35 Burst results for "Fifteen Million Dollars"

 Ford to make electric power units in northwest England

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

Ford to make electric power units in northwest England

"Three hundred and fifteen million dollars to turn a transmission factory in north west England into a plan that will make electric power units for cars and trucks sold throughout Europe the carmaker says that the Halewood plant will begin producing the power units which replaced the engine and transmission used in internal combustion engines by mid twenty twenty four capacity is planned to be around two hundred fifty thousand units a year Ford says investment includes a support from the British government though it did not specify the amount Ford

Halewood Plant North West England Europe Ford British Government
Minnesota Governor Announces Changes to Statewide Policing Practices

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Minnesota Governor Announces Changes to Statewide Policing Practices

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting Minnesota's governor announces changes to policing practices Minnesota governor Tim walls in out state wide changes to policing Monday the wall said will increase transparency and accountability walls directed state law enforcement agencies to develop a policy that will allow families of victims killed by officers in those agencies to view body camera footage within five days of the fatal encounter additionally a police misconduct database will be created the executive action also directs fifteen million dollars in grants received via the American rescue plan federal stimulus package for community safety and violence intervention programs walls acted just days after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Shelton was sentenced to twenty two and a half years in prison for the death of George

Mike Rossi Tim Walls Minnesota Derek Shelton Minneapolis George
California giving $116 million to people who get COVID shots

World News This Week

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

California giving $116 million to people who get COVID shots

"Announced one hundred sixteen million dollars in rewards the biggest program in the country including fifteen million dollars to be split amongst ten vaccinated residents meanwhile. Cvs launched its own sweepstakes the newly vaccinated could win a trip to the super bowl or a week on cruise island. Encourage anyone to get the vaccine winning a million dollars as an incentive enough. I don't really know what would be. Some small businesses are offering their own vaccine incentives in florida. A concert venue is charging twenty bucks per ticket. But if you don't have your shot that price rockets to a thousand

Cruise Island CVS Super Bowl Florida
Story of the Cocaine Bear

Ghost Town

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Story of the Cocaine Bear

"It's a tale of drugs planes parachutes in one. Unluckier this epic crime story centered in knoxville. Could soon be coming to the big screen. I read sometimes. Entertainment trades to see what's happening and i saw that elizabeth banks it is in the public arena. This information is out. There is developing a movie about cocaine. Bear and i vaguely remembered something about cocaine bear. I couldn't really place. It did some googling and went down outrageous wormhole that we're going to talk about today. Cocaine beer was briefly. Famous in one thousand nine hundred five when it was found dead in the wilds of kentucky after eating roughly fifteen million dollars worth of cocaine but that is just the tip of the iceberg on september. Eleventh nineteen eighty five and old man in knoxville. Tennessee woke up and went outside where he found the corpse of a man in his driveway. The body had goggles on. It was wearing a bulletproof vest and was strapped to a parachute. The body also had some other interesting features a couple of handguns and fourteen million dollars worth of cocaine on just your everyday morning in knoxville. The man phoned the police and when they arrive they identified the dead body as undersea thornton. The second the wealthy son of an elite kentucky horse breeding family former paratrooper narcotics officer and lawyer. Who left all these jobs. Because they were too boring he left them all to become a drug smuggler. For a ring. Known as the company thorn had received a purple heart after an injury in the dominican republic. He was deployed there during the revolution thornton for real dot board of his life and decided to. It's like the bigger rush. Decided to do more dangerous work than he already was doing which was already very dangerous. On september ninth thornton embarked on a mission with bill leonard. His karate instructor turned bodyguard. The pair hopton assessment for four airplane and flew to mont monteria colombia with plans to pick up four hundred kilograms of cocaine and smuggle it into the us

Knoxville Kentucky Elizabeth Thornton Tennessee Ninth Thornton Dominican Republic Bill Leonard Mont Monteria Colombia United States
Ariana Grande is the highest paid The Voice coach

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

01:51 min | 7 months ago

Ariana Grande is the highest paid The Voice coach

"Ariana grande is now if the highest paid coach ever to be on the voice. Let me give you all the dish. So arianna surprised everybody. When she announced she was joining the voice as a coach is going to be joining blake. Shelton john legend and kelly clarkson forsees in twenty one. She said that she's honored and excited to be joining. The voice family has been a huge fan of the show for a very long time. And you can't wait to go head to head with these incredible coaches and get to meet develop and no. Some new artists have fans will be excited to a does really melted down. She's going to be replacing. Nick jonas. This is a huge for the show an nbc. Let me just give you a few statistics here. Just you figure out how big ariana is on spotify. She's the most streamed artists of the deck. She has eighty two million followers on twitter. Which just is to give you. A comparison is almost double blake. John and kelly come bind myself. Says a telling me she's making the most of anybody on the show. Kelly at the moment makes the most she makes fifteen million dollars. They wanted to get her show. Particularly american idol was coming back. Very smart blake. Shelton ends around thirteen million dollars. Adam levine about the same member and miley. Cyrus was on the show. She got about thirteen million dollars to my sources. Tell me that they don't know the specific amount but they believe that ariana grande day could be getting twenty to twenty five million dollars a season which puts her on par. With what katy. Perry's getting at american idol.

Shelton John Legend Ariana Grande Blake Arianna Kelly Clarkson Nick Jonas NBC Kelly Twitter Adam Levine Shelton John Miley Cyrus Katy Perry
Washington releases Alex Smith following quarterback's Comeback Player of the Year season

Get Up!

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Washington releases Alex Smith following quarterback's Comeback Player of the Year season

"Quickly. I have some news that has just come in from adam. Schefters twitter feed. And it's not a surprise but the washington football team has released alex smith. Who was this year's choice for the nfl's comeback player of the year overwhelmingly. So he has been released. They save almost fifteen million dollars cap space so in an off season. Where does shawn watson might be available. Dak prescott might be available. Russell wilson might be available louis. How interested do you think teams will be alex smith as he becomes available now. I think alex is a tremendous mentor. I think alex would be a tremendous bridge quarterback at this point in time these people are going to really try and connect the dots between him in chicago given his familiarity with matt nagy and that system that they run in chicago like it was in kansas city. I don't think that's a that's the option that they're looking for but look. I have nothing but infinite. Respect for alex smith at any team would be better served having him in their in their quarterback room for sure.

Alex Smith Shawn Watson Dak Prescott Russell Wilson Adam Alex NFL Twitter Football Matt Nagy Washington Louis Chicago Kansas City
What Was The Westward Expansion?

Can We Health You?

07:49 min | 10 months ago

What Was The Westward Expansion?

"Today we're talking about westward expansion. Yes earnings comforting. Yes in the united states yes so in eighteen zero three president. Thomas jefferson bought the territory of louisiana from the french government. For fifteen million dollars. This was known as the louisiana purchase. That was a lot of money back then. It was a ton of money. I wonder what it translates to today. Do that just curious know sure. It's like billions of dollars. Yeah so that. Land stretched from the mississippi river to the rocky mountains and from canada to new orleans so that like mid section it doubled the previous size of the then young united states and as as soon as jefferson signed the treaty. He sent the explorers lewis and clark to find a route to the pacific ocean. Many other explorers made the journey as well and so began the expansion of the country to jefferson. Westward expansion was the key to the nation's health. Jefferson believed that a republic depended on an independent virtuous citizenry for survival and that independence. Virtue went hand in hand with landownership especially up small farms. He wrote quote those who labor. The earth are the chosen people have gone. Wow yeah it doesn't correlate to me but okay yeah right so you're virtuous visuals and land or work. Yeah ok you work. Land make something from it. Honest work i suppose. Yeah if you're thinking kind of thing you take away like what we know about him. I'm think stop thinking of him as a person and the right he wanted the country to expand. And i think he planted the seed for the pioneers. Till i look you know you can go right. Make something something for yourself. Yeah so in. But in order for jefferson's dream for the country to come to fruition expansion had to happen so he maybe the country the dream of the country came first. And then thought okay. I need to have more land People to do So while the westward expansion is one of the defining themes of the nineteenth century american history. This growth was certainly fraught with struggle and won't get into that way by almost about forty years later. Nearly seven million americans forty percent of the nation's population now lived in this area. Well they know that way from eight eighteen three from eighteen hundred eight forty k. So pretty quick. Wake seven million. That's pretty big. Most people left their homes in the east and followed lewis and clark across the country as promised they were searching for economic opportunity like jefferson. Many of these painters believed that they would find land to farm trusting that ownership would lead to freedom in nineteen eighty five. Sorry wow a lot in eighteen forty five. A journalist named john o'sullivan put a name to this idea. That helped pull the pioneers to the west. He said that it was americans. Manifest destiny to carry quote the great experiment of liberty to the edge of the continent. O'sullivan wrote that. The survival of american freedom dependent on it and it was their duty to quote again Overspread and to possess the whole of the land which the providence has given us an quote the providence of meaning. I think the providence of light. What they were given like the land that was before them. It's here so is ours to take. Even though it wasn't i mean. Is that kinda what they get this kind of the way. I remember from Es three class and talking about manifest destiny asked yeah so this became a widely held cultural beliefs which carried the following themes the special virtues of the american people in their institutions the mission of the us to redeem in remake the west in the image of the east and an ear irresistible destiny to accomplish this essential duty so was disappointed was so arranged of area. Right ideas are planted in their head. Like if you go out there you will make your money. you'll survive you'll be happy. Happiness is just. Yep exactly yeah you'll have your own lambs have all the freedom that you'll have yeah So that term became controversial. You know throughout time. Meanwhile meanwhile while this kind of happening the question of whether slavery would carry onto to the west was at hand around this time. The missouri compromise was made which attempted to resolve the question of whether or not slavery would be allowed in the new western states That the louisiana purchase sort of like you know was responsible for create Them so this whether slavery would be in. These new states shadowed almost every conversation about the frontier. The compromise admitted missouri to the union as a slave state and may had to change main to a free state had they needed to have. They had to preserve the fragile balance in congress between us owning states in nonstop hunting state. Yes i say. I'm surprised that main was asleep. At i mean because she just think of the south. But i know. I'm know an i don't really know actually slave-owning or they like the changes such. Yeah just to keep that the same number okay. Half-and-half just have to say i know going. Forward as policy was made progressing through that it was always taken into account those southern states or the slave owning states. How making sure that they get what they want. It always had to be part of the conversation. Yeah it's crazy for another strong decade. A yeah i think even on that of course of an attorney but while they're formation was been the biggest conversation sure. Oh yes right. See that the okay. So the missouri compromise also stipulated that slavery would be prohibited north of the southern boundary of missouri. So the the thirty six degree latitude line okay It couldn't be north. Slavery couldn't be north of that but missouri was north of that so i think like after missouri said that they were going to be a slave. Nobody else could that was it. Yeah grandfathered in so many. Many thought of sullivan's manifest destiny was a secret term for spreading slavery. Really yes who thought that the people that wanted slavery or did not want to read. You know the people in the north okay. They thought it was. They thought it was like a secret term for light taking it over there. Really conspiracy theory Despite the many conflicts Far more complicated detailed for wondering really what. Everybody's wondering about the food. Because that's what i talk about sure. That's what we're here for

Jefferson French Government Louisiana Clark Lewis United States Thomas Jefferson Rocky Mountains Mississippi River Pacific Ocean Missouri John O'sullivan New Orleans Canada Sullivan
A Proposal To Burn Ethereum Transaction Fees

The Cryptoverse

09:20 min | 11 months ago

A Proposal To Burn Ethereum Transaction Fees

"So a proposal to ben a theory of transaction fees. This is coming from an e. Ip which i will link in the show notes feliciano e ip stands by theory improvements proposal. So now i'll do is. I'm going to read just the abstract on the summary from this thing. And then i'll give you my comments on it. So i actually came across this on git hub. This thing. was originally created in april two thousand and nineteen and has been in development since then and this is all according to harvard and give hope they've logged all of their calls developing development team and if the regulating the less meeting they had on this particular thing was The thet december twenty twenty. So this roy up to date in fact the less meeting that they had at the summary notes for the goal from the december he says generally feeling is that there was enough robust analysis and research with this improvement to begin discussing the next steps in the process i e how to move forward introducing too old cord avs and the theory of maintenance exciting. So that's how close they says to going onto the maintenance right. I think perfected over the of the last year or something booked with talking yet. So they're improvement. Proposal fifteen fifty nine fee market for one point out so. This is an improvement for the existing chain while ago gates shoes on so the simple summary is this is a transaction pricing mechanism. They includes a fixed pad block network feet that is bend and dynamically expands or contracts block sizes to deal with transient congestion. So what does that mean the problem. We have right now. They've got a difficult forming problems with the existing model. The fed will quote is a mismatch between volatility of transaction fee levels and the social cost transactions. The basically say that you one minute. You can have a Network free that's two hundred times what it was a minute ago right depending on just massive spikes in demand for network resources and stuff like that which seemed ridiculous. It's completely unpredictable. At second problem. Is it ends up. With needless delays for uses so does no good as socially unproductive as they call it. Where was the slack in the system to meet block by block demand while that would be met by so the listrik book sized that goes up if the blocks full and goes down if the blocks unfaithful pretty sweet scandal like the big oin difficulty. Adjustment mechanism is for blocksize. Rather than mining difficulty kind of kind of climate also says the problem is the inefficiencies of first price auctions. So what that means. Is that The minute of its to use sophisticated algorithms to estimate what fee to charge the uses of the wallet. And even though they're you know that just doesn't work. Right you end up overpaying the fee or you think you can get confirmation fifteen seconds and it takes three minutes and then you have to submit the transaction again with a high of face. Just it's just a mess right. And then the third thing is they will they call the instability of blue with no block reward. And they say well think about in the long run blockchain bitcoin. They intend to switch to rewarding minus entirely on transaction fees. You know when the bitcoin blocker would reaches next to nothing and they said will there were no issues with this kind of thing instability and so on selfish mining attack vectors and does no good solution for this at present. So what they're proposing to do is twofold one is have. This elects the block size thing where grows books of fold and shrinks of block saw you know novel and then also introduced a different pricing mechanism for transaction fees which would be that would be to to transaction fee going forward one would be this fixed a transaction fee pueblo. Which again go up and down with the blocksize. So you pay that and that base based transaction fee pet blog which would be absolutely known that would get burned right so like i spent boom johnson. Then if you wanna make sure that said your transaction gets into the blog than you can include an additional minor. Bribe as they call on top of the base fee said the minor didn't get any of the because we know that gets burned but they would get the minor bribe and the block reward so they still get two sources of revenue. The blocker would that remains the same They get the minor bribe and then they base fee gets burned. Okay well you might think well as because she's gonna cause the same problem as we've got now no it's not because was different now. Is that the book. Size is going to expand and contract so even if you don't include a minor bribe your wallet will know what the current fixed block transaction fee is and it will know what the next one is as well. So that means that in your wallet when meta mascow. Whatever will you're using. It will be able to quote you very precise transaction fees and the predictability of how soon that will go through and get confirmed. He's also much more set in than is now so that's does really right. You want the detail on how this works. Technically they've even got technical specification and a bunch of solidity code solidity code of how this will work including houses going to be backwards compatible. And how do you order. Transactions and blahdy blahdy. Bob so does that well. If you want my comments on this area. I think this should have been the design of a theory from day. One in fact. When i stood at dairy month old. This was high worked. A thought will gas right. if it's fuel surely is being burned and destroyed and took me quite a while to find out that that wasn't the case to find out the miners. Who gained all these fees on the blogger would which i four was bombing. The second thing is that if this does get implemented nobody does. It will be a massive economic boom for the theory token as an a theory in token hold. I'd be well pleased with this. Especially this would have a big effect on theory and stop the flow ratio. Which of course is top of my mind right. Now since i'm studying under safety and moose and his new book fiat standard. I'm a fan of the standard at any way. But you know that's what sir. I'm studying day to day right now. So i'm always thinking slow. Soaked floor ratio so this proposal would mean that the stock of a theory and will be constantly being reduced to offset some of the inflation for the mining rewards at the minute. He's just constantly inflating with booker woods. there's no destruction. there's no system level destruction anyway might accidentally send some their into the wrong address or whatever but the system doesn't doesn't create any deflation and this would do so on that point while we're talking about you but if i go to f gas station dot info it does have a leaderboard of the biggest guest banners right so actually lofton's articles the the They put on. The side is cold gas burners but as we know until this is implemented this proposal they don't banning gas at all alley just fees going through the contract to the minus with the number one. Let's call him guest bene- right now on the network is the union contract and in the last thirty days the amount of transaction fees going through that contract is twelve point. Seven million dollars worth of ethereal. Oh near enough to day. Two thousand f has been spent on transaction vs pretty significant amount if this proposal was implemented that would mean that in the last days unique swap would be responsible for destroying the two thousand ethereal just brilliant bending they two thousand theorem just from the fees that uses paint to use union swamp great and then tether another twenty six thousand theory would be banned in the last days because of that. So if you wanna in theory times these they say two thousand if theory of the what would ban twenty six thousand. That ted would ban if you want in. Us dollar terms it means units will be bending fifteen million dollars of theorem everyday days and tether will be betting ten million everyday days. I think those would go though. Remember is the capacity of the network would increase with this elastic book size so every time a block is full the next book slightly bigger so absolutely balmy so when when when the network is congested well more transactions go through every book which means more theory and guest band so the busy of the network is the more fees get panda. The big of the fees is self fulfilling prophecy. So i'm of course i'm talking from an economic point of view. If you're in a theory of togo you'd you definitely want this to be implemented because it it. It makes a theory more scarce doesn't it because it's bending the stalk of a theory all the time

Feliciano Meta Mascow Harvard BEN FED Booker Woods Johnson BOB Lofton TED United States Togo
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | 1 year ago

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

"For many of us, Monday nights sieve Longman, Monday, night football. So today's a good day to consider a shakeup in the football world. The potential revival of a would be competitor to the National Football League last week actor and former pro wrestler Dwayne the Rock Johnson with other investors bought a start-up Football League called the xfl this take some explanation especially to those who aren't avid sports fans. Let's start with the xfl contrary to popular belief. The NFL doesn't football is just had a monopoly for the most part for so long that most. Most people consider it an institution for the last couple of decades though rivals have attempted to build new leagues to compete with the. NFL. The XFL is one of those its roots began way back in the year two, thousand when World Wrestling Federation chairman. Vince. McMahon decided to build a league that could compete with the NFL NBC Cohen the League and planned to carry its games the XFL plan to extend the football season by playing games from just after the Super Bowl in February. Until late April. Now, at the time league owners, hopes were high that the Saturday night games could Wu and elusive audience TV. Teenage boys according to CNN. Vince McMahon. WWF had been almost magical in its ability to appeal to twelve to twenty four year. Old Males who typically don't stay home watching TV on Saturday nights. The xfl hoped McMahon could bring that WWF formula to football and win that desirable TV audience, and for one brief moment, it looked like their hopes were within reach the first game in two thousand, one drew more than fifteen million viewers a massive audience. That gold ring looked close and yet it turned out to be so far away as the season wore on audiences spell like a botched handoff after that single season, the xfl shutdown. Sometimes in life timing really is everything, and so it goes for Vince McMahon who decided that twenty twenty would be the right time to revive the xfl it launched in February, pitching the Seattle dragons against the DC defenders teams played five games among both players and owners. Optimism rained TV audiences varied by geography, but were decent enough that by March believe was well into planning the twenty twenty, one season. And then Kobe came along the League canceled the season March twentieth less than a month. Later, the XFL filed for bankruptcy sports writers added the xfl lists of other WanNa, NFL competitors who'd also tried to make a go of it over the years. The XFL seemed to be just another failed startup, but perhaps they declared the league's death too soon. Let's get back to Dwayne Johnson better known as the Rock Johnson actually started his career as a football player, but never made it to the NFL instead, he joined Vince McMahon's wwf where he quickly rose to superstardom before retiring to become an actor, he's now the highest paid actor in the world according to Forbes. With his business partner Danny Garcia who also happens to be his ex wife, the rock led the fifteen million dollar purchase of the. xfl. Out of Bankruptcy Sports Management Company redbird capital as a third partner. Johnson says the purchase was actually Garcia's idea she loves football and when the XFL declared bankruptcy, she saw their chance to own not just a team but an entire league not to get too grand about this. Consider that the salary of a single NFL football star say. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak. Prescott is thirty, one million dollars. That's more than double what the partners paid for the xfl which has eight teams. Still, the deal made headlines. Perhaps it's a bit of hopeful light entertainment amidst the onslaught of grim. News in two thousand, twenty, Garcia. Johnson. Say They plan to produce multimedia content for fans year round, not just during the active spring season at production time, they hadn't yet said when the League will start to play again.

XFL National Football League Football League Vince Mcmahon Football Dwayne Johnson WWF Twenty Twenty Danny Garcia Partner Bankruptcy Sports Management C Dallas Cowboys CNN WU Seattle Kobe Chairman Nbc Cohen
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson buys XFL for $15 million with partner RedBird Capital

Monsters In The Morning

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson buys XFL for $15 million with partner RedBird Capital

"The Rock Johnson just kicked down fifteen million dollars for this -rageous happened right now, Mona The rock just bought some of the fifteen million dollars. He bought the xfl he bought the X. F.. Portico and a couple other news outlets profootballtalk one other one of the ones that are running with this. And he kicked down they'll pay a total of fifteen million dollars splitting the price equally with who else is he buying it with with? Your Boy Vincent Man Oh Heaven Vincent man going into into together. They're going to basically reform. triangularly and bring the xfl back and I'm thinking that you're commissioner, your voice, your face, your you know you're the guy that's going to sell it and bring it in resuscitate. This is going to be Wayne the Rock Johnson. that. That's a that's a good combination like it Russ you. Don't to like I don't hate the Rock I just think that he should do more in his. Ready to run through his social media for the next few years my God it's all we're gonNA hear Tequila in football hair. Better than. that. COMB. Song. Tequila. Hit Wow what he is he doesn't do things haphazardly. You know like he puts a lot of thought into everything that he does. Something partner with him is actually redbird capital, Dwayne the Rock Johnson and redbird capital of purchased on. This is hours before it was went to auction. He was GonNa go to oxygen today they bow. Press the buy it now price at fifteen million dollars and grabbed it and So I guess it was thirty they're splitting the difference I guess pay. PORTLAND. For we have a pandemic. Was it doing okay. Yes. It was. It was there was doing it was. Okay it was doing. All right. You had a couple markets. The Seattle team was doing really well I think the Saint Louis team was doing really well. So there was a couple of pockets of our teams that were doing really phenomenal. The product didn't look bad. Bad and then they had the you know they had the partners broadcast partners. It's I, mean you know if you're trying to usher this league in and it's a very expensive to try to start obviously professional football league there's been a ton of these guys are trying to start this. And so when you know pandemic hits and you're having to shut down operations in. Many things are going to survive that and especially Startup League. Yeah you get rock involved a lot of people like him her. I'm trying to think if it's you know. Everyone is running with Tequila and football.

Rock Johnson Football Portico Redbird Capital Russ Vincent Man Tequila Startup League Commissioner Portland Wayne Seattle Partner Saint Louis Dwayne
Biden takes aim at Trump's coronavirus response

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Biden takes aim at Trump's coronavirus response

"Seems hard to believe, but as of today we're now within one hundred days general election, which falls on November the third today, the Biden campaign rolled out a new ad that takes aim at the president's stumbling response to the corona virus. The AD is part of an almost fifteen million dollar ad buy in six states at the president one in two thousand, sixteen, Florida, Arizona, Wisconsin Michigan North Carolina and Pennsylvania. The president's failure to address the pandemic continues to hurt him in poll after

President Trump Biden North Carolina Wisconsin Michigan Florida Pennsylvania Arizona
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 1 year ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Rihanna and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey donate $15m toward mental health services via her nonprofit

Rush Limbaugh

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Rihanna and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey donate $15m toward mental health services via her nonprofit

"Riana is continuing to reach out to those in need through her foundation the Clara Lionel foundation announced a fifteen million dollar donation in collaboration with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to several organizations dedicated to mental health services food security and income loss to people in Newark and Chicago the donation is part of Dorsey's hash tag start small initiative

Riana Jack Dorsey Newark Chicago Clara Lionel Twitter CEO
NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

The Topical

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

"The National Rifle Association it may be one of America's most storied institutions, but it's also become a lightning rod for controversy, and that's led to some serious lackluster fundraising numbers. In fact, the NRA is experienced, significant financial struggles losing tens of millions of dollars over just the past few years. That might be about to change today. Thanks to some new fundraising initiatives by the Organization for more return to OPR's national national rifle association correspondent Marcy Hammond Hello Marcy. Hi Leslie allows you mentioned. The NRA has been struggling severely for donations this year, but there seems to be a writing of the ship taking place. Place as the NRA today has reported a massive funding increase from donors held at gunpoint tactic. How much money are we talking over the past quarter? The NRA says it's raised over fifteen million dollars from donors who are awoken in bed with a pistol in their face, informed with a child, and a playground is within an NRA. Snipers range, or simply grabbed armed fundraisers on the street

NRA National Rifle Association Marcy Hammond OPR Gunpoint America Leslie
NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

The Topical

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

"The National Rifle Association it may be one of America's most storied institutions, but it's also become a lightning rod for controversy, and that's led to some serious lackluster fundraising numbers. In fact, the NRA is experienced, significant financial struggles losing tens of millions of dollars over just the past few years. But that might be about to change today thanks to some new fundraising initiatives by the organization. more we For turn to OPR's national national rifle association correspondent Marcy Hammond hello Marcy. Hi Leslie allows you mentioned the NRA has been struggling severely for donations this year, but there seems to be a righting of the ship taking as the NRA today has reported a massive funding increase from donors held at gunpoint. Interesting tactic how much money are we talking? Over the past quarter The NRA says it's raised over fifteen million dollars from donors who are awoken in bed with a pistol in their face, informed with a child in a playground is within an NRA snipers range, or simply grabbed armed fundraisers on the

NRA National Rifle Association Marcy Hammond OPR America Leslie
You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:08 min | 1 year ago

You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

"Earlier in this week we talked about how the tech industry should either hire more people of color or invest in them higher or wire on that ladder idea. The past few days have seen a few commitments from established venture funds. Softbank, launch. Day One hundred million dollar fund support people of Color Andriessen Horowitz launched at two point. Two Million Dollar Fund to support founders from quote underserved communities with a plan to expand it to fifteen million dollars over time, but if we're being honest here. That's not that much syrup. Kunst is the managing director of CLEO capital. They are real amounts of money, but compared to the size of the industry and the amount of underfunding that has happened. Black founders get less than two percent of all venture capital dollars, despite being fifteen percent of the population and starting companies at disproportionately high rates so that historical imbalance is certainly not going to be solved with you know these cumulative called one hundred fifteen million dollars in commitments that one hundred. Hundred fifteen million humility is already small, and then when you realize that it's not particularly earmarked for black or Hispanic, underrepresented minorities, you have to question how much is actually going to get into the hands of the people who you know have historically been underfunded the most right, and also, if we were talking about structural change, white year, mark money at all exactly and I think you know my fund cleo capital. We don't have a mandate around gender diversity that being said you know. Know, my portfolio is incredibly diverse. We have a lot of black founders. We have a lot of Asian and Indian in Hispanic founders. You know we. We have a lot of gay founders like we've. We just find great people and we invest in them, and they make us a lot of money are two best. Performing companies in the portfolio are founded by women of Color, and the other one is founded by a man of color and his business partner in both are immigrants the exact. Exact things that people are saying. How do we do it? How do we find it? We have to have this carve-out or this sort of remedial training or whatever it is, there are funds like mind that have just been able to do it and we're making a lot of money from doing it i. mean there's research that shows trillions of dollars is being left on the table by not investing in more founders of color like why isn't that economic argument working if nothing else? I mean we see the same thing with gender right I have been on NPR I've been on these shows a lot to talk about gender and race over the years, and we saw a lot of these same things after me to where you know, there's massive economic arguments right? There's only really two schools of thought you either fundamentally believe that only white men are capable of greatness, which is a really thought that I hope you're very quiet about or you're leaving money on the table, and there's not really another. There's not really another option, and and so I think. Think when people realize that, and when people except that, they say oh, I'm leaving money on the table. And by the way the job of venture capital is not to invest in a museum founders.

Cleo Capital Managing Director Andriessen Horowitz Softbank Partner
Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

"Two a prominent DC based think tank the Aspen Institute is returning eight million dollars it got from the feds as part of the corona virus relief package just yesterday Aspin argue the small business aid was needed to keep its four hundred thirty person staff employed the aspen institute has a one hundred fifteen million dollar endowment and several billionaires are on its board of trustees the decision comes a day after the Washington post reported the institute got the loan it joins the LA Lakers and shake shack and among the businesses that have gotten federal money and then chosen to give

Aspen Institute Aspin Washington Post La Lakers
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Call when you do call don't be too stone place how much to throw this will be a little demonstration of those mice call yesterday our mayor said that she is very serious about the city growing its own recreational marijuana to give minorities a chance to learn the business and sharing the wealth the governor also praises idea so Lorelai fund set up to fifteen million dollars which will be used as seed money for the plan to open up a cooperative cultivation center that residence caller could buy into either with a modest cash investment or was sweat equity Lightfoot said the idea is aimed at overcoming the biggest impediment to minority ownership access to capital because it costs tall cake what I understand is that the basics to be a cultivator requires about a thirteen to fifteen million dollars and investment they're not a lot of people that have that have that particular in a market that a lot of banks and other traditional financial wonders won't touch so now I know that the city is in a lot of different businesses I get that but can it can somebody else tell me a similar sort of a similar sort of endeavor that the the baby had the the the city has invested in previously we're gonna actually own as a city of pot farm I think the only way to really crack this not as.

marijuana Lightfoot
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Is the Chad Benson shelf let's look a like a sleepy weekend at the box office thanks to doctor sleep always called the shine already sequel the Stephen king's the shining looks like it'll debut in first place with a twenty five million dollar more opening and a four isn't your thing there's the rom com last Christmas I'm busy aware story Millia Clark and Henry Golding that's looking at a fifteen million dollars so debut in that same range there's also the World War two drama midway and the family comedy playing with fire might struggle with under ten million not a Jack and I go to see a movie tomorrow we get a big hit we have big day going to see a movie and watch LSU game and she was the spam I'll be fine from going to be there so it'll be crazy I told misses the gad let's go see a movie a so we want to say is that I put this movie is so we can see Midwest it's it's but it's a you know slot action it might I ask my friends do certain bunches section craziness inside you know terms like not really is nothing like that language and lots of shooting is cartoon image that robot for god sakes of whites are right but doctor sleep I have no desire to see doctor sleep it is very interesting list Rosenberg who is the entertainer Porter for I guess Washington post she says she walked out just do it yeah she said that she got enough she said she wants you to know that it's okay to walk out of movies or just don't enter life too short just a note that sometimes you think a movie will be up your alley it is it I get that right I've I I don't I was really into the shining I've seen it a bunch of time I just never did anything I just like a you're a big giant scary and it's it was more psychological and I'm still an old fashioned horror guy and it just did nothing for me and doctor sleep just looks like in some I'm not interested in three two three five three twenty four twenty three ads have been to chose your Twitter we have a name alert we have a name alerts somebody who may run for president because this point now you guys know yes yes Kanye west he's got some for you when the four points to call me isn't a millionaire people say it's class to call yourself a billionaire I'm I legally change my name to genius billionaire Kanye west four years in jail understand exactly what it is he's not a cure would do what he says he is he is fire people techno what do you talk about in the city that's a really says your life well that's not the yeah well no come on tell me tell me always in any so I thought.

Stephen king Chad Benson twenty five million dollar fifteen million dollars four years
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Like a lot of money away to Ukraine and other places you want to see your country that's going to be not the president is a good man he got elected on the fact that he was going to get rid of corruption in Ukraine and that's I think the primary reason he got elected so we give selected on the basis of ending corruption in Ukraine well I think that's good and that's what I want to see but when Biden does a thing like that it is still corruption and that's not good. the question will be who is hunter Biden what did he do all I know that he did it he took a job on the Ukrainian big gas natural gas company for fifty thousand dollars a month for five years so that you do the math of your Steelers fan fifty thousand dollars a month what is that that's three million dollars a year for five years fifteen million dollars why was hunter Biden hired for that. did Joe Biden's intervention with the Ukrainian government have anything to do with that company and hunter Biden second question. we got on tape an admission of what he did and then what a drum set we'll find that out too you'll find out that really factor dot com works if you'll try it the starter pack of nineteen dollars and ninety five cents a starter pack is what makes it work for you the starter pack is the way to go all you have to do is get that starter pack from relief factor that come give it three weeks nineteen dollars and ninety five cents like carrying American Rivera Chalker come in the for natural supplements the combined provide support for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains that are plaguing a weather in Minnesota but they're driving around in Florida you're making a long commute from the Inland Empire in LA or Orange County. you're stuck on the ninety one you're stuck on the fifty five you're stuck on the tent of the sixty wherever you are in the United States if you're driving right now on your near in the middle of Atlanta yeah I to give relief factor dot com I tried to set Talbot put this together and works for you so.

Ukraine president hunter Biden Joe Biden Ukrainian government Minnesota Florida Inland Empire LA United States Talbot Steelers Orange County. Atlanta fifty thousand dollars nineteen dollars five years fifteen million dollars three million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KOMO

"Filed in Chicago by a Russian aircraft leasing company claims Boeing failed to disclose information about the air worthiness of the Max Boeing has declined to comment on this latest legal move the jet has been grounded worldwide after the crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia there are reports that the Max could be flying again as soon as October the FAA last week said that it would invite pilots from around the world to spend time in the Max simulators in addition to cancelling its order for thirty five MAX jets the Russian firm is also seeking one hundred and fifteen million dollars in compensatory damages there's a new threats to local trees the Hokkaido gypsy moth the ever hear reports that this destructive passed from Japan has been spotted in what way not far from admins devastation be really quite appalling Andrea dis there with the department of natural resources the gypsy moth program specifically she says the hungry tree munching mas love evergreens the past likely reach Washington aboard a freighter from Asia sickle cell anemia is a fairly rare blood disease that doesn't get a lot of attention these days and yet the one hundred thousand or so people in the U. S. who live with it often suffer excruciating episodes of pain in a world where getting a doctor to prescribe pain medication can be a battle we get a close on up but a close up on this rather from Kamel's Carly Johnson September is sickle cell awareness month something you may have learned about in high school talking genetics as it's an inherited blood disorder and no one really in my family do anything about that also but by the time he was a teenager the pain was often overwhelming for can west who serves as president of the Seattle sickle cell task force he would often end up in the hospital throughout my team in twenty pretty much once a month with the crisis sickle shed blood cells don't deliver enough oxygen to organs and tissues as healthy blood cells do that cause a slow damage over decades it is most common in the African American community or one in thirteen carry the genetic trait for sickle cell what is a pain like we can describes it starting out like someone snapping a rubber band on your wrist a little painful to begin with but then a graduate so the pain escalate where it's kind of like someone just feeding your wrist with a hammer and when pain is that excruciating nothing but narcotics will even come close to helping and if you end up in an easy are you haven't been in before a different doctor a sickle cell patients can often run into roadblocks and labels we get labeled as a drug seeker is simply because we typically use high doses of narcotics that thing in and that sends a warning bell K. D. hall has a four year old daughter was sickle cell the ethical fell Michael would it look like you know he's a pilot you know full very athletic and so that's something that we work we're going to continue to encourage her to be after that activity is really good for people analytical fail next month September fourteenth at Seward park all west and others are gonna want to raise money and awareness for sickle cell anemia research is key to getting the disease defeated you can find out more online at M. S. S. C. E. T. F. dot org for the metropolitan Seattle sickle cell task.

Chicago Boeing fifteen million dollars four year
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"A lot of talk for people frankly don't know what to talk about about negotiating with foreign countries they don't actually know what's going on comes you're talking about people who are negotiating with another company at all but this is in from Robert kind of interesting the next time to roll call since he knows all and sees all and on from life you might assume this how is it that of all the presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton were the only two that enter the presidency without two nickels to rub together and each of them left multi millionaires you might ask him why his hero Barack Obama I'm Mr climate change has just bought a fifteen million dollar seaside home in Martha's vineyard I'm sure that he'll be able to answer that since he knows all our presence yeah wasn't the fact is that it broke a bomber I actually believe that the seas were about to rise probably about the last thing you do is send out fifteen million dollars to Bossman rather fifty million dollars in order to have yourself a nice view of the ocean that rises swamps your home you're talking about a damp basement pretty much do it in like a build a dike around it just like you know the the Netherlands and and how you can do that because the special be you know Ireland Allama near mint the clear themselves are separate nation once that happens widget Graham takes interesting point if you are what the president's doing by the way in the middle of this trade dispute he was yesterday on face the nation on CBS and said he believes that in order to get China to change its trade practices we will actually have to experience some economic pain but that it is worth it every Democrat and every public and of note has said China cheats the Democrats for years and claiming that China should be stood up to now trump is and we just got to accept the pain that comes with standing up to China how do you get China the change without creating some pain on them and us I don't know yeah how do you get them to change the question is who has more bullets in the gun as it were in in the Goshen in terms and the economists who take a look at this say well it would appear that we do curiously because no they sell a whole lot more to us than we sell to them they put a terrace on our stuff going that way but don't don't have the ability to put terrace on as many things going that way so at the core their businesses are suffering worse than our businesses of any kind and now that the president is negotiated this deal with Japan the biggest alleviate some of the pressure on on from from the farm clocks be very straightforward this is the way it works Stephen notion talking yesterday with reporters and be a rich and Francis said historically our relationship with China has been incredibly lopsided.

fifteen million dollars fifteen million dollar fifty million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"Giving away like homecourt advantage, a free slot in the playoffs with what, how does that work? You could do something like that. I think you know, something I talk about fifteen million dollars in a pot and trust me guys will play for that. And yeah, they're star makes thirty but he, he wants to win it for the guy who makes the minimum you know, that doubles his salary and that and I think overtime, I think one of the things that happens is it will seem hokey, I think, for the first couple of years, I think people who didn't grow up with, including the players will see, like is this real? Then what happens is overtime the league filters out and guys who up watching the tournament is kids, not an with their brackets, all the sudden overtime the tournament starts to take on the kind of imported has in European leagues when soccer and basketball and that, you know, it's a process like, I, I think, in in your sudden, now the primary target audience, our viewers who just didn't know that there was anything other tournament that actually meant something and in people cared about, so, yeah, I think it I don't think it's perfect, like, I have my skepticism, you You know can know. Americans we talked to be American European soccer fans. I don't know. But I think you can create the incentives that make it real and really at the end of the day, it goes back to this. Right. Which is itself and sell globally, you can distribute that to eight billion people, but right? And you just that gets, gene, her money that gets Jim Dolan, his money, the owners would lose big time in a situation where you take away six eight home dates, you know, and then they have to renegotiate local broadcast got revenue that take here, take this money. And by the way overtime, the meaningful regular season.

Jim Dolan soccer basketball fifteen million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Have been told not to fly the rainbow pride flag on their flagpoles for LGBTQ pride month, according to various reports number of embassies asked for permission to raise the rainbow flag on their poles. But the Trump administration said, no though some of getting around that a photo posted on the website of the US embassy in Austria shows the pride flag flying just below the American flag on a pole jutting out from the building reportedly the pride flag is also being hung from. The exterior walls of some embassies. The administration issued its position on embassy pride flags. Even though President Trump himself tweeted, his recognition of pride month wrought, your star and Fox News. The estranged husband arrested in the disappearance of Connecticut, mother has hired a high profile attorney photos, dulas, enlisted norm. Pat, is to defend him Patas represents Alex Jones, the publisher of info wars sued by the families of sandy hook school shooting victims Delos is in jail on five hundred thousand dollars bail. Jennifer Delos was reported missing more than two weeks ago. A North Carolina team continues to recover from shark attack. Seventeen year old page winter lost part of her leg following a shark attack last week at fort Macon state park off the North Carolina coast. Now, doctors are working to save her hands. She underwent fourteen hours of reconstructive surgery and other is scheduled for next week after page was initially airlifted to a Greenville, hospital or family credits. The girl's father with fighting off the shark afterward attack. Act in waist, deep water, Tom Graham, Fox News you Orleans Saints quarterback drew Brees and his wife are battling a California jeweler over the value of diamonds, the couple bought the diamonds for more than fifteen million dollars. They claim they were defrauded paying for more than wholesale and costs as agreed that jeweler denies a wholesale agreement. The breeze also say the diamonds were pleased in painted settings to defend their color armature Jordan. And this is Fox News. If you're eighty five or younger, would you like peace of mind and comfort for your family?.

Jennifer Delos Fox News North Carolina Trump fort Macon state park US Pat Connecticut sandy hook school Austria President Greenville Tom Graham dulas Brees attorney Orleans Saints publisher Alex Jones
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And his way latte and Uganda where we just saw that aestheticians from Costa Mesa. She was kidnapped five hundred thousand dollar ransom. Don't know whether or not it was paid as soon as it was and she was released, but she's perfect example of Uganda. So there you go if you're going if you're traveling anywhere abroad, you might wanna check the State Department's list of the K indicators for your kidnapping potential if all right? So how much does it cost to keep Mark Zuckerberg safe? Now, remember the guy takes an official salary of dollar a year. He did not receive bonuses or stock awards in two thousand eighteen but his total compensation jumped from nine point one million in two thousand seventeen to twenty two point six million in twenty eighteen at what was that? Twenty two point six million four it covered the increase insecurity costs for the high profile CEO. Apparently there have been specific threats against Zuckerberg and its high visibility his high visibility. So we're. Talking personal security at his home. And when he travels because people are pissed about Facebook. And how all of their information was sold and got out there, and you know, the Analytica that whole scandal with the two thousand sixteen election. So they're they're still upset about that. And apparently, Mark Zuckerberg took those threats rather seriously. So it costs twenty two million dollars to keep Mark Zuckerberg safe last year and speaking money game of thrones. I I'm not I'm not a fan. I'm sorry. I shouldn't say that. I'm not a fan. I've never watched it. So I don't know. Maybe I would be a fan of I watched it. Anyway, last night was the big season opener of the vinyl season of game of thrones, billions of people probably watched it is the Bella producer Isabela was talking about how she's trying to go to bed and her parents have it blasting in the house. I love that anyway season. Eight will be the most expensive one yet. According to variety, we don't have confirmation for mayo. But according to. Variety magazine, the episodes are estimated to cost how much how much do you think each episode costs? I'm giving you three seconds three to fifteen million dollars each. At eighty episodes of the final four are expected to run eighty minutes per episode, but fifteen million dollars. A lot of money. And if you go to KFI AM six forty dot com this morning, he would wake up call. You're going to see one of the stupidest things I think I've ever seen in my life. How about a hot pocket sleeping bag day? You too can become a human hot pocket, and doesn't everybody wanna be think? Geek is the company and selling them online for eighty dollars. And they're designed just to look like the micro microwaveable sandwich down to the cooking instructions, and which side is up Cording to the website, custom microwave with today's the insulation system ensures your extremities, stay toasty and integrated Krispies leave for maximum retention stupid. Stupid stupid. If you're willing to sell out eighty dollars for that. Have abridged combined this KFI in Keio HD, two Los Angeles..

Mark Zuckerberg Uganda KFI State Department Costa Mesa kidnapping Variety magazine Isabela Facebook CEO official Los Angeles Keio producer fifteen million dollars eighty dollars five hundred thousand dollar twenty two million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KOMO

"The state can't afford to wait another year for action to protect the orcas. Something is killing dozens of swans around Monroe and crescent lake more from komo's Carleen Johnson. We're talking about the largest waterfowl in North America and the largest swan in the world. Trumpeter swans since March seventeenth the Everett herald reports more than fifty of them have been found dead or dying in an area south of Monroe and into north King County more than two dozen of them turned up dead near crescent lake that's a major night roost for swans this time of year state fish and wildlife and the north west swan conservation association said swans often ingest lead shot while feeding so they're going to test their livers to see if that's what's killed them. The lead shot causes paralysis in their digestive system lead shot his band for waterfowl hunting in our state has been since the early nineties, but swans can still pick up at ingest lead shot while foraging. Elsewhere Carleen Johnson. Komo news report shows, south King County school districts are not meeting the needs of their students. This is according to the students themselves the community center for education results surveyed about seven thousand high school students and most of them said they're not getting adequate college and career prep at school. Some say they have to take pre college or remedial classes. If they go to a two year college a couple of north west based air force officers have been relieved of duty after the units were investigated for hazing more from komo's Brian Calvert. An investigation began back in January after complaints that the hazing was happening. JBL AM and at Alaska's J B E R the practice is referred to as rolling up which essentially means airmen are tackled restrained. And then their hands and feet are bound with duct tape. Colonel Benjamin Bishop commander of the three fifty four. It says there are traditions that keep these units together in a statement. He adds when airmen however attempt to equate hazing as tradition. They do an absolute disservice to our air force culture and also undermine our mission effectiveness, Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Kates of JBL M's, fifth air support operations squadron and his Alaskan counterpart have lost their command posts as a result. Brian Calvert, KOMO news of Lynnwood will not convert a motel on highway ninety nine into housing for homeless families. More from komo's Erik Heintz. The city council was. Studying the purchase of the rodeo in the plan calls for the city working with the Edmonds school district and others to turn the fifty two room motel into housing for families with children who are students than a consultant's report. Convinced the council the only scenario then made sense was tearing down the motel and building a new permanent complex from scratch. The Everett herald reports new construction would come with a price tag of more than fifteen million dollars. The city will now look at other ways to help homeless families. Eric.

komo Brian Calvert Everett herald Komo Carleen Johnson crescent lake Monroe North America King County Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Kate north west swan conservation a JBL Colonel Benjamin Bishop Edmonds school district JBL M Erik Heintz Lynnwood Alaska Eric commander
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Beker worth fifteen million dollars. More on these stories at townhall dot com. What is it university worked as heartily your success as you do what? If I focus on healthcare. Help you focus on your future. What is the one hundred and twenty five year heritage came with the latest technology. Jason university with dedicated to educating and empowering, the extraordinary, nurses and healthcare professionals of tomorrow. Chamberlain university. What if we could make a difference together? It's flooring inventory reduction time at Florida mentions right now, the bay area's largest selection of install flooring, and carpeting is all on sale beautify your home for less than zero interest financing with approved credit during the inventory reduction sale at Florida mentions, delivering installation available to for the best selection. Big savings, an unbelievable service take the Gilman street exit off, I eighty two floor dimensions today, man. Sponsored by spot link Inc. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentarily, please stay tune. We expect to resume normal broadcasting shortly. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentarily, please stay tune. We expect to resume normal broadcasting shortly. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentarily, please stay tuned. We expect to resume normal broadcasting shortly. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentary, please, stay tuned. We expect to resume normal broadcasting shortly. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentarily, please stay tune. We expect to resume normal broadcasting shortly. Ladies and gentlemen, we are experiencing technical difficulties. Please stand by. We will return to our regularly scheduled program momentarily, please stay tuned..

Florida Chamberlain university Jason university spot link Inc fifteen million dollars twenty five year
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WTVN

"Traffic and weather every ten minutes on the tens powered by TempStar and customer with traffic. You can trust. I'm Johnny hill. Newsradio six ten w. TV an. Ninety nine for an overnight low tonight snow moving in about three o'clock in the morning and continuing into the morning commute during the commute that starts to transition into some rain rain snow mix, then it's rain in the afternoon with a high forty six days the weather powered by the basement, doctor it's thirty one in grove port. Thirty one degrees at your severe weather station. News Radio six ten WTVN around two hundred million Americans are in the path of a powerful. Winter storm over the next two to three days, it'll bring heavy snow driving rain and even some ice to parts of thirty nine of the lower forty eight states, including every state east of the Mississippi River, they snow is expected to move into our area overnight. Odom says give yourself extra time for your morning commute. And give those plow trucks, plenty of room to work with demanded that they give us our money back. Ohio attorney general Davis said today, he initiated the first apps in an effort to recover overcharges to the state for the cost of prescription drugs that were negotiated by pharmacy benefit. Managers made fifteen million dollars. And I don't know what there is to mediate. They broke contract. They took our money. I want it back. He's going after the private companies they contract with state agencies such as the bureau of worker's compensation as well. As Medicaid a Delaware County man convicted of raping his two stepchildren was handed a prison sentence of twenty five years to life today. Forty two year old David Morris pleaded guilty to three counts of rape and two counts of gross sexual imposition against his eleven and twelve year old step children and police began ticketing short north parking violations. Today is grace period is over you're paying hourly. You'll need to move your car.

general Davis Johnny hill David Morris Odom Mississippi River grove port Medicaid Delaware County rape Ohio attorney fifteen million dollars Thirty one degrees twenty five years Forty two year forty six days ten minutes twelve year
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It breaks. I'm Michael Crozier live from the KFI twenty four hour news from the LA county civilian oversight commissions opposed to the construction of a womens gaol. In Lancaster, the commission wants the board of supervisors to reject the plan commission chair Patty gig and says they voted unanimously to oppose it two weeks after the vote the board voted to approve two hundred and fifteen million dollars for it. There needs to be mold prevention and also when they go to jail. What are they learning? How are they being treated? What's their mental health is a big issue? Not only for LA county state of California in the United States right now. Digging says she'd like that money to be allocated somewhere else. In other words, where the females are are for gender specific programming rehabilitation and health and wellbeing services for when they're released some longtime employees at the Trump National Golf Club in briar cliff manners. They were fired for being in the country illegally and providing fake work documents. Their lawyers says they were chefs housekeepers and waiters employees who've been working there. Ten years twelve years fifteen years and all of them claim that management knew they were undocumented. They were recruited to work there. And they were told that documents were not necessary to work for this golf club. Some of the workers fired had one employee of the month awards and received glowing letters of recommendation and the Rams have a hat a hometown. Send-off rally in Englewood players and coaches were there yesterday with the giveaways food. Trucks activities next week is the Super Bowl you can hear it on. Our sister station. Am five seventy L A sports. Check out.

Trump National Golf Club LA county Michael Crozier KFI briar cliff Lancaster Digging Patty United States Englewood Rams California fifteen million dollars twenty four hour five seventy L fifteen years twelve years Ten years
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"How much were you putting in play over six hundred thousand dollars per play seven plays a year? Four point two million dollars wants this roll down Wisconsin per year. Never get nervous. What did you do with all the losing tickets? You saved them. Big, you know, the big toe the classic totes millions eighteens fifteen million dollars worth of losing. And you have this just in case we had a physical federal audit. We had the upstairs of the barn. I store them in in the other end. And then I thought oh, no this floors come fall through. So then we start them down in a pole barn, and we had probably sixty sixty five tubs of tickets ever say we're supposed to be retired here fourteen. Drives to Massachusetts fun fun is fun doing it. Hi, Ed, Gabia satisfaction of being successful at something that was worthwhile to not only us personally, but to our friends and our family, but in two thousand eleven the Boston Globe gotta Tim in discovered that in certain Massachusetts locations, cash windfall. Tickets were being sold at an extraordinary volume. Smart people had figured out if I'm buy enough of these tickets, I'll always be a winner. I'll get back more than I spent got Allen overseas. The Globes investigative reporters known as the spotlight team. The papers. Reporting revealed, the two groups were dominating cash windfall. Sylvie gang from Everett Michigan in their competition. A syndicate led by math majors from MIT, the Massachusetts Institute of.

Massachusetts Massachusetts Institute of Wisconsin Everett Michigan Sylvie Boston Globe Globes MIT Allen Tim six hundred thousand dollars fifteen million dollars two million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Starting9

"The NFL for that matter. But if he's only gonna come to play for the as because they're thrown an extra fifteen million dollars, Adam. But he really wants to be playing football, dude. Go play football. Like as the if you're as good as you were this past year playing college football. It's not like you're going to be poor playing football versus playing baseball taking the fifty. And I wonder if there's and I wonder if there would be some contingencies thrown in there. Where look they're signing this money, he has to like, I don't know there might be a non compete where look you can't play football after quitting baseball for the next five years or your money is being taken away again. Because he you know, what if he says yes, and I'm good to go and he plays for two and a half years in his like, you know, what not good enough. I'm going to go to the quarterback guru. I'm gonna go running some sand and Malibu hit the dunes and break off the route tree in front of some scouts and might find myself in the CF L for year, and then on on an NFL depth chart come buck and twenty twenty three. So here's a question for you before we conclude the whole Cuyler Murray discussion if in win because I think it's a matter of when he chooses the NFL over major league baseball. Put a percentage on it. What are the odds that he finds its way into into not major league baseball per se, but a major league organization at some point still afterwards. If you choose his football, I? I will say there's still a shot. I will say there's probably a thirty percent chance. No. No. No. No. No, no, no skews me that was going to be to potentially get to the big leagues. Oh, I'll say there's a greater than fifty percent.

football baseball NFL Adam Cuyler Murray fifteen million dollars thirty percent fifty percent five years
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on High Noon

High Noon

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on High Noon

"Learn how to cook. I'll do everything you want fifteen million dollars on about it. Why because baseball has an inferiority complex about losing better athletes to other sports. And for some reason, they think that this dude can be worth blowing up the mold. They have all of the other players in there. Well, this is I think we're dovetails into the complementary interests of Kyla Murray and Scott Boras because think about this if you got bored. You gotta be a little salt. You about the way this is going. You don't represent football players you represent baseball players. But if you're Scott bores, what thing you do not like is the structure of the draft as stand. Now, you wanna be able to get your money for your clients outside of the slotting of the draft draft used to be set up taking these dudes wherever you want it pay him, whatever you want that worked will to have a guy like how Murray you can take them into third row pay a first round pick. And you've mitigated the risks that came for the fact that you might not sign him. But with baseball tell me this no one sure that he's even going to make it to the major leagues. Like everybody keeps telling us that. You know, you gotta go down there. You gotta work on this. Not that likely that he's going to be a superstar once he makes it to the big leagues. So if you give them this fifteen million dollars. What happens when he gets there? No, this feels like baseball responding to receives humiliation. Because this is this is a big story. I mean, they're sending John Rosie of FOX marketing executives to these meetings. Kyle. Trying to convince him. No, you can have everything you dream of that A-List status with us. But yeah, you still got to ride the the second best baseball player of my lifetime right now. Plays in the second largest market in America..

baseball Kyla Murray Scott Boras Kyle John Rosie America football fifteen million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"There can you guarantee. I'm to get back in your face because you're such a smart asset. So the time went viral a lot of these people don't like you. Guarantee. The president tells the truth during the speech tonight what a grandstanding D bag question. What do you think the answer is going to be there? Jim, what do you think she's going to say, oh hell, I don't know. Well, maybe I'll tune in and find out I saw speech as written a crayon, and they can make an half of it. What do you want him to say right there? What do you want her to say right there, are you? Okay. With this hammer new streaming series about the life of Jesus being released in April. We don't know the platform yet. But this new streaming series about the life of Jesus being it's it's dropped around Easter time just became the number one crowd funded series and entertainment history. The makers raised ten point three million dollars for this new streaming series about the life of Jesus are you okay with this. Now before we get into this for those who don't know what crowdfunding as what's the easiest way to explain this. Well, I think what these guys did. Was they they released a pilot episode. They released a single episode about their their version of life of Jesus. It was seen by more than fifteen million dollars people or I'm sorry, fifteen million people in the people if they wanted to fund a show like this and the response was historic. I'll give you an example, they unseated the record holder for crowd funded movies or series, which is the mystery science theater three thousand they only raised five point seven million. Now, this is like go fund me and those types of this was crowd funded this there's fifteen thousand investors wideness that's a lot of money, man. And look this is why crowdfunding exists this type of movie the series about Jesus probably would not have got a second look from Hollywood executives. Even though it clear that movies about faith do incredibly. Well, it just feels like there's not a lot of movies or shows. About faith or religion. But not quality quality. Look passion of the Christ of the early two thousands hundreds of millions of dollars. Excellent. What are the most brutal depictions I've ever seen by? So it's hard for me to watch. I still get teared up where Jesus draws the line in the sand and keeps everybody from stone in them the prostitute. Right. That makes me a little bit. I think people are going to. I think I think there is definitely an audience for something like this. And I think there's a clamoring for it. Actually, people are on board with things about faith doesn't even have to be religious per se the movie I can only imagine did really well at the box office. It didn't cost a lot to make that movie, but it did really well at the box office. So yes, absolutely. If the people want to pay for this and people like this fifteen million people watched the pilot episode alone. Absolutely. I'm okay with this. This is good. Okay. Coming up next. I if you liked Kellyanne Conway versus Jim Acosta might have to play.

Jim Acosta president Kellyanne Conway Hollywood fifteen million dollars three million dollars
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Fifteen million dollars to the city. This guy is now out at the library. And she's in at the library. Oh, did I mention that? She is also a member of the Carmel clay public library foundation board of directors. No. I bury that. Current Carlton vary the lead and Maria samba reporting. Yeah. He's out. She's in she sold her property city. And now she has a deal basically with the city where she sits on the board of directors. I'm sorry guys. That's on creepy. That's full on creepy. And you should be looked at a skew you really should be in the entire library board should be looked at a skew. What can you tell me about the current occupants of that library space of that coffee? Shop space that he wasn't doing his job properly. What is it about only Vivian law head and I'm not mad at her yet? I want to know what it is about her and her coffee shop that she is the only person who could possibly run it was it out for an open bid. Did I have the chance because of I at the chance I would like to put together a coffee shop to put in the library. Me I'm going to get together with Liz bureau, the Andy star Sindi Hawkins a circle city. Sweet. I'm going to get together with the guys from Julian's coffee and brickhouse coffee. Oh and BJ over there at P coffee roasters. You will not believe what we're going to put in there. It's going to be amazing. Oh, fantastic. World class service. The best pastries you can ever find coffee that is specific to to the people of of Carmel. Right. It's going to be people are going to come from everywhere for this copy. That's amazing would be did. Did we get a shot did any of the people? I mentioned get a shot. Did anybody who wasn't on the board of the library? Get a shot. Did anybody who didn't work out a deal with the city to sell a fifteen million dollar property? Get a shot. You wanna know how important local reporting is. That's how important. That story shouldn't be small that story should add that people asking a lot of questions that story should have reporters from every news organization in the city heading on over to karma being like, so what's the deal here? Why is this happening? Do you think this past the smells this passes the smell test because it doesn't pass the smell.

Carmel clay public library fou P coffee Maria samba Carmel Sindi Hawkins Liz bureau Vivian Julian Fifteen million dollars fifteen million dollar