podcast guys Guess has been maximum firm instacart brandon hill. Avoid and mike duboe of lock guys. Thanks much for coming on the podcast for talking. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you. Check us out at village global dot.

brandon Torbert co village global aid network max mullen Borey brandon max instacart amick dan David Mike lacroix Imbaba seventy percent eric fifteen twenty percent billion dollar kovin brandenburg gersh gordon reynold us
Beth Ford | All Markets Summit by Yahoo Finance

Yahoo Finance Presents

19:27 min | 7 months ago

Beth Ford | All Markets Summit by Yahoo Finance

"Beth ford has run land lakes since twenty eighteen. it's one of the largest food and agricultural cooperatives in the us. It's fully farmer owned and we'll be in business one hundred years next year or it has helped lead the farming sector through multiple recent challenges including cove in nineteen tariffs and extreme weather conditions for the first time in gallup's twenty years of pulling americans views of business and industry farming and agriculture is now number. One i'm alexis. Christoph chris with yahoo finance joining me. Today is beth forward president and ceo of land lakes. That is so good to see you again. Thanks for joining us on the market. Summit now thanks for the opportunity looking for the conversation. Will there's a lot to get to. But look i want to start with this i. I don't need to tell you how much people are baking and cooking this myself included. And i know you're on track to sell something like a record. Three hundred million pounds of butter. This would be a company record for you Do you see demand remaining this high. Is it sustainable. Well it certainly elevated. It's really interesting. We're stepping into on november december. Normally he sees the butter business. Has that's normally are all baking and cooking and getting together. We seen this incredible elevated amount of butter being sold and cheeses while the cheese business is since the start of this pandemic and So do we say. See it. Stay elevated while i'm really gonna be interested in what that holiday season looks like normally as there's a surge we're starting to see. The orderbook is really quite full for october as we step into that at a retail shops. I think it'll stay elevated certainly towards the end of the year and then the question really goes to what is the reopening. His law of dairy products are sold into food. Service right bulk. Butter type stuff In so will there be a shift. How quickly does that open. What is that dynamic. I do expect that will continue to see elevated levels through the holiday season in that. We're gonna see what the reopening plans look like in next year. How have you been keeping up with demand. Supply chain. Look like i remember. I went to market not long ago looking for unsalted butter. Because i wanted to bake there was only salted butter out. There and i had to wait a while. So what. what's keeping up with that demand. It has been really really amazing. You know it's not that there's not enough milk to make the butter milk. Production has been strong for dairy producers But we are operating literally. We had to reduce the variety of skews. You said salted. That's interesting that you couldn't get unsalted but we also have different types of of others that we put on the shelf we pull back from those. We had to go to one particular case. Count for every retailer like thirty six versus eighteen right so that we could maximize production on our lives oftentimes in the spring which is the most productive for cows making milk. It's called flush you make a bunch of butter and the put it in your refrigerator for keys and key season being november december. Well we've been selling everything so there was no butter put up because everything was kind off the lines and going into retail stores. And so you know how is it. Well were were maximizing production reducing skew variety. We're in a good position as we get into Two key season. But we're gonna see how the year ends we know that farmers are the lifeblood of land lakes and people may not realize that your company's a fourteen billion dollar farm owned cooperative and it's been a tough couple of years For farmers. I mean they always have to deal with sort of challenging. Whether that's always sort of in the backdrop of they also of course now have the pandemic and then they were trade issues concerning china during the trump administration. Just give us a feel for what our nation's farmers are feeling right. Now how are they doing. You know you went through the the waterfall cascade of issues that have been present for agricultural end for farmers as you know farming and outdoor sport. So it'd be too hot too wet to dry you brilliant farm. You can still have issues. I'm how are they feeling right now. The pandemic did exacerbates supply. Chain back up. So i mentioned what happens with food service. Oftentimes producers are theory on the dairy side shipped to service restaurants processors who make products for foodservice schools have been shut down So you lost basically fifteen twenty percent plus of the market for distribution. You saw back up in a meat processing. Right of hogs cattle as to what happened was that there was an immediate drop in collapse in commodity prices as well that wasn't a lot of international trade because alive in were were numerous saying here in the united states especially early in the pandemic and exports are crucial to profitability for farmers for instance dairy one day out of seven up production is exported in variety. So this was really. It was really causing pressure at the farm aid in terms of pricing. Now how are they feeling right now. Will we made it past this particular. The point of the pressure. The administration in the senate and house did provide a funding for farmers interim payments. Make up for this gap. Many will make it to the other side. We're going to see what happens with this. This next new challenging months depending what happens with the pandemic. I have seen a rain pricing so broke crowd. Farmers of beans and corn has started to strengthen the price over ten twenty ten thirty corn price. I saw four numbered in front of it. And so that's stronger performance for those crops wraps in so that's a that's a positive. That's a positive. I'm seeing a little bit more momentum a little bit stronger performance for dairy food box program that is providing salute for for underserved communities in for For food insecure has has elevated milk price event at farmgate. We're not seeing the same woah bankruptcies at a dairy farm model so they're feeling a little bit not stable. Let's not say who were in the stable environment but there are. There are more positive signs in there for less New couple of years especially trade has started up in china ceo. Lada of shipments especially soybeans for hogs etc into a into china. Are you looking any more aid to come from the government you know. We're still waiting for this. Next stimulus deal to to materialize. And when it does are you hopeful or is. Do you have reason to believe that there will be some aid in there. For our country's farmers well the administration. And i think the house and senate reallocated some funding to To a funding area that it provides funding our support to farmers as well support programs. Insurance programs will be credit. All the farmer has to sign up for insurance same thing from the dairy For the dairy side. So are we looking for support. What we're gonna see. I mentioned the food box program funded head Had run out for that food box potent. But it looks like they're upping for maybe another billion dollars as what we're hearing toy expect. We're going to see something we don't know what's going to happen in that round for my government affairs team and certainly we are connected through our through our government affairs team into Both the administration the house and the senate. I get a view and an advocate appropriately. It's or some level of out payments for farmers as we as we move through this pandemic something that farmers have had to deal with. Even pre pandemic has been access to connectivity and to the internet and the pandemic is really just exacerbated. That need i know that. You are a huge proponent for internet access in rural areas you'd back legislation regarding this. Where do things stand right now. And what else can the public and private sector do and come together to help aid the farmers thank you for phrasing it that way. This is about coming together. Eighteen million plus americans lack assets broadband majority of them are in rural communities One in four armored or a rural community citizens lack access to broadband. This is exacerbated. Are this is highlighted is as digital divide that we have you know oftentimes on a far. They're happy with the teachers. Have to drive out with this paper homework so these kids can have because you don't have enough technology on the farm or you gotta run farm equipment. I mean it's it's really unacceptable. This isn't a rural issue. This is american food. Security is a national security issue. We see this front and center right. We all see this working from home were connecting with doctors from hall. And there's a shortage of forty thousand dollars in america there's a lack of hospitals in saudi. Seek coke it coming into these areas. So what are we doing. We are advocating started a coalition called the american connection project at over one hundred and twenty other companies microsoft cargill players. Tractor supply any number of company partners. Who also see is as we must fix this This lack of access to broadband it needs to be like a nineteen thirties. Rural electric initiative going across the country. I want to switch gears for a moment and talk about the world we're living in right now and land. Lakes is headquartered a short drive from the minneapolis neighborhood. Where george floyd was killed. Why has it been like leading an organization. That is at the epicenter of what sparked a lot of these protests throughout our country. It's been painful. It's been difficult You first of all our responsibility. My responsibility as a leader is to acknowledge this is. This is just terrible and painful. This should never happens. This basically we saw a sudden lose their life right in front of our eyes and In what what. I would say this many folks in the in the community. The twin cities saint paul seventeen four to five hundred businesses here. This is not an inactive community of making reinvestment in a community to say we've got closed some of these dispel disparities. There's been a different outcome between minorities in these communities and and the rats and we can't have that so what is it been like. It's been very painful in the community and very difficult. As a ceo of this business we have lists held listening sessions for our team. And i don't have that lived experience of having fear. Tell my children go out to right. The right right to unto drive. We've had stories where You know where senior executives minorities hold on right on the way to work. We don't live that. I don't live that. We have to listen to that. We have to understand. What are the systemic issues can how we make sure our employees feel engaged in their workplace feel heart of of our community an as they believe were have we make sure we are committed to making appropriate investments To to make sure that they feel safe engaged unhappy in their communities so it's painful a learning session for many of us and connecticut through the minnesota business partners. A and as well as through this roundtable is on some those Those medicines well sitting there ordered to try to address. What is it very challenging. Time i think for all land lakes Is going to be celebrating. Its one hundred birthday. I think it's next year and off past screaming. I you remove the image of a native american woman From your butter packaging and there have been all sorts of ideas out there as to why you may have done that shortly thereafter. We saw other changes like aunt. Jemima changing its products. Uncle ben's changing up its products but tell us the reasoning behind why you change that butter the imagery on on the butter. Approx yeah. i mean it's interesting because we did that in january february right then. All of these other changes came after in some discussions on racial equity Those types of why did we do it. well When i took over c which has been a little over a couple of years we started looking at number things. Yes we're coming into our anniversary. We are a farmer on cooperative. We take a great deal of finding that in fact research tells us market research that nobody's more respected than the farmer right and so what we recognize this. We messaging now that that is special about us that we're farmer on that work walkerton in when we did our research what we found from consumers of. They didn't know that. Wait wait a minute. We didn't know that if you told us that that would have been more reason to be connected to your products so we made that decision in some people view it as you took it away. I view it as we move forward to message. What differentiates us our products. Who we are. We go right from the arm. We you know we know the cow you know we we own up you know we the pows. We retail business. And so we're different and we wanted to message that consumers and that's why we made those changes. I also wanted to congratulate you on making fortunes. Most powerful women's list of twenty twenty on that is awesome. I know that for meteorite your background. You grew up in a large family in sioux city. Iowa growing up who were some of your female role models of always. Big role level is my mother Do in fifth in the family of eight. I have three sisters four brothers. We were very much a working class. family My dad was a truck driver. You know we started working very early in our lives because if you wanted your own clothes Work for that. And i got one drawer. That was mind in a room with three sisters. So but i want to. I want to say my mother is my biggest role model and the reason is. Here's a woman who who wrote of north edge. She was adopted. She became a nurse to very young nurse. She had eight of us. She went back to school. It became a psychologist psychiatrist initiating administer. She's i work on their body in their mind. Did not whether soul up. She's still with us very fortunate to say But her resilience her kindness empathy. We didn't have as we said to nettlesome. But i remember so vividly her telling me we would have to take a meal to a a a family in need at thanksgiving. I'm thinking we don't have pets. Go there and then she say to me. I can just see it so vividly. A home with kids knitting avalanche. She said do understand your responsibility. You have been in so much. Don't understand this is about somebody so my mother is my role models Incredibly bright strong resilient capable and back. I think the only should all this fire for that. It's certainly a blessing to have your mom if you don't mind me asking what's your first name. And how old is she. Her name is carol watson smith and she is eighty three. Now i believe. Now why am i right. You know it's funny is that i all the siblings than we live in all parts of the country. But now what we we do. Is we do a zoom with all of us and there for a long many years. I wouldn't see some of my siblings for a couple of years right because they're in some of the now it's like we're seeing my mom and all of us I'm soon on sundays in catching up in. Its its lesson. yeah i can relate. I can relate to that for sure before we let you go. If you had five minutes alone with the next president you had you had his ear for five minutes. What would you want to tell. I would say that. We have work to do on where we think about investing To to close some of this economic disparity in that we see and to make sure we stabilize operating environments if i'd say it in my role as the ceo of land lakes have concern in continued concern for rural vibrancy for the The challenges that i see in these communities that lack investment like access to health care Some of the most food insecure are actually rural america. My housing lap of of you know we need to do better. It leaves us insecure at end and leads us as a nation was secure and we need to focus on that and oftentimes. This is viewed as somebody else's issue. That's a rural issue. This is an american should. That's what i would be. I would be saying. It's no different than i used. This phrase that america's new intercity and we should think about that because what we've done is we not invested appropriately for nineteen percent of american levinson girl america. They price forty four of the military. These are people willing to do the hard work for our country and we must invest in them in these communities to make sure we have a vibrant america so that would be my mind focused. Technology is enabler to close this gap. We should be excited about the ways. They'll be in big about that including is unable or for data and analytics for sustainable production so that farmers and farming a part of the solution for climate change in for other Other bigger problems in society. Now thanks for shedding light on rural america. Beth ford ceo and president of land lakes is always a pleasure and thanks so much for spending time with us to see.

milk Beth ford Christoph chris Three hundred million pounds land lakes fourteen billion dollar trump administration fifteen twenty percent senate america china one hundred years gallup forty thousand dollars george floyd alexis house twenty years yahoo billion dollars
April 25: Share and share dislike

As It Happens from CBC Radio

45:40 min | 2 years ago

April 25: Share and share dislike

"This is a cbc podcast you know what's crazy not using smarter tools to manage small business you work too hard to work this hard collecting receipts v eighties are you making a call from a payphone later spreadsheets are you rockin a radical perm right now quickbooks gives you a smarter set of business tools that do all the hard work for you it's easier than rewinding vhs before returning it you earned it we're here to make sure you get it quickbooks backing you hello i'm carol off good evening i'm jeff douglas and this is as it happens the podcast addition tonight share share dislike canada's privacy commissioner has serious problems the way facebook has over user data so taking the company the court all in the family dd leaders break with tradition unannounced with the children of dd women who were in played by isis are welcome in their community fatal miscalculation usa led coalition originally claimed a few hundred civilians were killed during airstrikes in syria in twenty seventeen amnesty international says it was more like sixteen hundred he's got the whole hands in his world or at least a new pet land man claims he has found images of jesus's hands inside of broken rock which is now for sale although the prices shutting down folding it's cards instead of your pen japanese companies high tech i robot was supposed to fold laundry drain by the company has filed for bankruptcy because it couldn't increase the machine creasing ad hey you to get a broom a married couple tells us about their journey to the world mixed doubles curling championship where they are the first team ever to compete for nigeria as it happens the thursday edition radio the find them between a rock and day hurry hard plates canada's privacy commissioner is taking face book the court daniel tell me again maybe announcement this morning after a joint investigation with british columbia is privacy commissioner they they found that the social media and data harvesting behemoths committed to what they're calling serious contravention of canadian privacy laws the focus of the investigation was facebook's collaboration with companies like cambridge bridge analytica a political consultancy that was given access to the data of millions of unwitting users including hundreds of thousands of canadians we reach privacy commissioner daniel tell yeah in got to know conditioned italian i hadn't found enough to take a facebook to court because although we have investigated and their privacy policies for more than a year now and have come to conclusions under the law facebook is disagreeing with my office the federal office and are bc colleagues about a certain number of violations of a of privacy law so the company a is simply treating these conclusions up regulators in canada a mere opinion step bacon disregard then continue as they were and what exactly what what have they ignored about what you ask them to do so to mind you're a listeners these stocks were of course revealed more than a year ago and by british newspapers to be effective at a facebook failed to protect its users personal information which lead and certain analytics companies to then use that information for political messaging and micro targeting electors a hindu u s what we looked at was all these terms and conditions you primacy terms and conditions of facebook's wind did not make that possible and what impact would any deficiencies have on canadians and what we found essentially which are colleagues is not thee privacy conditions put in place by facebook are an empty shell that they do not protect privacy facebook disclose information for instance to third party applications that sit on the platform without informed consent by their users with a potential harm to users which manifested itself in the case of a cambridge analytica with micro targeting of a lakers cambridge analytica is the one that has been under the spotlight because there's a whistle blower named christopher wiley a canadian who revealed the degree to which at the cambridge analytica a was getting access to all this facebook's data and there was also another canadian company aggregate i q that that was part of this equation as well mark zuckerberg who is the head of facebook has been able to to dodge all kinds of questions about how and why that information share to that extent that we were you able to get any response in in at all while har har focus again was on v a the terms and conditions we had a long discussions with representatives of facebook on the failings of their their privacy policies in general so let me be cambridge analytica issue is just one application that resigns on the facebook platform there are millions of these applications and he protections in question in argue a horror are not effective they are an empty shell and what did they how did they respond when you confounded facebook a disagreed with our conclusion we say that facebook discloses information to a third party applications which results in certain legal obligations to inform users properly meaningfully and salon facebook says that his stop disclosing information to applications that it is merely making their users information available had the users request so that that's a good sign high thing that facebook does not accept responsibility sponsor ability for his actions it is shifting responsibility iser to individual users or to third party application developers which they do business that's that's another problem actually that facebook as you say dodgers questions or a in terms of compliance with the law does not assume it's responsibilities for its user and yet we hear from at facebook ceo mark zuckerberg who says the company has quote a privacy he focused vision for the future of social networking and has given statements and speeches about how committed he is to that you're saying their privacy protections that are therefore canadians are quote an empty shell so well that that that's it's impossible to reconcile what a mr zuckerberg says one that he wants to build up your privacy focused company but also that he wants to work with government and regulators to ensure that at a here's users privacy is well protected and then when it comes time to actually have a conversation with a regulators v conclusion is facebook disagrees with her conclusions does not wish to implement recommendation it's impossible to recover but i guess from that point of view why should they care i mean they have despite all the that's been revealed about how they shared data our days how how they have exploited our information they are growing as a company why should they can what i would say is not first of all i'm not i'm not blaming individuals to continue to be on on the social network people have an eight to communicate and in two thousand nine nineteen this means using digital services including social media platforms i single a that individuals expect government to protect them when they engage on these platforms sold so that a they do not have to reid a fifty page privacy policies and on understand these intricacy and that they can freely a engage with these platforms lives a modern live in twenty nineteen team with digital services while being protected that's i think what is expected and i think facebook will care when there are laws that force them to care a whit penalties width proper powers for regulating agencies to ensure that they actually respect people's privacy and that they're no longer allowed to say we care when they don't are you on facebook i'm not personally on facebook and the as institution we had limited presents on facebook a v office of the privacy commissioner but as of now we have decided no longer to be there because of be lack of accountability that we we found in this investigation commissioning tell you i appreciate speaking the thank you welcome daniel tell his canada's privacy commissioner we reached him in a gutsy no comeback facebook's responded to the commissioners announcement with the statement that reads quote after many months of good faith quote cooperation and lengthy negotiation we are disappointed that these old pc considers these issues raised in this report unresolved there's no evidence the canadians data shared with cambridge analytica and we've made a dramatic improvement to are platform to protect people's personal information unquote one hundred fifty nine according to amnesty international that is the number of civilians u s led coalition has acknowledged killing during its assault on raca be official line is that every practical precaution was taken to avoid harming noncombatants in the push to drive isis from its self declared capitol in syria however amnesty international has been on the ground investigating an in a report released today says rockets civilians paid a much higher price donatello rivera led the investigation we reach ms rivera in london this is a very you're saying that the coalition is only egg knowledge ing one hundred and fifty nine deaths in america what is you're investigation tell you that there have been ten times as many the number though we have for the civilian casualties in russia is in excess of one thousand six hundred i personally investigated six hundred and forty one casey's on the ground in rock call be very small percentage of cases the coalition acknowledges are the case is that on the international an air wars have submitted to the coalition the coalition of failed in its beauty to investigate a they're not proactively investigated cases it's only when we have done the work for them the day acknowledge the smaller percentage don't give it why are you so confident of those numbers what what accuracy can you point to i have been carrying out steel investigation into a very large number of cases i've spent months in rock on the grounds visiting more than two hundred sites of coalition strikes interviewing four hundred people who are survivors and witnesses of the strikes examining the material evidence including the remains of the munitions that were used by be coalition forces ending addition we've done remote sensing which include deed examining an analyzing more than two million frames of sock alight imagery for the period of e coli should operation in rock cup which just destroyed or damaged more than eleven thousand buildings we covered a course events as much as most news agencies did and what were of course it was impossible to get accurate information from remote 'em as to what they coalition airstrikes on this shelling was doing to people in raka at the same time in you that isis was making it impossible for people to escape the area using land mines and snipers to keep those people hostage inside so what else could the coalition strikes have done well the coalition was very dismissive about the presence of large numbers of civilians in the city and certainly bombing buildings with civilians inside in killing entire families is not be uncertain to a situation where civilians are trapped and unable to leave prevented from leaving from ice is be aim of your peration of the coalition wants to protect civilians at least that is what they have stated end at the same time they're both states openly that fired more artillery into iraq call done they had ever done anywhere at any time since the vietnam war everybody knows that's artillery is a battlefield munition it is not accurate it should never be used in an urban environment where there are civilians presence should've called quebec should the coalition have known how many civilians were trapped inside there before it began its assault the coalition you the the where a lot of civilians tra in rock caught because organization like ours the united nations told them because they're where civilians were managing to escape from rock every day with great difficulty in putting their life in danger the people were getting out of rock i was near rocket and i was speaking to them every day and the coalition could and should have done the same the coalition did not speak to people were coming out to rock at the time and the coalition less still not been speaking to people in rock call you a spokesperson for the u s led coalition says that they they had to a in response to what you're you're saying well they have to balance out the damage that isis is capable of doing they they atrocities a tort people that it was capable of that had to be stopped and that the balance out against what casualties might happen by this is so on rocker you buy the no because as i said there was more the coalition could and should have done a son will be dependent on the choice of munitions artillery is very cheap but he has a very high cost for human life ever delivered munitions that were used by the coalition's a where precise but the coalition did not put d e f four and the resources that were needed to verify the target in many cases because you've done so it would have knocked taken out entire buildings with entire families inside so we are not looking for a kind of utopian situation where there would be is zero casualty in in in the urban conflict like it was in rock come but there are possibilities abilities to take measures to minimize and to reduce civilian casualties and the coalition did not do all that equipment should have done to reduce the harm to civilians and now the coalition eighteen months after studio peration is also not doing all that they could and should do to investigate a what the consequences of its operations have been for the civilian population all right we will continue to follow this story this is that i really appreciate you telling us this update tonight thank you thank you thank you wanna tell reta is amnesty international senior crisis response advisor we reached her in london a a long long long long long a when someone says they have found jesus usually they mean that they have come to some sort of spiritual awakening berry craig means it a little more literally the new plan man recently discovered a pair of rocks but he says look like the praying hands of jesus now he's trying to get those hands off his hands by putting them up for sale we reach berry greg in commerce new finland very first of all can you describe these rocks for us i was an engineering inspector on on a job force access road in cars and the we needed some we came across some rock upside of the hill as some fractured rock activator was digging way at and that it has to be one of the rock sailed out in split pretty well right in front of me and what is split seeing this court slight structure in each of the the two apps that goes there and i look when i got home i know one rocks loser's gonna look like a hand of some sort so when i went back to work the next morning short off the two rocks were there i was like wow looks like the praying heads of jesus you know it fossilized in in iraq okay but when you say you see the hands of praying has been jesus hands right you're saying it's a rock formation and it's not absolutely no it's not actually it's it's the same as it's a symbol of symbolism behind that there is not actually an snow you know about it too when you look at it if you mean you there's many representation sit worldwide as a symbol of of jesus is praying in you know it it's using google there's many types but those rocks window window when not if you could clearly see the resemblance up of two ends like praying ins and that's a very very symbolic i must say and now you're the only one who could see the mode others use shown also see the hands of jesus many many others have said the same thing goes strikingly was like wow i mean this really do look like now i mean i've had i read comments on facebook when i when i posted it looks like pillsbury pillsbury dough by hands and sock puppet since all on its facebook you're gonna get you're gonna get people saying everything anyway but i mean most people that see have seen it is clearly represents i mean it looks like praying is the thing about it it's it's rare there's only one you'll never find another one like it in the world oh yeah essentially roxanne like that i think that now i did you we did it like a spiritual moments where you when you saw that this would you think the only for me when i you know what i mean like i said i i believe in god and so on but i'm not a regular churchgoer anything like that but yeah it was it striking because i've gotten say it will really was it was like wow the symbolism behind this i think is monumental it's a you know it's it's it's a symbol of of jesus christ hands in in fossilized in the internet in the natural geological formation an i mean i think juche okay so what are you gonna do with these rocks for sale get an like i said i i love this because i mean i i really pitcher if this wasn't a glass case sign of display at some church or some church organization or even a museum and what the story told behind it it's dissemble it's the symbolism of of jesus christ in god you know that's worldwide if this was on on display and there's only one like it in the world i mean if if this was a painting that was found by michelangelo that was painted three other years ago at out a piece of kansas their property worth millions today okay but they are all right i mean so you have had people who've seen the face of jesus on he's toast and in chocolate bars and they've all kinds of images and clouds 'em in year cappuccino so how different is this a mother the times people think they see in the difference between this rock and will say a piece of toast or cappuccino this was like again it's the connection between earth and god there's only one there's only one it's not gonna change it can't be reproduced you'll never find another one well maybe they maybe they maybe they could be they paying hands of the prophet mohammed well like i say they they could be but i mean just in in our society and in christianity again the praying is of jesus is is very common areas well no mocks christianity and that's that's what it looked like now anybody could put their own interpretation do it but i can assure you that the most people that see this and especially on display with the story they're gonna see what i see what i mean like i said i'm not a staunch christian or anything like that but it really do resemble and like i said you gotta look at connection and despot non going to debate and ongoing for years has been you know the guy create gear in or was it was it formed by the big bang here's the question when you're price tag you put on these rocks well to be honest today i've had a couple offers all right eight that's in the five digits the lower or five vision and i'm not budging on that i'm being i'm short we also saw dream someday fun treasure well maybe this could be like i don't know okay you have in the president's you got a woman who sold a piece of grilled cheese with see which she says is imprinted defaced of jesus on she got twenty eight thousand is that the kind of price you're looking for i think there's a big difference in this in this rock specimen feature krill she probably gonna rot overdrive that doesn't really rocked as well preserved served properly billions of years old okay but if you if you really believe this to be some kind of miracle where a god has revealed himself to these hands of jesus and the rockland why not just give it to a church why why you need to make money off of it why not i can't really answer that why salzer why not i mean that's you know that's a better choice an i mean if it's valuable that's no matter what choice if it goes in someone's private collection then world will not will be will not be able to see the hands of jesus and the rockets you discovered when he's still abbott i mean that's that's like famous painting victor's paintings that's worth hundreds of millions of dollars that a desert auction off that that private collectors f they're not seen worldwide but it's the value is still there all right very good detective thanks all right thank you bye bye perry craig owner of two rocks but he says look like the praying hands of jesus we reached him in macgyver new finland and you could see a photograph of mr craig's artifact on the as it happens website cbc dot c h slash hey i h the new washing machines washers dryers dry it doesn't matter how high tech they get right that is still basically all they do so i mean it's great but we don't have to take are soil overalls down to the quick whip the washboard anymore but where is the breakthrough that's really gonna help with a laundry where's the machine folds everything i know i santa angry i'm not no you know what i am i am i'm angry because until today i did not realize how close we had come the lawn droid is was an hr laundry folding robot designed by japanese company called seven dreamers it was able to identify the article of clothing you put it in it calculate the proper technique and then deliver neatly full the t shirt a button down later hose and unfortunately it didn't quite do what set on the ten one tech reporter gave the laundry day dark shirt which had to be pride out of it after fifteen minutes now engineers from seven dreamers told the reporter launder words cameras couldn't recognize the shirt and of course would robots cannot recognize they destroy and they were less dramatic problems to one it took about five minutes the fold any single article of clothing into it was initially priced at over twenty thousand canadian dollars and apparently the company could not find a way to make it any less expensive so now after accumulating nearly twenty seven million dollars in debt seven dreamers has filed for bankruptcy you know what i think we should give the laundered some credit here because it wasn't great with quotes but it did manage to get a whole company the old under these so called islamic state is eighty women were kidnapped held as sex slaves enforced converted islamic those who escaped faced another challenge returning to their community with children fathered by the militant sweat enslave them traditionally is eighty officials have rejected mixed marriages end children born to outsiders but this week these these supreme spiritual council announced but they will now welcome these children into their community tighter dome lee is easy man and minardi rights activist we reach into hawk northern iraq this you're dumb they just how significant and here's today's announcement that these children born to yazidi women who are in slaved by isis will be welcome back into the community there is a big has thirty forty years video tradition at just a come after big a working answer about now because there are a lot of discussion a lot of impression about it they are not coming those deliverance yazidi spare tire diligence they understand this so they make this announcement they say all of that survivor they are welcome so i mean it ends on woman's yazidi religions also give the woman's right to a half the children in here names and also a we are now thinking how to vote kate with the iraqi law because that is the biggest challenges to fight this issue and so before this decision was made buddy as eating supreme spiritual counsellor what happen to women who returned home where those children to to iraq where they accepted or did they have to leave their children behind this is very good question because we don't have that big number in the the year gd genetics city affairs they announcing they have just a just a seven woman with the children low and they say they are safe place just nothing happened to them the finally they will come the summer they support so because of that before the number become the big but yeah gd a league that they understand they should have this decision a second there are a lot of children's now in the or find center in bucket that in syria and other places and there are ever unrefined another woman also they don't want hurricane inbox because of those children a because of that it's like the opening the door so now we are looking for the support from the international community especially iraqi the governments meant to register those students are they is eat it because you have a big issue that the iraqi law for the woman who have the advantage will unknown a father they just sat him as a muslim when they just said that the muslim go directly the money they would just there's other muslim this is the big issue in the iraqi legislation okay if i understand correctly so bringing these children back you had to get to the social stigma this social resistance of women who had had children louis which these isis fighters outside of these eighty community that was a problem but also now you have a problem in that they these children have no status under iraqi law is that right exactly they don't have a start but also because of that we are looking at the iraqi legislation they are ready to change this africa's for the sake of the community i was understanding this very well it's not easy to ask the monday a they have a man disappeared more than ten fifteen twenty percent and maybe one of those people who killed us one he will be the father of those children as a this is the biggest stigma because of that a year dd community they are now doing the bigger fordham with the social life with the largest life with the other things and also for the stigma i understand it's not easy for a woman she how about children i don't you know one of the father of veteran who's being a proxy they paid for the must graves killings on a genocide process i'm rape other moms and killed the old woman and man's a isis they want to do this to to make this problem with his community that they tell him years easy they will not accept you but yes he did they say we are welcoming the woman when it comes to the inverse coming all of the survivors so now the game is an iraqi low to accept what is easy they won't and also it's a part of the perations habitations overdose woman to support him to reintegrate to the community onto the real life where these people these women themselves they were taken from iraq back from their yazidi communities in slave taken to syria where they were forced into sex slavery had these children many of them are in displaced people camped others have gone all over the world they've had to leave some of number in canada all these issues what are you actually going to do to encourage these women to return to their community i this is really a little early to say this we hope we we understand that are still a lot of women in syria maybe we still have some woman in iraq also the area was not been liberated they are welcome and we will coming on but we understand of also maybe they can find fortunate these were there to advance on to take him with vince but the this issue we should face and we should be more human thinking for those future for those children net for what happened to the pot they suddenly we leave it there and i think i thank you very much for telling us what's happening with these young women in their kids thank you for your support you think you have other life kind of only is the minardi rights activist we reached him do northern iraq the police want the driver and saint patrick's day hit and run to come forward and so today in a stunning move they wield the victim out in front of the camera in his hospital bed last month the twenty one year old and the vendors took rum thing was walking home after a night out in brampton ontario when he collapsed as he was trying to stand a driver slammed into him now doctors not sure if he'll ever be able to walk again the driver has not been identified and so today mistook rum's thing took matters into his own hands here is part of what he had this at appeal police news conference today one that's his 'cause that driver have mercy on twenty one years old and have a life of love is always forever going in i wanted to do what most people want it to work and have the best left the clinton now i can't walk i barely survive i don't know if i will be fuck i can move my can talk in i can enjoy life where i said man i feel less of an effort what do you know what that's like phil i'm not mad at you for letting me as people to make accidents and i don't want tissue get into any trouble just watch it'd be responsible for shoot it to me what changes to meet my life in it's gonna be changed like this forever twenty one year old and a vendor the crumbs thing making an appeal directly to the driver who hit him last it might be an understatement to call them under dog curling mixed doubles world championship ship is underway right now in norway canada japan in sweden are in the league by far further down the rankings in substantially further down is nigeria however it is the first time in the history tree of curling that they african nation is competing end it is the fulfillment of a lifelong dream t j cole half of nigeria's husband and wife doubles team we reached the nigerian american athlete at the tournament in the longer norway earlier this week tj what was it like for you to walk into the opening ceremonies of these championships carrying the flag of nigeria oh i it was one of the proudest moments of my life to be representing my country in a sport for the first time in representing not only my country but all of africa five year unamerican right yeah i have do you found these from nigeria yes so why did you wanna compete as and i do and why did you want to do to represent nigeria in these games because i'm proud of my country i'm proud of are people and i'm proud of are determination to build day curling federation a that will be first and all of africa 'em you know so we've been working hard and we hope we maybe get sponsors are people who are go fund me page and help us build the very first currently rank and all of africa you living denver right yes how do we have been trained in denver and canada but okay so lots of people get involved in the sport they like it they don't start to think that they're going to start then training for championships and maybe they olympics right so when did that that idea enter you're ahead oh i i have loved the olympics since i was a a a small child 'em i'd always it was one of my goals in life to compete indie olympics in in an event and as we became better and better it became a the course that we want it to go but why curling i may have all the sports you could maybe representing nigeria in white shoes that one well i'm a much older now i don't run as fast jump as high or throw as far as i might of years ago 'em andy was something that i could do with my wife which was just an amazing thing to train hard together to work together ice brought us closer it improves are communication andy the it's just been so much fun okay so you're in the curling mixed doubles and you're you're in doubles with fewer a wish your wife right this is susanna yes i'm here hi suzanne of this is carol hi karen so what's it like for you competing as he world class curly refer nigeria is just amazing it's just something that 'em a you know you never thinking all your life that you're going to find yourself in a situation like this is just an amazing feeling it's it's an honor i just feel humbled to be here okay but a whole bunch of things first of all did you ever think you'd be competing on the the world stage in any sport i did not i did not never never had i consider this type of level of competition until i met my husband howard people reacting to this moment moments in sports career they're they're happy they're just may than what we've accomplished in their very supportive and encouraging and you know we feel really excited because even though the win loss column hasn't gone are way of we've come out against some of the world's best teams and one two or three ends an have been somewhat successful still as young people learning the game you've been getting some coaching from from canada is right that's correct some of the best coaching where have you been doing that 'em are coaches ellery robust show jeanette robust show and then rick perone and they 'em curl out of they curling center a c c e s currently center of excellence and moncton new brunswick antifa they have been phenomenal as the teaching not only myself but preparing the teach the entire 'em nigerian men's team in mixed team okay so there's more there's more then just your team in curling is that right that's correct were were growing the sport i'm telling you look out nigeria's coming okay so growing the sport did it even exists t for you in susanna got involved in this no but what we did is we went to nigeria last year and we talked to a lot of folks we've put on some dry curling clinics a we put the word out in the usa the nigerian curlers nigerian americans who might curl and so we've got a very good response an we should be able to field almost all the different curling teams within the next year but right now we do have a men's team and we do have a mix team and we have are mixed doubles other curling rink in in nigeria no in nigeria what we've done is we have several a dry curling events an we're doing like national championships with all the a junior level players in the high schools and middle schools reporting on clinics and then were holding little mini tournaments to really just introduced the sport to all of nigeria so they know the basic rules they know they equipment they understand 'em everything about the game and like i said we're working so hard to to get eight curling facility in nigeria that once we do that we think we will really really take off people are comparing you just you're you're you're curling team to they famous jamaican bobsled team in nineteen eighty eight olympics yeah yeah we cool runnings and you know we're very proud an end you know in in many ways were so appreciative of them because they showed the way that if you have the heart the drive in the willpower you could make things happen and you know in the last olympics in nigeria we had a a a women's bobsled team a and m that also was very inspirational i think where we think we're a slightly different is we're building a program andrew we are expecting to be as competitive as anyone in the world sooner rather than later will be watching fill you in on me i said thank you so much for your support support and yes just always remember will be working hard k tj susanna thank you bye bye bye bye bye good luck pgn susanna coal makeup nigeria's mixed doubles curling team and they're representing the country treat it participates for the first time in the world curling championship we reached kohl's in strong norway end today they got their first win they beat france eight five only npr website there is a terrific dynamite tip for writing ineffective headline it goes like this pretending elevator doors shutting and you wanted help someone on the other side about a story story unquote great great advice the headline writers at the uk is bristol live website didn't quite pull that off today because really there is no way the elevator stays open long enough for anyone to say mystery of man walking down bristol street with musical shed on his head the blast fire out of the chimney now i have to give them credit they did back a lot into that headline and yet there are still many questions still many questions such as mystery of who walking where where the on his head blessing what out of what the truth is it turns out that there is no way to tell this story easily even when you have no word limit here is breathtakingly long sentence from the bristol live story by reporter kristen cork quote quite why there was a man with a miniature wouldn't shed on his head with disco lights under the ease and fire blasting out of the chimney in time to the music the shed is also blessing remained a mystery to passers by who stopped to watch with a mixture of fear apprehension battlement confusion delight and admiration unquote we have posted a video taken by one of those passers by on her twitter feed you've been listening to be as it happens podcast are show can be heard monday through friday on cbc radio one sirius xm listen to the whole show on the web just go to cbc

jeff douglas canada commissioner facebook usa syria twenty one year twenty seven million dollars ten fifteen twenty percent thirty forty years twenty one years eighteen months fifteen minutes five minutes five digits five year
In the Dirt 11: An interview with your host Craig Dalton

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

38:49 min | 8 months ago

In the Dirt 11: An interview with your host Craig Dalton

"Hello and welcome to episode 11 of in the dirt from the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton and shortly I'll be joined by my co-hosts gentle Jacobs this episodes about as self-explanatory as it gets so I'm not going to give you any warning. We're just going to jump right in Randall. Welcome to the show this week. Yeah glad back as usual or bi-monthly routine. So what might get picked up on audio but is definitely getting picked up as I'm looking at you on video is that you're outside today long as are you so I'm let's see I am on the ridge by skeggs point above Silicon Valley, but I'm actually looking to the West over at Half Moon Bay off. So pretty fantastic area where I'm posting up for the next few months. Anyways surrounded by a lot of trails. How did you explore there? I'm really eager to figure out Of a San Francisco to Santa Cruz bikepacking route. So keep it keep an eye on the trails and think about a route that we might be able to build through there. I know there's been some back and forth on this already, but I would love to kind of crack that code and publish it. Well that actually ties back to a previous conversation about trying to crowdsource this and we have the Forum in that we have been working on you have your Facebook forum for the gravel ride podcast and we have the thesis slack forum and we're going to be combining those two into a single Forum that we're calling the ridership home. That's still underway and we're kind of prototyping with the existing communities, but that'll be something to be announced hopefully on you know, the next episode or one shortly thereafter, and maybe we have a channel dedicated to you know, letting them having having some of the listeners and some of our Riders come together and put together this route going through their. Yeah. I think that that'll be great and I'm really excited about the concept of ridership that wage. Talking about just creating an online home for the gravel and Adventure cycling Community to come together and share, you know, fun stuff about bikes and gear down and roots and local rides and rides you're aspiring to internationally. I just think would be really cool to get all that in one place and just provide a free service to the committee. Yeah. Yeah. It's something that we I mean we started ours about a month or so ago and just seeing the level of Engagement and the quality of Engagement amongst the people participating has been great and then same on the Facebook group. So like tying those together and then slowly over time opening it up to other collaborators to bring their communities in and having like public channels for a general topics and private channels save like, you know just for say like our riders or you know, if there's a if there's a section only for gravel ride podcast supporters, you know, you can wage A special channel for that. Yeah, I think there's a lot of cool stuff. I mean obviously there's a lot of Big Adventures that people plan and want to share with the world. There's also big events every year and the idea of being to be nice to create sort of a specific channel for an event to allow people to collaborate and share that they're going and maybe get together for training rides or share tips and tricks from the crash last year. Like all this just needs to have a home and a way for people to access it over time. That's easy and gravel Travel and Adventure cyclist focused. Yeah. And by the way, it sounds like we have this all like mapped out and so on we're actually thinking about this in real time and kind of prototyping it so it's at that stage. So as we can unveil this the the feedback is going to law school and making sure that this is a resource that really resonates and is useful to you. Yeah, exactly. I mean this doesn't work without the community. It's not Randall and I putting content out there. It's it's you guys contributing content asking questions and just interact with each other. I mean that's that is what community is all about. And I do have to ask to tell me about where you're at right now. Yes. So as The Listener may remember I'm down in Los California for the next three months and speaking of community. It's been great interacting with people online just to get tips about the different trails around here. I'm surrounded. I'm right by Topanga state parks. I'm surrounded by a bunch of different ridgelines and thanks to just people have met over the Internet. I've discovered East Topanga Fire Road down into the Palisades. I have discovered Sullivan Ridge and Mandeville Canyon and so it's been great to kind of get that mental map of the area. And I've needed it so much. I've needed to kind of get out there and explore just to keep me sane. It's hard being away from home, but it's great that these bikes can be a gateway to Adventure. I was in a pretty crappy mood the other day and I just went out and all these trails are so new to me that it just really kind of brought me back up to a point where I'm like I can get another day. I can relate to that very much. So I had one of those Rags the other day where it's just like, you know, this this afternoon, I'm not getting much done. My head is not in the right space and I have the Good Fortune of having flexibility. So I am buried myself on 3-hour ride with a, you know, fifteen twenty percent grade twenty thirty minute climb at the end and it was just what I needed to to get focused, you know in the moment. Nice. Well everybody out there keep those emails coming to me about your favorite routes around here. I'm going to aim to explore the old Mash sites where the show MASH was recorded. Yep. There's a whole they're still like the old truck and a few old signs as artifacts in this in this one area kind of on the Malibu. I think it's in the Malibu Creekside. Anyway, I've got a truck up from the guys that gravel, California. So we're going to go over and check it out on Saturday if all things go as planned. Very cool. Very cool. Well, should we should we dive into this week's this week's topic off. Yeah. What are we talking about? Random? So this week we're going to be turning the tables on you and you will be in the hot seat and I will be interviewing. All right, man. I'm game. I think I've put this off as long as possible because I'm in right. So the way I actually like to do things a little differently instead of going into story just or a direct question, like what motivated you to start this You know, that's a pretty easy one. I guess two things combined to create the opportunity for me to create the gravel ride podcast one. I had purchased my phone number gravel bike essentially the commute into San Francisco. And what I realized was that the bike I had purchased wasn't necessarily going to serve all my needs and the moment I started riding it off road tubeless and not getting Flats like I used to do on my cross bike. I knew this was a sport. I was really going to enjoy I can get into my cycling back around a little bit more later. But what sparked the interest was that there were so many choices in the gravel market like what what did I want to get out of a bike and I've been around the sport literally my entire life both on the mountain bike side and the road bike side. So you would have thought I would have just sort of figured out immediately what I wanted in a biome. And that just wasn't the case so that interest and curiosity and the new sport combined with an interest in the medium of podcasting just came together at a natural point in time. Whereas like this will be valuable for me to just put information out there. Well, and I think that initiative to actually go from an idea to you know, putting something out in the world is either against and it's not your first experience with this, you know aware of so you want to share a bit about your dodocase experience. Yeah. Sure. So I mean most of my life I've I've have been exposed to Black entrepreneurs which has been great, but it wasn't until much later in life that I started to really see how it worked behind, you know behind the curtain and I want to share a couple stories of that sort of motivated me. So right out of college, I worked for Dean titanium in Boulder, Colorado and I'd been pretty sort of fed up with college and I decided wage At a certain point because I discovered the bike that if I was going to graduate college, I was going to go work in the bike industry and I was was calling out to a number of companies in Colorado cuz I wanted to move out there off and Dean was one that responded to me and yet he was the other one and I was have these conversations and they were quite encouraging and I think what I showed the owner at the time a gentleman who's still in the industry today, John Seacrest was that I was persistent. So we'd say call me back in ninety days. I would call back in ninety days. And eventually I just packed up the car and moved out there and over the entire course of time. I'd been calling him for for six or eight months every time someone else would answer. They would say something like well, let me go get him. I'm in the production Wing. I need to go to the business office to get him and as I went out there and finally got my first face-to-face interview and ultimately got a job with them. I learned that they had literally just moved into an office that job Speak and when I was calling previously and a guy named Doug was telling me he was going to the business Wing what he was doing was hitting the roof of the garage with a broom handle to get down to pick up the phone in his house. It was an entirely it was an entire fabrication of what I thought Dean titanium was all about. I just sort of assumed that was this medium-sized company with a production facility and I mentioned that not to sort of throw any shade at all. I thought it was brilliant and I thought it I learned a ton about how you create the experience you want for your customers and the voice you want regardless of your size and maybe some of that resonates with you know, your life as an entrepreneur thesis. Oh for sure starting in in the converted dining room of a small San Francisco apartment. I can definitely resonate with that. Unfortunately, that's no longer the case but getting started for sure. So we're working in that small business sort of gave me a little bit of a framework and I stayed in the bike industry for a little while afterwards. But ultimately I went back to business school and had a career change in business development essentially in the tech industry. I worked in the mobile industry and then later in the gaming space, but when the original iPad was announced I connected with a business partner and we created a company called dodocase and it was a handcrafted in San Francisco case for Apple's iPad. So we thought we had we didn't have a big business plan. We didn't have any business plan. But what we knew was that the iPad was going to be a thing in the world and we believe that people were going to want to put a case around it and the the concept was to use traditional bookbinding techniques to make an iPad cover. So when you opened up your ipad, It looked to the uninitiated I that you were opening a book and we ended up building the company out in San Francisco and at its peak had around thirty-five employees wage. Mostly all Artisans. So we had bookbinders. We had leather craft workers. We had a sewing team and it was an amazing Unexpected Journey in my life for eight years between founding that company and selling it that really was a joy. I mean and one of the big things about the dodocase experience life is from the get-go. It was very community-focused my partner and I Patrick we were completely transparent about who we were and the original product had was made out of a bamboo frame that attached to the the the book bound exterior and I'll distinctly remember photographs of me carrying dead. Big sheets of bamboo plywood on my back into a Woodshop getting into the you know handing it off to Patrick to rout out the frame of the iPad for the iPad out of that would and those are some of my favorite memories was just kind of getting my hands dirty and and really sharing that experience with with the would-be customers. Yeah. Yeah, I recall home, but I think one of the first long conversations you and I had we were driving out to NAB sand, you know this coming up you'd shared a another kind of important part of your your journey, which was founded a. We're you were you were ill for a while. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's it's interesting to me. My battle with cancer is quite related to my own history and passion for endurance Athletics. So I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma and it's actually a rather funny funny and ironic story wage. Just certainly Bay Area listeners and maybe listeners around the United States might be familiar with a program called team and training from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and it was it was shortly after kind of we all went through nine eleven in the United States that I was in that period where I just wanted to give a little back there was a lot of that motion and activity going on in the United States people. Just wanting to give back to the community and I wanted to raise money for something and I'd always wanted to do a triathlon. I'd been a cyclist. So I knew I had that on lockdown, but every time I just sort of thought about doing a triathlon I would just stray back to cycling and I would never actually get the swimming and and and biking done. So, excuse me. I'm running done. So I decided I would commit to this fundraising Endeavor. So I had to raise about $3,200 to go do the Wildflower Triathlon in California. And so I committed to that page. Graham this was completely prior to any personal connection to lymphoma or leukemia and over the course of that six-month training. I was feeling a little bit ill I managed to get to the race start line finished my first half Ironman Triathlon, but then a week later I went to the doctor wage and to make a long story short. I was they found a six inch tumor in my chest while and it turned out to be Hodgkin's lymphoma. So six months training for the triathlon the next six months of that year. I went through chemo and radiation and I remember kind of looking the doctor in the eye and making it clear to him that to me walking out of this experience was not enough. I want it to be riding out of the experience running out of the experience and swimming out of the experience. And now that was big for it was a big motivator for me to kind of fight through that chemo and radiation experience because it's it's brutal to your body. I wanted to make sure I got back to where I was when I left off. So, you know, I'm happy and pleased to say and this was a while back so, you know don't shed any tears for me today listener, but God, I went back to the same Triathlon the same Half Ironman. I did the year before six months after completing chemotherapy and I went faster than I did the year before and it was off to say it was cathartic is an understatement. Oh, I would be an emotional mess. Yeah. I mean I had I can't believe I'm kind of choking up at this moment, but I had I had a single it on that said cancer-free handwritten. And it was yeah. Yeah, I got a lot of a lot of encouragement and pats on the back and definitely broke down at the end of that experience, but I wouldn't change it. You know, I thought it was huge. And that's so this is one year like you you went and did the event the the very next year you had six months of treatment and six months of kind of recovery before the so that's nice. Yeah. Sounds like a best case scenario for what is a very harrowing journey. I think I would imagine you confront a lot. Yeah. I was quite fortunate that Hodgkin's lymphoma as type of lymphoma goes is the good one and a lot of people in my corner back then who really helped me stay encouraged and stay strong and get through it. I mean you don't own it was an yet another point in my life where Community just came flooding in to my life and I think that's why Community is just this common element of anything. I do any Endeavor. I want to get into I want that to be a part of it because I feel like I've benefitted from the aspects of community coming together around a cause so personally and know how valuable it can be, you know, and in in pleasurable situations, but also in life and death I can speak for those of us who who know and love you and especially those of us who've met you after that. That we're really glad that it ends up being that best case scenario and then you're here to participate because the way you show up is really wonderful. I appreciate that Randall. Yeah, so I'm always interested to know what is it about like diving deeper into the experience of riding bike. What is it that that really, you know resonates for you? What pulls you in? Now I've thought about this a bit from time to time and the sport of cycling. There's something about the methodical, you know, that the constant motion of peddling the repetitive motion of peddling that really works with my physiology for one reason and I often think like oh if potentially I could have been a long hour I've tried running and maybe that's not for me but I just like these kind of repetitive motion Sports combined with the outdoor elements month and the mountain and off road and gravel side has always been sort of the the the missing piece of the equation. I've certainly done plenty of road miles and off and Dunn Road touring Etc, but there's something about being out there in the dirt. That is so special to me and it really kind of invigorates me every single day. At the opportunity to do it. Yeah, I can I think well everyone who's showing up to a podcast like this can probably resonate with that sentiment. Yeah, and it's funny to me. I can do the same ride over and over and over again and I feel like I get something different out of it every time and I think that's certainly augmented when you're in the Bay Area because of the weather plays such a dramatic role in how we experience the trails, but I'm even finding it here in Southern California just the time of day the sunlight the composition of the dirt. These are all things that that change and all reasons why I encourage people to like take the unbeaten path and get off road. Yeah, yeah, especially like now it used to be that you had to choose between a road bike and a mountain bike and you had to like, you know choose a very specific experience. And now with the machines we have we can really go and and mix it up and just go explore from our you know from our back door. Yeah many days. I feel like that's that's a struggle for me to remind myself of that fact and I'm trying to be cognizant of that while I'm here in Southern California, cuz I feel like there are a lot of amazing Road Canyons to explore out and about around Malibu and those combinations again, they keep everything fresh. So it's a great sport because you can kind of reverse your loops and all of a sudden experience something so different now, I'm curious. What was your first like was your first serious bicycle? And how old were you how are you writing it and so on? Yeah, so I got into cycling actually rather early on so both my parents are from England. And in the north of England and my father was an amateur bike racer as were a number of his four brothers my cousins all ride. So it's it's been patiently part of the Dalton family Legacy but much to my father's Chagrin. My sort of first bike that I was passionate about was a BMX bike and I I raced BMX and my my road racing my father thought I was ridiculous and I think he pretty much refused to join me and made my neighbor takes me through all my BMX racing but it did did sort of ignite a passion for getting out there and putting a number on and sort of the fun of being part of a you know, an all day long Heats of BMX experience. And and so I know quite a few like downhill TJ's or like more like, you know Enduro types that might have started in BMX. Where where did you go from there you go into mountain biking or I did so I did a little bit of a little bit of Road riding in high school. Go with my dad not racing by any means but more touring he had the guts to take three of my friends and I on a tour of Upstate New York and Vermont all through youth hostels off on bikes with panniers, which God bless them for doing that that was a great adventure for us. But you know anybody who knows my dad, he's he's he's a bit of a loose cannon. I remember we all have sort of pay our own way on this trip cuz you wanted my friends and I had to feel kind of equal in this experience. We were having and we were up in Vermont and he told the group of us and we're like, you know, fourteen fifteen years old if anybody can hit 50 miles an hour on their odometer on a descent I'm buying all of you dinner. That's so how did that work out? I think I assume nobody got hurt. No one got hurt no parents ever found out about it, but we all ate well that evening very nice, but I would say my I was a soccer player in high school and Ed. My after my freshman year of college I came home and my dad had actually purchased a Cannondale mountain bike and I was living in Massachusetts at the time or at least they were and I discovered mountain biking that that summer went back to school in Washington DC started working in a bike shop and bought my first mountain bike that had been in very early 1990s like nineteen ninety and discovered mountain biking in Washington DC and at that time the scene was just kind of taking off you had the norba race series you had a lot of local radio says kind of in and around Virginia and Pennsylvania that we would travel to and I just remember having these wonderful experiences. I mean pretty much everybody would camp out at these races. So you'd go and I had a really crappy tent that I would stay in that if it rained water would wake up with our heads in water, but you'd all just kind of shake it off and go race so Iraq. Mountain bikes all through the remainder of college and worked in the bike industry worked in a bike shop. And then as I mentioned earlier after graduating from college decided I wanted to work in the bike industry and moved to Colorado. So I moved out to Colorado after having sort of got to you know, close to the front of the pack on the East Coast. I suddenly had a rude awakening in both terrain and talent level moving out to Boulder where everybody was just sort of a Quantum Leap better, but it was a great experience to kind of go out there and race the the the Corbett series out there in Colorado and and that's where I spent a lot of time riding mountain bikes in that age. How about road bikes. Do you have have you done much Red Riding, you know, I picked up Road riding on the tail end of my experience and then definitely had it in Colorado. Um, you know, definitely Road enough Road and rode with enough Roadies to kind of assumed Late into that community and find find pleasure in riding with a Peloton and riding in a you know, close pack of close friends really had a lot of enjoyable experience has raised a little bit of the Criterium seen But ultimately moved out to California and kind of found off-road riding was still my passion, but weirdly even with that recognition was riding on the road more simply because it was more accessible. You know, I could just get on my bike and go out the door. So in any given week I might still you'll enjoy the mountain bike more but Road riding was what I did more often cuz you're as you're mentioning that it it makes me realize that you know, there are aspects of the road experience like that song writing tightly and having conversation that you really struggle to get on the mountain bike until you stop and so having a bike that's mixed terrain allows you to get kind of The Best of Both Worlds like the adventure your kind of, you know, dog. You yourself flowing through the environments, but then when you link up on the roads, you can kind of spread up and get next to each other and and you know connect. Totally I think there's I was going to say there's something unique about San Francisco proper as a cyclist, but I don't think that's actually true, you know, a lot of people listening may have to ride from their homes on the roads to get to the Great off-road terrain and you're absolutely spot-on. I think that's where you blend the beauty of the two you get to ride elbow-to-elbow wage in a tight formation with your friends on the gravel bikes when you're on pavement and then you get to split up when you're on on the trail as you naturally do as people's strengths and weaknesses come into play off and then the other thing you draw from the mountain bike side is that I just completed this section. Oh my God, I have to high-five someone cuz that was so rad off. Yeah. Well and you're like, I feel like you get it all on the gravel bike, which is just I mean, I'm not here to I mean maybe I am here to sell gravel cycling, but it just it has really just it it checks. All the boxes for me. I mean there's a reason why we both gravitated to this for sure in just the convenience of being able to just like have a single machine that you roll out with. I mean we can go wax Palm about this all day. Now. You have a young one that's getting into writing. I do. Yeah, that's been that's been pretty fun. He's on a 20 inch geared bike right now and I just I've got a tow line for a cam. So we're trying to build his confidence to go up hills a little bit more he tends to look at something and say like no way I can't get up that but with the tow line, it's kind of this elastic product that I hook around my back seat and around his handlebar and I could just provide a little bit more horsepower. So we're getting a little bit more range into him and I've been in telling him about this idea of creating a mental map of the terrain and the Canyons cuz I want him to be able to go outside and be able to read the cues of Nature and you know find the same simple pleasure in things that I do in the outdoors. Yeah, how how old is he so his name is Cosmo and he's six years old right now. Very cool. Yeah. It's such a I would imagine it's super gratifying to you know, have your heavier kids get to an age where they can enjoy and participate in the same activity that that you get so much out of yeah, and it's it's going to be interesting to see I mean, obviously my father being a racer there was sort of a 10,000 imagine for him to push me a little bit and that really didn't work that well, so I'm trying to allow him to discover his own passions, but make sure that two-wheeled Adventure is something that is exposed to enough that hopefully falls in love with it. Very cool and what what are some other passions that you have in your life or other things that you spend your time your mind share your your effort working on, you know, that's a really good question. I mean obviously like I'm a family man, so I wouldn't be able to do what I'm doing without my wife and I enjoy whenever we can carve out time together. We certainly enjoy getting out for walks and that's certainly a being down here in Topanga is going to be another part of my exploration equation is getting out there and hiking and and being out there in nature. We're also trying to take advantage of slightly warmer weather down here and spending time on the beach and doing more Beach type activities. So getting in the water, my wife has a great passion for swimming. So trying to integrate out a little bit more into our lives. We're we're down here and and can take advantage of it. And how about with you know in terms of like your vision for the Pod from where you are now, so you've obviously you've now have had done how many episodes have you done at this point? So often in aggregate, I'm getting close to a hundred episodes. So I've got around sixty seventy sort of named interview episodes. And then as you know, we've got the ended dirt Sears is which this is I Believe episode 11 that will be publishing and then I've got a few special edition episodes that I've done visiting the national handmade bike show a trip you and I did together often visiting sea otter. So I'm basically trying to get out there and get information for the listener where it's happening. So that's been part of the goal is obviously I am not in the bike industry proper as I was in my early twenties working for Dean titanium and later avocet and Veta, but I've wanted to be a mom Just a pain in the industry because it's something I just throughout my life two wheels have been a great passion of mine. So my goal for the podcast this year is to really get it to be a point in which it's economically sustainable. I think one of the challenge particularly in this Cove it time where I've lost my sort of gainful employment my full-time employment opportunities. I need to get it to this point where it's not a a money-losing proposition for me. And so as as a listener knows I thought I set up a program at buy me a coffee, the gravel ride and I've really the last few weeks and month. I've been trying to put some energy into a new membership program and I've set the goals for myself to get 100 paying members to the podcast and those memberships. It's $5 a month. I'd like to think it's quite affordable for The Listener and yep. Get to that point and I feel really good about my ability to remain committed to producing the content because I also have industry sponsors who come in periodically wage and support the podcast the combination of the two can make it so that I'm super stoked and have the ability to get out there go to events and bring what I hope is great and valuable content to the community now and as someone who's sponsored in the past with the text segments we did and then also with the kind of the programs we have now, I like to let the audience know that you know, one of the things that Craig and I have set up where is if if a gravel ride podcast listener is interested in getting one of our bikes from the page you would get $100 credit through our bring a friend program and then Craig would also get the other side of that referral so that we can keep him riding the latest gear and not buying stuff on his own. So that's a another way that we're trying to collaborate to support the content. We want to see in the world and make sure that this is really lovely community resource that you've built continues. Well the future Why I appreciate that random. I appreciate your support the support a thesis and the sport of all the other sponsors that have come and wanted to be part of what we're doing. Obviously. We're not a big media organization by any means but that's nice. It's sort of given me the freedom to have the conversation. I'm interested in having with people and also offer directly get feedback from the listeners about who they'd be interested in hearing more from because at the end of the day, this is just a sort of Journey Through The Trails right off its circuitous and I'm going where it feels good and feels good to The Listener on one thing I can I just want to share and I may have shared this with you before but you know, it's fake it you are a bit of an inspiration and that I had always wanted to have the opportunity to be on public for like this and so to be first interviewed back in the day when I woke You know was a guy with a prototype and and a website that I'd thrown together and was trying to drum up interest and and you know, the project that is now, you know thesis and then you know, when you invited me to to be host, it's a real honor. It's forced me to kind of push through some of what I would imagine you've pushed through in terms of like the discomfort or putting something out there and like you know, what if you you know, how are you going to come across and things like that? So I just want to thank you personally for that opportunity and also just say like I see what you're doing and it's it's I really the value of what you may have created here is is very apparent that's really kind of you to say around I appreciate it and I appreciate you kind of stepping out of your comfort zone. It's been fun to have that as a co-host and be able to throw all my hard technical questions at you and get get like a reasoned response for The Listener. You know, it's it's funny. I like intervention. People because everybody I talked to has some great nugget of knowledge that can share with our listener. That's not always the case with me. I feel like I want to hear from others. It's been fun to share a few of the elements of my personal story with a listener today just to get a little bit more context. I would not I think I'm an introvert by nature but I've trained myself to be extroverted when needed and this podcast has been a great experiment and that to put myself out there and just to get the positive feedback that what I'm doing is valued. Yeah. Well my friend how would you so how would you like to wrap this up? Because I actually do not have much experience with interviewing being on this side of the table. So give me some advice on how to how to wrap up an interview with you you just you just hit the red button and hang up as in that dead. Now now it's been I mean, I think you sensed it as I typically do during any interview conversation that there was a beginning middle and end and it all felt good it flowed. And so I would just thanked me for my time. All right, my friend. Well, thank you for your time and hopefully our paths cross in person again in a rather than later. Yeah. Well, thanks for turning the tables on me Randall. I appreciate it my friend. All right. Well, thanks so much to Randolph for turning the tables on me and thank you for listening. That was obviously a very personal episode for me. I was happy to share a little bit about my background and why I started the gravel ride podcast, as I said the podcast really won't run without your support. So I really appreciate everybody's visits to buy me a coffee, the gravel ride where you can join our new membership program. I'm just actually launching the gravel ride podcast Jersey. Pre-order and if we can get enough of us together, I've got an awesome vendor that's produced. What I think is an eye-catching Jersey. So come over to buy me a coffee, the gravel ride and check that out. I've just posted a bunch of stuff over there. And the other thing I really wanted to highlight was our new Rider Forum called the ridership. I'm really excited about building This Global resource for writers about gear Roots anything you wanted to talk about as a community. We've chosen slack as the channel to begin with. So if you're connected with me on social media, hit me up. I just need an email address and I can share that link with you. We've got about three hundred people in the slack Channel already, and I'm excited to have you join. So with all that said thanks again and have a used to finding some dirt under your wheels.

Dean titanium San Francisco lymphoma Randall six months Colorado Craig Dalton Hodgkin Big Adventures Los California Topanga state parks Sullivan Ridge Mandeville Canyon ninety days fifteen twenty percent twenty thirty minute John Seacrest dodocase $3,200 six inch
React Native at Airbnb with Gabriel Peal Holiday Repeat

Software Engineering Daily

55:39 min | 7 months ago

React Native at Airbnb with Gabriel Peal Holiday Repeat

"React native allows developers to reuse front end code between mobile platforms. A user interface component written in reactnative can be used in both ios and android code bases since react. Native allows for code reuse. This can save time for developers. In contrast to a malware completely separate teams have to recreate front end logic for ios and android react native was created at facebook. Facebook itself uses react native form mobile development and contributes heavily to the open source react native repository in two thousand sixteen. Airbnb started using react native in a significant portion of their mobile code base. Over the next two years airbnb saw the advantages and disadvantages of adopting the cross platform java script based system after those two years engineering management team at airbnb came to the conclusion to stop using react. Native gabriel peel is an engineer at airbnb. Who was part of the decision to move off of react. Native gabriel wrote a blog. Post giving the back story for react native at airbnb and he joins the show to give more detail on the decision. There's a lot in this episode. It was really good one as far as i'm concerned. And it really gives a lot of color to the advantages and the disadvantages of react native and just to be clear. This is not a show. that's against react. Native airbnb has a very specific use case. And it's a gigantic company. So it's not to say that react native is something you should not use. In fact we've done many shows about the advantages of react native. And i think it's incredible platform so it's a great show and it gives both sides of the story before we get started. We're hiring a creative lead if you are an excellent communicator. Please check out our job posting for creative solutions at software engineering daily dot com slash jobs. This is a great job for someone who just graduated a coding bootcamp or someone with a background in the arts. Who's making their way into technology. If you want to be creative and you want to learn more about engineering and you have an excellent work ethic check it out at software engineer. Daily dot com slash jobs In an era of online retail. Where everything is just a few clicks away. Buying a car should be different. That's why carbon. Ah you can buy a car one hundred percent online. We made it easy to browse view and by from over ten thousand cars. You can even trade in your old car all while binge-watching your favorite tv show afterwards we'll deliver your cardio or you can pick it up one of our car vending machines either way. Your car comes with seven day return policy gravity relaxing your comfy pants and enjoy the new way to buy a car at cartagena. Gabriel peel is a software engineer at airbnb. And he's a writer of a post about react. Native at airbnb gave me a welcome back to software engineer. Daily thank you so much for having me. So airbnb has been using react native for developing mobile apps for the past two years and i want to start from the beginning and get through some of the story of react native at be how were mobile apps developed before react. Native was at airbnb. Yeah so so. This is an interesting one so when we go back to the earliest days of mobile airbnb they really started in around the two thousand and twelve timeframe now. That point mall was pretty young. We were just a website and over time. We realize the importance of having a mobile app. Not just for booking. A listing but also travelers because often when he travel. All you have is your phone and so does really important for us to have a really good mobile experience so twenty. Twelve two thousand thirteen when he started to build the early stages of our mobile apps which then grew into a fifteen person team on each platform andrew s in in the middle of two thousand sixteen. Now that point we were starting to see a a huge influx of mobile. Traffic are mobile. Usage was going through the roof and it went from this tiny tiny fraction of the business is something that was extremely important and then teams are encouraged to make sure that they're features worked on mobile on android and ios but with fifteen people on each platform. We literally just didn't have enough people to build you needed and team structure issue. That was the whole idea behind react. Native is that react native would give you reusable components that would allow for some communication centralisation within different teams. So you can. You can sort of design component and make it make it portable between android and ios and web That was sort of the goal of react. Native if i understand it correctly so i'm sure when that when react native came out it was like. Oh that's that's our problem. Yes so so. I guess there are two similar but different mantras that people take when they think about react. There's a learn once right everywhere mantra where you learn the react paradigm you learn javascript jazz sax and and the ecosystem and then you can write on any platform and then there's write once run anywhere where you literally write the code once and it runs multiple platforms and so in this particular scope of reactnative. It's actually a little bit of both and it's important to understand like why why they're different and understand which one you're trying to glean the most value out of so it started from the learn ones right anywhere paradigm because at every meeting no at that point we had about fifteen android and fifty nine zero s engineers but probably well over a hundred people in the company who knew react. Our entire website is react is very successful for us. Rewriting our website in react and we've also built a lot of infrastructure in libraries in our highly leveraging the ecosystem around react so we saw that as an opportunity to build on our existing native infrastructure but then allow people who react to contribute to mobile and so that that would be their their learnings from web on mobile. That being said over time it becomes clear that because reactnative is in fact react. It's not a fork of react. It's not a clone of react. It's actually react running on your phone and so because of that you you literally can share a lot of code. You can leverage a lot of the same libraries so we use things like redux and and a number of other industry standard libraries in the in the react community. And although there's some organizational challenges in actually starting to share code between web and mobile. We saw the potential to do that. Either by directly sharon code or by having the same person right the feature once on web and mobile because they could use a lot of their thought processes when you started using react native. Were you just kind of experimenting with a little bit or did you make a a really decisive decision to. Let's let's just go. let's do it. Let's go all in on react native so it depends who you ask. And and this is actually one of the more contentious organizational challenges. We had with reactnative and that so it was started as essentially an experiment. I think it's really important in the world of engineering to treat this. Everything like an engineering problem. It has pros has cons in. It's really important to understand the full set or as large of a set of pros and cons as you can. In order to mitigate risk and help Have in the not rocky rollout. So that's really really important so it started kind of like an experiment. There are essentially two engineers leland. Richardson spike brehme. Who are very experienced. React engineers and they worked in partnership with some people on on mobile myself and a few others to to build out a product on mobile so we built out it. Was your reservation alterations. That was the first thing we ever launched with reactnative so we started building it out in july. Two thousand sixteen men had launched in october. And so in that process we had Build out a bunch of things like experimentation internationalization deep links navigation are design language in a number of other things but then things started to change really quickly around right around that same time because november of two thousand sixteen. We launched experiences which you so you can book something to do in a city and in addition place to stay through airbnb so this particular team had lots of web resources in not enough mobile resources to actually build out what they needed to before launch in so that became this sort of pivotal moment for reactnative because that team in particular just decided to go all in on react native for their products prior to us ever watching the first one For a really really important in highly visible watch and so this is a opportunity that had it could have gone a number of different ways It certainly wasn't painless. I think was. It was kind of hectic getting that out the door. There was a lot of work to be done a lot of long hours. But at the end of the day did launch it. Launched on time did not launch bug free but it did launch on time and It would not they would not have been able to finish building features said without pulling engineers off of other teams in order to launch time so it became this interesting case where one team kind of just for their hand got forced into this direction and ended up really dramatically. Accelerating the reactnative adoption very early. Because i understand correctly so you react. Native comes out. Different teams on airbnb mobile development said. Yeah let's tinker. Around with this experiment. With it let's do a few things internationalization et cetera and then experiences gets announced as a feature that we're going to build and the experiences team makes a very rational decision which we've got a lot of web resources. We've got fewer mobile resources. Well let's see if we can go all in with reactnative. Let's see what happens. They went all in with react native and they did ship on time they had to pull people off of other teams but but it sounds like it did get shipped okay. Do i understand things correctly so far. It launched an eye with every launch. There are few lodges are perfect and smooth and bug free and this was not one of those just like others but it went out the door people able to use it. People are able to book on it so in a sense it did allow them to get to goal. I sense that there were some it. Sounds like there were some foundational things that as experiences with was being built or as it was being released you were sort of like. Oh no this is. There's something wrong here. So i think it's really important to to understand exactly at break. It down a little bit further so reactive is when you when you add to existing code base your especially if it's a larger one with a lot of infrastructure of its own as ours was and still is it's really important to think about what that interaction's going look like and what kind of institutional infrastructure that you have to either recreate rebuild or bridge and so in this particular situation it was kind of like a cat and mouse game where they're just in order to in order to build a screen you want to be able to leverage our networking stack. You want to be able to It was critical that we run expectations. 's all the internationalization has to go through internationalization pipeline. There's just no. There are no other options. If we want to actually ship product we have to do that work upfront. And so there was just a huge a huge amount of work that had to be done to get from zero to one in the case of react native. I mean it was not it was not the sort of thing we could just tack on top. Just right right. Windscreen and 'isolation ship it. Just simply that would never have been a good experience and it would have hamstrung the teams that have Would have chosen to use it. I think in in this particular case because everything was happening so quickly. I think there was a combination of things that were made difficult specifically because of reactnative but also simply because we were tacking on a huge new platform and there was just an incredible amount of work that had to be done and i was just a matter of hours in in some in some you and i were talking before the show. About how now. The main thing you're focused on his android infrastructure and you said sitting like eighty thousand lines of code in android app. Eight hundred thousand eight hundred thousand gay. So and i'm sure there's something proportional off on ios side of things and it's like if you if you imagine the amount of infrastructure that has been built around managing an eight hundred thousand line android app and i'm sure it wasn't eight hundred thousand lines back when you were launching experiences but there's probably something you know still tremendous he think about using the necessary build tools or whatever other supporting infrastructure. You need to put into a mobile app to make react native work not to mention all of the organizational reconfiguration that you need to do in order to ship a feature with this new hybrid platform. You're potentially incurring a lot of strange not strange but fresh fresh types of technical debt. Yeah and and then those things are going to need to be forever maintained as well so when your company comes out with experimentation platform v. two or api v. three or starts rolling out graf moving from rustic rafael. Somebody has to always be there to keep react native up to speed or it's just gonna fall further behind so when experiences launched and you were you were having this realization that you did incur this fresh technical debt. What what was going through your head. Were you thinking. I need to bring this up or you know we need to reconsider react native or or are you thinking we're going to have to like push we're gonna have to bring in a lot of support to make reactive work. Where were you gung ho for. React native at that point a restoring to feel nervous about it so it's important to consider in a particular question like this that one just one thing i want to call it about native is that it's a incredibly polarizing and there's no way around that a lot of companies are choosing to use it not choosing sees it but almost in every case there are people within an organization are very pro reactnative and or cross platform in general and very against it. So what the answer that you hear is gonna vary tremendously on who you ask for my personal perspective. I understood why react. Native was the cross platform framework that we chose. It made a lot of sense to be able to leverage our existing infrastructure and talent here because we have a lot of it that being said. I think experiences betting the farm on reactnative was a huge risk. And i think that there were certain aspects in which they had to sacrifice the product quality as result of jumping to react native and going all in on it so quickly and so. I'm someone who. I cared deeply about product so things like it has to be smooth. It has to be responsive it has to. It has to feel amazing to us and we can achieve that with native and so i would be worried of with reactnative if i felt like we could actually achieve that so that being said with reactnative surprisingly we're able to get closer to that bar than most people think is possible so so i work closely with a other engineers in things like shared. Ahmed transitions working between native and reactnative screens in an api. That was canonical in react in also worked in. Iowa's things like this. I think it goes to show that if you put enough effort you can actually overcome most of the technical challenges that may be associated with reactive but one of the things we discovered is that understanding. How much effort is going to be. Needed is something. That's very difficult for a number of reasons. So one of the big reasons is that reactive inherently is not just one platform it's actually kind of three platforms baked into one and so if you're working on react native most of the time you're living in javascript and react land but you can't forget that it's running on android and ios under the hood and there are times. When when the the native implementations kinda peek through or you have to dig down and understand the nuances of each platform in order to do something appropriately and so that creates a challenge. Where if you're working in one platform you can. You can learn that platform through through. You can become an expert at it and you can understand exactly where poke in where to prod and where to look to to make it do what it's abandoned your will essentially by. I've yet to meet engineer. Who can do that effectively on three platforms at the same time and so getting to some of these. Last five or ten cent sometimes requires some explicit and intricate knowledge of a platform and just and being able to effectively iraq. Native is is a really hard problem. I e yet to see an easy answer to that because it's at the end of the day it's it requires understanding three platforms. Okay so what you're alluding to is the fact that in reactnative if you if you're just doing fairly basic app based interactions then react native is mostly going to take care of it for you and you can stay in javascript. Land and from. What i've heard react is is pretty great for that if you've fairly basic interactions but once you get to really complex interactions or something that needs to be highly performant then you might need to dip down into the native code so react native You know is is in this java scrip- land with this java script bridge and you might need to actually write objective c code or swift code on ios or write java code on android and therefore if you need to duck down on a regular basis i can see it being quite troublesome because so how how many understand why. Why wouldn't it work just to have you know you've got a bunch of react native engineers. And maybe they do most of their development and java script and then occasionally they have to flag over the irs expert to come over and help them with their low level feature was we. Do you have to dip down into ios code into swift or or or objective c code more frequently than than you would have hoped. Is that what happened. So i think there's a little bit complicated so i think the to answer the first part of that question about reactnative engineers sometimes needing to pull over the android or ios engineer for help. So so there's there's two parts of that there's one is understanding where exactly the problem is. And so there's a lot of moving pieces. There's the react platform there. Is the reactive stuff in java script. There's bridges to native. There is the native implementation in java and objective c and then there are native libraries such as yoga that handles the layout and a few other things as well as well as the javascript. Runtime itself and so you just. There's a lot more black boxes in the world and so if it were as simple to always pinpoint exactly why something is behaving the way that it is. I think you can make the case that you could do that. But but it's we encountered so many situations where something would happen and it's just almost unfathomable how you would go about debugging it because it could be coming from so many different places and you could certainly you can have one. You have one debugging environment on the job group side and you have another debugging environment on the west side. And then god forbid if you're if you're issue is some somehow related or you're having layup performance issues in yoga figuring out. How did he bug. That is is can be a nightmare. And these are these are situations that you don't really encounter as the demand for telemedicine grows. So does the need for connecting five g meets that need qualcomm remains focused on giving doctors and patients superior security rich five g connectivity. Learn more at qualcomm dot com slash invention age on very frequently. Okay so let's talk a little bit about that tooling that you developed so as react. Native became something that was a central part of both the android and ios apps. What tooling did you have to include to help with. Things like debugging to help with things like build time I don't know what other issues you have to solve at the library or tooling level. What kinds of standardization did you have to put in place. Yeah so so. We had a fairly complex file in iowa spilled file on each platform. That sort of knew. How to use watchmen who watch for changes in java script and build a bundle locally so we don't check in the script bundle for react native repo because it's fairly large. It's split up into split. Bundles and in a changes frequently. So just be a lot of stuff to commit to the repo so it gets generated on on the fly on each person's computer whenever it changes and so we had to bone infrastructure on that. And make sure that the caching works for that. We also you know. There are some complications on how to handle reactnative libraries that that have native components so on android It's a little bit complicated because we use cocoa pods on ios. And then you have to do some weird sin linking where you sibling some cocoa pod sources into node modules or vice versa in on the side. It's a little bit more frustrating for us. At least because our at least a lot of the android community is used to using grateful and just and are greater than they publish most libraries to even. So you can simply add one line of code in your file in generally works quite well but a lot of reactive libraries require you to like link the source from node modules. So you install the node module. Npr masala whatever. And then you have to integrate file linked to the source there. Which is fairly atypical and an nonstandard. If it goes against everything else that you so we we actually wound up like having internal maven repo or he had to like get libraries and then like republished them internally and it caused little things like that 'cause all kinds of pain and overhead in random places that you wouldn't really expect what were the organizational consequences of these changes to bill time and debugging. How did it affect the overall product development. And maybe you could give us a a point in time here. Where are we in time right now. Like after experiences launched was react native continuing to to be first class citizen or was this when you were starting to have doubts. Give me a little more context. So yeah. I think it's important suggest call out how. How big of a role reactnative plate in our mobile development. This is something that i think. There was a big misunderstanding of among the community. So at at the point where we launched experiences because it was a big important launch for us. A most of experiences was wreck. Native in there wasn't much else in reactnative at that time and so without amounted to roughly twenty percent of our engineering work at that point in time and then after that some of the experiences were kind of stabilized. it wasn't quite as intense there but then some other teams ramped up on it and over time we saw a fairly stable cohort of people that debt amounted to roughly fifteen percent of mobile engineers. That were working on reactnative at any given time and it never really grew so much more than that. And so somehow whether it'd be our us talking about native externally i think the miscommunicated the misinterpretation of is being one hundred percent reactnative or moving from native to react natives somehow became the the sought in the industry but but in fact it is something we continued in parallel For about fifteen percent on the infrastructure side we had myself leland. Richardson working fulltime on the reactnative infrastructure. For two thousand seventeen. And that's about the same number of engineers. He had on android and ios that were purely focused on infrastructure so six total plus like plus about two or three more who work on native builds and ci. But it was never much more than that so medium-sized effort overall. It's certainly not one hundred percent of rab into how did that affect the organization like how are you feeling organizationally about the impacts of reactnative. I think it depends who you ask. so for. teams that decided noughties reactnative. I think there was actually very little impact. So does things like. I mentioned like that building that jobless group asset locally so that that added sometimes a minute or maybe two or three minutes just a clean bill every once in a while when necessary. I think there are things we could have done to make that a little bit faster. But that was probably the that was the majority of the extent to which they had to deal with reactnative. Then again there are other teams who basically invested one hundred percent interactive and from when they started working on it until when we worked with them to to work on moving away from it didn't have to hire a single andrew. Ios engineer that being said it wasn't that was not to say they never had any work in native ender irs. Many of those engineers had some experience on one platform or the other but also part of the reason. Why leland in i worked on reactnative infrastructure. Was that'd be provided a significant amount of support so we made ourselves available to other teams to help them when they were confused when they were stock or when they needed to have some native work done this can be a challenge organizationally because people different teams have different incentives and stakeholders and. It's really important to understand that in a world like this. If you're going to have a team that's ready to write bridges or help or debugger provide mentorship. It's really important to understand that that team like part of that. Team's incentives needs to be a lion such that they're willing to invest that time directly and almost in a randomized way because they can come in at anytime for other teams. That might need it so that that understanding between the teams of of help is something that needs to be understood by the organization or otherwise one team is essentially doing charity work for another team in the wind up frustrated or wind up in worst-case resentful having to do free work essentially for another team. Okay so before we talk about migrating away from react native. I wanna give my caveat as well. That i i think react. Native is an amazing project. I've done i think twenty or fifty or something shows on reactively fifty. But i've done a lotta shows on react native and i think it's a great product project. It's really exciting. And and every company is not airbnb so like you published this this ball post about moving off of react native at airbnb. That doesn't mean everybody should be off of react. Native airbnb is a really big company. You've got eight hundred thousand lines of code and also by the way you're in a very unique business situation where airbnb has one of the biggest motes in in technology like you've got a huge moat and you kinda from a business perspective from a technology perspective. I think right now. Airbnb is really in the phase of like. Let's let's get our house in order. Let's do very straightforward. I mean the business model is so good that it's like we can just do kind of the boring things on the engineering side and the business will work really well. I'm not. I'm not saying that's what you were doing here what you had to do. I think it's i don't know you could certainly go that way and make a good business. You don't really have to do anything. Super fancy on the on the engineering level other than scale which is fancy in and of itself necessarily agree with that really. Okay yeah i mean i. The business is doing well and and that's always great. But i think for us like we. We are more so than a lot of companies were designed i. The co founders of this company our designers the ability to create really incredible experiences has been really core to the dna of since the beginning and the decision to move from away from reactnative was not even directly result of us meeting or not meeting product goals or our ability to to achieve those. It was simply a matter of practicality. I mean i tried to outline it as much detail as in the blog post series as i could but i think that there were just some challenges technically organizationally that such that the benefit that were getting out of it was no longer worth the investment and based on the people who are working on both of my cell phone. We went on the infrastructure side as well as the product engineers. I saw that. There was a lot of opportunities to make native even better and at the same time i think. React is actually going fairly well and the teams that they were teams. That were very were able to use it very effectively and into their vantage but the overhead of maintaining the infrastructure both maintaining it on its own as well as sort of the opportunity cost of those people working back native like contributing their work directly to native android Just wasn't worth it and so now like now that there's more more resources on android and ios again. We're actually seeing some material improvements in both the like things like bill times. Cindy open source libraries. I'm really excited about something that we're working on android that were coming up very soon and so in fact some of the principles of that were inspired by some of the things that worked well in reactnative but again it's not it's not about us just like settling down into the easy path i think is just a matter of the opportunity. Cost was very high to very polarizing subject. And you know there is and there wasn't really a path native to ever be more than fifteen or twenty percent of mobile here right. Okay so i just shut up and ask you this question when you were when you decided that you were going to move from react native to just to sunset reactive and moved to purely native mobile platforms. But what was your forecast for how that would change the build. And the engineering. How that would make you move faster. Yep so at the time decided on said we had about two Engineers we're gonna infrastructure and again about fifteen percent of mobile engineers and we looked leland deny we sat down. We kind of looked at all the teams that were using it. And we we did. Some four road mapping to figure out like what teams may start using it in the future. What new opportunities or opening up that may be a good fit for and we didn't see we didn't see that growth potential and the thing about cross platform and both entered iowa but also building robust infrastructure to do things like co-chairing between web and mobile. And then also building infrastructure around code push which we haven't talked about yet but would enable over the are updating all of those things are highly leveraged based on its usage and without significant usage across our mobile products. A didn't it no longer justified. The the investment so it really just came down to the fact that there wasn't a real opportunity for to become much more than fifteen or twenty percent of mobile fifteen twenty percent of the mobile code. Base code is the number of engineers contributing versus entered. Iowa's okay when you decided to do this or when you proposed it was that divisive as well or at that point where people organizationally realizing the the the costs were being incurred. So i think i would say it's about as smoothly as you could have hoped it would certainly be like i mentioned. There were a few teams that had really effectively leveraged reactnative. They had effectively gone all in on it and resource. Their team appropriately with people who knew react native at the expense of west engineers so it took a little bit of additional work and we provided some additional resources in enhance on mentorship in and actually in some cases drag to rewrite some of these features initiative by at the end of the day i think that once they kind of landscape was outlined to them. It was it really only fairly on decision for most teams than for the last few that really depended on it. I think i think they understood fairly quickly. And and there hasn't been much pushback since by the way. What are the things that you have to duck down into native code to do on android or ios using if you're using react native like. How often do you have to do that. So it depends on what you're building but some of the things that that we bridged were on the infrastructure side there things like our networking stag experimentation internationalization. Deep links navigation and then on the on the this sort of the product co. side. It was things like geofencing maps video views lodhi and a few other a few other things like that so Some of these cases most cases are wrapping views but they can be quite complex. Let's take the video maps example. So they're they're very very complex of functionality. Sometimes it depends on the hardware and it can be frustrating. Sometimes when you started of your testing reactive on ios you write it in. Everything looks good go to android and it doesn't work exactly the same now. This is a very frustrating situation because the whole point of reactnative is that it should just work in both platforms. But we've found very frequently in the case of iraq native apps that that was one of our own libraries that you know i think we could have done a better job maintaining but takes incredible amount of time and energy to do so and his Quite a complex product. When you find that you have a bug on one platform or another Under react native native library is very frustrating. And it's very common. And so we found that many of these libraries and the reactnative or written by an engineer or engineer's who were very familiar with one or two of the three platforms but frequently lagged in in one of them. And this is to be expected right. If you're one engineer writing an open source library how could you possibly right. Perfect across all three platforms. It's just these unicorn. Engineers simply don't exist in the world and so as a result you find that there is often significant code quality issues on at least one of the platforms and so that's an example of when things go to native and sometimes it's those are things we built in house in sometimes. They're in third party libraries. How did the when you were in the thick of it. When you had or i guess you still do have go reactive infrastructure but how does it affect releases so for the most part reactnative was pure purely process. Reactive didn't have a big impact on. So we we shipped a bundle with the app and it didn't we didn't update it during the life of a of an app in the wild towards the end of our reactnative lifetime we were working on some push infrastructure that would allow us to update that rag native bundle over the air. We actually got fairly. And we had an entire royal plan that would have had several phases. Going from hot fixes in cherry picks to fixing major issues to eventually getting to a world where we could feasibly see a world where we have continues to play on mobile and that's an incredible world simply it's not possible with native apps with the review process and so it's a beautiful promise but it would have taken a lot of work to get there not just technically but also also organizationally and understanding when you when you do have discreet releases and then a continuously updating bundle you. There are a lot of things you have to consider to safeguard it in a lot of ways with automatic rollbacks and minimum versions and things like that to ensure that it has the same native. Api to ensure that. I'm you simply. You can't test a new bundle across every apparition manual. You can't send that the qa process so we we have to think about some of those problems ahead of time. So i think the community will continue to work on this problem. And it's it's something that reactnative enables which i think is very cool. We didn't get there also on the release process. We had to make sure that we could understand. Crashes in the wild so john askew crashes by themselves just bubble up as jse exceptions on native and so we had to do a little bit of additional crash an link to make sure he caught the actual crash. We uploaded that to bug snag. Which is what we used for crash analytics and then properly make sure that source maps are uploaded as well so so there was a fair amount of effort and we actually had to work with bug snag to make sure that they supported javascript. Source maps in addition to native ones to make sure that that all god fired up and it also introduced a new opportunity for our own infrastructure to fail. So i think we had one or two releases early. On where some of our our wiring that connects the reactnative crash to a normal bugs not crash in his properly source mapped and things like that that that broke a couple of times. Because there's just a lot of moving pieces there and so we did see more instability there than we did then we saw in native in addition for you android engineers at there. You may be able to sympathize with this but you re vonda with just so many random. Oem devices that crash randomly uncertain versions of android are in certain regions. Where we're dealing we're still dealing with this really nasty crash. It only occurs on about like six or eight different samsung devices on a specific version of the software and we keep buying these devices custom flashing them with these roms and we cannot reproduce these crashes that occur so specifically uncertain devices. And we've seen a number of these like not just one or two but like over you know. Since we launched jack native we've probably accumulated tens or hundreds of thousands of individual crashes from these super obscure native library loading in middle react native on on lollipop samsung wa. They're just mind numbing. How to figure out how to fix them okay. We've talked about the debugging process the tooling pro the debugging processes difficult the amount of tooling the f. to include his is can be difficult and the fact that you have to write java script and for a lot of that changes team structure. It changes communication. What are some other subtle problems or changes that you had to make to the process of writing the mobile application due to the fact that you had adopted react native okay. I'll give you a sample so take android saga. So so we have android on android. It does this peculiar thing where we'll sometimes kill the process of your app in the background. Ask you to save some state in a Slow bundle and then actually restore your avenue new process to make it feel faster so you can store things like the idea of a product page and then which you can use to refresh it. Also recreate synthetically recreate a back stack and whatnot so that even though you office killed kind of feels like it wasn't so this is really cool and in subtle things like this can help improve the time to interactive. It can bring the user back to where they were. it's a. It's a good user experience on the rack native side. we were using redux to store state. Now redux just a java script object that's floating in space there is simply no way to reliably persist that in this pro personable. Bundle we try. We thought about a number of different options like we could go through that and figure out maybe which parts of it are principal in only purchase those or marking certain things as possible. But then you have react engineer. Who like doesn't really understand android well enough and knowing the right places to do that is mary. And if you only persist something's not others automatically you can actually wind up in a super broken situation where you've only restored haffey estate but but it's in logical say that makes no sense so unfortunately we just had to resort to we. We did a little hack to determine if we were in a different process and we just finished all of our reactnative activities so we basically just blew away all that behavior really unfortunate and i haven't heard any good solutions to that so so that was one thing another thing that was pretty tricky was figuring out how to handle text inputs and a scroll will screen so one of the things you need to make sure you do is if you touch tax input. That's below the top of the keyboard. You need to scroll that screen to bring the text input interview and this is extremely tricky. Ios makes it a little bit easier. They just have. There's one keyboard there's one way to handle it and you can more or less. Make that work on within on android. There's you're starting. there's two top level options sometimes. Basically configure inactivity on android. You tell it what to do when when the keyboard cup pops up you can tell it to either do nothing or you tell it to re size the window to make room for the keyboard and so the idea this over a year ago. Now so a trying to remember the specifics. But i've i've probably spent two straight weeks kind of dealing with understanding the window on android versus ios and understanding. The keyword is up and take into account that on android. You can kind of any number of different keyboards. You can have one. That's like split on the left and right side of the screen you can have on. That's floating and there are so many different configurations for the way. Keyboards can work on android plus different heights of auto correction rose additional padding and things like that so something simple like a screen with a form like a log in and password or maybe some other form an having a text input field and making sure that it does everything with a keyboard. All of a sudden takes two weeks when you didn't expect to happen. What's the roadmap for sunsetting react native. What's your plan for transitioning teams off of this technology so we be prior to announcing it the rest of the company and we sat down with engineering manager of every single team. That's working on native to understand what the impact of it was and then we have a spreadsheet now internally where we have all the reactive projects and their owners in the process of moving away from it. I can speak more on the side. Because that's what i'm more familiar with. But i i think the teams have been very very very cooperative in and i'm very thankful for that. Such that they all are making sure that they have resources on entering us to move away from it. So at a high level we agreed so essentially maintain support for reactnative through twenty eight eighteen in maybe a little bit into twenty nineteen basically. We're saying hey like this through this really quickly we don't want to randomize your current roadmap and so we're gonna make sure it doesn't break for at least a year year at half but after that you should really start to move away from it because we're not going to be putting as much effort into maintaining the infrastructure so that was one side of things the other side on the android side. We've used this opportunity of moving away from reactive but also doing things like adopting katelyn which we've done very well this year we've gone from zero to eighty percent of new code and katelyn in two thousand eighteen alone on used opportunity to kind of take some of the best aspects of the functional reactive nature of react and we built this really nice android katelyn library or framework that leverages. Some of the basically a lot of the common things ready do screens and it. It robs us some of these patterns into really nice framework. That's both fast to develop in but also it will feel familiar for people who are used to react native because it has some similar concepts support for this. Podcast comes from boost with facebook. Who's podcast my business with david fisher features unique perspectives and insights from some of the world's most interesting business leaders and small business owners. Check out the third episode where you'll hear the owner of magic fingers studio in brooklyn discussed the power of online community with the ceo of mono music group and co founder of verses. Listened to boost my business. Wherever you get your podcasts. So do you have any advice for people regarding react native so who should use react native. Who should not use react native. Or i don't mean to make you prescriptive. Maybe you just want to talk about specific strategic decisions but can you help people vet this technology. Yes so this is the golden question. Should i use reacting overnight. And i refuse to give specific. You should use your acne. You shouldn't but this is what i would say. First of all doing reactnative does not preclude you from ever having to do native android or iowa's so there will unless you hire people who explicitly how to do that. Just be aware that if you do native you will need to jump into andrew s fairly frequently depending on what you're doing and the second one is that when reactnative works it is amazing like i saw we had a couple of teams that had really good experiences with reactive and the productivity and the speed with which they are able to move was like simply off the charts like between hot module reloading which actually works. Reliably you right line of code and shows up on android and ios in like one or two seconds. I think that's really incredible. But would you wind up with. Is these what. I call land mines so everything is going swimmingly. Well and then you hit a little landmine so you an example of one We had one instance where sometimes on certain phones even in particular. The pixel was particularly notable for this randomly. We didn't feel like we had made any significant changes. We one out of ten times or so already. Screens would render white. They would never render. And we didn't know what everything seemed. Fine it was initialising hitting the java script but it just simply wouldn't show up on the screen and we're pulling our hair out trying to reproduce reliably figure out what is going on and after i would say a solid week of multiple engineers going heads down trying to figure out what was going on. We discovered that we had removed the initialisation of fresco so frisco is react natives image lending library load images from a network airbnb we glide which is basically. It's a similar library but instead of using theirs we've always used glide and so we just wrapped the image tag in reactnative with our own image view but the reactive library has fresco out of the box and so we we had that included. All we did was removed. Initialisation of that and randomly caused uncertain funds some screens to never under native to this day. We have no absolutely no idea what the connection was but it spent multiple engineers sudden had to spend like an entire week trying to figure out how to make this work again. he's it was released blocker in screens. Were simply not rendering. So this is this is really really bad other issues like the keyboard thing that i mentioned. I think you're like oh. It's just a simple form and you made you. You write the components of the four men like an hour and then you spend two weeks trying to make it. Scroll above the keyboard so things like that are really really difficult for us because it makes it really hard to forecast how long things take or you. End up giving up Even though it's technically possible to make do you want. The amount of effort is to to figure out how to solve. Landmine is not worth the investment. So i don't have an answer for this. And i think teams like teams just needs to be aware that this is the case teams often will do like a prototype in the prototype. Go really well like great. Reactnative is the best thing ever. And then as soon as they try to to take the last ten or fifteen percent to production ready is when they encounter all these problems. The other thing that i would i'd say is extremely extremely important. Is that react. Native requires significant and continuous investment in infrastructure. Will give you an example so we we have. We maintain a fork of reactnative at airbnb. We don't wanna do this but Through the practicality of the situation we wanted we really really wanted to get our screens to have better ability. This is just one of many examples but reactnative. Accessibility support is lacking. This is another case where you think everything is great. You're like oh just make it accessible. All the exists on entered night wes. But but they're not plumbed all the way through the react native lee yoga and view system. And so you have to end building it yourself so we went ahead. We built ourselves but that changed. Had to go need of core. We could of course reactnative being an open source platform. We could have gone to the facebook repo. We could put a request. Got approved merged it but then we would have to wait for weeks for it to go into the next release and then run that update locally so the turnaround time for that would probably be six plus weeks plus many many additional hours. So sometimes we do that in parallel to also cherry picking that onto our own fork so now it happens you we. We have some commits on our fork. In fact over the two years that number grew about fifty fifty individual commits and again. We don't love this situation. We would love to just get back into react native but sometimes when you just needs to get your work done you have to do things a certain way. And so now. Every time. there's a new reactnative upgrade wishes. Once a month we have to manually cherry pick fifty commits back on top of the tree and of course reactive is moving very quickly. It's progressing and so very very frequently encounter merged conflicts or like just sunday's are small but sometimes like the entire files changed. The entire file is missing or the entire. You know the entire libraries totally uprooted from underneath you. So you wind up in this situation where you basically get stuck. So we're on reactnative. Owed forty six now. I think i'm fairly certain that will never be able to upgrade reactive. Ever again that airbnb at this point this is not a good situation. And it's something that it's very very easily easies accidentally find yourself in if you invest heavily interactive. So sometimes i've heard of individual teams thinking. That is good for them by. You really need to take a holistic. Look at what its impact is and what it's continual maintenance is gonna look lake because it's way way more than a lot of people think it is final question. We just did a couple of shows about flutter and flutters pretty cool. I don't know if you've had a chance to look at it. What do you think about. The potential of other cross platform frameworks either for airbnb or otherwise. This is a lot of people have been asking this. Oddly enough i feel like like fled with good reason is has been very popular. The zamaran folks are so passionate about their framework. So hats off to you guys just loving it publicly so much bud for whatever reason that was notable for camera but No for flutter and other frameworks i think. I think it's great that the the community is trying to solve this problem. I think there's billions of dollars. Annually wasted writing the same thing on android and ios completely wasted. Yeah exactly literally trying to write the same thing in if there are differences trying to understand why we're the subtly different so i think this is a real problem and i think it's great that people are putting an effort to solve them. I think people really Seem to be really enjoying flutter. I think that it's really important. Sandra stand that even even if they solve some of the technical problems on maybe maybe the performance is better. Maybe the is better the language you like more. You're still going to have a lot of the same organizational problems. Plus you lose the entire reason. Why at least we chose react. Which is we have a lot of people who write react. We we had a. We have at the time when we started reactnative. We probably had three times as many people in the company new react in java than we knew then people knew android and ios combined. So i think that's a really important point and it'd being react is so beneficial because when something doesn't work you can google it and you can find your stack overflow answer. You can find a get hub open source project with thousands of stars that work. I think that these are incredibly important points that that and you would lose a lot of that by going to flutter in. I'm not going to say. I wouldn't say that google is definitely gonna stop investing in flutter but i think that that there is more of a risk of google stopping to invest in flutter because they have they've built fewer internal apps with flutter than than facebook has with reactnative. Facebook has dozens if not maybe even hundreds at this point of teams internally that us react native existential the app is huge so like it may even still not be a huge percentage of their overall app. But it's enough that they have to continue to invest in it in the community has clearly invested a lot in it. So so that's really important. I also think that some of the facebook published a really good blog posts right around when we published hours about some of the improvements that they're making to react reactnative like they're they're gonna make it easier to ride synchronous code between overreact native in so while that sounds like it may only be useful in each case in enable some extremely critical things like for the first time they can properly wrap recycler review in you i collection view from reactnative to native and so that is absolutely huge. And it's going to solve one of the biggest pain points between the two also the fact that everything is reputable. I think that's a a fairly big difference from flutter so i build laudi for android for example and getting it to work in. Reactnative is trivial. You just an hour. You can write a rapper and you can make it work but if you want it to work in something like flutter with its own view system than you would actually have to render again and so you you know that could be a landline for example. That could happen in the future. So it's really important to consider it holistically in like what you might solve. Some problems can introduce others certainly gonna share a lot of the same problems as with reactnative on the side. I think you know we. We really invested in reactnative specifically because because of our infrastructure and our our expertise with react and. I think that that was our shot right now to do cross platform so i really don't anticipate us. Adopting flutter zimmerman or any of these cross platform frameworks anytime soon. Certainly not at least until react native is actually out of the code base which is probably another year to out so okay. we'll gabriel. Thank you for taking the time to come on the show. This has been a really interesting and topic. I think you know people really responded to your article and and found a lot of value in it. And i think it's awesome that utah. You were willing to talk about it and you know it's obviously like you said divisive in in kind of a touchy subject but i mean when it comes down to it we're all just trying to build stuff and we're just trying to share information how to build stuff at least the the engineers and the room. Maybe you know the vendors less so the You know the ceo's in some cases less so but you know from the engineers. We're just want to know how to build stuff faster and more efficiently. And i think your article when a long way to helping people better understand the the pros and cons of using react native so so thanks for writing the article on. Thanks for coming on the show to discuss it. Thank you so much. it's always a pleasure earn.

airbnb one hundred percent five g leland andrew s two years gabriel peel Native gabriel Gabriel peel fifteen percent spike brehme twenty percent facebook qualcomm Richardson seven day cartagena iowa Iowa fifteen twenty percent
035 - Unmasking ANTIFA Pt 15 - The Unmasking

40oz Hemlock

1:59:56 hr | 2 years ago

035 - Unmasking ANTIFA Pt 15 - The Unmasking

"Jakob God material or immaterial what is something that's material space you can give me an example so listen you don't stop they lasted to intelligibly analyze these losers we have to understand generally faded out so I think we're going to go are you ready we have seen that too intelligibly are you ready ladies and gentlemen awhile has it been a while dropped thirty the we say that general thing is radical ideology right remember that mention those words a couple of times and we I truly there's going to be an APP you can have on your iphone or your android device and it will always have the latest podcasts and news articles Elsie Here's another big thing there's going to be an APP yes in addition to the fantastically beautiful and pristine forty on website brought to you by you we've been building towards this for fourteen episodes now and I'm hoping to do this right and hope it conveys something important to you tonight and if I fail I am also a procrastinator life is toughest how right now okay so bear with me it is going to film you exactly all right here we go what it is what Antifa is in generally what Antifa is is a particular sort of more general thing in that general thing is what we're very recently dropped thirty four several times which it out bullet back out pull it back I'm sorry In addition to being a perfectionist preconceived anyways assumption presupposition right it's an outlook it's a way of looking at things it's not we can share the blame do you think I was GonNa say they're sorry those no we'll get through it and we're GonNa Change soon one of them is the podcast schedule it's going to become a little bit more normalized another one is the format we're probably going to be incorporating video much to my this is it this is part fifteen and a very excited about this not just because we get to move on to other things after this but because see see the difference it's and you can and you can tell all this by the way at least in part by the way in which it's advanced talked about specifically what's radical about it and we've talked about specifically what's ideological about it and while taking them in reverse order ideological uh-huh because we're going we seen that to analyze ANTIFA is that the first time I've called antiques I think I've been calling ANTIFA whatever the thing the weights advances in a way that makes pretense of being subject to evidence of being scientific being observation based of being empirical marks always claiming to be a scientist it'd be doing science social science right the way in which it's advanced is wants dropping when it's dropping and really honestly I mean you look at my track record who the hell knows when it's dropping that's GonNa Change soon in fact a lot of things are GonNa Change soon or you know several things okay it pretends to be scientific but when you dig deeper at its core you find a proposition or small cadre of proposition and thus it's not a science you see simple as that will then what is well like we said it's an ideology I think I think you'll find this fascinating or some some revelatory stuff here tonight while there better be right it's the big reveal it's the big boxing it's the big unmasking forty outside doc dot com is the website go there click subscribing the upper right hand corner and then you can always to me out when I'm telling you about the podcast schedule you'll just know because you'll get notified that you know try not to get nauseous from the CENTRIPETAL force of argument it's because my theory says so it's which will admit of no possible counter evidence that could overturn them and that's the point see if no evidence could overturn it that none is needed in support of it such that the first category is entirely accounted for by the second category all as are BS mark says all instances of human social history are are instances of oppressed an example a piece of human social history any peace you going to get a donut down the street this morning any peace right if you bring him it must be oppression in there somewhere why marks because I have this thesis that says that all the best basketball players are from Norway oops I mean all instances of human social history are this is of oppression I haven't ideology so we talked about what's ideological about it grin and some some in addition do more frequent schedule some commentary on television Some News and so forth it is in a way that makes pretense of being subject to evidence but in fact it's immune it's got a built in immunity from the evidence about it is that it is a philosophy it is a view it's a proposition it's it's or set of propositions fundamental assumptions it's an outlook it's what we call in last last episode it's a a set of preconceived what are they come preconceived ideas oh discover as soon as you start bringing great basketball players that putatively are not from Norway and I declare Oh no no don't there from Norway why because they're great we talked about with radical about it right what radical about it what's radical about it is that it asserts the necessity of the destruction of all values he's don't exist okay they're really just one class oppressing another with its ideas their class interests they were previously thought to be there are no eternal ideas says marks all of would have been like justice and Truth and and and the particular way in which it's advanced is such that it gives us a real clue to this this this true actual nature and notice I I don't mean necessity here like calls for them it asserts they are destroyed as as they do not exist as they are not what to to it what are we supposed to do by the way as far as the destruction of all value an example that you don't think seems at all like oppression and you say marks what about this he's GonNa say he's not going to be moved he's GonNa say why why why why Norway what why because I say so I mean that's not what I'm GonNa say right I'm GONNA pretend like I'm giving evidence that they're all from Norway the players and I have this theory that says that all such are Norway as soon as I started doing that you're going to be like wow what oh I get it you're not basing what you're saying on the facts right the thing that's looked at it's not a in other words it's not observed like it's not observed scientifically it's it's a way of looking at things colonel objective idea to base any sort of moral claim on it because otherwise why am I telling you you should adhere to it Marx's like there are none of those the destruction the tearing down tear it down tear down are you sick of hearing me say tear it down all they WANNA do is tear it down of the spiritual what are we say last episode the chaos in the street is a manifestation of the chaos in the mind and we can go step further the chaos in the mind is a manifestation the day and it just kind of stuck with me ever since just because it's it's it's goofy right and it makes you think about what's being said all the best basketball players are from Norway right it's an ideology are you uncomfortable yet unending revolution so this tearing down get blank no marsh wanted permanent revolution on ending upheaval off and all that just think about this that's the physical manifestation okay of what is a more basic phyllis is physically manifested in these things we're describing but but it has its root in something and crap like that on it it'll just be the forty s I'm like up or so I've been told we'll see those are the things that are in the works the music's in anything that symbolizes or represents or is based on them seat pulling down statues which is all the rage these days in addition to rage rage is all the rage well or you know if you really want to go all out you can pull down statues in a fit of rage pulling down statues and burning stuff physical tearing down of monuments and symbols and so on and so forth and changing of names of elementary schools and all this bullshit this is what this is what we mean by the destruction of all values don't mean he's saying we need to destroy these values he sang in virtue of what I have to say don't get everything not for some purpose his wasn't like listen it wasn't like Marxists like we gotta have this revolution so that here mark say something almost identical okay why do we gotta tear it down we got to tear it down because any evidence of an eternal idea would mean there's an eternal mind any evidence of law order intrinsic to the universe would mean that the universe had an intent and you know what that would be Shen animal class struggle class warfare struggle right all of it all as are bs and just like the guy who say all the best basketball players Norway if you try to bring marks the tearing down this tearing away this up rooting this a radical of any notion of law order intrinsic to the universe exist and Hegel told us that that's not the case there is no complete mind back of the world it's all developing thing and we're at the forefront of it as you'll see as you'll hear exciting sorry I want you to notice something that it's you know you always hear about the atheistic nature of communist sadness and you know they're all of what have been asserted to have been eternal ideas or appeal to as eternal ideas and you would have to appeal to something as an goal if you if you don't like the term spiritual guess what they gotta mean the same thing a spiritual intention the the physical things just a manifestation of something that is thought to possibly be there like you can't hate something that's not there right well maybe that sounds like too much of a stretch for you right now right yeah marks was an atheist you might you might argue my say yeah I mean if of course if he believes that their social ills that are associated with they're all a function of class consciousness all human social history right you start to get a little coster folks where does he wants to go what does he want us to do that. The got blinken somebody's language that we quoted who really just see closely mirrored mine and I got all excited about like see that's what I'm talking about I do with marks well likewise marks right we just look at the form of the statement the logical form I mean it's just taking one category of things relate relaying relating it to another category of things that would mean that would mean it had an tender all right now you might be picking up on something and I would encourage you to do so psychological something spiritual there can't be we can't let it define divine foot in the door it comes out of a hatred of God we can't let a d tonight all right we cannot allow a divine foot in the door just finished his review believe it right right or the part of the cure for the diagnosis right. It's not malicious it's not atheism atheism sake but you'd be wrong if act what we already sort of seen Shen of chaos in the heart and the chaos in the heart is a manifestation well we'll see that tonight like what are you GonNa get if if everything it's like suffocating right suffocating recall that password from past episode the series of concepts not unruly right to quote my eight year old daughter God is spirit ransom God is spirit you've got to get hold of that you'll hear a character in a book say that tonight and thus unintended her behind reality and that we cannot do if you go back to that episode called sterile soil men it's the goal right but is it really atheism or is there another layer to this we're gonNA look at when foot in the door we can't have any eternal ideas why because if there were earth eternal ideas well let's just be frank there would have to be an eternal mind in which for them to oh you might continue when he professes his atheism or the or his associated agenda with respect to religion that's all he's doing I mean it's not like it's an end in itself secret handshakes by the way probably episode name I'm most proud of out of my nascent podcasting career marks wants you to understand fellow communists for money not not like after some big shakeup just no just as a practice you I think what Oh yeah there's a lot to this guy you know this is not you know I mean you could you might think this is atheism but this is if you pay attention this sounds a little bit more like a hatred it's not like it's just hatred of God it's not like it's part of the pack you know it's not atheist for atheism sake it's just what he sees as part of the PR the pro the diagnosis we got we ought to believe in the values are real justice any of it believing in in any sort of eternal idea would be to believe in an intended reality in that are not commensurate with its value than if he's engaged in a project of social reform it would behoove him to address the issue of religion as he sees it and so officle if you listen to the last episode and I hope you're not listening to this one unless he listened to the last one a spiritual or psychological Darwinism which is a really interesting discussion all of morality is just one class of people oppressing another class of others than it all needs to be torn down constantly everywhere marks that we must criticize everything critical theory people so f it screw it shake it off what what had professor bike lock say morality is just a tool of the narrative and therefore it's unfairly imposed white privilege see that's just another way of expressing the same idea because it's all made up and therefore unfairly imposed on you every notion that could be remotely called moral like don't steal or don't kill people or last episode that clear in last episode that took like seven seconds why did take me three hours last time Dan that all morality I hope you understand what's in scope here 'cause I just keep saying things like justice trying to catch all words out there every sounding language as as we last episode grave sounding incomprehensible prose why wish I I wish I could have made episode thirty five part fifteen of unmasking antivirus for downtime cod cast will back drop the beat madness confusion Die Westerner you listening to this podcast you have to die everything about your culture your family your life it has to be yes it's just oppression all right so the inference goes because it's all made up and therefore it's arbitrary plant anything new once you've torn out the route because you're poisoning the ground you're saying anything that grows here is oppressive you know don't sell your friends to the secret police or which is something marks did sold his fellow communist to the police sold out his is at its bottom simply unending criticism of anything and everything in just really high although to to to to come back to this ridiculous thought Experiment Iowa pick this illustration well I know I picked it on the why borrowed it's borrowed from this lecture that I heard well way way back in it won't by the end of the episode like you could okay look you could be you might be tempted right now be like look nick this is a stretch on your culture and keep tearing it down until all the things that they don't like about it social skills where right if you believe that all of human social history is really just oppression through and through than you probably not going to be the life of the Party talk about it stick around all right I mean this is not going to be like an episode about Marxist social skills and we can imagine what Mars go back to this episode sterile soil secret handshakes a we covered this whole thing as far as morality goes and ex actually also I think related to hi it's radical this is what radicalism means it asserts the complete eradication of all institutions all structures all traditions all values everything suffocation because he represents individualism success fear of Gao recent fairly recent fear of God hey for a lot of us okay that's why they came professors to be in an to be an elation what's the corporate it's the physical tearing down there want there are two sides of the same coin like Mark said we have to criticize everything that's kind of person who can not find satisfaction for his bent soul unless it has control of others control in fact this is why they became professors because they knew they could ensconce themselves insulate themselves in academia and launch these unending assaults fear of God is a recent thing in life so don't be don't be too hard on the guy all right this is why The Hague him if you haven't listened to to to from hates the image or evidence of the Creator everywhere he sees it and must needs deface it lead dreaming about this dreamily for as long since they were since they had the thought I think I'll become a professor so don't be surprised that the kids are pulling down the statues their their professors have been just diligently in wet dreams all the eternal ideas that bind them and prevent them from controlling their fellow men because there's a certain breed of person there's a certain continue to do so or refers rolfast sewer one download yesterday thanks man worn out as that we have to start over and keep starting over you'd have to keep starting over this is why it was called sterile soil dc you can't anyway incidentally you remember as well that we also saw that there is at frankly okay because to put it metaphorically or maybe not to put a metaphorically the devil Oh let nothing grow here don't be surprised that kids on college campuses are pulling down statues there professor serves are all Marxists I they're all Marxists some flamboyantly some beneath the covers they're all Marxists and they've been dreaming about this day for years and it's only going back to the first episode this all the academics hate trump this this this and this alone that right with undermined quote not only is it a the the sake it's socialism for atheism sake it's everything for atheism sake. Atheism is not the means said UNTER the basis of your criticism all criticism stand standard but see that a standard is exactly what you can't assert if you're a Marxist because by definition all standards are oppression airman to make a living in a way that insulated themselves from the repercussions his wife is why a lot of people going to government of all the kinds of things that they hate and our inept we ended with this question looming what on Earth did marks mean in his line about Hagel the justice that you are demanding what you're demanding is that it'd be imposed on those whose idea it doesn't it is not it does not belong to you're saying everyone needs to adhere to this oh I'm sorry it was so long man I hope you today last time to to criticize something what has to be true what what I has to be true before you criticize something you have to believe in something namely that's why you're fighting for social change not changing you you want to change society right so whether it's your own subjective idea of justice or someone else's or some groups so that anybody may think exactly as he wishes are pleases Labor paraphrased and quote and paraphrase what did he mean in that poem he wrote about Hagel when he wrote as a youth quote words I teach all mixed up in a devilish muddle while interesting maybe you know in psychological sense certainly involved somehow in his political program is not thereby intrinsic or necessary or integral to it right all right Tara downtown tear it down and what's right and what's the intellectual you know the psychological the spiritual correlate got that word Corlett Cohen by then what do you mean by devilish well let's just ask the question what are we to make of this notion of Markaz atheist this idea that he merely doesn't believe in God you know and that this well this way you're gonna find that when you get down to it a lot of your thinking has been sort of like informed due together let's be scientific let's go to the data Marx would approve of that right let's go to the evidence what evidence and then other in the next breath calls for justice well justice is a moral concept what the hell's that marks see if morales clearly incoherent engulfed self contradiction but what did Hagel teach US contra diction don't matter does last episode make sense see so in other words marks out of one side of his mouth talks about values being imposed by the class structure of society and thus being oppression in this what yeah look just look I'm not gonNa say it again rewind it it's look it's very clear I am going to say it again into Donald Trump you should go back and listen to our first series it really puts a lot of this in context and will continue to do this to do so because we're gonNA come back to it okay do we have a Marxist thoughts on God and you know especially as that thought or those but but that's different than saying God does not exist whatever it is mark scholar Kevin Anderson in the journal Critique Classic it's German Stink read prey listened to me too I know here I idea let's not let's let's to demand justice would be to demand depression why because whether it's your own subjective idea of justice that you're demanding or someone else's subjective idea talking about the non existence of God yes marks goes on and on about the eradication of religion and the poison of religion and evil right so does Richard Dawkins News of marks total writings that have been planned only eight have been released a thirty five volumes eight have been released and I guess that's the idea that's what you were taught I was taught that's what's always repeated by idiots shouldn't listen to people thirteen percent what's going on there what's being hidden well you know it's possible and I'm speculating it's possible that there's folks who are concerned that if you saw other writings of Marx you an inherent contradiction in all this buy that buy in all this I mean radicalism right remember that this was this part this popped up in sterile soil and secret handshakes has been this has been in some measure confirmed by the by the the folks of the marks Marks Archive no-one seen the stuff it's I mean you know so let's let's be generous let's be as what he says it is that he can't turn around and start demanding justice to demand justice on Marx's view would be to demand oppression to buy what I don't think by Marx you know he talks about the radical notice the logical difference between talking about the eradication of religion and we have of Marxist thoughts on God yeah we saw some of it yet religious opium masses Blah Blah Blah but you know the atheist and it's attributed to communism it's like how much in nineteen ninety seven hundred fourteen years after Marx's death and we do some addition and ask the question again I guess that the at one point I read I read that Stotts whatever it be whenever they be plays or does not play a role in motivating aspects of his life and action including his writings what data do we have give or take right thirteen to twenty four percent of what Marx wrote has ever been read by any of us why is that a number of the writings of Marx which have never been published in any language and then he asks why is still the case so that you really get from Marx himself like explicit assertions of atheism you're going to be surprised I think that you might if you think of Marxists thought he was such a genius I thought he was so brilliant I thought his thought had to be applied to anything and everything and we'd have a Marxist reading of this and a Marxist reading of that Well Albert Albert Camus almost said came as Albert Camus the French existentialist I think said was quoted as having said that of the thirty five volume you're demanding it'd be imposed on everybody and that is what Marx calls oppression you cannot be a Marxist without being and just that German philosophy in general regarded as critical philosophy while we heard right credit critical theory Kevin Anderson says there's a significant the with our sub- twenty percent only twenty only twenty percent of what Marx wrote making some obviously some assumptions about the uniform of the size of the volumes in the set right but in his critique that's a reference to count by the way who's major works were titled the Critique of Blink in a Marxist reading a Shakespeare in a Marxist reading a Winnie the Pooh a Marxist reading of the back of a Coca Cola bottle in a Marxist re if you've been to college you know what I'm talking about what anything other than God in hidden maybe a sense of what has okay because Marcus marks a really religious kid but not be so excited about the ones that you've read right it's something something's being hidden here all right and we can look at a little bit of what's not in a poem called the invocation of one in despair Marx writes these lines quote so a God has snatched from me my awe in the curse rack of destiny all his worlds are gone beyond recall nothing but revenge is left to me I shall build my throat not I shall turn back death Pale and dumb clutched by blind and chill mortality maze happiness prepare its tomb the best explanation of this there's a poem shortly after that time in which the line the motivation that the character arc the driving you know of Lucifer in the Bible of Satan thank God you know that it's well maybe I should make that assumption you know thank God we're fighting here this is what you look at it and go now what we do with this how do we form a theory that accounts for this what would make this make sense. In high overhead cold tremendous shell summit be for its bulwark superstitious dread for it's martial blackest agony who looks on it with the appears I wish quote I wished to avenge myself against the one who rules above and quote night I'm offering this context bulwark superstitious dread for it's martial blackest agony or anything like this what's going on here I shall build my throne high overhead coal tremendous shall at Summit be for its manuscript to that person what I'm telling you is that of everything Marx wrote only like Thirteen fifteen twenty percent has ever been read but yet marks he was a really religious kid wrote a lot of poetry was very you know went to youth group with the Church I can't tell you the name of the book right now it's leader A lot of these excerpts I found in two distinct places one of them is said to be the one that we all need to read you know at one point the Marxism control like a third of the planet above the stars of God right there's another poem called the player Unquote now I want I think the point is obvious I just go now I've noticed says by myself the points pretty obvious right who writes like this I mean look I wrote a lot of poets a good honest look at what's being said and why something like this would be said and we're GONNA have to ask ourselves how are we going to count for this because this is the data okay the Prince of darkness sold it to me for me he beats the time and gives the signs evermore boldly I play the dance of death unquote right now this is the guy that all your idiot friends hopefully not peers they're stupid quote the hellish vapors rise and fill the brain till I go mad and my heart is utterly changed see the sword the reality we're GONNA grab some excerpts from some remarks from Marxist pin the young Marx Okay and we're just going to hikes what is Lucifer say the book of Isaiah Forty th Chapter I will ascend into heaven I will exalt my throne and he's hitting every benchmark of like satanic imagery and in ritual therefrom has like an archive there's some room in like in a basement somewhere you know surrounded by like steel filing cabinets and cement it's all probably dingy soul so now he's in charge he's my metronome just we're just gonNA take some excerpts here but just context is not needed here the CA- here the context is I mean this is loose this is essentially that the character type of commemoration of one's induction with a sword that represents the selling of one soul see the sort the prince of darkness sold it to me but his poetry after this certain point in his life takes on a well what is it how do I describe it I'm not gonNA describe it you like some communist bloc you know decor mildew and shit this is what cabinets in on your lock and key with all the reason evil it's peculiar for me he beats the time and gives the signs I sold marks he missed and I just have this notion about God that he doesn't Miss so here's a couple of months it's from the aluminum provided you're you've got your your puke bag handy that's weird said a one off no these are few lines from the poem by the point is there's this there's a drama called the aluminum and I can't verify this but supposedly this name 'em is supposed to be both the abyss yawns in darkness you will sink down and I shall follow laughing whispering in your ears descend come with no nothing professor running around extolling this is the guy who's called the great benefactor of mankind this is the guy who said to have a heart for the is away in a wretched crawl stop I've got it now it rises from my soul as clear as air as strong as my bones yet I have the power within my youthful arms to clinch listen to this quote and just think about what we said in last episode sorry about said last episode we talked about the sort of imagery that's there's also a drama the Marx wrote probably one of those classical you know like this back in the day me friend ruined ruined my time has clean run out the clock has stopped the pygmy houses crumbled soon I shall embrace attorney he does he says he doesn't believe in eternal ideas he damn sure believes in eternity sounds like he's pretty upset into my breast and soon I shall how gigantic curses on mankind and quote does this sound to you like he doesn't want it crush you who's you humanity to clinch in crush you with tempestuous for us well for us both listen to this while for us both poor and the needy and wanted just to eradicate oppression in this the guy this guy all right us it's a name given to Christ in advance by the prophets in the Old Testament what it means is God will come and be with us he will live among us Christ came to live among us and then right by the fact that it's quickly approaching understand what the abysses right I four US or some of us Out or if he was trying to get he was trying to get I used to describe what these folks want to see happen to those who oppose them while to Western society in general and to to their to their particular atheist this man is sure preoccupied with God upset at God pre on suffocation and confusion and convulsion death and strength strangulation think of the way that madness is descr listen to this occupied with eternity and seemingly certain of a very abysmal literally eternity for himself what the and that crazy crazy I feel bad he was saying that's crazy because that's so diminishes it it's it's it's fearsome it's disgusting I can't name right now and the other one I can't remember I'll put it in the blog or something but these are readily available I guess that these are not part of the body of work that's it she is our eternal grief an indescribable and immeasurable death you know on many accounts eternity is going to be great the abyss the door between this world in the next the event horizon between here and L. Remarks Hell that blacks you too I wasted a lot of years of my life to nineteen twenty six now I got I got some pretty dope bribes actually I should say that I got some bars but but listen it is in these lyrics reproachable you want that's an actual I've read that's an actual piece of satanic ritual this sort of passing of a sword I'm hoping for a good one I'm believing in a good one I've got I've sort of like laid my plan released to the public because if it if they were that I couldn't be reading you again there's a you know every major author like everybody like thinker in whatever country is a Lotta these passages in it he says think of the Demons Jesus casts out in Matthew Chapter Eight they have this idea that they're ultimately headed for play sort of sort of like a syntactical play on Emanuel which obviously if you're a Christian you know is is is the meaning it refers to Jesus because it means God with front door but listen quote ha eternity all right this guy this book that I was reading that that had they seem to believe in eternity to for a guy that said to be he says Vile Art officiality conceived to scorn US Israel death it's like dude you know there's there's also this thing called eternal life Marxist notion now ruined ruined I'm ruined I'm going there and I want you to come with me I want you to follow me you will see says quote you will sing and and and nearness to God through no work of his own and marks infinitely thick nothing that on which on which of the other side you know is the other side and you will not get there and or the abyss and they don't WanNa go yet right 'cause they say to Jesus they say did you come here to torment us before it's our time Simpson I don't necessarily like that I'm not trying to sound punchier flip about damnation but damn she is our eternal grief an indescribable anymore or you haven't used it yet here quote and they are also Wulan Him Wulan him the name rings forth like Death Rings fourth until it dies down and I shall follow sorrowful you follow laughing he's GonNa make sure you go he's GonNa be behind you right whispering in your ears descend come with me friend him walk because he's being pretty hard himself and everything right but this at least at least the sentiment brought out here is not you know Marxist and alone in this this center good line he says made to be the fool calendars of time and space having no purpose save to happen to be ruined so that unless they really mean something and they can't really mean something less I have ultimate control so either I'm got her no one's God it Martin Luther doesn't necessarily seem to deny the clockwork mark says we're it's VI- vile art officiality conceived scorn us now please don't think here he's talking to when he says artificiality this is some sort of you know you know counter proof of what I said about him not believing he doesn't mean artifice it'll be something to ruin and quote now Casey I mean I've been we're we're being pretty hard it's for a good one sort of centrally re- revolves around Christ I'm not trying to be flipped I am because I don seem to come out on a on a different end of it luther was sure that he was going to heaven to eternal life enjoy this passage also vexed luther if you re losers autobiography aside his biography or one of his batteries I guess there's there's also vex luther he I know how to talk about this without being in a casual way obviously it's very serious subject I'm trying to be sort of casual about it so it I think I think there's some awkwardness what Paul says on the subject enrollments because it's very offensive it's very offensive to your philosophical instincts jobs aren't artificiality if God exists and since God does exist I'm an artificiality because I can't be truly free my decisions can't mean anything ourselves being clockwork blindly mechanical he says and this is actually a pretty cool line sorry the poet poet in me is discovered anyway so here's the end of the M I struggled I struggled with that but I also believe through I believe no work of my own imagine that emmys figured out how these folks describe what they want to see happen to those they oppose oppose them think of the the language in the imagery that they use we talked remember all all the different variations event that that that has him on the rack so to speak that the the philosophical Barack of torment that this this thing that's vexing him in Oh Paul is like he imagined somebody arguing with him who sounds a lot like like less petulant marks or luther is imagined somebody saying well hold on a second why does God find fault with us if he if he knows in advance that we're going to sin and he made us anyways that it's his fault what the WTO up right that's the artificiality he's talking about made to be the full calendars of time and space it was in addition to Luther struggling with this Paul listen closely quote if there is a something which devours I'll leap within it though I bring the and now there's more going on here philosophic we're GONNA get out here but but but Paul forestalls a lot of a lot of the flossy just goes dude world to ruins the world which bulks between me and the abyss I will smash to pieces with my enduring curses oth- why does he find fault then if we could do know otherwise then why did he throw in hell stinks is is that because you're like well how does that glorify him that's the problem I sympathize with that thought that's a very real that's very legit Tis world who are you to tell God what he can make for his glory and what he can't now what offends your philosophical embracing me are you ready embracing me reading my book following my doctrines and ideas so it's the mark of anything satanic that it always tries to destroy the being the nature and thus the being of things the fastest they're like they take after the old Greek drums it was like a choir goes like that kind of kind of it's kind of ridiculous to our our modern days it's kind of ridiculous I will smash to pieces with my enduring curses I will listen to this a throw my arms around it's harsh reality I say this as somebody who who spent about ten years of my life honing and exploring and critiquing at my philosophical right it's not that to tear it down and the result is also is always then the sort of Adam he says listen that line again embracing me the world will dumbly pass away and goes on and then sink down to utter he's going to the abyss but on his way he's GonNa smashed to pieces of the world that stands between him in there in other words he's GonNa are you ready the Bible says God created the world out of nothing so everything in existence anything has being though says we live and move and have our being in him in his mind everything kind of did so right and here he says the world stands between him and the abyss and he seems to imply that this wearing my little shake wear t shirts running embracing me the world will dumb -ly pass away nothingness see all something nece is of God sin and death and destruction are in negation to borrow heavily term they're a negation are you ready for this guy she just blackout right this just mic drop he's GonNa tear it down it until he gets there everything has being derives its being from him so at the at the at the other extreme is nothingness okay the artificiality in the sense that God is a construct or invented or false he doesn't mean artificial artificiality since he means are our allies dresses this in the book of Romans and you're not I don't like and you're probably not going to like and I think very few people do like and I don't think enough people really look at and read and appreciate attic approached to nothingness in fact some people have used this ocean sorry we're getting a little mathematical conceptual here some people have used this notion I think Lewis particular uses notion to argue I guess scared me to argue the song started we got to break that really scared me those footsteps that's part of the song I'm like you know like I have anything to show for that but I'm just saying you gotta think about this because in that in that book of the Romans Chapter Nine chapter something listen to the podcast the justice criminal every cop criminal black lives matter listen to that in the previous stands that we the previously that we read he talked about you know descending into hell and get an and lavishing curses on me well you figure out the importance of the song numbers GonNa play it I'm GonNa look the whole song play this is the last episode of the series we are podcast I don't somebody's walking up behind me in the studio Lewis uses this notion to argue that it's not actual human souls that go to hell it something less closer to nothing something less than at the end of this so have some sympathy for the devil and that's an tunes remixing the Rolling Stones a reduction it's like a like a like our they call it chicken stock where you boil it down right all right we'll take a break musical break we're going to be back and we're going to get onto the rest of this sandy us courtesy have some sympathy after I choose this life of rebellion against God shows it his fault I'm going to be thrown into the doc pass away by the way what's dumb way to pass away let's stop there what's a dumb way to pass away well you might argue one of the dumbest ways to pass pass they stole many Ammann's a of the notion first of all suicide itself whether we're talking while we're talking to an individual level we talk about suicide but you could make an analogy to level of culture society I don't like all of it believe me there's actually a lot of stones is music is just not to my taste but I get there's some of it and that's death rock you know that's rock suicide is a very satanic idea vendors up all sorts of you know suicide involved in satanic ritual and so on so forth Marx himself was was his life was riddled with immutable. It's wonderful play fifty times could it's great it's great it's great arrangement starting remix of it and of course man I didn't grow up like Marxism at bottom is just a way for culture to kill itself embracing me the world will dummy pass away and then sink down into utter anyway so want to keep going with the should we keep going in in in people look out for the APP subscribe at the website find us on Itunes by the play and all that let's get back to it that would be really living in other words completely lose your being would be really living is this part fifteen I'm asking anti our third series episode thirty five overall stay tuned more coming for downtown dot com is the website yeah suicide of relatives and kids and everyone in Mark's family I mean centrally it's like his life stories about the story of like everyone around him killing themselves all like thinness perished with no existence see because all existence as a reflection of God therefore the only thing that can be truly satanic is the approach of nothingness the approach to nothing why would that be really living because marks thinks that there cannot be any freedom except apart from God and the only way to be completely apart from asymptotically you know I'm not talking I guess it just sort of selling great chain of being here but anyways sorry he says perished with no existence say they'll call me Lucifer mom and need a restraint so you're mean me we're going to do called why can't even tell you what it's called cheese it this reveal thing is hard this big decision boxing things you know like I vocalist musician and then it hits you like Oh this is dope and I get the thing about MC I get now earlier in life and I'm in I'm all in and I I just think that that that idea is going to be really important in a minute you'll see there's a segment and of course there's defenses that get thrown out there sort of just rationalizations for why this the the ratio is so low The God would be to have no existence because all existence from God to have no being so he says ironically that would be really living tongue-in-cheek in a moment I want to come back to we're going to have to come back to this line from way before it because I should add well no just before the break the beginning line of that verse that Stan wait is that your own hands because that can certainly be avoided right there's a lot coming up in a moment if there is something which devours a leap within it though it bring though I bring the world to ruins okay in other words you know show me something that destroys back a little bit about I'm GonNa wait I'm GonNa tell you because I feel like any anyway I try and describe it Jones fan or anything but I like I like hearing some of these classic classic are like would you discover why everybody loves a certain artists you know it's like you just there's just one moment where you're listening to the anyways I've already ruined it doesn't really matter anyways thirteen percent really thirteen percent what I wanted the rest of what Marx wrote be of interest what what's going on I'm going to give a little bit of a way and I'm a pretty significant argument here in a minute someone had just hold onto for a second I'll just say this those two lines are per a perfect introduction to segment that's but something happened after he graduated high school was a high school at College I believe it was high school equipment high school age economist Rothbart Murray Rothbart the Great Austrian economists Mary Rothbart says quo he says historians when they discuss these poems tend to dismiss them Well we started to see a little bit of you know I mean now that you've heard a little bit more from marks I think that you can maybe speculate is a if there is something which devours I'll leap within though I bring the world to ruins all right we're gonNA have to talk all his kids killed it it's like it's sick it's weird it's awful all right anyways a dumb way to pass away as to kill yourself and you might argue that as inchoate romantic yearnings and you can just imagine this right you're in your college classroom like you read the stuff and it's just immediately written off just you know the the sort of like the wandering heart even tell like like like in a youtube tell people what you're on boxing isn't that to sort of ruin the surprise salmon boxing this well then why in boxing you just tell me what you're GonNa box with the rightist binding even finished that passes before the break because I had ever had the footsteps behind me would just turned out to be the beginning of the footsteps in the song embracing me the world will dummy of youth sort of exploring the space exploring the spiritual space like just seeing what's possible to say just explore the space curse God it don't take it seriously it's just the inchoate inchoate row rambling romantic yearnings right but he says Rothbart says but there are two congruent it's tyranny and murder and oppression and mass genocide and the things that have been done to citizens living under communist regimes will give you nightmares tonight in a poem called Human Pride Marks Writes yes marks by the way we're talking about Karl Marx Quote Heaven I would comprehend I would draw the world to me living hating I intend that my starshine brilliantly and worlds I would destroy for torture and vile disgusting violations of Human Rights that if I recited them to you you would vomit it this fall will not stifle my ardor he goes on then I will wander god-like and victorious through the ruins of the world and giving my word worlds I would destroy forever since I can create none if I can't be God no one can and his childhood sweetheart and later wife Jenny von vest fallen marks expressed both his Megalomania and his enormous thirst for destruction he says in this poem he says by the way you ever write a poem for a girl you like elementary school did it go like this I will wander god-like and victorious through the ruins of the world and giving my words active force I will feel equal to the Creator please don't late marks is vividly revealed he says thus in his poem feelings which was dedicated to his childhood wife don't forget what and who were talking about here it's not just like people can't so I will destroy everything tear it down turned down tear it down have I said this before in bucolic fields binding a big things of wheat together and singing songs in the sun ever since I can create no world since my call they noticed never end quote what what in other words you know words an active force I will feel equal to the Creator see the closest I can get to causing things to happen with my words liked God doesn't the very first chapter genesis is I can destroy things with my words so I wrote this little book it's called the Communist manifesto you should really read it listen to that I won't in other words I won't even break pace as I destroy this thing I'm just doing a little interpretation for you communist Manifesto Guy Loved Humanity Guy just wanted you know just wanted to get the kids out of the factories guy quote with ain't I will throw my gauntlet full in the face of the world and see the collapse of this pygmy giant whose fault will not stifle my ardor if someone account recounts them to you okay and cure who you are boy marks was an atheist be done with that's a lot I mean where where in Marx's written do you get that here's what I get I just told you but I just read it marks dad was really concerned with his son after this turn happened in Marx's young life dad was really concerned I son I've different concerns for my son I try to imagine the way Ah ah father must feel who has a fully functioning being slowly to a devil and just think what have I done what have I produced you know here's here's here's what could be a man true and two years after this exchange and he's a demon he started caught wind of what was happening to mark I guess Marx wrote him some letters and his dad was like dude I mean so much so that like you on earth and in heaven that do not recognize human self consciousness as the Supreme God head able minded able bodied son yet who is the son yet who is turning odds which is you might say well this is more expression of this here's our evidence of atheism he doesn't like Canary Conflict based storm Shuman Drum in a forces Hegel Developmental Ism humans are the crowning achievement of this blind dialectical evolution and I thought atheism wasn't entrance into communism and I thought it was all right are we with that now and it's it's interesting because they're always seemed to be the ladder operating behind the former one of the main main exchanges between him and his father on this point Marxist writing a preface to an enter translation of of some works of epicurious doings thus you have like freedom fighter organizations and you know the border the immigration amnesty all these all these organization where have we heard language like this before Hagel in the preface he quotes echelons who says I harbor hatred against all gone the scientists in this book and this is what this is really interesting right because you might it is interesting to ask the question where the just like where are the folks where do we draw the line between the folks who and thesis theses an anti theses resulting in synthesis he's right and out of it spirit is growing in mind level deluding themselves and therefore does have the opposing beliefs somewhere within their heart that's just being sort of like muffled or suppressed but it is an interesting he qualifies what he said he says in his preface he says that what do you mean that he's against all gods level let me just play this the notion of dolphins is like I'm not just the Christian God him against any guy that's all Marxist Saints Atheism Okay no no no no no no no no agents that are really just hidden Marxist enclaves of you know revolutionaries masking their Marxism in some sound that sounds like righteous and and using the former as a front in you'll find interesting right because Marxist communist always use front organizations to mask their get the feeling when you read the exchanges between them it's Kinda got that awkward flavor to it where like his dad like dancing around it doesn't want to say it's kind of nervous to bring it up and is like excuse me now Lorenza you know this innumerable organizations that you know let's act as really are and if we can believe this like if you believe scripture you there's a sense of what you have to believe that nobody really believes this because you have to believe any anybody who's professing atheism is on some sense on some the out and out atheist explicit oh no I'm just you know science believing it says those folks behind the those those folks are those folks are Growing the absolute and man is at the forefront of it man is God my daughter and I were reading this book by Louis Sh- my daughter is brilliant said western I understand you perfectly I have no doubt that my phraseology will seem strange to you and perhaps even shocking early and revered associations may have puppets relative to WHO's behind that what the folks behind the scenes actually believe 'cause atheism is a lot more palatable than is one of the real weaknesses of organized religion that adherence to formula that failure to recognize one's own friends God is a spirit ransom get hold of that go familiar with that already stick to it God is a spirit of course but what then what then I spit it the protagonist ransom that this idea that he's come to about this spirit be behind or underneath or sort of IMF unfolding within the Word Harvard Law Center you know they're just front organizations right let's oftentimes I I suspect that nervous and agitated the way describes it just was like he's just trying to cue marks China Q. Him to dispel the notion even though he knows the notion is real he just wants to just tell me it's not galaxy is the work to which I dedicate my own life and the life of humanity the goal ransom the goal think of it pure spirit the final vortex of self thinking Theodore not believe me we are talking about exactly the same thing I'm not at all sure that we are that if you will permit me to say so awesome all right it was as a scientist and the book and he's like he's hardcore non-believing scientists and he sounds like just like the sort of materialist kind of st named freedom spontaneity that's what I'm talking about that is the goal towards which the whole cosmic process is moving the final disengagement of that freedom that spiritual ask the question if we just bracket that it is interesting to ask the question where do we draw the line between folks who are like no I just flat out don't believe in God and those who do and hate him it's a hopelessly flawed proposition now the smart folks know this but they want it to be true nonetheless so the thing about the problem here where the mind came from and how it comes to do what it does because that's the essential mark of a person okay and on some level these folks know that all their attempts to make the brain we want to explain mind but all we've got before us to work with is materiality because that's all we believe so somehow we've got to come up with a theory of the originating activity let me just stop this for second real fast and explain what's going on behind the scenes don't me just give you a little bit of philosophy real quick so you can understand have to do with this well the problem is that for like a hundred years these folks have been trying to make good on that claim all the arguments just collapsed and if you listen to the our series the very first series from Darwin to Donald Trump what the connection is here see you have these folks called them materialists who like ever sense welfare I mean ever since the ancient Greeks you know honestly but like in full force ever since account for that just don't work right see here's the thing now you can't just go you can't just ignore the problem then right you can't just say well we we put it out of your power to recognize in this new form the very same truths which religion has so long preserved and which science is now at last rediscovering but whether you can you're going to acquiesce to occult properties listen listen that was loaded this character in the book Weston acquiesces descartes came up these really great arguments to show that the human was human that that person was like mind body spirit matter flesh you know these two parts ever since then you hear how some of that works it's really profound and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA come back to it I mean it's really profound the argue they just don't work it's like I called the hundred year fail okay it doesn't work atoms he's he's material ends nothing else there's no immaterial spirit there's no incorporeal aspect to him okay now you might say what's what was that so you either suppose that material mind can somehow be explained out of the activity of matter but that's a dead end or you say that mind is not entirely matter who's that popular writer Carl Sagan you know that kind of that kind of thing but he has some adventures in this book by the end of the book he's like channeling the dead entered sort of like you know just for the good of mankind we have to believe what's true and shed the false beliefs therefore we should believe in Adams bouncing against each other and that's how progress comes in you just got your standard these folks have been like really really anxious to show that that you know no man is material only you know the mind is the brain and man is a you know if he's made of sort of cold hard dark materials you know the the you know the show you like the scientists a candle in the night you know who's that guy we see that we can't explain it so we're just gonNA leave it be because you started off by making all these accusations at your opponents that they believed in mystical qualities we've already we've already ruled out two options there's only one more so we have to go with this somehow here's the third option this is the only thing that's left in the logical space some oh that is he's channeling now you know an which is driving his science this spirit is really just the same thing ransom means by the Holy Spirit so we're on the same team so you know like it says in the Old Testament awesome that is getting increasingly popular doing well well we can't explain how the mind could arise out of materiality so what are we going to conclude we've moved from that metaphysics to something a little bit more spooky because now we're talking about like a mysterious property that matter has it's always been in there somehow the properties of mind have always been intrinsic within the properties of matter they just have to be sort of brought out an atheist but I guarantee you that there are other folks behind the scenes who have much mind and thus a theory of Person Hood because what's unique about persons they have minds I mean to to understand a person to understand a mine just understand a person to understand persons you have to be able to account for uh-huh chronicles whatever and it's like just come join us my people are people right come on we're on the same team misses this idea ransoms away remember we we're sorry we're talking about Hagel members said it if you need to just for a second think about this thing that Hagel describing behind that the developing behind the scenes this mind that's developing behind the scenes if you need to think of it or developed thoughts on the matter and are using atheism because it seemingly innocuous a neutral as a front organization to advance something entirely different talking about whether marks is an atheist or like an occultist right there's there's a connection here and on the popular level you have p people that can't do that because that would make you can't let it divide foot in the door that would make you not a materialist which are making not an atheist right yet do that either so what are you going to do here's what you're GonNa do right like Weston remember Hagel said Mind Spirit it's developmental it develops woman because they can't explain the activity of the mind the materiality so now six go go back a theme to a theme in this series in a way something's gotta give right cult accomplish they call it they call Voss occult properties so that we can't have that right but then they run into this brick wall and now we have subtly moved from pure scientific materialistic materialistic materiality and atheist altogether by the way said ransom is it in any sense at all personal is it alive an indescribable expression passed over Westerns I let Western continued ransom. You mean it doesn't yet exist said Western something which you have believed all your life as part of your religion he suddenly subsided again into a whisper a crow king whisper unlike his usual voice why did he said chosen guided I become conscious that I'm a man set apart why did I do physics why did I discover the western raise he's he moved a little nearer to ransom and began speaking in a low voice that's what none of them understand he said it was such a gangsters I am too seriously when it has been attained you might then say it had been at the beginning just as well as at the end time is one of the things it will transcend I see what's bothering you of course I know religion pictures in as being there from the beginning remember last episode difference to make it one would be to take sort of filling in some parts of the story here because I know the history of thought on the subject you can't do it so what you end up having to do and what a lot of flowers are doing these days there's a view called Pan Psyche you you Christians were all about the spirit he cannot he cannot imagine the distinction you cannot imagine that there's a bifurcation he cannot imagine the why did I go to Malik Hendra it the force has pushed me on all the time I'm being guided I know now that I am the greatest scientists the will schoolboys whisper and so unlike his usual artem lecturing style that ransom for a moment felt a sensation almost disgust yes said western we can attribute goodness and badness at this level to he thinks it's all one he thinks goodness and badness those categories are constructions mm-hmm one wants to be careful about this sort of thing there are spirits and spirits you know at which point Western is like what are you talking about has yet produced I've been made so for a purpose it is through me that spirit itself is at this moment pushing me onto its goal look at random okay well we don't believe in the spirit and the flesh because something spear is like a cult and weird and mystically we can't touch it or burn it or poke at or measure right we get we don't WanNa talk about stuff like that 'cause it's weird and like connection between the like common materialistic atheism and the more sinister thing that we are sort of beginning to lay hold of here I hope it's have existing completely in the past that is God like genesis where you don't don't worry about that because once he exists at the end and you see that then there's a certain sense in which we can say he's always existed because his public manner about the opposite extreme of excessive abstraction has perhaps in the aggregate proved more disastrous call it a false a great inscrutable is to the occult because he's on a search for the explanation of the origin of mind and he started off as a materialist but then I it develops with we figure out its pattern of way we can we can harness it may we can get on board maybe we can become it I did he said chosen guided third given up the ghost here any sort of notion of God that is not based in the idea that the human human consciousness is God humanism says another word for satanism actual side just point out how laden with disturbing satanic imagery you know invocation Shen and enthusiasm and prophecy and so forth are all these early writings of Marx they'll they'll be like you know S- coffers be like well yeah hope you're beginning to see the threat of connection between the two I'm not going to spend a lot of time on it but I thought it was worth including those comments that exit from that book where the Galen Ideas Community how and that somehow hides all the mystery hides all the occult business I don't mean caught like Weird Satanic Pentagram as though I mean it cultish inexplicably okay somehow is God well I get for that's kind of okay but you're going to see in a moment that's not at all what it is right in the in the scene in the book in this story this scientist is trying to convince aided because marks essentially says the same thing in his preface to the the the work we just talked about when he says I I it's not that it's not really dominate atheist is that I hate any I couldn't believe it myself till recently not a person of course anthropomorphic is one of the child is diseases of popular religion here he had resigned how about you and it often sounds like it's not just imagery that he's trying to summon again it gets a little harder to recognize the idiocy when you're talking to people who are of an academic bent because they talk in grave sounding and and so when we get down to the level of basic see how this is all coming together so we get underlie level basic reality those categories don't apply anymore just like you said about time he said well don't worry about the notion that it because I mean look actually by the way just by way of counterargument what what on Earth could simp- simply saying and so This guy again has some in just about every concept and piece of imagery from satanic ritual that I care to hear about comprehensible pros last episode listen to it they're able to cloak idiocy you know in so much language that makes them sound thoughtful and reasonable and measured cerebral and well read informed inarticulate cerebral and so forth but really you really just have to bear in mind that you're in all likelihood you're talking to like a child fool worse than force pouring into us from the dark basis of beef from the bottom of force that can choose instruments it is only lately ransom that I've learned from actual experience so you know I mean if we agree that he was relatively young when he wrote these things than the pertinent question is okay then in which direction I love this book but it's Freaky is I sort of like I sort of encounter with with sort of these spiritual constantly but those were the early writings of Karl Marx those were early he was young given break you know they'll say like what what's important about Mars isn't what he wrote then of Marxist thought do these writings find themselves do they represent marks and a young lost period of his life before I don't know say like finding Jesus hand in his belief and turn knowingly and willingly towards darkness guided all right guided except for me but the earlier stuff like Marx's writings is the right point this stuff out to somebody that's familiar with marks

Marx Jakob Shen thirteen percent twenty percent nineteen ninety seven hundred Thirteen fifteen twenty percen twenty four percent seven seconds three hours eight year ten years two years
Britney Says She Won't Perform Again if Father is in Charge, Hillsong Fires Cheating Pastor's Wife - Daily Pop 11/12/20

Daily Pop

41:22 min | 7 months ago

Britney Says She Won't Perform Again if Father is in Charge, Hillsong Fires Cheating Pastor's Wife - Daily Pop 11/12/20

"Everyone to daily. We have so much to talk about today. So let's get right to the big headline of the day. Britney spears will not perform again as long as her father controls her career. According to the ap britney's attorney dropped that bombshell in court yesterday during the her ongoing battle with her dad over her conservatorship her attorney also claims. Britain is afraid of her father. Jamie now jamie has been britney's concern since two thousand seven and the pop star has been on a musical hiatus since twenty nine nineteen. Do you think she'll ever perform again by the way it sounds like britney and megan markle are talking because he's very strategic o. Bring me just put her big d on the table because she knows and the people behind who support her nose. That money talks. If britney doesn't perform money is not made if money is not made. No one gets paid and britney knows is she gets all those lawyers those managers and all those people on her side during this fight. Yeah she's got a case. Never remember whenever she's stopped her residency because her allegedly because her father was sick and she wanted to be there for him My little brain is ticket talking here now in thinking i wonder if she was warlike. You know what this is my chance to take a break in to put my foot down while i can. So do you think that this has been like kinda pull the whole time like as you said money talks. She's really really trying to say. Get me out of conservative. And i don't want my father to be near it at all and that the relationship really is as bad as everybody thinks it is. I feel like we talked about this a few days ago when i really tried to make it as simple as possible just because i feel like i'm trying to grasp because we get so much information all the time about what's going on and i feel like i'm on one side of stuff and more stuff comes out. I feel like if anything right now. Britney and her father or whatever's going on her mother needs to get in between the two of them and we need to really understand what's going on with britney like what is going on with her to the point that someone else needs to handle her financial decisions and take care of her. She's thank thirteen. I know there. There's been a shift in brittany. The this has not been working since she was that young. But there hasn't always been this side. There's obviously there's some sort of an. I'm not a doctor but there's some mental shift. She's dealing with something that's causing people to say we're controlling you. Now go right. They're open with that and they kind of give the world. Listen this is what britney goes through every day. This is what happens if she does not have somebody as a conservative. If somebody's not she's not taking this medication. This is what transpires but it sounds like britney is not saying. I don't want a conservative. Britney thing i just don't want him to be the consider. This is too much for me. And i think sometimes i go. I'm half and half. I'm like it's working. Let's keep it going. You're you're on those slow and steady path. You're doing you're damn thing but obviously this woman thinks that she can have a better life and somebody else in that chair so let's give her a five year period. Let's give her. You know twenty four months to like show that she can keep this on the rails. Yeah and if she can't it just goes right back to j league. That's what i would say if i was a court. Get on a chance right. And they said they were open to hearing this again but they have not decided to make the change quite yet so the one thing i also talk about our read about was about her her brother give interview awhile back and said you know. She's always had a team of people around for all of her life. We're all like a little scared of what would happen. It's one of those like they feel condemned if they do damned if they don't as the way i'm interpreting it almost as though they can't see their so scared to change because they think it could be very bad but at the same time i think you know. They love their sister. They love their their daughter and they want to try to let her grounds. I'm sorry. I love this family and i think it's about you know her well being. I also think it's about the money. I think it's about the money i think they don't want to be. Let go all lived off of her for the last twenty years. It's hard to let that person go and a lot of times in hollywood the minute you get laid off or you get let go or change in regime. People realize you weren't really do wish it. Anyway yeah and you were taking ten fifteen twenty percent by shots. It's really messy at this. It's really hard to follow along. And my opinion changes every day about it tricky so they need to figure it out all right. We'll keep you updated on that. Now there is more drama surrounding the hilson. Church and celebrity. Pastor carl lintz the sun reports that carl's wife laura has also been let go from her leadership position. The church carl whose followers in addition hollywood's biggest stars admitted that he had been unfaithful to his wife. We reached out to both hill song and laura for comment Nowhere back yet now. Looks like she lost her job because of her husband. Now that's not confirmed but if it's true men. That benches is unfair right. I don't know i don't either. I think view come in as a couple and your package yourself as this power couple and you rise through the ranks of organization built on that. And you're helping other couples go through things like this. If hall goes down in the sandal. Oats is going with him. So i think it's part of the faithful and committed in that relationship and she was living god's way of living or however they whatever it as the ground she's doing all the right things. Why is she punished because her husband messed up. I'm sure that the church what justice it's sort of it's bad for business. You know what. I mean like a unfortunately. It's not her fault but she's attached to something. That's scandalous at this. And i also feel like the church probably has flipped it in a way that they feel like you need to take this time with your husband your family you need to focus on them you need to focus on rebuilding your relationship and your marriage with your man. You can't have your attention divided and sort of be one foot in the church. One foot out of the church like you're in this predicament. So it's not fair. But i also can see how it does make sense. I mean i feel very bad for the woman. Because that that's sucked. Your whole life is conveniently taken away from you and your and forget your your income. They're not gonna have an income anymore right now so i mean i just think it's bullcrap. I don't think it's fair that she's losing her job because her husband messed up. I think she could still be person. I give what you guys are saying but it just to feel. It just doesn't feel fair because it's like if i worked my ass off to get to a spa and then my husband brings me down. It's like okay. Let me tell you this. Let's imagine this. Let's say you meant shanna. And he kind of was outlived complected and this whole time. He told you he was black. Man and you worked for organization your husband worked for the acp and all of a sudden it came out that your husband wasn't really black but you were giving courses about how to be interrelate interracial relationship in the us. Are they going to keep you on. Do you know how to be interracial relationship with that whole. Wow hot down. no. I would not be able to speak on being on an interracial relationship if i was into thinking. I was in an interracial relationship but i wasn't actually in we're also talking about we're also talking about this is not a normal church is a church of merch church birch. It's based on a lot of appearances like a lot of how they they get people in other people's experiences it people's power he lost. His power lost her sue. I just think in america a lot of times women feel the shame of their husbands affairs. You know on an affair happens. I feel as the woman held holds onto this shame. And it's so frustrating to me. Because she didn't do anything wrong and like i just don't like that. I feel like you should not that anybody wants to be like. Hey everybody my husband cheated on me. Just want everybody to know. You shouldn't be declaring it to the world or anything like that but at the same time you should feel guilty. I mean you shouldn't feel as though it was like. I mean you did. Ship takes two but don't don't hold onto it like you've failed. Have you read between the lines. This story a little bit. The dean of the night and i started reading the story on daily mail and i kept on going back over one detail that i couldn't get out of my head and the detail. Was that if you guys read the story the detail was that the church and his wife found out at the same time because the messages popped up right. I have a weird feeling and this is only a hutch that she found the messages went to the church and was like look what he's doing. Look at this. I can't believe this went off. Went off and maybe just maybe she maybe showed her ass a little bit. Got a little height and maybe that's what kind of happened. What led to her. Know the way. I read it was as she was she like found a widths other people from the church winter as the way i interpreted it and that i would never wanna find out with somebody else. That's something i would want to find out on my i. I don't know that seems a little what you're sitting there with somebody from the church looking through your husband's text messages. All of a sudden they just pop up and someone else in the church season. I think it was more. The drama spilled into the church. And it probably should've stayed in the house. Maybe maybe people in the church already knew how i don't know i just hope that for her sake. This this is the only story that's gonna come out about him you know. I hope that she doesn't have to hear like other things or anything like that. Okay moving on coming up. Todd and savannah christly are talking drug deals breakup and just what the heck is going on with their family but i take bachelorette journey is off to a rough start why she may be questioning everything that snacks. Welcome back to daly pop. Let's get into some bachelorette drama. Tation just started her journey on the show and her biggest fear has already came true. Watch and unfortunately She chose somebody else in my feelings for her were real and You deserve someone amazing. You deserve someone who's all went and Unfortunately i can't. I can't do this anymore. I will say. This is one of my fears that i had coming into the s. Well i mean what are they putting in the chicken fingers in lupita because everybody is just fallen in love after three be like. Yeah i told you. I was special. No big deal. I mean all these boys in love with me after two weeks Surprised i mean that's hard to kinda like get all excited about one girl and especially if you really showed that you know and you really obvious on camera. You also don't wanna look like a total phony and then all of a sudden you love with this station. Garlic really indicate did watch a little bit last night arlit guys. That weren't like we didn't really get to even know claire. So i feel like i mean. Nobody really got to know claire besides dale but for the most part. But if you were like open about your feelings about claire that it looks like you're kind of like a in it for the fame if you're all set now for two too so it's fine for his best interest to leave they'll probably have them on bachelor in paradise or something. I mean but the at the end of the day these guys were not given a fair shot. I mean clear left early if they stick it out. They wanted a full season to at least try to win over the person that they went on for so. I don't think it's really not a bad thing. If they stay for the fame. I mean first of all most of these people are going on for the fame. Like what like what are we. What are we talking about like. Let's not make this such a serious thing like i do. Believe people fall in love and make connections but like people. Staying doesn't mean like bad on them. I think this guy was probably exhausted. He felt like there has been so much change in drama and felt like okay. This is my experience. I'm tapping out now like you know i can't do this anymore do i think. He's like madly in love with player. Like i don't know. I think he was ready to go home and i think he was ready for two weeks. He been on the show for three weeks. He's i've seen this menu every day for the last thing. Yeah so the producer was okay. You gotta tell her own and this is how you're going to do it you guys saying -tations going to be insecure now for the rest of the season. I think she's fine. She's fine she's gonna find somebody. There's a lot of other men they're still. There's a lot of other people for her to get to know. Some new energy is coming in to ask her about this. And we're gonna talk a little later in the show so she's gonna tell us everything turned out. Okay so just stick around for that. Cuoco says one of the reasons her marriage works. Is that her husband. Carl cook does not feel emasculated by her success. But as she told dax shepard on his armchair expert podcast. That was a major problem with her ex husband. I think even with my married previously but even with that person. That was a big problem. And i was like i have to be with someone who really has their own weather. They're famous or not their own life. And i think what's so cool about carlin. Everyone that's gotten to know him. He loves his life and he loves his equestrian world and his. He's so cool in that arena. I love what he does so much that i get obsessed with his lifestyle. You know i'm the one that's so cool. You did so good today. Do you think it would be hard to get married to someone as famous and successful as kaley. I think she put it really very well. I think it's one of those things that he or. She pointed out. Look if i was going to be with somebody. She's incredibly successful She's been famous for a very long time. She works very hard. You cannot be in a partnership with somebody who does not have their own passions and their own hobbies. It doesn't necessarily need to translate into value or amount of dollars but you need to have some of the. She said who loves their life. Because if you're somebody that's extremely successful works really hard. All the chips are lining up for you and then you have a partner. Who's kind of struggling to get it off the ground and becomes resentful and bitter because things are panning out as easily for them. That's a really hard narrative to live in extremely extremely difficult. So i think whether your partner is into pottery or baking or music or whatever it might be like if jordan was not the biggest musician in the entire world tomorrow. it doesn't matter because still loves music. Those passionate always play guitar. He'll always have something to do during the day. Whereas even if you're not making money in the woman is the breadwinner but your husband has something to fulfil his time. I think there's no problem with that. I think the managed shore. But you gotta make sure to hype your man. I don't care if his hobby is said. Do you better be like daddy. You make sure you do that and don't say. Did you make any money from that to do today. Because you know we only have nine hundred seventy five million dollars in the bank. We need more back. That's the problem. I we have to remember that women. Yes men sometimes get threatened by women success but women also emasculate men in the sense that they have a preconceived notion of what they want. They man to be out there. Man doesn't meet those those satisfactions and those limits and hit those points for them. Sometimes they can't let a man just be a man. Yeah it's yes you're absolutely correct on everything you say but women also have to remember hype you man a little bit the roles reverse. I mean i don't really think that men feel the pressure to hype their women up whenever they do a great job as go or it's just like okay. Cool i back. We're going back now. Shares bull. Look she you lebron. Do both ways like you know. It's all about showing appreciation in giving admiration to your partner. No matter what it is that they do like if your wife is the stay at home wife. Yes she loves yard and make you a nice dinner. Don't come home and say like really spaghetti again. All right great you know. It's like come on man like if she works real hard. That's getty then you say this spaghetti hundred percent. That's a fulltime job. I think the only line that gets confusing. It's not even if somebody is as successful woman is relying just if a woman is relying on her man to also financially chip in and he's coming short of that. That's where things get really really tricky. I think if he if he comes to the table and says i'm gonna paint every day and not make any money and that's going to be your role. Then that's fine with the guys name. He used to paint on on tv. Pbs but you are abroad gets you. Michelangelo upi newer some coin with that coming up. You guys broken totally in debt. Oh this is fun. We're just talking about well jason. Hello i love that. We used that clip. Every time he's memo is getting real about his struggles. After game of thrones we come back jason momoa just revealed. He was broke and in debt. After starring in one of the most popular shows on television and the december issue of in style out november twentieth. Jason says he struggled to pay his bills for several years. after being. on game of thrones. He says quote. We were starving. Elder game of thrones. I couldn't get work. It's very challenging when you have babies and you're completely in debt. I love that. He opened up about this. Because i think there's like a big misconception. Everybody's always knew loaded chime in hollywood and it's not true not surprised that he went through this a little surprise because he is jason momoa. He seems so popular. And i'm surprised that he struggled kidding. Work that part surprise to me. What did you like that right when people just pop up. And they're show success when they become the biggest thing in the world. You're just used to seeing them in that way in that light. And he's aquaman and all these things so you're just memorial. He's larger than life. He's this huge persona that you you don't see the climb you know what's that mean on instagram. Where there's the iceberg and you literally see like their much iceberg underwater that you don't see but the new seat just the tip that you know what i mean. Thank you so just so. I like people don't really realize people's struggles and how hard it is to get there and how long it does take and how much work does go into it. So i'm not surprised. He was broken type. He probably had a lot of debt from before that made some money and spend it on some shit and now and then he could get one after you buy a house. Whatever you making this income. You assume that you're going to keep that income going and then but you didn't ask the producers. How far did your precarity right. And i lose your job and you're like what i've already got this house payment now and now i have to figure out what i'm gonna do. Babies it also is a mind. Screw this not the word. I wanted to say but it's a mind. Screw whenever you're on this popular tv show in people know who you are and people just assume that you make this amount of money and you start thinking to yourself like oh my god. Should i be making more money in my like. You know low balling myself because let me tell you something already like that was back. When i started working here. I took a pay cut to come and work here but you look at the opportunity and you say ken this yield something bigger. Does this have more potential to move forward. And i think for jason momoa. Unfortunately i'll have two kids and a wife and a house. I don't have that kind of responsibility so for me. It was easier. We're married man. Who's going through that. Yeah it's much harder. I'm still broke. I understand completely. I totally very hard. It's hard to be happy. It's hard and energy industry too because you just and that's a lot of actors say that you have to be able to ride that fame and ride that wave because it does come and go and that's where like financial planning really comes into play. It's almost like athletes like you needed courses. You're going to be an actor to be able to make one movie stretch for five years just in case you. Don't get another gig for reason. You have to be able to learn how to do that. But nothing about jason momoa and this is not like. I'm not ragging on him. I think he's beautiful. I mean he's gorgeous. I think a lot of are gorgeous but there are some men that just don't scream financial help like something. I would look at him and be like. Oh yeah. that guy has intact saving for a rainy day. Like he doesn't seem like that person to me. And i think a lot of times actors as well as athletes get these huge contracts and my biggest fight with a lot of people because i have cousins who were in the nfl. They don't know what to do with that money and agents aren't saying hey look you're gonna take twenty percent of this and put it in this and ten percents higher business manager. You know. it's not even easy to trust those people like it really is a tricky situation and most people that come into so much money at once. Didn't really have that much money before. And it's really hard to manage that and you think you know what i've always wanted about. I deserve a meanwhile. If you do not buy the damn dan. I love this. This is why i get so upset. Why the hell did i need. Four years at pe paying dodgeball. When y'all could have been teaching me one on one a finances and what they need to teach children about money is flowing. Need dodgeball to you. Need all right as a singer. Dancer actress and all around boss. Jennifer lopez does it. She's been named that people's icon for the people's choice awards and in celebration. We're going to take a look back at her career and where it all started fly girl on in living color. It's just like you know really been happening girl. You know who's got it together. Nearly three decades later jennifer lopez as kind of a big deal. The megastar got her first big break back in nineteen ninety-one dancing on in living color. I saw them on. Tv the first season three years ago. And i said the myself. I knew that there was just one. Small problem fly but awry. There was no money in it. Jennifer then turned her focus to acting her portrayal of selena made a big impression simpler groping abroad. She became the first latina actress to be paid one million dollars for a film and got all kinds of award buzz. When i first got the part. I expected to be so big within two years. She dropped her first album on the six and it wasn't long before she was reminding everyone. She starred in countless movies including classic romcom high to crime drama and even earned producer credit for her box office. Heads like hustler's in total. Her films have grossed truck full of money dry over three billion dollars. She also dropped hit after. Hit selling an estimated seventy million records worldwide by two thousand twelve. Jennifer was named the most powerful celebrity in the world by forbes. She's been on times most influential lists and she took vegas by storm becoming the top presidency by aladdin. Artists always going to look at this as a very special special show. We also can't forget that history making super bowl performance not to mention we pretty much have jaylo to thank for google images that sachi grammy gown the internet and ever since the mama to has been shutting down red carpet after red carpet. When you start believing in your own soap worth and what you have to offer. I believe that shows on the outside She's the rest checkout out. J. lo as the people's choice awards. Sunday night at nine pm right here on e. all right guys up next time. Christly calls out his daughter during our interview and tells us how he looks so damn young singer when it comes to the christly is not even a bad internet connection can keep them contained. That is right. I talked to todd into van about their show and the skin care routine that keeps us man. He's twenty years old. You will not believe it. America's first family and the people who got me through the pandemic todd and savannah christie. How are you guys. we're good. I was texting vanna watching the reruns. And i was thinking god that you guys were on tv and giving me last. Have you heard that from a lot of people you know. During this pandemic we'd received. I mean so. Many people that have reached out testing. Say at this show is getting me through the pandemic this. It's a good escape and so that makes me feel good. I mean i want to make people laugh at. I wanna make people feel bad and this season. You know you're making people laugh and it's kind of fill truffle. Figs and neighborhood drug deals what is going on. In the household have uncovered the biggest drug deal in tennessee. Say you need to call in and take some pitch going over there. I'm always paranoid about my kids being around anyone with drugs or whatever and i really thought that based off the stuff that had happened in our neighborhood that that was what was going on and it ended up not being what was going on separate around age obviously savannah calling off your wedding was the best move for you and your fiancee at the time. How are you coping with that right now. You know what we're doing very young and embiid. We're following our dreams and we had the restaurant lives figuring out right now. You know mike von just tomorrow sassy spell for that so excited this girl's a worker. I wonder where she gets it from up. That makeup line seems to be a huge hit taught using your products right now because he's looking like a fetus. You know. I i posted a picture awhile back and i think it was the new york times said. We want to know todd chris. Skin hair people kept saying. What are you using. what are you using. And i don't use that much use. What is that stuff that pumps in the bob. The uc to fail and were in the shower. And then i use. I use the led like bought me. You use your credit cards about it. No so here. I thought she bought me a gift. So i use that but i do go for laser about once every three months. And let's play a little game of chris concussions. You guys have the answer this as truthfully as possible who starts listening to christmas. Music earliest savannah. You tow your dad got that damn blue light thing you said about me the order. What was the last lie. You told savannah. I don't lie to savannah eve that tell me alive. Whatever lachey about. I tell you when when you're putting on something that i don't think looks right if i say that makes you look heavy. You should wear. I don't i love that last one. Todd what is the one thing you wish savannah with. Throw out of her closet the sweater that she has on today. I i just wanna be christly in the worst way and you know what. I'm dying to get this party. Started because christly knows best starts again tomorrow on usa savannah and todd. Thank you guys so much for joining us. We can't wait to see you back in studio. Thank you so much patty we love you. Oh my god this ruthlessness. Oh funding coming up bachelorette. Tayshia adams tells us everything. She's looking for a man and her major celebrity crush but up next the queen's wild workout and while you might not be able to do this one at home wanna work out like a queen while apparently all you need is a crown. Glamorous sheridan excerpt from the book long live the queen. That says she doesn't do any traditional exercise and the only way training she does is wearing her heavy crowns so the one her coronation weighed about five hours and she has her burial sake. Crown that ways almost three pounds. Just a reminder. She's ninety four years old. You really believe. She's never worked out done any kind of traditional exercise. Maybe not now ninety four when i'm sure when she was young. Lord jesus i have not asked you for anything since i asked john stamos poster in one thousand hundred six. But i'm asking you. Please let me be this rich. When i grow up i wanna be so rich. That only work out with diamonds. Yeah i just wanna work with diamonds. I'll take a crown on my head as a workout all day any day. It's a lot though five pounds on your head to balance sheet to practice for that. That's not easy takes skill. You're right you know all right you guys. Twenty has been a wild year and we need to get all the joy we can get so stars i jesse. James decker sticky. Nikki got a jump on holiday. Decorating and share picks of their trees unused graham and at twitter poll forty four percent of. You said the moment you've had well preparing for the holidays is that you'll have more quality family time this year. So true and in partnership with a flavorful sparkling water has arrived. Were about the unexpected holiday trends. That will make this year special. I up deck the halls early break out those lights and decorations now and keep them up all the way until spring is always the season for elf on the shelf. We're actually going to get archery out. I think two days the energy. When i get home a confession high have been burning christmas candles since july because they make me feel better on the black market. Define them but i got them. I think you know what this is the year that just do what makes you feel good one percent increase else. It is. it's the stuff your face which brings us to our next unexpected trend. Roller skating hottest work out of the year in a fun way to burn up all those holly jolly so why not get your friends and family new skates. I second roller skating. So do i. it's not easy. let me tell you. it's not an easy skill. ninety to practice. I love some roller skates. i would actually like some rollerblades. Some denim cutoff shorts. I can wear while. I rollerblade right down santa monica boulevard. Okay we'll get those for you But since traditional get togethers might not this year a ring light and a phone tripod could also be a good gift. This way your loved ones can look their best. Ed virtual holiday parties. This this is my whole life right now. Anyway like i only see people through a ring light and throw dry bod ring lights. Like sold out everywhere. This quarantine all obsessed without you know you need. The right leading really makes a big difference. Oh yes it does matter. You guys up next is tayshia happy. She gave the bachelor franchise a third try what she just told us. And can you guess the celebrity who is carrying this giant role of bubble. Rab the reveal after break. That's it's so comfortable about welcome back before the break. We asked you to guess the celebrity carrying these crazy fount of bubble. Wrap any ideas who could be kaley. Cuoco was going to say. It's also crazy that i actually knew the answer earlier and do not remember so i have no idea you know what's funny is i think i was told the answer to at one point and i forgot completely as winter no area would you go on now. Peaking those out that super cozying comfy. I want the whole thing okay. Creation made her big bachelorette debut last night and there was no shortage of drama. I've found out from tayshia herself if she's happy with how everything worked out and what she's looking for a man. What are you doing here. So when you got the call splaying league out of that habit and then go down where you totally shocked. Of course i was. Actually i was in quarantine was not expecting it. I knew the season had already started the last phone call bowed ever got but i was in my bed and i was reading a book. I was eating doughnuts my zone. Okay and then. I got a phone call and i was in shock not expecting that they had told me you know. Things are moving quite quickly here and we think claire might have founder person. Now he's gonna have to think about it for a hot second. I need to call my mom. It's a big decision your husband. Oh my god and you've done together. We got you did bachelor paradise which donald love for a while on that show. What made you want to give this franchise a third well. I feel like what i've taken away from. My previous experiences is just really leaning into it. You never know what's going to happen and people surprise you. I knew i was. I was ready to start dating and looking for my person so like why not and this is the best way to do it. Especially because the world right now to quarantine step by myself so it helps take already. What are you looking for in a man. Tation siphons someone not me laugh. And it's fun tainted and fun. I like someone not is a family man. Someone that is ambitious Challenges me but i like fix decibel someone that's gonna fearing. Some of the has just a lot to offer is looking for a partner and two golden empire way just the hypothetical if you could have had a celebrity in that dish that goal of men if you will once liberty would you wish have been in there well. The celebrity is unavailable but that would probably be matthew mcconaughey That maybe like some liam hemsworth fall in love with staff pleaded. Wouldn't that be something. I don't know you'll have to win. Z are you happy am happy. I grew a lot. So i'm i'm happy. Shouldn't why shouldn't get a man. Oh i grew a lot of justice. Five minute okay. We'll see see tastes journey to find love when abc's the bachelorette on tuesday nights still ahead. It's the heated debate. We have at this time of every single year. Cheesy holiday movies. Do we love them or do we hate the guys nor i see on this one. We just started november. What the hallmark channel is already two weeks into their countdown. To christmas started rolling out there. Forty new holiday movies of foam week before halloween and net flicks just dropped the trailer for their newest holiday film. The princess switch again starring. Vanessa hudgens watch this. I have a great idea. You want to sue walt switchback. You said you needed more time with kevin. Do you think we saw what could possibly come between two people looking at each other at the resenting. Latest maggie move. Ooh double lots vanessa. Hudgens is definitely working for her paycheck. In this film. She plays three different characters. All right do you love cheesy holiday movies or hate them. More family stone kind of guy like lifting a reason to eat pizza bennett. Throw me into that. Depression is a little bit more adult into it as of late. I think it's also like with us just staying home. All the time like you kind of beggars can't be choosers. So i'll watch whatever. I live for this. I guess not easy. Christmas movies. I was well aware with hallmarks. Started the countdown at started watching the christmas movies. Oh this is like my favorite thing like. I said we're going to put up the tree. We've already got planned out. We'll turn on hallmark and it's going to be a whole thing like this makes me happy. This is like one of my stress relievers. Like if i'm having a terrible day shannon will just play here have some wine. I'll turn on homework and just a you need some time when i'm like thank you it does. And i'm really excited about manasa hudgens because it kinda wednesday like parent trap. It's the the princess switch to switched again. It's on netflix november nineteenth. And i'm excited. She's just so the youthful that hallmark started this. I think three weeks ago. It's richards working and mark right now kicking off christmas in the middle october where people are just ready to get in the mood and the christmas movies are a part of the season. Just it fits good right. Yeah that's today. Make sure you watch the people's choice awards this weekend. The fun begins a seven pm on sunday with e Live from the red carpet. You can check out the live from the e stream starting at eight and then the show starts at nine o'clock right here on a you do not want to miss it. Tomorrow's a huge nearly. We're talking babies romance and jealousy with the bella twins plus joe. Joe see wah tells us about the wild night but she wants to have with lady gaga and miley cyrus. Have a great day. Everyone we will see you tomorrow bye-bye.

britney jason momoa megan markle five year twenty four months claire ten fifteen twenty percent carl lintz hollywood Britney savannah christly lupita carl laura Carl cook jennifer lopez nine hundred seventy five mill Michelangelo upi two weeks hilson
The Best Kind of Growth (pre-tax growth) | Ep. #1106

Marketing School

07:43 min | 2 years ago

The Best Kind of Growth (pre-tax growth) | Ep. #1106

"Welcome to marketing school the only podcast that provides daily top level marketing tips and strategies from entrepreneurs that practice what they preach and live what they teach. Let's start leveling up your marketing knowledge with your instructors neil patel and eric su welcome onto another episode of marketing school. I'm eric su and i'm neil patel today. We're gonna talk about the best kind of grow neil when your parents when you were growing up or maybe when you're first learning business what everyone say what's the most important thing when it comes to business spend less than you make but is it. What did they say. They say. Revenue avenue is vanity profit is profit is all that matters profited saturday. That's that's the same debit. Remember my parents had had broken english not not my dad's mom. You hear about this a lot right. Everyone's like profit profit profit profit profit but the thing is if you spend less than you make yeah now even the mommas raise your mama's right but what the question is. What do you do with that proffer right a lot of people in in business right. What happens is if you take the profit. What happens when you take that prophet you put in your bank account. How'd you get taxed. Yes you do so okay. What's going to grow faster. If i make one hundred dollars. I pay thirty five dollars to fifty dollars if i'm california to the i._r._s. What happens my hundred dollars becomes fifty dollars but if i reinvest it in the business the hundred dollars that growth doesn't the growth doesn't stall right so here. Let me give an example when you are investing in mutual funds for example or any type of investment investment vehicles like mutual show funds you might have to pay an expense ratio meaning that the people that the find the financial advisers the people doing investing for you. They take a cut right if if they take a cut their slowing your compounding growth down so if you can if you can decide between having a pre-tax growth versus posttax growth you rather go with what you rather go with post-tax grow pretrial. I know eric is right. I just had a mess with them a little bit because you always wanna make you always wanna spend your money before taxes and this is a mistake a lot of people make when they're making money in which you make one hundred under thousand dollars you pay taxes. You love fifty hypothetically and then a year later like alderney. Put that money back into the business. If you made one hundred grand and you put it all back into the business you would have more money to put back in roughly double than if you waited to get tax on that money and that's a big mistake that a lot of people make but there is a caveat erica's right. There's the best kind of girl i was joking with him earlier because in reality we can't all do this. You gotta live and make money and pay bills dell's and rent. I remember eric years and years ago when you started seeing a grain. He's like i'm putting it all back in. I don't have any expenses like and then he's like. I'm selling my home home. He's going all in you know. It's all or nothing. That's not realistic. When you have a family you got other algebra. It's true but in general don't worry about pre tax or post tax a better way to look at it as when you know something's working working for you. Go all in like if the formulas right you know that for every dollar you spend you could be making two dollars profitable. There's no hitches or <hes> hiccups. Cups spend as much as you can be careful though don't just go all in all your money the next state because as you scale sometimes things break so you want to just keep going and going going and going until the economic slowly starting not working. That's how you should view growth <hes> if you can of course do that with pre-tax dollars that's better better but in general spend as much as you can as long as it's profitable and when you have a winning channel or winning mark tactic go all in as much as you can dan and within reason that is important because it doesn't last forever google ad words is amazing but seven eight years ago ten years ago it was much better. It was now because there's so much more affordable yeah the other thing too. Is this neil remember when you used to do angel investing yeah. I still a little bit right. The law angel investing being real estate. I still do both you didn't but you did a lot more in the past and you stopped for a period of time i saw prepared of temp real estate of slow down because the markets concern too hot angel investing. I think i've done you've done in the last twelve. Yes i also slow down angel investing i say because i've been investing a lot more in venture funds where they just invest in punk hubs much time right. I now try to spend more time walking with my child in the park. Even though oh she can't understand what the best kind of growth right there <hes> but i guess the point i'm trying to get out to his meal like what's had the better return over the years net net. It's probably your own businesses. This is right by far by far i if a venture fund really kick spot for me you know maybe fifteen twenty percent returns per year her. I'm better off just investing myself. I don't really well from angel investing. I've had some amazing reach. Twenty percent are some way more. I've had at some deals right putting money and i get like seventeen x back or connects back or five x dude there. You have it so you either. I didn't expect to get that one but yes yourself for sure. If you get to play around with if you can put money into a fund and you might get a seventeen x return to do that as well but the best growth if you can do it if is is usually yourself. I agree with that. I've actually probably had equal return from angel. Investing is investing in myself wow so he's gotten into percentage wise not necessarily dollars wise is because of course i put in more dollars into myself also at the same time though if you're thinking about your returns from angel at the end of the day you have the dollars to show for it right but but you know if you're investing in yourself you have there's more brown power that you're building to in addition to cash. I prefer investing in myself or anyone else no offense. I love you guys all about it's it's. It's a safer bet not that you guys are riskier anyone's risky. It's when you invest in yourself everyone listening. Everyone washed this you. You guys have a skill set. You're talented. You're smart. Don't be afraid to double down on yourself. Don't try to find someone like eric. Are i doubled down on double down on yourself yeah and by by the way i mean to neil's point everyone's unique. I might have a unique background playing games and then doing marketing and all this stuff right so then that also working online education like that's my unique perspective. Neil has different perspective too because he has you know some of the experiences he had from like selling c._d.'s in high school like that has led to who he is now and so each and every one of you. You are unique so anyway that for today don't forget to go to marketing school the iowa slash live. That's l. I v to apply for our growth accelerator mastermind. That's where we get together and really cool areas around the world and help you grow your business. You're gonna amazing people. Fill it out. It's free to application and we will reach out to you if it makes sense that is it for today and also don't forget to resubscribe l._l._c. tomorrow. We appreciate you joining us for this session of marketing school. Be sure to rate review and subscribe described the show and visit marketing school dot i._o. For more resources based on today's topic as well as access to more episodes that will help you find true marketing success. Ask that's marketing school. I l until next time class dismissed.

eric su neil patel california alderney google erica dell iowa c._d. hundred dollars fifty dollars fifteen twenty percent one hundred dollars thirty five dollars seven eight years thousand dollars Twenty percent
The impossible choice Canadas seniors face this winter

The Big Story

25:21 min | 7 months ago

The impossible choice Canadas seniors face this winter

"The a long long time ago. It's only been eight months really but it feels like eight years. I asked my mother a question on this show as we tried to figure out how to keep her. And my dad safe last question. If i told you that you could live for five or ten years guaranteed not get sick. But you couldn't go upstairs and play with maggie. What would you choose. I'd probably go upstairs and play with maggie. Because i wouldn't believe you. The answer she gave back then was after two weeks of lockdown so imagine how she feels now imagine how seniors who haven't seen their children or their grandchildren or their friends in eight months. Feel as much of the country heads back to lockdown. Now that toronto. Where i live is back on. Its toughest restrictions. I'm back on my own mission to convince my parents to comply with as much of that as possible. I'm doing this as i told my mom because i want you guys around forever and she replied with while we're not gonna be around forever so it's foolish to pretend that if we lock ourselves away we will be. This is a choice facing hundreds of thousands of canadian seniors and their families right. Now it's going to be a long lonely winter for all of us but doubly so for our older loved ones who live alone or in care facilities that used to be vibrant and engaging but now consist of closed doors and safety protocols even if they don't get covert. Some of these folks won't be around this time next year. Don't they get a choice as to how much. The risk of the disease is worth sacrificing. The time they have left are we giving them that. Option and while our current approach may absolutely be necessary in some cases. Are we also looking closely enough at the harm that loneliness and isolation is doing to our seniors and weighing those two things against one another. We say that we're doing all that we can to keep our older loved ones safe but are we doing enough to keep them well. I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story christina. Franjo is a freelance writer. Who specializes in health and science and she looked into the toughest question of the next few months for canadians. For maclean's hello christina. Hello why don't you start just to Maybe put it. On a level that people can relate to because i think everybody can relate to this a little bit by telling me. The story of george spalding. Who is he what happened to him. So george spalding. Because of a photo that his daughter posted on facebook. It was a picture of george looking out a window and he is an elderly man with white hair and grey eyes. Bit of wrinkled foreheads. And he has his hands to his lips like he's either blowing a kiss or that he's maybe seen something that is upsetting to him. It's kind of unclear when you first see the photo by it really connected with people because it has this feeling of sadness and loneliness and sort of speaks to the distress. That i think a lot of families are experiencing standing on the outside unable to access their older left ones and so his daughter francis had posted this photo and it wound. Its way to maclean's in eventually to me. George spalding was ninety six. He was living in a retirement home. In cochrane ontario. He'd been living there for about five years. He and his wife grace had moved in together and his grace passed away about three weeks after the two of them moved in and their kids really worried about how george was going to do in a retirement. Home he was a lifelong outdoorsman. He'd worked inside his whole life. He he told me about happy miss late to his own wedding because they had to do some emergency milking the cows monette ninety before he moved into to the care home he was still chopping wood outside for he and grace and he only stopped because the smoke for their their their woodstove was too hard on her lungs and so his kids really didn't know how this was going to go to have him there by himself but he really flourish. He really took to it. He loved the social aspect of it. He told me he used to count his steps to get back and forth to the dining hall and he probably walked about a half mile a day. He weighs a real sort of shining star at third dance nights in carnival and he was always keen for bingo and all the social events and so he was doing great and we should all hope to be in the kind of shape georgia at ninety six and then and then now covert everything changed. And so i remember back to those those days in march and april where we were so worried about. Ppe in our hospitals end in our long-term care homes and the the media response was just to go into to lockdown in in many retirement homes and so that happened in in georgia's and all Sort of sharing meals were cancelled and dance nights and kneels would be dropped off outside the door of his apartment and george had a longtime cough but this was identified as a possible case of covid in. He couldn't get tested for it so he just went into extreme isolation for two weeks his meals were dropped off outside a store and then he'd go get them in pick them up. He really had no interaction with anybody and he just stopped eating Over time and when. I asked him about it later. He said you just don't need much food when you're not doing anything. And he ended up in the hospital in june and his family couldn't get into see him and that's when francis took that photo shoot. Her dad was on the ground floor room in the hospital and she stood outside and he said to her that he didn't want to go back to the apartment in the retirement home. He'd been on a a wait list to get into long-term tab for some time as are many canadians. Even before the pandemic i think it was about forty thousand canadians on weightless to get into long term care and george just felt like he could not keep going in the apartments by himself. He would rather stay in the In in the hospital and so his kids were in a real quandary. What do you do. Do you stop paying for the apartments. Do you Him into going to departments. They didn't know what to do but she was in charge of making all his decisions in after many talks with with Authorities about where wet was available in long term care. They made the decision to move him into the back department and hopefully he'd been long-term care soon but he never really bounced back and he and i spoke when he was home By face time and he said to me you know you've just got to do what what's right and this virus is a bad thing. We need to be responsible about it. And he said you know. I'll get by. But he just never came back to being himself and he he about a month after he was discharged from the hospital. The first time he was readmitted he passed away in july. That's a tough story to hear And yet i don't think It's it's all that unique this year and that's what we're going to talk about today. I wanted to start with that story. And then i'm going to read you something you already know it There was in your story that his daughter told you all these people that might have a week or a month or a year left. Would they really choose being so alone and not getting covert or would they actually choose some risk now. Can you explain how you tried to approach that choice in telling the story. Because it's really the key question. I think why this story resonates with so many people. I think why. France said there is what so many canadian families are dealing with. That we are all connected. You know Older canadians aren't separated from the rest of us. Their grandparents and parents and professional mentors. They are They provide a lot of the unpaid caregiving in this country and so protecting our seniors. This line we hear over and over again can't just mean completely shutting them off from the rest of us and so families across the country are trying to figure out how they manage these risks. What is going to be best for them in the months months ahead And so i spoke to a number. I just wanted to hear what families were doing. How they're how they're managing an ice spoke to people across the country. How they're dealing with the issue of kids going back to school. That was a real challenge for a lot of families how they deal with rising cases in their communities and everybody is having to sit down and do these calculations in. It's not enough. That older canadians are separated from their families. Until they're they're in palliative care because they are at the very end. I want to explore a both sides of that choice so i I know we've heard about it a lot especially at the beginning of this but we've been learning for ten months so tell me what we know now. about just how badly covid impacts the elderly in canada compared to the general population well the taliban risk for the elderly as much higher. And so you know for people in their eighties. It's about fifteen percent. It's eight eight percent for people in their seventy s. An energy just sort of goes up incrementally but at the very highest risk in canada are for those living in long term care and that's where the mortality rate among people infected with covid with about thirty five percent in. May if we look at how canada compares to the rest of the world were doing terribly eighty percent of canada's cova deaths have been in people who lived in in long term care that's double the average in other ac oecd countries. I should say those are those are figures from the first way but we certainly see no indication that it's going to be any different in the second i'm gonna poke it that A bit. Because i think this is part of the quandary. That that we're talking about. Which is you know even an incredibly high mortality rate is still you know fifteen twenty percent which is unacceptable and a lot And i don't want to go down the road of kind of repeating economic or republican. Talking points about this but a big one that we heard about the lockdown is. The cure can't be worse than the disease. And that's the thing that i keep coming back to in this case when we're talking about locking away our elderly loved ones. And what do we know about the impact of just the the isolation and the loneliness that that's created on seniors enormous and before. I even get to what's happened with covid. I think we need to acknowledge that older adults in canada already have like high levels of of loneliness in are quite isolated and so fan sort of landed on his situation that was already in crisis has turned into a tragedy so we have people who are becoming the geriatricians. I spoke with spoke to this that we have people who are becoming increasingly frail increasingly depressed. Who are there's there's an increase in in falls they might experience advancing dementia or or like george. Maybe they're just eating poorly. I've heard that from so many families. I've spoken with over the last couple of months that their loved ones just aren't eating so we are seeing that and then we're also there's been reports of increasing financial fried over seniors. Because there's a lotta scans that target lonely older canadians trying to get money out of them and it's the more likely to fall prey to that. If they're extremely isolated. So i think when we talk about the cure being worse than the disease we need to talk about the cure having more options than just being a complete lockdown an isolation of our seniors when you speak to doctors who work with the elderly What did they tell you about that. What kinds of conversations are they having. In what options are there. They're really And again i'm not Inside this both my parents still live on their own but it really seems like there aren't a lot of options beyond isolation or risk there are there are options. There are things we can do. And i actually found speaking to physicians for the story really helped me figure out how i can continue to connect with my parents and and see them. They also live on their own. But i was really concerned about bringing risk into their their And so they one of the things that i started to think about is is. Let's talk about risk and let's talk about this in terms of like kind of advanced care. Planning we might know what our parents want. If they are dying we might know what what they want if they can't speak for themselves and their at the end of their life but what do they want now. What is most important to them right now. An if that some element of seeing their family. What can we do as families to the best thing for them. If you have kids maybe that means that. You didn't put your kids in school this year but that you everyone washes their hands. Religiously end you have socially distant visits with grandparents. It's about sitting down and really talking to people. I think one of the other things that i hear that always comes up when i speak with geriatricians in i really wanna make this. Point is that camp is older. Adults are ange one single frail vulnerable entity. You know. there's a whole mix of people an ability an health status and living situations. And like i said before these are people who many of them are. Still in the workforce. They do a lot of the volunteer work in. Canada is so we really need to acknowledge how connected we. We are to across age groups in canada. Like we don't we don't have the option nor should we to to shut out people over the age of sixty five. How much of. This too is us wanting What's best for what they think might be best for themselves. You know because. Obviously i want my parents to be here forever And i know that in the early days of the pandemic on board but if you told My mom or my dad that you know they could. They could escape cove it but they wouldn't be able to see their granddaughter for a year. I know that they would choose to take that risk. Even though i might not want them you know and we've seen it in our family family too and we'll get to make those decisions for our parents or grandparents. We make them with our parents and our grandparents and so i think sitting down and really talking about what's important to them and then if if they are going to be seeing their grandkids wiped you grandkids and parents that those grandkids do to make sure that they have minimal contact with people other than our grandparents and most important thing is that we will get to make these decisions for older canadians. They get to make them themselves. A lot of the troubling parts of this pandemic has been the downloading of safety to matter personal responsibility. I think which we've heard Again and again. And so it's one thing for me to to sit down and talk with my parents and and you to talk with yours and try to figure out ways that we can be safe. But what are larger organization saying you know what our advocacy groups recommending and what can governments do because this is a problem that goes beyond a personal level. I think well. I think there's there's two parts to that. There's the things that they wanted. Before the pandemic we need even more now And then the pandemic specific things that we need and the first one and ns would overlap. Both of those is that we need better housing for seniors. We need more affordable housing options with better healthcare. We need much more staffing in our long-term care homes and we need more support for the people who work in long term care homes. We had months between the first and second waves to manage. This is no indication that we had any success in doing that. We have many older buildings that are for long term care. That don't have enough room for people to set socially isolate. So that's one we could could change. There are again before the pandemic there were four hundred thirty thousand canadians. Who had unmet health care needs at home the older canadians. And so if you think about that. That's a population of halifax and so we need better supports for people at home so that they can continue to age in place and that was a big problem in the first wave of kobe especially again getting back to the shortage of p people didn't want healthcare workers coming into the our home care workers coming into their homes. Who didn't have masks and gloves. But they weren't a priority for But we need more affordable options for people to to be cared for in their home instead of going from a home to long-term character hospital liked to have had the hospital as the place where you get them the majority of Your healthcare like people are teetering on the edge of being able to stay in their homes and we could help if they had more support beyond What governments and groups can do you talked to a ton of people for this piece. Tell me Hopeful enterprising stories. You heard about Families who came up with ways to to support their elderly loved ones And still be safe. One of my favorite people that i've interviewed throughout the pandemic is a woman i met for this story. And she's reverend diane parker. She lives in halifax and she's a retired rector. But she still performs weddings and funerals and she also has a clown ministry where she dresses up like a clown and so she's she's widowed. She said a two time cancer survivor. So she is. She is at risk for kobe. And she's also you know at risk for being isolated and so but she just thought of so many creative ways to make sure that she was still connecting with her community and so it started with putting window displays up in her living room to route the pandemic that people would come by look at and then as soon as the snow melted. She had someone come and build what she calls her cova deck which is a lower level of her front deck where she can sit on the top level and someone can sit on the bottom level and they're outside and there safely. Socially distanced has a happy stick that extends to meters and she uses it to pass things to to her neighbors and she makes treats for them and they drop off groceries for her She and her neighbor has has started a beehive. Initi- said to me he's the drone and i'm the queen and she's is she someone who has spent years doing advocacy work prevent isolation of seniors. And so she recognized the risks of this situation and she was incredibly proactive in finding ways to prevent that. Now it hasn't been easy. She has grand children in calgary that she was supposed to come visit. She has performed funerals where she can't hug people and she finds that really really hard. That's how she connects with people. She is continuing to seek out work arounds. That make sure that she's connecting with her new movie. The last thing that i want to ask you is kind of about another thing the comes up again and again in your piece and we talk about it on this show fairly often. You know when when i have a guest on and we talk about vaccines and we say you know. There's light at the end of the tunnel and this time next year. We'll be looking at a vaccine hopefully and that kind of stuff and and that's intended to be hopeful. But i think if you're seventy five or eighty or eighty five and you're locked in your house. That late at the end of the tunnel means a very different thing. It's a very different frame of time. How do you manage that. When you're you're talking to the loved ones in your family and and not and not wanting them to be conscious of how differently you both my view that time. It's interesting because the the older people in my life are thrilled. Event this light at the end of the tunnel. I am for them to I think that at least for They have not excluded older people from their vaccine trials. So there's a lot of reason to believe that this vaccine will be able to be used for people who are seventy and seventy five and eighty and that the government of canada will have a strategy that prioritizes getting vaccines to the people who need them most and that would be that high risk age group and so while all of us continue to be in this painful pause in our lives we can all keep working to find ways to make it okay until we get to that light at the end of the tunnel. I hope so. And i hope we can find creative ways to do that and i hope the governments can help. Thank you so much christina christina franck who is a freelance writer who specializes in health and science. That was the big story for more from us. You can head to the big story. Podcast dot ca. You can find us wherever you get. Podcasts apple google stitcher spotify as a matter you can talk to us on twitter at the big story afghan or in our email. The big story. Podcast all one word. A lower case at rca dot rogers dot com. Thanks for listening. I'm jordan heath rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow.

george spalding george eight months jordan heath rawlings canada Franjo maclean maggie christina two weeks francis eight eight percent thirty five percent eighty percent georgia fifteen twenty percent cochrane eight years ten years three weeks
Rising Leader in the Labor Movement Sara Nelson, President of AFA

Talking Points

31:21 min | 2 years ago

Rising Leader in the Labor Movement Sara Nelson, President of AFA

"There are three things that drive me crazy one people who put their seats back in the economy to alternate side of the street parking end three bad why fi thankfully i got a solution to that last one it's called ero it's a system that provides fast in reliable liable connections to every room in your house even in your backyard and it's incredibly easy to set up and with euro plus you're connection will not only be fast but also protected that's because eero plus is designed to provide simple reliable security the defender homes devices against threats like malware spyware phishing attacks it could even block unwanted content and also with their a plus you don't have to worry about your kids wandering into the cd parts of the internet because it automatically tags sites that contain violent silent illegal or adult content end you can control it all right from the app on your phone you'll never have to worry about why fi again with hero and right now talking points listeners can get one hundred dollars off the euro base unit and two beacons package in one year of eero plus by visiting euro dot com slash teepee g n entering the promo code t p g at checkout that's e e r o dot com slash teepee jay promo code t bg did you know that she pg has official merge that's right you know when you see me instagram and my jet lag f sweatshirt we actually made those it's super super high quality you can get a bunch of teepee g approved stuff even for your dog or baby shop dot the points guy dot com and check it out end last but never leave head over to you to dot com slash brian kelly to keep an eye on my blog we are currently knee deep in my ethic trip to israel everything from united polaris seventy seven deaths ten review to coming in hot on a hot air balloon we nearly flipped over it's kind of scary but also really fun and of course we've got it all on camera new episodes every tuesday and thursday welcome to this week's episode of talking points i have a very special guest today she has been dubbed the d most powerful flight attendant into in the world also one of the most powerful union leaders in the world sara nelson these international president of the association of flight attendants thank you so much for joining us happy to be here so what is it like to be the most powerful full flight attendants in the world well you know when that statement came out i was actually a little taken aback by it but as i really thought about it i thought about how great that was speak has until recently i don't know that anyone would have put the word powerful our full would flight attendant and so i think it's really it's really a sign of the times first that women are gaining equality in gaining a real voice in the conversation in this country and then that there's a recognition that all these people who we thought didn't have power actually have it in flight attendants have been exercise that power and we've been on the move we've made a lot of changes and we've been a part of the whole me to discussion to which is i think a part of raising are profile i just think that it's not so much about me but it's about the profession and so that feels really good and thinking about me too and flight attendants for years have been at the front lines of harassment sexual harassment when did you become a flight attendant and was up clear you'd want on the job oh for sure so i became a flight attendant in nineteen ninety six an i'll just give you a couple of anecdotes so my first week on the job there was a disagreement in the office between the purchaser of the flight where i was working in these supervisor and so there was a contractual disagreement in my flying partner one that and then she pulled me aside maybe a little tense for a little while and she pulled me aside and she said look management's thinks of us is their wives or their mistresses in i their case they hold us in contempt your only place of work is with your fellow flying partners and if you wear union pan and we stick together there's nothing we can accomplish and i have to say that was a lot to take in as a twenty three year old fresh face a recruit out of company training but i really i really learned through the course of doing the job just exactly what that meant end really how much truth there kind of was there and then i'll give you another anecdote in that first you're flying one point i was setting setting up the galley and all of a sudden i felt someone rubbing my hip and were end an whipped around and this guy standing there and he said oh i was just checking to see if you had a girl on 'cause i didn't know how you'd look that good without a girl and say like you know this is normal stuff this is mid nineties nineties yes but this was also this was the environment that was defined by all the marketing through the jet age where they had ads like i'm cheryl slimy an had people wearing hot pants and go go boots and it was all about selling sex and the flight attendants were the symbol of that so when you think of pan am and those days you kind of shutter like you still have that aviation the alger like so many people do don't realize it was based on sexism or you know i know actually flight attendants have a lot of pride in are contribution aviation over the years and i think when we look at that we look at that as those were women on the job who were fighting behind the scenes maybe the public didn't see it but they were fighting for flame retardant uniforms and they were fighting for evacuation signals in the planes and they were coming together and making sure that when there was a death we were learning from it and had better safety regulations and so we're workforce that was eighty percent unionized we were the driving force for safety in the cabin end so when i see that and i think all they had to push through and all the discrimination if they had to push through and make those changes i saw a lot of pride and i think other flight attendants due to one of the things i did realize how much flight attendants have pushed on equal opportunity and you just explain to people who don't really realize that behind the scenes role that the flight attendants have played in kind of moving the needle forward in terms of rights in the workplace sure when we first organized in nineteen forty five and by nineteen forty six we had her first contract at united airlines an we had seniority lists so right off the bat we were saying that were not going to be in a position where we could trade sex for schedules and pit workers against each other because of their age we fight back against the new marriage rule and the fact that you had to leave the profession if you were age thirty or thirty two depending upon the airline during a period of time we weren't even supposed to talk to the pilots and 'em end we had the stepping away skill until nineteen ninety three why it was nineteen seventy one when we won the court suit that allowed men do have this job to so we fought for men have the same rights as women on the job is well an all of that we push forward and that led to a place actually where we were at the forefront of fighting for lgbtq rights and we won contractual protections ron domestic partner benefits and then we participated in the hearings in san francisco that led to the ordinance around domestic partner benefits that was on the roads marriage equality so we take a lot of pride in what we have done over the years to fight for equality and that's something that we take very seriously is flight attendants both in terms of how we've built are career but also the people that we have on are planes recognizing that we have a little microcosm of society on every flight so how did nine eleven shift what it was like to be a flight attendant especially on airline those impacted yeah i mean it changed everything i was based in boston an i had flown flight one seventy five the week earlier i remember over that summer and probably for the last six months i remember people watching us says we were doing the service and going in and out of the cockpit and 'em in you know i lost nine really good friends 'em so it changed everything for me personally but it changed everything for flight attendants across the country and we actually got designated as being able to get benefits if we had ptsd normally you have to have a direct experience but there was a recognition that because we know that workspace so well it's so unique and we knew exactly where those flight attendants where we could be having are owned flashbacks this is something that every flight attendant cross the country identified west and think about what happened the very next day i mean the very next day we were not only aviation's first responders responding to safety and health and the cabin but we were now all of a sudden aviation's last line of defense in i went after being in are crisis center in picking up the pieces and planning a big memorial from my friends and and also dealing with the furloughs that ensued twenty percent of our workforce furloughed overnight but when i think about quitting at that point oh gosh you know it never occurred to me actually on because there were so much to be done take care of other people and i remember i was in the back of a seven fifty seven and my flying partner who's sitting next me on the jumpsuit said when we've been taking off instead of being in the brace position we've been putting are hands over are throats and that way if anyone reaches around the corner without a knife to slit arthritis will get are hands and stuff so that's how we took off in those initial days on before we had all the security divisions in place we had the new ts say new security the reinforced cockpit doors all of the things that happened was there a moment where you finally felt somewhat secure when flying again you know i think that we felt 'em that there wasn't immediate change with the tsp workforce which was on which is out on the job very very quickly and there's so much more scrutiny over security at that time the other thing that happened frankly right after nine eleven was the every single passenger came on board was watching aspirin russians let us know that they were with us thanked us flights were pretty empty so there is a real heightened sense of awareness but we take that with every single day so this is something we think about the public doesn't have to but as were boarding planes we know very clearly that the best best way to avoid a problem in areas keep it on the ground man so were watching during that time in one of the things that happened right after nine eleven obviously was not only did security change 'em but are way of life changes because we went into all those bankruptcies we faced a thirty to forty percent cuts and pay we had continual furloughs remember we also have the sars epidemic right after that we had iraq war on so all of those things led to decreased bookings and fewer jobs and one of the things that's airlines did to cut costs was they cut staffing backed fm minimum across the board domestically and cut way back internationally as well and that is something that is not rebounded we've negotiated end regained some of the money some of the flexibility some of the retirement security can you still retire at fifty now what is the new norm now the new normal is sixty five mhm and there's a whole host of people who got caught up in this bankruptcy who had pensions terminated where it was too late to make up for it and so they're working you know into their seventies and later and that's the new reality that's what was created there so you're used to negotiating with us airline execs but this year it was the government with the government shutdown and arguably i mean the the flight attendants union like you guys helped end the government shutdown can you explain a little bit like what was going on behind the scenes and how flight attendants really help bring it to stop the government shutdown were always opposed the government shutdown let me just go on the record saying that because it does interfere with safety and security now we have so many redundancies that in the first day of the government shutdown is probably you know not is unsafe say the eighteenth through the twentieth of a day but we'll post it right from the beginning and we were with the rest of the industry on that if you go back and look we encourage the industry of come together and talk about the effects the shutdown and try to have people focused on the fact that we were diminishing safety and security in one place with argument that we wanna increased security at our southern border it was absurd an we were putting two million people in the middle of the fight who had nothing to do with it so all these government employees are government contractors were out of work in the private sector we would have had sixty days notice to be out of work no one would go to work without a paycheck and so we were very concerned learned about the practice that was being sat here that we could actually treat workers in this country that way but what was most concerning for us is that nine eleven other catastrophic accents where we've lost her friends i've been in many places debriefings things where people are distraught over the fact that we had this horrific accident or incident an everyone says if there's anything that they could do they would do it saved his life i mean there are people who wondered why they were alive instead of their friend friend an so as we saw safety and security steadily diminishing restarted and not only feel like this was wrong and we need to oppose the shutdown but we needed take drastic action to alert the american public end and we also starting to recognize that we actually had some power to make a difference here because in the political spectrum and seen them there was there was i let's there were so doug in that's right so really with air travel and it was also be at laguardia air traffic controllers that called out absolutely so let me just put this in perspective to because a lot of people you know give are using it with ending this and and let me just say that we provided some leadership there sure and we were very clear about what we were willing to do but the federal unions had been fighting from day one for their members ants they often represent people who were out of sight from the american public and often seen as nameless faceless bureaucrats and what they had to do is tell their stories he's in those workplaces in those agencies in many cases they were getting memos from the white house saying that if they were asked about how they were doing during the shutdown they were supposed to say orange green resign everything's fine and because those unions were there they were able to push back and tell the stories of ordinary people who make all these things happen in our government an interface in aviation so completely with private industry that if they can't do their jobs we can't do ars and there were actions at airports all across the country but the other thing that those federal unions were up against was that not only could their members lose their jobs if they struck but they could be sent to jail they gonna be indicted in central jail so they had to tell these people know you can't call in sick you can't walk on the job you have to go to work and we also recognize to the there was a real attempt to privatized all these functions and if they had walked off the job all that would do is a crew this is the reason why we knew exactly so you know i i really really wanna just a shout out to the air traffic controllers and transportation security officers and all of the other federal workers who continued to go work in the face of that because i think they also save these programs for a future we currently been without an essay administrator straighter for what a year and a half there is currently a nominee how would you describe to be traveling public like why this has to change and why hasn't it been urging on the government's agenda using well there's all kinds of 'em positions leadership positions sort of not unfilled by the f s one of them in and that's concerning especially as you look at the challenges of the epa has had faced this year this is not a slap against administrator l well who i think did as well if he could be acting administrator in these circumstances but then you have the seven thirty seven max issue and one of the things we said as a union was yeah we may not being a technical position to determine whether or not the max is safe to fly but it does matter to us the u west continues to elite aviation around the world and the less we were among the last two ground and we took a real hit music that's because boeing has too much power and the government well i think were finding that out that boeing was a very arrogant company that really was allowed to call the shots all the time and i will tell you that just in my conversations with them i'm hearing a real different tone on them now much more chasing tone but it's something that we need to look at we can't allow this sort of dynamic to continue to exist and so just remember the narrative thing odbc opium pilots and african airline it yeah there's coincidences and i just i mean well crazy to think that china band and every you know what eight other countries before we finally came around it was really embarrassing it's really why am i think a week before the effort of yeah it's not just embarrassing it's actually very concerning because one of the reasons that you us airlines are able to fly to almost every country around this planet and have such a rich network and that matters for are jobs to and the connection for the rest of americans to the rest of the world is because of the status of the essay that is a big part of it as a leading regulator in the world first safety an so if that is questioned that also can have an impact on are ability to have that kind of reach and so we have a very direct concern with not having a confirmed deputy administrator who has the full authority to do what he needs to do well let's switch to a happy well a sad but happy ending stories so we at the points guy i remember i was in this office in march and we had received an email from a man whose wife was a mesa flight attendant a docker recipients and had been told by may such a fly the mexico city were out and upon returning houston was jailed in i remember sitting in my office being like this sounds like crazy but i something about we receive a lot of emails but my my news team we immediately ran with the better dead talk with a lawyer and then we we posted about it and it went super viral and i think for hours you had tweeted about it by that afternoon hillary clinton below sea and for those who don't know selene was released from that border facility which had been in four weeks six zero a pathway out due to the pressure that we all collaboratively costs so when you first heard about it what happened behind the scenes so first of all i wanna thank you so much for breaking the story because they didn't know where turn your organization is actually how i found out about it and so the second but i found out about is actually late at night and a we launched a petition right away and started using all of the resources are are union to reach trout everywhere to try to get pressure to get her released an the tweet that you saw from hillary clinton was also we were behind the scenes on that so a lot of the publicity that took place after that we were fanning the flames on what you've helped provide the platform for and then we were also using are connections in government to raise this issue i started working directly with the ceo of mesa who also astoundingly did not know until they almost exact same time i found out so we were working hand in hand and we were directly calling are contacts in government and then using are stopped as well both democrats and republicans should apply as much crushers we could these ice facilities are sort of lawless in a sense like unclear clear guidelines well think about this she went to work with her flight attendant uniform on pulling her roller board with the overnight bag and when she flew her quick turned monterrey mexico and back she was held by cb p at houston and then after a few hours turned over to ice andrew her family's very concerned because of her status about making a big deal out of this in was working with an immigration lawyer who also thought through regular procedures they'd be able to get her out and they didn't wanna make this a bigger issue but when they found out that her daca status was going to be rescinded or the the government was going to try to resend it that's when they decided they just needed to go go public she was stuck in this place after going on her flight attendant trip you know she came to this country when she was three years old she's graduate from texas cnn decided whatever it is you're when decentral flight attendant senate right andy 'em here she was clinton a jumpsuit she was threatened end could only see her husband through a couple of inches of glass once a week average at another email the valentine's day couldn't even touch his wife you know and it was just heartbreaking it's heartbreaking but it's also a real lesson to us are members were absolutely astounded that there was a flight attendant who is flying endless dockery's and yet that really opened a lot of people's eyes to what this immigration issue is all about andy who's being affected you know she absolutely had the right to fly out of the country until the executive order to end daca and when the court we instated it they did not reinstate that one little it'll provision about being able to fly out of the country so here she was a brand new flight attendant on probation told her supervisor that she wasn't sure she could do it in the supervisor reassured or no you can ensure enough then she got caught up in the system okay let's take a quick pause right now as we hear from our sponsors you're union represents what percentage of flight attendants and the uss about halfway out at ten fifty thousand flight twenty airlines and so notoriously delta is not union airline although there are votes on going with that well delta's pilots are union there dispatchers and the rest of delta's property is non union and that is very rare that did not happen any other major airline industry is a great airline by a lot of statistics on time arrivals and some people say oh delta flight attendants are nicer because they're not union i've actually heard that being said before and how would you respond to that well i i think that's absurd of all i think we should remember that the entire industry has been through consolidations so there is a percentage of the delta flight attendants were former north west flight attendants who had a contract for sixty years and then there's a very large percentage of delta flight attendant who have wanted gain union for many many years what we have found through all of those organizing campaigns is that the reason that you think that you know it's a shiny happy place is because the only voice that's coming out of delta is management's voice and an so flight attendants don't have the ability to raise up those issues and speak out so delta really gets to create the message and that's not really what's happening inside side i mean there's a lot of complaints complaints about toxic uniforms right now that's not being addressed and we we talk about that i've heard so many written about these fancy new designer outfit on almost a lot of the carriers so what is are they just making these really cheap uniforms well we the whole if anybody wants to go check it out are you to jump on the cw way we have a uniform video that's about six minutes long they can give you all the information on this but basically what's happened is that the manufacturing in the united states stays essentially since the time of nafta was originally past and we allow china to enter the w t o the garment industry moved outside of u s and so we could no longer have the single sourcing and you have governments that are made from places all over the world andy if you don't have a controlled process where you can test each one of those pieces of uniform you have the ability to have chemicals there added that can be toxic to people and this is happening even in are stores so if you're gonna nordstroms trends or you go to j crew or whatever you could be someone who is sensitized to some of these products but as an individual consumer you get three turn that proud of it didn't work for you now uniform you have twenty five thousand people who were suddenly into this thing you find out pretty quickly that fifteen twenty percent of the population is sensitive to these chemicals and has reaction and now they're forced to wear their workspace or their lines pretty quick to resolve it or a well so we have actually defined it as an occupational hazard alaska airlines is the first place where this happened in initially the airline was resistant to resolving it but through are testing and science that we were able to resent them we were able to show this is a real problem and i have to say that now 'em alaska did a really good job of putting the flight attendants and a temporary uniform those nontoxic and then moving to a new vendor that is world renowned for its process and creating these uniforms american allowed for alternative pieces for flight attendants but didn't put flight attendants in eighty transitional uniform and so they're sort of ongoing issues there andy delta's in a place where they're not even really recognizing this problem exist yet although there is some success by some flight attendants being able to get into alternatives pieces but without a union there's no consistency there say interesting or so you actually are still a flight attendant you still do regular united flight so my status status as international presently association of five tenths of a i'm actually paid by the union i am still on you the united seniority list on a union leave under my contract and i keep up on my qualifications every year and then occasionally will go and work a flight as a flight attendant and remember when i was like i do this job i you know i feel like i got caught up in this thing because i just happened to him forrest gump tony like i happen to believe you're seniority right i keep my seniority but in a place where all of a sudden they got involved because of nine eleven everything that happened after that but i am fairly junior flight attendant a united airlines twentythree years i miss it a lot and i do this job because i love it so much i love fact i can go to work i depend on the people who were working with me and i used to say that you know i took a lot of pride and saving a lot of marriages because people would come from a bad business meeting or you know just had a whole time getting to the plane that day or whatever and and we could say you know sit back relax you're gonna you're gonna feel a lot better in so i loved doing all of that and having the opportunity to really hosts people but i would say that you know some of that son has been taken out of the job because what i'm describing is also a time when we had twenty five to fifty percent more staffing cardi abode out right now it's just cut to the bone it would record profits it's well it's outrageous and so what has happened is most recently united airlines announced a cut on international staffing 'cause domestic has been cut own on every carrier for over ten years now and has not returns right it's an area where they had total control wasn't something that we bargained over because the airlines would traditionally staff over the minimum and it so never became an issue that we needed to take a bargaining table now united airlines is the last to cut back most recently on this latest staffing cut internationally matching delta and american and the reason is because as they executives were going to wall street and saying hey we're gonna work on united route structure and we're gonna really be investing in the airline in you know do a better job of returning airline to the dentist but it should be in obviously they're doing very well at that now right but in doing so there were so much pushback from wall street because it would mean not as much revenue is free first stock buybacks end so investors put a lot of pressure on those executives to keep labor costs flat an they ultimately made that promise and when you have contracts that have raises each year obviously labor costs are gonna rise so where are they gonna make the cuts they made the cuts and the bodies which means we have fewer people to do the work on the planes planes for safety and security but also for passenger service so what do you recommend the passengers to complain or to voice yes passengers should join us yeah because these cuts we feel it on the job but you feel it and you're in the variance on the plane that's it's right aviation world politics you're working in extremely male dominated industry is what is that like and what have you learned and being a powerful woman at the bargaining table with in a male dominated world oh well i have learned that women who are willing to get in there and mix it up can actually get a lot done because it is something different in the men don't always know how to respond to it and if you really are clear on what you're trying to accomplish and and you don't take no for an answer a lot of times you can actually get more done but i'm not gonna say it's easy and i'm not going to say we don't have a long way to go to make this a lot better and make sure that we're creating an environment where everyone has has equal ability to speak up all right you're favorite destination when you wanna go and get away from it all where do totally on one so this is crazy i love waikiki going gonna say i love my job and being in a coma no no no no no i mean if i really wanna relax and i tell my dad all the time if i get too crazy ever you put me down me up and send me to hawaii you should try to oh i should eighty seven eighty seven service from san francisco was so let me going a little plug here on seven eighty seven yes the seventy seven is a totally different experience because you don't have elite air coming off the engines you don't have potentially toxic air you also have a higher percentage of humidity and you're gonna feel better when you get off the flight we are spoiled with the new planes thank you so much for coming in i could go on for hours and hours and hours but it's been a real pleasure and thank you for doing everything you do not just her flight attendants but for the traveling public well thank you and thank you for the focus on aviation you at the end of the day still magical and it's really a symbol of freedom in a symbol of great american ingenuity and i love what you're building here at the points guy i think it's really important well when you're back to being a flight attendant let me know and i will be i promise a very good passenger on you're doing what you're doing let's go on a flight together i'm gonna pick up a trap do it do it that's it for this episode of talking points i'm your host brian kelly andy huge thank you to sara

fifteen twenty percent one hundred dollars twenty three year twentythree years eighty percent twenty percent fifty percent forty percent six minutes sixty years three years four weeks six months sixty days ten years one year
Friday 11 October

Monocle 24: The Briefing

58:17 min | 1 year ago

Friday 11 October

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the eleventh of october two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four the briefing is brought to you in partnership with ronan oh that right here on the briefing with me m elson at least four US national security getting personal and then i'm standing on top of the berlin wall which for years has been the most potent symbol of the division of europe and that can be few better illustrations shows were so worried about donald trump pressuring ukraine that they call the lawyer and that was even before the fated phone call will look at administrations arguably at odds with themselves orc which has placed a lot of political intrigue in the trump era i was after all the SDN lie which arrested and successfully prosecuted michael even though the restrictions on money in american politics from american citizens have a sort of been a reduced partly by judicial spend about the phone call to alinsky in a moment but i these two donors left parnasse and eagle fruman these meanwhile to donors to trump's twenty sixteen election campaign have been charged with violating campaign finance laws the men one of whom is ukrainian the other from belarus one way flight eight one way tickets to frankfurt were arrested by plainclothes police officers in response to an indictment issued by the US attorney in the southern district of new officials were so alarmed by what they saw as donald trump's pressuring ukraine for political gain they sought advice from the white house lawyer the washington post has reported that the officials the bus accused of conspiring to follow foreign money to candidates for federal and state office will making sense of it all jacob per kilo is an expert on US politics dance violation so that the US has a a fairly strict set of laws prohibiting foreign donations to political parties or political action committees action over the last few years the restriction against foreign spending remains very very strongly enforce so they stay put money into a pro-trump super pacs it's sort of three hundred and twenty five thousand dollar donation and donated to various other republican congressional candidate who were not named in the indictment but have subsequently been i also coming up a preview of this weekend's elections in poland and after the click chemistry between leo varadkar and boris johnson wonder if ultimately politics still depends on race that concerns before president trump called his ukrainian counterpart vladimir accidents key to pressure him into sharing details about his rival joe biden's family oh and and has been sort of proof involved in various other scandals in and around the trump administration so these guys were arrested on campaign that have just suddenly being catapulted into the headline they are so these two men were arrested yesterday it's being reported that they were arrested while walking down the jetway to board have to teach people about why it matters plus marcus hippie will join me to go through the days front pages and fernando augusta per shaka will be here to share his views on the cost of music charts and an associated the london-based think-tank l. s. e. ideas and i'm delighted his here in the studio to shed some light on what's going on we'll move to the issues about the they'd had lunch with rudy giuliani shortly before going to dulles and being arrested so there's clearly a close link with the president's lawyer although identified one was pete sessions republican congressman who lost his reelection bid in two thousand eighteen and they seem to have been involved in a scheme to try to get a legal pot license in colorado as well which is a a fun little detail on the side of the story they see that quite an interesting pet do we know how these allegations came to light there is some information the changes were just sweeping across this continent than the party which is taking place here on top of it tonight it's almost thirty years since the berlin wall fell but do we do the charging document has been released but this this obviously ties into the bigger questions about trump and ukraine these are people who've done business with rudy giuliani in fact giuliani's own description of his relationship with trump seems somewhat fungible sunday's he says he he works as an attorney it seems to be a sort of it when it's convenient for him to claim they don't take particularly kindly to interference from above so it's possible and we can't say for sure obviously this is a developing story and it's quite early any client privilege although it's not clear that he understands what limits of attorney client privilege are and he certainly doesn't understand the strategic value of going on fox news and essentially in all these revelations but if i had lunch with somebody who then went on to be arrested for work associated with what i was doing i would probably be a little bit worried about legal exposure so that muller was able to indict specific named officers of the GRU but if this in trump's mind if he can throw enough doubt on pointing people in directions that they wouldn't have explored otherwise so he's he is i think we should be worried by this because the the more let's call them exotic theories about the the muller case which are basically i mean i don't have time to sort of go through the whole thing but the the upshot is about the southern district of new york that it has a famously independent attitude and wall william bar the attorney general is nominally in charge of the SDN y parole and we haven't seen any records of that the white house under the trump administration has taken to issuing very very short memo's of conversations publicly she didn't help me it was actually ukrainian oligarchy conspiring with DNC now it should go without saying this is ridiculous like there's a significant amount of evidence someone from a number of stories reported reported principally in the post and the times but also in MSNBC and a few other sources that there was a wide great because i think what's been lost in some of this is the extent to which trump is looking he's looking at this through a conspiratorial lens shaped by some of the the trump and threw him william bar are looking to discredit the entire finding of norling damola report but the joint findings of the US intelligence committee can say my election was legitimate after all the democrats and my enemies in the deep state of ginned up this whole conspiracy against me and it was fake from the beginning there are a number of issues here that aren't solely related to that call so the fact that concerns were raised by national security officials prior to the twenty fifth of july call the ukraine so much so that it rang the white house's lawyer tell us a little bit more about this so this is in keeping with a general sense that's emerged lesson ego freeman we'll hear more of them a little later i'm sure but let's move onto the continuing the impeachment impeachment process here that we had the whistle suggests that this was a serious ongoing issue in the call was the pinnacle rather than a one off and this would be seized upon by those wishing to have donald trump successfully impeached i think that is all but guaranteed at this point the democrats i don't think incredibly pull that back they've they've made the threat i think they have to go through that otherwise they will lose the faith of their own their own daughter class and you've seen a significant increase in significant increase in sort of running the shadow foreign policy with the assistance of the now resigned that the reluctant assistant i should say of the now resigned special envoy to ukraine oh how correct are we in thinking it's going to help with the impeachment you will help with the impeachment i mean i think if by impeachment we mean a vote to impeach in the house the community that the russian government was responsible for hacking the two thousand sixteen election trump is looking for a product to say they've tried to de-legitimize my election by saying russia helped me the most legitimate president ever right let's move on there for a while these two men are languishing in new york in washington does new york jail isn't it left career officials who are trying to manage indeed scramble around them all very uncontrollable oval of the real question is how big is the casualties have been reported as turkey continues its cross-border offensive on kurdish held areas of northern syria report suggested dozens of fighters from kurdish forces and pro turkish factions have been killed there also concerns about the number of civilian casualties brexit talks between the UK government and e you negotiators are resuming in brussels and then the internal document looks more like what we saw the july twenty fifth call so there were previous interactions and we have all this information about rudy giuliani running around ask aid because he had the one the whistle blower whose report triggered this entire series of revelations other people are now seeing that it's it's more possible it follows detailed discussions between the british prime minister and his irish counterpart boris johnson and leo varadkar said the meeting was very positive and they could nest able to come forward there's a kind of strengthened numbers thing and i think people are going who who might worry about their own exposure including possibly political appointees may start seeing office that's still very very open question jacob what does it say about the internal pushes impulsive what's happening in the white house with till you about career civil servants some advantage in coming forward as well so i think if you're waiting for more revelations i suspect you won't have to locked away take care parakeets thank you very much indeed for joining us concern shared by a number of career national security staff about the trump administration's dealings with ukraine and particularly with this alinsky administration a four US national security officials who before that phone call we're worried about what the trump administration was doing with the lashed minute does our today's headlines spec to you emma thank you very much indeed dearly and let's get the latest business headlines now we're joined by why are we talking something here that could be potentially very damaging to trump in terms of the broad scope of ukraine and actually i think we have to be careful to not disagree blur who had raised concerns about donald trump's conversation with blood moore's landscape the twenty fifth of july we now have reports in the washington post see a pathway to a possible deal and today's monocle minutes reports that seattle's monorail has finally and after fifty seven years of separation being integrated into the in the public support for impeachment so i think that is essentially look likely or or nearly guaranteed to happen in terms of whether you actually remove trump it among other things the polish elections this weekend but i with a look at the day's latest news headlines his union gopher thank you emma is on monocle twenty four you're listening to the briefing with me emma nelson the time here in london is eleven minutes past midday my news panel will join me in the studio in a moment's talk about in sits and talks trade talks between the world's two biggest economies and on both those fronts investors seeing signs of positivity we've heard as been saying shins promised another hike in the middle of december so that's what investors will be hoping will be averted from these trade talks but positive mood so far city's bus train and light rail system the policy means that regional transit passes can be used to pay for fairs across the network for more head to monocle comes etc but do i this depends quite a lot on personal personality politics here doesn't it yeah absolutely the market is reading the fact that trump is going yesterday of course was talks firs day and today positive outcomes on two fronts of course we have that meeting between boris johnson and leo vodka of ireland over break imports from bloomberg news welcome back to monaco twenty four stock market looking healthy today why is that hello nice to finish the week on a positive note hof of electric car sales has seen the bubble deflate a little china's neo probably heard a very big car maker in china big electric the electric car market we've talked a lot about his son monaco before it's just two years since the vacuum cleaner maker dyson announced that it was getting tiso and steve mnuchin expected to resume those talks later on today for day to watch out for progress on those if not talks went to quote very well these the first in person talks since late july vice premier li her and US trade representative robert movement in the donald trump presidential election campaign is not something new i mean the whole muller report was based on it it on that scale i mean are we talking small firm aiming to sign the US is due to increased tariffs on about two hundred and fifty billion dollars chinese goods from twenty five to thirty percent in just four days time and then the trump administration says he's going to spend thirty three billion dollars on electrification and dyson a sizable company but they just say they can't compete in such an enormous to these meeting at all as a positive sign that had been phased that perhaps he decided not to get involved and just left it to the negotiators that would be a bad sign so investors read since may and stocks around the world rallying on the positive signs from the trade talks between the US and china donald trump saying the first day fold in car manufacturing and took a lot of people by surprise two hundred two and a half billion dollar investment in electric cars by dyson and today they said and it's important to remember that the july twenty fifth call from which we've seen that memorandum that essentially confirmed all the things the whistle blower said there was a call between salons game trump and from the car makers that it will be the tech companies which dominate this space douglas has been spending lots of money on on this this area as well the basic finding he can has a product for pardoning paul manafort who has stuck with him quite loyally clearly in the expectation of some kind of pardon or commutation and he how pulling out of the whole business they said it wasn't a technical failure but they can't make it work commercially the bring lots of problems the electric car markets china which i don't really want to plow this enormous amount of money into this quite untried technology because the demand is not there yet the number of electric car sales around the world is still a tiny make last month reported widely expected loss and saw the stock tumbling to a record low a lot of competition in this market and not that many it might be altered by the donald trump has tweeted that you know meeting the vice premier li later on but he says they want to begin with this weekend's elections in poland the ruling nationalist law and justice party is expected to easily win the most votes in sunday's elections but it's not clear whether uh of change is coming soon twenty twenty four welker gordon sand the the american ambassador to the european union who is a big trump donor with clearly involved in this as well safe god in the f for future generations gain precious insights into the fresh thinking that is disrupting received wisdom for the better and learn how phyllis action continues to be the crucial and how it will pan out you and i thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four you're listening to the briefing coming soon monaco rolex johny fraction of diesel and petrol so at the moment there's no money to be made in them but they all say this is coming down the line so all being forced to move into that those are the threats mm you the pioneers the pioneers is a brand new series that tells the stories of people improving the planet you'll hear how rolex supports these interfaces with whom they share a passion continual battle going on in eastern central europe in in the post communist countries and that's the battle for direction because the country all these societies are quite split loyd's anywhere near one seeing the pound strengthened the great deal is up two and a half percent over the past two days against the dollar at its highest level against the euro look they travel they work abroad they know foreign languages but so many so much of the population doesn't know if you go to war soil budapest away to a deal is the words used by the league of ireland that's a possibility that we might be edging to brexit deal when everybody thought that we probably in terms of the influence that it has had low in polish daily life yeah i think it's it's also interesting to to think about how long it takes a society to reshape party has for some time now absolutely capitalized on hasn't had i mean there may message is pride in polish nece but that's only scratching the surface being built around it so there's a real struggle i as the who controls the market in five or ten years time a lot of money being ploughed in a no one really could be enough to allow it to form a government again so adamnet speaking with you i read somewhere that this weekend's elections have been described as an existential battle is is it's a combination of all these things and how they feed into each other and when people have that discomfort you come out of a very strong structural you have a sort of minority maybe fifteen twenty percent of people you could say broadly are have a more global internationalised out goals as well as tesla which we've mentioned before on the show traditional comic is like general motors and volkswagen also plowing huge amounts of money into electric cars VW itself so the car companies want to make sure that their product which is the vehicle for software rather than the other way round the software being the the key product and the carter said itself and and people sort of asking is this a question about social conservatism is it a question about economic inequality or economic struggle and i think what it is atmosphere shot away within communism for such a long time and then having to pay play catch up so quickly can have a very disruptive effects on ah the struggle becomes when people try to ignore the history and and things that you can just substitute something else because it worked in another context and in context which i'm much more familiar with is run the risk of and like many north african countries have seen you have people come in with strong story and people can attach themselves about gay rights about feminism antiracism they took decades it's not like we emerged from the second world war as these multicultural liberal tolerant societies i say thirteen seventeen listening in warsaw it's twelve seventeen here in london let's look at some of the day's other news in a little more detail and joining me to do the heavily it when you mentioned the likes of volkswagen they have to accept the the electric cars they sell them the batteries that they make are sold at a loss is it one of those ongoing processes revolutions and second and third way feminism and student revolutions in sixty eight an anti-racism movement and the anti nazi league and all that kind of thing that reshapes opponent while i think every time there's an election in eastern europe people say it's an existential battle for the soul of the country but funnily enough they're almost right away because there is a putting in the studio the sudanese australian writer and broadcaster yes mean abdelmajid and the journalist and writer adam libor welcome voices studio to see britain and other western european societies SOS racism in france this is simply never happened so don't expect us to be like you just because you know so that strong story for a long time and it isn't until that new generation grows up that ten fifteen percent that has a bit more of a global context that something really changed they took decades and it's something that's still ongoing and people in eastern central europe often feel that there's a value set took us a very long time to get to firstly might not be exactly right for us secondly you're expecting us to be like you immediately well we can't do that because we were locked down for fifty years and when you had your feminist who it is to be whether it's polish or even in this case english perhaps but i think it what what you exactly what you say about a story they lived under a system which was built on a lie which was communism and so that was pulled away from them and they were told actually you can order sushi on the internet and this hipster barbas and everything you know all the kind of western consumer things you want so people think oh it's just like london or is disliked already in the west about the crisis of masculinity what does it mean to be a man what's what's your role how do you relate to the massive changes in women's confidence and women's rights it's communism whether it's a any sort of post war mentality and then you've got this vacuum royal who ali and you need a message and understanding of yes well it's not actually because they have completely different histories and outside the capitals these are very conservative societies and this is something that the law and justice we'll have more sophisticated capital cities where you have nice restaurants in great nightlife actually it's been more complex than that plus all these people were lied to for fifty years is as a good signal that the president himself is getting involved so let's watch up headlines from that later on today one more thing before i go instinct sign in the all that stuff you believed in or even if you didn't really believe in you had to say you did it was all lies it was all nonsense it was rubbish so there's what what what was my life about yeah so when that's dropped onto a society very conservative i think it makes people short circuit a bit especially perhaps if they haven't traveled if they're have living outside the capitol and i don't mean tall to sound patronizing here but if that people who've experienced hasn't been as global they revert back to many who've whom of adopting a liberal and and center politically central thought many of these women especially as you say the women are becoming much more certif- and much more independent i think the men don't necessarily have the means to deal with that so they revert back to old fashioned values is that you guys have dyson trying to make it very very quickly but actually it's the long game that's important here yeah for sure you're right on that it's tricky business because the car companies that'd be wonderful for you well actually they didn't say well in britain today so why would it work well in eastern poland some people have argued that in this new in this latest but i mean it what happens in the meantime and whether it's too far gone is another question tell us a bit more about this game of of historical catch up that that entry such as poland has had to deal with as many of notice that as as the west sort of went embrace things like LGBT rights and just an opting more liberal and include darkly how long have we had very strong patriarchal cultures very strong kind of social norms very strong structures around what it means to be a man and two ova tunnel of that and they feel that you know that they have to put them down or be sexist patronizing so in a country like poland where this division is happening where the idea that kept country alive when it didn't exist as an entity which arguably makes the whole anti-european rhetoric rather more comprehensible when you have the i think even the so their their identity is based on people invading and killing them and the centuries so of course they're going to revert much more strong patriotism because it's but there is a large number of young polish men who are adhering to this more much more nationalistic anti eu anti immigration round of elections where the country is so deeply divided that a lot of the divisions can be seen most clearly in young poles on a on a on a country context yes exactly i think that's a really good phrase into play catch up because these processes that we went through in the west with a lot of change and then with the added while you should be like us because the west is you know that's or whatever which is a and we must not forget how you know if people i mean i i don't know too much obviously we'll defer to adam in in terms of eastern europe but certainly looking at experience in the north intense story could experience it didn't it didn't exist for for a long time then in the second world war it was squeezed between the nazis and the russians and it was occupied by the russians having a struggle in the sense that several at century opinion countries are having a struggle trying to find their way as independent nation states but within a europe that constrains lhasa fee is there any reason why that is the case in poland us a very interesting question i think it'd be complex reasons for that but there's a fair amount of torture come from a historical place of pride and and you know they're proud of the national identity or the proud of who they are and then you try to tell them actually the way that you're doing things wrong and you should be like ear what you're selling to me and i'm going to go back to as you say what feels safe and familiar exactly and i think the thing about poland is it has such a the large amount of its historic territory has a completely different historical experience to us in britain who've never really been invaded for thousand years and then we kind of absorbed the invaders us all of a sudden even if somebody might have been listening to their backs against the wall you know what i don't want to be anything like you i don't want anything to do with that back to the other way so it's an awful lot of energy is expended you're listening to the briefing rely on monocle twenty four now this year's nobel peace prize has been awarded to the primary can we work together in that kind of framework because what happens is if those three parties take power they'll just yank poland one way and then they'll lose in three or four years and then they'll go lauren justice will get the most foes this could former these three rivals could actually form quite a successful coalition and tilts poland adam who've talked about the stripy middle europeans he'd like to kick hard against brussels mean poland really having a struggle with europe isn't it well it's it's laws you can pass because they have to be within you.' norms so that that's the struggle and before before we have our next topic that the polls at the moment suggests stalemate following their border war in one thousand nine hundred eight and this is a this is a well-deserved pride many people saying yeah i mean as a as the sovereignty as they see it because when when you join the EU and you're in the schengen zone you essentially you know lose control over your borders you lose control over values which they feel safe with now and they're just as there are in western europe european countries lots of men feel threatened by confident assertive women of like northeast african being from sudan i was like yes brother those a federal whooping in my house when i heard that news polly i think also because there is an opportunity he of us to celebrate an african leader in a way the like in this decade i think what's really interesting is that these changes that have not been around for a long time and if we think about sort of his the the the law and justice party will get forty seven percent of the vote but there is there are three parties up against it one of each civic in a different direction back towards before before so you end up having these seesaw politics we go this way we go that way i mean perhaps government of national unity might might not be a bad idea maybe people should accept that she these divisions are not gonna be healed people do think completely differently so and what do you do with it and what do we do now now you have to be like you and the IMF is going to come in and say a stereotype benefit shot the factories and it's the hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio on atma dory house in london i'm nelson and coming up at least four white house coalition rushing which was partly founded by the supreme council president donald toes to others true centrist parties and there is a possibility that actually although sir i'll be honored for his work to bring about peace with his country's bitty bitter enemy eriteria the peace deal ended two decades long twenty year military that we haven't got the chance to for a long time and there's an opportunity to reshape the idea of an african leader from someone who is a dictator or authority carrion whatever th this sort of stereotype might be to someone who is actually in the case of amyloid so who really decided you know what i'm going to go rather than about me in particular me individually and that is also very important to the african historian society it's a very collectivist community and so with yeah exactly i mean this is arguably makes president of wacky look good for the first time in quite a long time i think we can safely say adam yes inch population of a diaspora and be young people in africa i think the the percentage of people under the age of thirty is enormous in on the of changes happen and so i just think it's fantastic and the nobel peace prize isn't always one which makes us all happy right like i think there is a lot of hope and change that is possible and i think there are a number of reasons why there are like a huge you don't run the risk of celebrating the individual above the people and i think the reason he is also celebrated that he's very much saying this is about the people hild in it but it's something that overall we yeah obviously we have to welcome but i think we need to be looking at ends one it's a milestone opening up new opportunities for the region how much do you think these opportunities will be capitalised upon i think and then all of a sudden you've got leaders who are willing to an and the big thing i think with with is is that we i what i personally ashley wasn't a huge fan of barack obama getting getting the peace prize well let me think let me count the ways i mean like quite honestly something that caused a lot of her personally again in the communities when he's still came about there was huge joy because people didn't hadn't seen these secretary general of the UN antonia cherish setting i have said often that winds of hope ah blowing ever stronger across africa and prime minister ahmed is one of the main reason a combination of youth and global access information and solidarity and hopefully leaders that are willing to kind of put them put themselves in the ego a little bit aside for the i i think it's obviously something to be welcomed because this was a particularly nasty war lasted a long time and it was vicious and a lot of people were were not only is his record as a a leader in in terms of what we did what he ended up doing with drones and someone deplorable but also the fact that he had been president for incident and so you've got folks who see all the opportunities that the rest of the world have but they don't have it on their content and they wanted and they want it to be authentic and they don't want it definitely it's not always even even the fact that gratitude book was suggested on nominated i think there was a lot of discussion about whether she would be somebody whether you're getting the great good you know it's a it's a slightly difficult price to award though just a one man when you have a peace process that inevitably requires two parties and the revolutionaries and that has led us to a point now where we're we are reshaping the country and there is a lot of hope and opportunity the the border war with eritrea was to be brought in they want to create it themselves so i think i may have access to that through the incident and they have which is which is a big difference with right to previous generations and further liberalisation in ethiopia and also in eritrea which is really one of the world's most repressive regime so i hope that the fact that the war is easing off it might have been good to include yesterday the irish t. shark live radka spent a full three hours talking about a breakthrough in the brexit negotiations with british prime minister boris johnson by the and of yesterday the headlines were full of possibility in progress hugely different from the angry divisive rhetoric of the last few months we may still be some miles from a deal but how is an issue with barack obama was arguably don't count your chickens but let's talk a little bit more about this idea of of hope and pride which this this award now gives i mean we've had the can the personal touch move things forward in situations like this yes maine i mean there's been a lot of fun made of the happy couple wandering around a wedding what's interesting about this to think about how you know how do things get done in politics right and you can think about it in house people who no matter what the book says will always do things through personal relationships and i think like very clearly boris johnson is that guy boris johnson doesn't give a damn what the early on symbolizes start a new era in that part of africa which has so much to offer we move now to the tree lined path of the leafy gardens in the northwest of england venue in the north west of england but stuff was done yesterday between gerrad karen johnson yeah i think i mean in hurtful in shot la as i say ah like three days or something like that when souls like i'll say he's getting a prize for being black and so don a little while ago about how effective personal relationship can be one of the examples given was the fated meeting between neville chamberlain and is get done in any sort of what workplace context team based context you know there are some folks that really like things to be done in a very sort of process oriented you know we've got to follow the book and there are some through through history but also sometimes we go the other way where somebody because they're following the process even though they may not want all to do the thing that they're being asked president registered a very trail in this as well as happened before with other nobel peace prize is when you look at i mean there's actually to israel and palestine there was sadat lanman ever gonna do anything that was for a greater good was if it was a part of a personal relationship and i think we do see this in in lots of different cases rulebook says because for him it's all about his you know his self in his relationships and what people think of him and how he charms folks and so i do think the only way boris johnson pichler back to scotland in nineteen thirty eight when chamberlain was given great your reassurances that hitler had no sinister motives and he went back to learn of what the nature of the nazi regime was he really wanted to believe that he could do business with mr hitler as he called him but he he was he he he was in denial obviously but also at that time in britain he chamberlain wasn't an outlier there was a very large amount of people that that wanted to do business with me doc in bagan and there was also rabin and yasser arafat so is it slightly odd the only one side has been given this because it takes two to start onto to stop it but bookstore welcome back to studio you can see that especially rabin is is horrified by this idea of taking the hand of arafat but he grits his teeth and does it so that's you know the the total lack of any personal sorry is growing into a robust collection of well-turned out titles for an in depth look into our core theme of quality of life why not delve into our first action they're still didn't stop that peace process from happening of then again we could look at reagan and gorbachev got an extremely well and arguably that chemistry arena vacation which brought east germany allied to soviet russia back into the west the fall of the wall when it came was rapid but a number of events had been building up hitler not start the second world war because of what happened in the first so it's a very tricky balancing act but also as a as you were saying before about processes a good staffer book the monocle guide to better living for any would-be business leaders entrepreneurs are even established companies in search of fresh ideas there's the multiple guide to good business to do because it's the result of the process and that they think about change they will do it there's one thing that it reminded me though and it's all it is absolutely unrelated but there's quite a lot of work a years since the fall of the berlin wall making it a full generation since germany and indeed europe was physically divided it marked the start of a process known as fida financial signing we bypass the foam fuss uncover the makings of a truly great meal monaco's handsome books are published by our friends shelton in the wrong person well i think if we look at neville chamberlain i think it's because he wanted so hard to believe in the face of all the evidence really the already accumulated by that stage glen and offer a world of new experiences between the covers so spruce up your shelves today and by some of our titles online at monaco dot com or from any nelson here with the briefing it's thirty eight in london remember this i'm standing on top of the berlin wall which for years has been the most potent symbol of the division of europe all of that i think his rabin and arafat who and if you look at that clipping of them shaking hands on the white house lawn with bill clinton's kind of basically forcing them to do it but around the eastern bloc which culminated in that exciting night while i'm joined in the studio by steven steven covered the collapse of the soviet union for the bbc and now gives talks on that night in november was one thing but there had been these sorta satellite fast moving events that have been happening in other countries all over the eastern bloc ninety on the berlin wall to younger people very warm welcome back to the briefing even right let's have a little bit of the context here the culmination the collapse of the world is in how to make a nation a monocle guide we looked at the small and the big things that can help make our nation's work better and in the monocle to drinking and helped bring the cold war to an end as an yes-men abdelmajid thank you both very much for joining me on monocle twenty four our very own monaco live in and said i trust him we have in my hand a piece of paper famous clipping and and we have this issue of a man who put misplaced trust in sollidarity the trade union which had been around already for a decade was recognized and then in june of nine hundred eighty nine one hugely in elections and so hungry tearing down their fortifications on their side of the border with austria was a huge move because what happened then was that thousands of east germans can be few better rations of the changes were just sweeping across this continent than the party which is taking place here on top of it tonight it is almost thirty one thousand nine was the next year of revolutions and it started in poland when the the the ruling socialist stroke communist party had to give up its its its power michael boorda this is something perhaps younger people today don't realize that you're was divided top to bottom by a physical border not just a wall but there were death strip thousands east germans had done this at which point east germany which was always the most solid ally of of the soviet union as a russian once said to me in eighty nine was certainly news terms the most exciting year of my life today there's been quite a few of them quite a few years and i and i'd be very very surprised hungry came next and one of the things hungry on the second of may was to tear down its border and because bear in mind when we talk about the iron curtain there was actually a checks or check slovak's i should say there were then decided to visit angry and go through to australia and get out to the west and by the end of september thirty it's ever overtaken i was i was working for the bbc as you say covering the soviet union but therefore obviously keeping a close eye on what was happening in eastern europe and of october so that was increasing but all that time we still wondered what is going to happen next and and even a few days before the war came down on simply on the basis of personal relationships here there is a dangerous and if you follow the letter of the door on the processes yes meena said there's no doubt there's no risk that you might be shown flowing from from from germany the germans tried to stop it by by blocking their border first of all with hungary nemechek slovakia and the effect was to to re ministrations beginning in leipzig particularly every monday in september and into october and he went from one and a half thousand people on the first monday of september two three hundred thousand in the it was a domino effect it was a real domino effect i remember thinking at the time by the end of the year that it was if eighteen forty eight had been called the ear of evolution unite germany asked the speed and success rate that actually when you look back as it was absolutely breathtaking how they manage to do it i have no idea that is geographically close even though not relevant to the lives of those under thirty what what i find delighted to say is when i do speak to younger audiences one was really predicting it and the interesting contrast with the soviet union because what happened in the soviet union yes nine hundred thousand nine also is a very exciting year but of course the soviet union all the way through that year we saw poland go we saw hungary go we saw these east germans escaping and east germany not knowing what to do in closing the border and then master amazing and it was it was it was a fascinating year to live through an report on even so i i think there's a very interesting contrast looking at from the soviet point of view as well because she's great i'm not i'm not preaching i'm just trying to get across some of the excitement some of the warri some of the fascination of of of what was going on in particular in that year of nine hundred ninety nine and not bath and it could have gone like that eastern europe though went the other way and eventually it was a largely peaceful revolution whereas in the soviet union it did go back to the hard doc so her ability to understand the power of coalition and compromise and bringing people together is actually a force in europe that that we ah the that at the end of ninety one but russia ahead so what i'm just trying to say it could have gone either way the east germans there was a shoot to kill policy introduced in in and what is it that they give the impression that the missing what are you adding to and is actually a sort of a consciousness that we we should be looking at something which is very which is well joining one part of germany back to the other but of course the social development in those two parts of germany were was hugely different one of the problems with line is before going back again and you're now lecturing to people who are under thirty so they will had actually they will have never experienced a physically divided europe service barbed wire there were dogs go after anyone who tried to escape escape from east to west not anyone who went to go the other way could do it quite easily we're studying the cobra i'm really interested in the cobol and actually do want to know what it was like so i i find i get a a very interested response we and and they can't quite grasp it because of course they've never seen it and hopefully never will see as such division of europe but many of them say to me aggressed in one thousand nine hundred ninety one until you get the the coup against gorbachev in august ninety one which they tried to stop the breakup of the soviet union actually hastened that that skin kobo times whether germans yesterday had the war against but they're not just germans that prussians and they like order and they'll do as they're told and suddenly you had this this certain level instead of being lifted up and that so you had an east germany which was far poorer than west germany far lower living standards and of course they are interested in instant to have someone who lived through it and okay as a journalist not a politician but was close to it spoke to the politicians reported on it the speed of history now i sometimes wonder whether the success of angela merkel is because she was born in east germany so she knew what it was like and separated from huge developments in social society and economies that actually going back to the old arguably simpler hardaway's is worrying few years will be gone i think you're absolutely right i think that angela merkel having come from east germany she was the right right person in the right place at the right time i think because how much do you think that there is a affair that history now moves too quickly i mean every generation will accused lost generation of having no no consideration for what's gone before but when you look merckel there who could actually bridge the gap i think it was very very very clever i don't think they've yet succeeded though in in totally bridging the gap between east and west did you still have the the message should have been we need you know what what's the problem we should do away with poverty whereas what actually happened in those countries and in the soviet union with aromas dragged down a little bit of nostalgia don't you and when you see what we were talking a moment ago about poland's the fact that the game of catch up is so fast when you've been when you have literally aged children you get the odd treat and for a lot of people that that was simple life satisfy them then suddenly to make decisions realizing they could be made redundant the security minister brandon lewis has said that if europeans fail to apply for the residencies by the end of twenty twenty they would be deported from the in syria he will send three point six million refugees to the european union area and this is obviously an astonishing threat to be bratislava occupation we will open the gates and sent over three million refugees your way this is a very complicated situation for the european union obviously let's see adding to choose another job was a huge decision when you haven't had that you know if you don't mean brought up with that being put into that when you say in your fifties that's a real short you then with another depressing story from the guardian it's about brexit on what's happening so for quite some time the home of his here in the UK ESPN there were of course huge problems if we look past nine hundred eighty nine the unification process took place in one thousand nine hundred if we look beyond that of course you know it's over made by someone who won't get impressionist politically on the back foot exactly what he said exactly is that he told european union itself together he said if you try to label it's time on the briefing to have a look at the day's newspapers joining me in the studio multiple twenty marcus hippie marcus what we found is often leipzig by erich honecker then leader of east germany he said these demonstrations carry-on ordered the police and the stasi the secret police shoot to kill so that it could have been thing about when they're looking at applications for permanent residency or settle status when it comes to you know all the european union citizens living in this country they will make it i stephen DL thank you very much indeed for joining me in the studio you're listening to the briefing we live on monocle twenty four and the newspapers follow in just a moment awesome as practiced in the soviet bloc was pulled everyone down to a certain level it a dan tag is the rich it's talk from the rich not to give to the poor but the they'd give people was a guaranteed job to job for life keep your head down and talk about politics get on you on march but you'll have a roof over your head you'll have a job you can the european union he's saying that if europe a dozen stop placing pressure on on this on what he's doing now when he's pushing through with this offensive north easy if you've been permanently employed for years and you can show a track record of having paid taxes but there are many parents for example who've been spending years in years at home and haven't had any salary eight month imitations despite having less than a point oh one percent of the number of brain cells in human so scientists dismayed test if he thank you very much indeed joining us on multi for you're listening to the briefing tweet goes basically completely against what's being promised initially there's an awful lot of uncertainty among a lot of nationals of three and a half million or so he live in the UK really clever supposedly there's a big difference between if you're able to count to four or if you're able to count to five and i was being proven that honeybees very often in particularly if they were punished oh hang on right so we have bees that can count which is interesting and then beat the right cards they were given sugary water but if they chose wrong wrong card they were giving given beat a tasting queen and just mean is number two in the UK is possible as well this is soft power gang banana accessible take us through the we've got five records to play you if you if you ah that's settled status is not is not a foregone conclusion very unsettling and also it's very stressful so for so many people obviously i've gone through that process myself SEC as possible but now it sounds like things may be a bit stricter than we have initially assumed in an interview with the german newspaper developed so that was a lot of jealousy a lot of envy of people's who'd saw west was like no why didn't we have this why can't we have it now and so having it it is because for a lot of people all they want to the simple life roof over the heads guarantee of a job and of course by one thing that that soviets stroke social systems it's friday and fernando pacheco is here it means it's time for the global countdown where are we going fay my first time we're going to kosovo brilliant and up beat and if you look at the video clip you know everybody dancing that's why i say in house party you know they're dancing like crazy very lavish men i wanted to have a say about what's happening in this country as well after having followed these things so much mr finish something more positive feminine honeybees surprising hey to be compared different cards one god has had four stars and the other one five or more and the bees way will speak the roy's once i who who can't count i mean a lot of it goes to me again several spin talk about how to how to educate but that's true so so these honeybees that deuce it is huge and lyrical son his his demand for looking for it but if you if you look you know lead revollo singer quite handsome so i think you've got the hip hop you've got the kind of in kosovan rapper and he's one of the biggest hip hop stars in kosovo he pops quite big there as well how big a hip hop scene are we talking here in kosovo reason why i chose actually they have quite a very very good music scene as you know even here in the UK duleep retard both have you know heritage in kosovo and the current kosovo the this this story is pretty much on the front pages of every single newspaper round the wells turkish precedent had raped i bear one has been threatening aw man me league it's a little bit more depressing actually 'cause the songs about a relationship that is being destroyed by jealousy and there's some hip hop beats there as

europe ukraine michael US attorney donald trump washington post ronan US berlin orc alinsky belarus frankfurt white house twenty fifth fifty years thirty three billion dollars twenty five thousand dollar fifteen twenty percent