35 Burst results for "Fifteen Million Dollars"

 Ford to make electric power units in northwest England

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Ford to make electric power units in northwest England

"Three hundred and fifteen million dollars to turn a transmission factory in north west England into a plan that will make electric power units for cars and trucks sold throughout Europe the carmaker says that the Halewood plant will begin producing the power units which replaced the engine and transmission used in internal combustion engines by mid twenty twenty four capacity is planned to be around two hundred fifty thousand units a year Ford says investment includes a support from the British government though it did not specify the amount Ford

Halewood Plant North West England Europe Ford British Government
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Here & Now

"Is here from npr and wb. You are. I'm peter. O'dowd i'm robin young. It's here and now. President biden announced today that he'll visit the site of that collapsed condo building near miami beach. Florida on thursday search and rescue teams are into their six day sorting through the rubble. There one hundred and fifty people are unaccounted for. Eleven have been confirmed dead. Here's florida's governor onto scientists at a press conference. Today first responders are breaking their back Trying to find anybody they can and they are going to continue to do that and they've been very selfless. They put themselves at risk to do it. Npr's jasmine garza joins us now from miami beach and jasmine. At that same press conference officials went out of their way to that. They understood that there was anger about questions about the condition of this building and other buildings. And a letter has surfaced sent by the champlain towers. South communion association president to residents in april saying the building's foundation was seriously deteriorating. And that the cost to repair had risen. Tell us more about that letter. Sure absolutely and you know walking around the affected neighborhood in the affected area. You hear you hear words like Negligence corruption. I think the mood is turning from sorrow and shock to to anger and outrage Oh what was what became clear. Without letters that the president of the champlain. South towers condo association told residents in april that they're building was in desperate disrepair and the letter urges them to pay the fifteen million dollars in assessments needed to fix structural problems and just a reminder florida buildings are required to be recertified for electrical and structural safety after forty years and that condo building had begun the process. So you know. In some ways. I think the mood is shifting from Unexpected tragedy to almost a chronicle of a death or several deaths unfortunately foretold well in this letter just in april came after twenty eighteen report. Warning that there's going to be more deterioration so lots of angers and we're gonna talk more about the alarming structural questions later in the program but this is still as we heard being called a rescue effort. You were this morning. what'd you see well. The entire area continues cordoned off. I have been speaking to rescue workers who you know they're exhausted. They're working nonstop for now. six days. Twelve hour shifts nightshifts. Day shifts It is storming two-run -cially here in miami. It is very hot. And but everyone i asked said until we are told otherwise this is a rescue effort and they keep citing you know earthquakes and other situations internationally where people have been rescued alive. Seven eight days out so they are exhausted but holding out hope and they come from all over the world. Yes the i spent some time yesterday with A local rescue team which is from tampa and they were telling me that they are so grateful to the israeli Rescue team and the mexican rescue team. That is here to help. Yeah Very slow going for their own safety the rescuers and so as not to possibly you know affect somebody who might be alive under that rubble. What are you hearing from relatives watching it on full. Of course there's a sense that it is very slow moving and in fact one of the rescue crew members told me yesterday that he keeps hearing about how. It's slow moving and he understands this. This feeling among family members that this is very slow moving But what he wanted to make sure that people understand is just how massive this collapse is and we're talking about. Really heavy beams. He described it. Almost like a jenga like if you pull one piece out everything else underneath shifts and it is a dangerous to the rescue workers and it's also dangerous victims to survivors And so he wanted to explain why it seems so very slow among family members. What we are hearing is a sense of you know hope but also incredible sadness. Yeah and here's jasmine garze in miami beach. Thanks so much thank you. The white house is defending the airstrikes that it carried out over the weekend in iraq and syria at a white house. Press briefing yesterday. Press secretary jen. Psaki said the strikes were retaliation for attacks on american personnel by iranian backed militias. The president's view is that It was necessary appropriate and deliberate Action of these strikes are designed to limit the risk of escalation We will take and he believes we will should and we'll take necessary and appropriate measures chip ten. Us personnel partners and allies in the region. This is the second time. The president and biden has ordered airstrikes on these militia groups. The i was in february and democratic. Senator chris murphy tells politico that biden may need to come to congress for a debate on declaring war if this back and forth of attacks with orion proxy groups continues. Let's bring in. Julian zelezny professor of history and public affairs at princeton university. June good to have you back. Thanks for having me in based on what we know. Today president biden have the authority to order those airstrikes in iraq and syria. My guess is this would survive scrutiny. I think there's legitimate arguments on the left and right that we give president too much power to conduct these kinds of airstrikes but the reality is Really since the cold war These kinds of have become quite familiar. Legal challenges haven't worked in the last decade. Or so. And i don't see any reason why this would withstand the same kind of scrutiny. But there is a lot of scrutiny. The house just last week voted to repeal the two thousand and two resolution that authorized the war in iraq and then there was another one that authorized the invasion of afghanistan after.

Julian zelezny miami Today iraq jasmine garza jasmine garze Twelve hour april congress today last week fifteen million dollars yesterday six days South towers June chris murphy cold war Senator Eleven
Minnesota Governor Announces Changes to Statewide Policing Practices

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Minnesota Governor Announces Changes to Statewide Policing Practices

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting Minnesota's governor announces changes to policing practices Minnesota governor Tim walls in out state wide changes to policing Monday the wall said will increase transparency and accountability walls directed state law enforcement agencies to develop a policy that will allow families of victims killed by officers in those agencies to view body camera footage within five days of the fatal encounter additionally a police misconduct database will be created the executive action also directs fifteen million dollars in grants received via the American rescue plan federal stimulus package for community safety and violence intervention programs walls acted just days after former Minneapolis police officer Derek Shelton was sentenced to twenty two and a half years in prison for the death of George

Mike Rossi Tim Walls Minnesota Derek Shelton Minneapolis George
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on ExtraTime

"We've seen it work occasionally but there's you know most most teams Play with with a true number nine and to get flooded with manchester city fans but like new england. Teams are right pets. Teams are an outline for a reason. Now i see the sort of laura of it just with the idea that we haven't had a number nine really emerge right now but i think ultimately still wanna use. Chris shouldn't On that left hand side allow him to kinda create from there. Plus we have. I think we have really good options. In the middle of midfield. I think legitimate stepped in as another one. I wanna see mussa more. We got weston. We're getting tyler back. So i think we're in a pretty good spot there. It's really just about a generally it's like breaking we. I think we talked about this before covering the national team with like centreback. So there you go two or three years three where you only are looking for two or Generally feel like if you have a broken part of the car. You fix that one part. You don't try and move other pieces around in different places to to just sort of get whatever you can out of it. It's i still think a nine will emerge it's just that spot is still there for the taking Frizzy the way we talk about that number nine position because it just hasn't been super productive obviously but like birsh of moenchengladbach which is a team that is you know their top seven team in the bundesliga. They're about to spend millions on him to play as a number nine for them. You know darryl deka was awesome and mls than was even better in the championship. Like there's a good chance he will move for ten or fifteen million dollars this summer You know we. We saw george. Peacock did in his his appearances for the us. Scorned like by the second half of the year. He was scoring goals all the time in switzerland. We know what josh in any rookie league. Thank you and we know what josse artists has been over. The past. Couple of years for the us ultralight able Like i i'm just not concerned about the number nine. I think we ended up. We have good We have good options there already. And i would be surprised if a year from now. We don't consider at least one of them to be a great option. So i don't think it makes sense especially to get back to. I know we're going long on the segments. These going to have to indulge me. One of the things with pulisic as the number eighty everybody thinks about those plays where he was able to get on the ball in central midfield against mexico. Turn and drive the game forward. He i think i forget. I think he's skin dutch. Asha one time. There are a couple others he dragged at alvarez mascara. Hostal has nightmares yeah. Nestor out is so those but like those plays don't happen because he's already stationed in central midfield. Those plays happen because of the. Us team shape in. The build-up has sort of tilted. The field in opened up this big gap so that when politic checks to the ball. There's only actually one defender with him. And that is the situation we want. That's a situation where he can turn and can off the dribble sort of unlock defense. And if he's in that number eight role he's the one who's going to be dropping back and having to make defensive plays to help out a fullback to to sort of tilt the field in the first place so i don't think it's a. It's a good use of resources. The other thing that i wanted to add the way..

ten Chris switzerland josh george Nestor Peacock two darryl deka three years mexico josse Frizzy One one defender second half fifteen million dollars millions tyler bundesliga
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Let me get into some of the context of baby boy. Let's talk baby boy a little bit as you said griffin he wrote. It is a novel. Initially that's where the womb stuff comes. Sprinting complete it. Right but he started off And i mean this. This is the quota after we griffin. I assume you're looking at our doc on this. It's so funny just like what's the genesis of the project and he's like the idea came from sitting around the crenshaw mall south central watching these cats. They walk in with no shirts on. They're twenty years old. They're flirting with teenage girls. One minute than some other guys come into the mall and there's a fight. I thought i want to write about one of these cats. What's he doing with his life. Just wandering around aimlessly all of the heroes. Actions are defined by his fear of dying. He has this. I don't give a fuck attitude allows in the freedom of not realizing he's afraid so he's just like see people hanging out he's like what's up with these guys that's a movie like rubbing stones together. Well this is the other sub-genre movie falls into that is one of my personal favorites. Which is kind of like director imagines what their life would have been like if things have gone different. Yeah right like 'cause you consider that. He was making boys in the hood at the age of this character. Yes and i think it is is him looking at the mall and being like it like you know i think i. I have an oscar nomination. I made five movies but just as easily. None of that could have happened. An oscar nomination. I defied expectations apple. Right right lake. I it's it's the reason i talked about this extensively when we did the episode has been the reason i love ed wood so much as i do feel like ed wood is tim. Burton looking at would and being like. I don't understand why i'm successful in this guy isn't like i don't understand what the differences between the two of us other than people like my movies and they don't kiss and i think singleton has that same kind of thing where it's like. There's a very fine line here and so much. You know his films are. I feel like if anything. The biggest theme of his movies is like you know fathers and the lack there of and how they define development in lives right and this is sort of like okay what what happens if i don't have a data around. Maybe you know whereas like boys in the hood is so much about what if you get sent to your father's and he's kind of shapes your entire life That'll make also there's the to park thing of like he's writing this for two puck right and it seems like he feels like a lot of kinship with to park as a fellow like slightly wayward person who got famous really young and was overwhelmed by it like you know. He's really shaken up by two puck dying. Yeah i mean this is the amazing to quote which is from hollywood. A reporter piece. Where he says he had all too was was a baby. Boy he didn't know whether he wants to be a thug. Or revolutionary he had all this brilliant but not enough time or purpose and no mentoring all and by the time. Somebody was ready to mentor him. He wasn't ready to accept it. That's this whole thing of this generation thinking they know everything and they don't know shit and that was from an interview. He did like late in his life in two thousand fourteen where he was sort of looking back in his whole career but he was like pitching this movie to pack. When they were making poetic justice he was like you know. This is your mean streets. And then now i'm gonna make your taxi driver. I'm gonna make your raging bull like you're going to be my deniro Here's a movie. I'm writing for you. It's going to be the one that legitimizes you it gets you an oscar and then yeah when to died the movie sort of got like stalls slowed down for a while right until i think he felt. Maybe while being gummed up in like the gears of shaft like i want to get back and make something more personal again it is. I guess i just didn't realize the terachi napping in anything obviously therese is defined as an actor. He takes this to columbia and like they're the only studio the wants to make it because of boys in the hood. They're like all right. You know we can sell it as like it's quote unquote spiritual sequel and this is another thing to think about is. There was a point in time. Where major studio could look at a movie like this and go. It only costs us fifteen million dollars. What's the risk will still release it. White in the middle of summer against blockbusters. Yes yeah right. Whatever and now studios. Just don't even bother with a movie this small. It would not even be a consideration for them. Even though it's kind of hard to lose money on a movie of this size yeah. I don't think this movie lost money right. After singleton died his family sued sony and they paid him half a million dollars in royalties from this movie that they had been hiding. Wait bullshit right. Yes but you know cost fifteen million dollars. It made thirty. I'm sure sony was like yeah. Sorry it didn't it. Sold it for a bunch of money to cable at probably sold a bunch of dvd's many times.

griffin thirty fifteen million dollars twenty years two five movies columbia singleton sony One minute Burton tim half a million dollars two puck one ed wood crenshaw mall one of my personal favorites central bunch of money
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

GSMC Football Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

"Willing. I don't know if you've noticed that that's that's k. Accommodating willing for you because you've never you've only been great to me folks out home if you're listening and then the final segment of the show last episode. I gave my top ten running backs in the league and i did preface that by saying you know what my ideal running back would be and you know i also did put an asterisk next to say i. I think most running backs are interchangeable. And then i probably gave about three or four. Who i said you know those are a difference makers and those guys. I would give up a lot yet and i think those guys were you know christian. Mccaffrey alvin kamara. Kareem hunt those types of players and now the the same thing with wide receivers top ten. And i'll give you what type of receiver i would want. Ideally and how valuable. I think they are in the game of football today right. Running backs have kind of decreasing importance. Quarterbacks are of the utmost importance where wide receiver san won't. We'll get to that topic. But speaking of wide receivers. Why not talk about the premier. One who currently does not want to play for the team. He is on or under contract with and neither. Does the team want him neither. Does the team want him. So you have a player who does not wanna be on the team and a team. That does not want the player. If you've guessed it by now if you're good at guessing you good gasser. because it's julio jones. I'm sure you knew that already. That's the first topic of the show. Julio jones let's recap where we are at with. Julio in case you've forgotten well. Julio jones costs a lot of money. Okay i think fifteen point some million dollars or guaranteed name so it doesn't matter where he's playing but he is going to accumulate fifteen million dollars now. A key deadline has passed. And that is the june first deadline to june first deadline makes it. So that if julio jones was traded well the atlanta falcons aren't on the hook for all that money which basically the june first deadline in layman's terms means Julio jones can be traded and the atlanta falcons can save money okay Atlanta falcons are in cap h e double hockey sticks again. I have not found out if i can say that or not. And if you've been living under a rock Unless you've been.

Julio jones Julio julio jones fifteen million dollars Atlanta falcons atlanta falcons fifteen point four Mccaffrey alvin kamara first topic today first deadline One Kareem top ten christian top ten running backs june about three Willing
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

"That's one of my favorite moments in the history of the. Because i was literally just in my own world over here like trying to listen to jet trying to see what jets saying just literally not even fully recognizing that people were watching right. Don forget sometimes. And then. As soon as i i filed away in and you guys go on all her first bitch. That was steam road in snowballed into something. There was no means spirit behind that to jet passing. I would like that to be known. But what a fucking. Maybe my favorite moment in shows understands. He's been on the show several times before. I guess what you can't come in and do the mike in drill uncomfortable dunk on him. Four or five times and then and then start powder about getting bullied. Think a lot of his the the jets suggests you know the jaffe in the jets. Yeah yeah just. I think is fleet. You know what. I mean rich to tanger. He's his airport here. Whatever the they did say that we were being disrespectful and say after watching it back. I could see how you could see. It was disrespectful but also numerous times. We said jet. I mean you started this whole thing with mentioning hitting a baseball star in the great depression. He did mention nineteen twenty. I would like to apologize to jet for what happened. There was no means. Spirit there to to the hangar to the fleet of that fall along with passing we do not mean to disrespect jet or based baseball. Fuck six but like you guys at all just love eugen now with that being said the bruins are dead in may they lost okay to a team to a borough to a city swat to a fan base. That is i mean they might have the might be the kiss. The angel kissed this restaurant. Their side yup bounces are on their side of this happened to the pen. Say we get some good calls back in the day with a go away. Goalie would accidentally just closes save something out of nowhere. If feels like that's happening for the islanders. I know the avalanche good and marc j floor is still standing on his head over there. Tampa bay their fifteen million dollars over salary cap on. I mean they're unbelievable. Got house down. Tampa and i was invited to the tampa bay playoff game by the way. Oh about that not by the lightning but by the building okay. The people that worked at the building would like to extend in denver. Sue us because we're down there to go so shouted lightning the reigning champs or whatever but. I don't know if anybody's getting it. How the islanders were getting right now. They are humming all facets and they're getting like the good bounces it feels like potluck. That's a potluck there. There's that's a team that's going to. Are the islanders gonna win. Fuck lord stanley cup. Last year in barn over there on that island neck. No was what the lightning are doing right now. You can think of them like the bucks of the nhl of the nfl.

Four fifteen million dollars denver Last year nineteen twenty marc j five times six first bitch Tampa bay tampa bay one of my favorite moments playoff Tampa islanders
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

GSMC Football Podcast

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

"Patriot. He's gone so it's just. I wonder what they do where their hands can get so injured. A i guess baffles me in a sense so i had mentioned rexburg was the culprit for brady back in the day. Now expert is a houston texan. So what does this mean for camden. So like i said before the nfl draft this past spring bill check had said that cam newton was the starter starting quarterback. They brought them back. You know reports said fifteen million dollars. But it's it's nowhere near that for cameroon salary if i'm sure if he has always incentives it's fifty million dollars in the world and league that we live in when a report gets a story from like an agent agents can say with the contracts max worth is because the agent wants to sound like he's getting the best deal for the player fifty million dollars is not the number remember cam. Newton is still probably comfortable or you know if mack jones does win the starting job in that leads to our next question. This hand injury undoubtedly is going to give mack jones. More repetitions with i seen has to write and less. They're going to give it to jarrett stidham but from my inside sources at patriot camp. Mac joe's has been getting has been going in right after cam newton in terms of drills in terms of wraps so mack jones is next in line and according to points bet sportsbook cam. Newton is still minus two seventy five to be to take the first step for new england in terms of betty. Mack jones's plus two fifty jared cinemas plus eleven hundred and poor old brian. Hoyer just does not even make lists. I'm not even sure if jared sit makes team. We talked about this a few weeks ago to about which of the four quarterbacks will make the team because we know that the patriots aren't gonna keep all four cam. Newton is the heavy favorite right now. At what i say minus two forty and mac is plus two fifty bill ballot. Check doesn't really like starting rookies on offense. We know that okay. He doesn't you know or at least the last couple of drafts of offense players haven't been great a when he sony michelle and the first round took him a couple weeks to get michelle into the offense and you know when he drafted national harry. Harry wasn't the most trustworthy receiver. Either he was in brady's doghouse or he was in bella. Checks dog house origins. Didn't know what the heck he was doing. Eshelman has said it. You know. I was listening to interview with men and chris long today and ataman was saying. This isn't straightforward algebra.

Patriot Harry michelle jarrett stidham camden fifteen million dollars fifty million dollars Newton Eshelman ataman mack jones today first round newton first step mac rexburg harry brady Hoyer
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"We can't pay him fifteen million dollars and put him on the ross. We just have no room. Yeah that's the problem with the seahawks. By the way the seahawks tyler lockett making seventeen million decay. Metcalf going to get a new contract most likely after next year i mean just you just can't keep paying. There's a salary cap somehow. He's not aware apparently not some some of these players are are clueless all of this now. The other big thing in the nfl is tomorrow. Starts the green bay packers mandatory minicamp and the question is whether or not aaron rodgers will show up going alatha boat show and it'd be dozens and he doesn't he'll be fine ninety three thousand dollars unless of course they give him an excuse to absence. They're not gonna find him. You kidding made their wanna work out with them. They don't wanna train them. They are not going to find. Mark murphy came out and said you know this thing has really become an issue of wait until we get to the summer. Welcome to the party mark. We're going to be a real issue august. If he's not used the thing if he retires you'll have to repay part of his signing bonus and roster bonuses. I believe but he's not going to retire. We'll just sit out but you can't just sit out you'll have to. You'll have to repay the that bonus money piano show up and you can get fined. Obviously for not showing up honoring your contract. Us men's national team beat mexico three two at the concacaf nations league final. We talked about all the crazy stuff that happened in that game last hour. Patrick kelly won the memorial. Jon rahm the whole issue with covid was really in position to win had to withdraw because of a positive cova test on saturday and Sloan stevens lost in straight-sets today at the french open roger federer withdrew. You've got novak djokovic. Raphael playing in separate matches coming up later this morning as my main Tt pasta and in the french heat. See poss- still in it. I don't know so we're gonna get knocked out. I believe she got knocked out on the women that was saturday was not a fan dole. Sportsbook french open read. That had the record on friday so they asked me to give a name. And i didn't want to go. You know joke of dowa wants to do that. It's too easy. I did that you did that. Seems to easy i did so with. Tt poss- so. I'm hoping he's doing was he even in the front row. Hope so you're not even sure i'm not sure. I looked at the french open odds and he was up there all right well. He's not playing today. I to tell you that. And he's not playing tomorrow. Mike guesses he was knocked out. No but maybe not in doubles oh good lord doubles. That doesn't count there is no you know what. Tc poss- one. Nine one is fourth round match on sunday morning over. Pablo carreno right out of here. Corinna six three six two seven five now. The question is when does he play again. Because i don't see it all right walkie keep an eye on him. He might pick these on that gender ninth. He's on the other side where there was like no one you knew yes. The one side had veteran juggling playing medvedev remember. Yeah the ninth is what that's wednesday right. Wednesday didn't go far enough so he plays wednesday morning nine. Am eastern you. Can you can take care and watch. T. poss- that's live. Att poss- live on the show. Lets them on right before the match has that's his first name felix.

Patrick kelly Mike Raphael fifteen million dollars Sloan stevens saturday ninety three thousand dollars friday Mark murphy today Wednesday seventeen million sunday morning aaron rodgers Metcalf Pablo carreno tyler lockett novak djokovic tomorrow wednesday
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Rear Vision

Rear Vision

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Rear Vision

"This is an abc podcast. Hello i'm carey phillips. Thanks for joining me for revision where we'll take a trip into the psychedelic past. The federal government will spend fifteen million dollars supporting. Clinical trials examining the effectiveness of some psychedelic drugs in treating mental illness. The grants will help fund trials that are looking at substances like mda ketamine and then approval of the drugs is subject to the The therapeutic goods administration that gi. So they're the people who make the decision about whether or not they should be used kind sitting. The waistline is Let's do some trial in furthering investigate this area because it does show some promise. That's the assistant minister for mental health. David coleman speaking after the federal government announced its financial support for psychedelic drug trials. Will he more about what's happening in australia later. Psychedelics are hallucinogenic substances that generate altered states of consciousness that can range from terrifying to transcendent. Some can be found in nature in mushrooms and cacti and have been used by thousands of years indigenous cultures but this story begins in a pharmaceutical lab in switzerland where the first synthetic psychedelic. Lsd was deadly created professor erica. Dick is a historian at the university of ceska on. Lsd was first synthesized in nineteen thirty eight but it wasn't experienced until nineteen forty..

David coleman australia carey phillips switzerland erica Dick first fifteen million dollars thousands of years Lsd eight nineteen forty university of government nineteen thirty ceska
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Front Burner

"Provinces. They know they have to rebuild that trust with first nations people. What happened to joyce glen. This is an example of the province will invest fifteen million dollars into sensitizing healthcare staff about first nations culture and.

fifteen million dollars joyce glen first nations first nations
California giving $116 million to people who get COVID shots

World News This Week

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

California giving $116 million to people who get COVID shots

"Announced one hundred sixteen million dollars in rewards the biggest program in the country including fifteen million dollars to be split amongst ten vaccinated residents meanwhile. Cvs launched its own sweepstakes the newly vaccinated could win a trip to the super bowl or a week on cruise island. Encourage anyone to get the vaccine winning a million dollars as an incentive enough. I don't really know what would be. Some small businesses are offering their own vaccine incentives in florida. A concert venue is charging twenty bucks per ticket. But if you don't have your shot that price rockets to a thousand

Cruise Island CVS Super Bowl Florida
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"Love him. So what does that allow love. Hello bizarre so people have to understand. Aaron rodgers is making more money percentage wise of his team salary cap than any other team in the league. Yeah so he's got no right to complain about roster construction. Tom brady made twenty five million dollars. I remember the salary cap one down this year. yeah. Tom brady made twenty five million dollars last year. And that was essentially. What fifteen million dollars less than aaron rodgers was making these understand that like you know. Aaron can have it both ways. We'll give me all the money and then say you're not getting me the play on the side of the packers with this but our rogers would say would be a draft choices are cheap and you traded up to get another quarterback as opposed to someone to help me. That's why woodside so he got. They got them a new coach. New offense is thirteen and three back to back years and mvp so he was motivated by the draft. Morgan and it worked and it's worked with his coach. Is coach is a terrific young coach. I'll care what anybody says. I mean that was a brilliant higher by mark murphy and the green bay packers worked out a total opposite of mike mccarthy. I think mike mccarthy you think about this big heavy set guy just throwing the ball out there. Giving the ball to aaron rodgers. let go like a young aggressive. Awfully solid over here with the jets also going to be involved in everything said mike mccarthy it looks like the autopilot in the movie airplane. Fortunately does yeah. Let's just to do the same thing. Dak prescott down in dallas. Now know it'll be alright. I think who knows boomer and geo on the fan. Cbs sports now. We're getting the odyssey app. Aaron.

Tom brady mike mccarthy Aaron aaron rodgers Morgan mark murphy Dak prescott twenty five million dollars fifteen million dollars last year Aaron rodgers dallas thirteen this year three both ways odyssey app boomer green bay rogers
Story of the Cocaine Bear

Ghost Town

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Story of the Cocaine Bear

"It's a tale of drugs planes parachutes in one. Unluckier this epic crime story centered in knoxville. Could soon be coming to the big screen. I read sometimes. Entertainment trades to see what's happening and i saw that elizabeth banks it is in the public arena. This information is out. There is developing a movie about cocaine. Bear and i vaguely remembered something about cocaine bear. I couldn't really place. It did some googling and went down outrageous wormhole that we're going to talk about today. Cocaine beer was briefly. Famous in one thousand nine hundred five when it was found dead in the wilds of kentucky after eating roughly fifteen million dollars worth of cocaine but that is just the tip of the iceberg on september. Eleventh nineteen eighty five and old man in knoxville. Tennessee woke up and went outside where he found the corpse of a man in his driveway. The body had goggles on. It was wearing a bulletproof vest and was strapped to a parachute. The body also had some other interesting features a couple of handguns and fourteen million dollars worth of cocaine on just your everyday morning in knoxville. The man phoned the police and when they arrive they identified the dead body as undersea thornton. The second the wealthy son of an elite kentucky horse breeding family former paratrooper narcotics officer and lawyer. Who left all these jobs. Because they were too boring he left them all to become a drug smuggler. For a ring. Known as the company thorn had received a purple heart after an injury in the dominican republic. He was deployed there during the revolution thornton for real dot board of his life and decided to. It's like the bigger rush. Decided to do more dangerous work than he already was doing which was already very dangerous. On september ninth thornton embarked on a mission with bill leonard. His karate instructor turned bodyguard. The pair hopton assessment for four airplane and flew to mont monteria colombia with plans to pick up four hundred kilograms of cocaine and smuggle it into the us

Knoxville Kentucky Elizabeth Thornton Tennessee Ninth Thornton Dominican Republic Bill Leonard Mont Monteria Colombia United States
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Caught on video in new york city another incident where nypd officers were harassed by the public that confrontation tuesday show several men surrounding nypd suv one with a megaphone hurling profanities and insults about the officers wives. Walk to officers. Sit inside with the windows rolled up before they drove away now. This is just the latest in a string of incidents with police as protesters and deform queens groups. Continue to rally against law enforcement. After the death of george floyd last year. Fox's laura ingalls says. Violent crime is in new. York murders have risen nearly twenty percent compared to this time last here. Shootings are up more than fifty percent. The situation is also tenuous between police and the public in portland oregon from random vehicle shootings to the worst nine months of homicides in the city's history. The streets of portland have never been more dangerous cities on pace to shatter the all-time murder record. Violent crimewave follows months of unrest and defunding of the police department was stripped of fifteen million dollars and eighty four officers. One hundred fifteen have quit since july putting.

new york fifteen million dollars last year Fox george floyd portland more than fifty percent laura ingalls tuesday nine months York One hundred fifteen eighty four officers nearly twenty percent july men nypd one
Ariana Grande is the highest paid The Voice coach

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Ariana Grande is the highest paid The Voice coach

"Ariana grande is now if the highest paid coach ever to be on the voice. Let me give you all the dish. So arianna surprised everybody. When she announced she was joining the voice as a coach is going to be joining blake. Shelton john legend and kelly clarkson forsees in twenty one. She said that she's honored and excited to be joining. The voice family has been a huge fan of the show for a very long time. And you can't wait to go head to head with these incredible coaches and get to meet develop and no. Some new artists have fans will be excited to a does really melted down. She's going to be replacing. Nick jonas. This is a huge for the show an nbc. Let me just give you a few statistics here. Just you figure out how big ariana is on spotify. She's the most streamed artists of the deck. She has eighty two million followers on twitter. Which just is to give you. A comparison is almost double blake. John and kelly come bind myself. Says a telling me she's making the most of anybody on the show. Kelly at the moment makes the most she makes fifteen million dollars. They wanted to get her show. Particularly american idol was coming back. Very smart blake. Shelton ends around thirteen million dollars. Adam levine about the same member and miley. Cyrus was on the show. She got about thirteen million dollars to my sources. Tell me that they don't know the specific amount but they believe that ariana grande day could be getting twenty to twenty five million dollars a season which puts her on par. With what katy. Perry's getting at american idol.

Shelton John Legend Ariana Grande Blake Arianna Kelly Clarkson Nick Jonas NBC Kelly Twitter Adam Levine Shelton John Miley Cyrus Katy Perry
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Winning Plays

Winning Plays

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Winning Plays

"But but I guess like if you know the Bane's if you think bank is going to be okay in that third man role and obviously is going to be better than anything you read in the street and you I guess you do have that salary for trade purposes if you need to use it in the offseason, like if you need to pick up that option just to make the money we're going to do but you also the TV so that shouldn't be necessary. Anyway. Yeah, I literally think of it is just like getting back out of the deal basically saying like if you could undo it and get can't hear back would you and like I don't really want Cantor back either but in the grand scheme of things, it's like I just dead. Really want a 9 and 1/2 million dollar third Center next year. Now if you think like if you look at the market you say that Tysons going to make fifteen million dollars and Tristan Thompson to be my backup center next year. Then that's fine. You could keep him and just move forward thinking that ties is going to be gone. Like none of these things are like needle movers by any means right? It's just you can look at it and depending on what you think about Daniel theis and what you think the market is going to play and in the off-season it would be completely reasonable to me that they could make a move like that. That would just seem like nothing. Okay. Why did you bother with that? I'd be like, yeah. I know. I mean I get it it's fine. Whatever. I understand why they would do it off and so from that like that's where we are with Tristan Thompson though right now. I think we're it's like he's not playing poorly. He's not playing great. It's just kind of too much on the roster. You want to rebalance it and sometimes you rebalance by making a trade that everybody sort of shrugged ranked every trade that Danny Ainge is made right some of them you look at and you just want to shrug in you're like, yeah. I mean, I was fine. I get it and there's not not a whole lot more to it than that. Right, and I guess it's it's printed two for now. I think we're anything else is standpoint of like this is this is a one obvious area to address the next 10 days. Like like we said waiting to the offseason do this if you have out now whether that's Toronto weather, that's another.

Danny Ainge Tristan Thompson Daniel theis Toronto 9 next year fifteen million dollars two 1/2 million Tysons third man Cantor next 10 days third Center one obvious area Bane
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on My First Million

"Yeah i'm the under above each one. Time told me that there was some guy making a million bucks a year and he was like the biggest earner on all on excel. Exactly so google fi. I one hundred percent thing you can do page meeting. I have to be cheap though because it's the same as the map of like how much money you make forgo sheets. I think that there is absolutely something there. And then the last thing is the someone tweeted at me. A community of bedded senior engineers. We've talked about advance. Engineering concepts like how to scale a text akron hundred Ten million users totally buy into that something like that. That is incredibly niche incredibly high end. Where does this other component of it. It's about community. Is you have to make it so that information that you gather in that ruth you cannot find online or tiger twenty one not that many people are going to talk about how life because this bears it. How do i give my child. Fifteen million dollars without the government ends on it but that's not something to tweak doesn't bears same thing with a hundred thousand it's humbling users Simply not that many people who have done it. You're not going to find a lot of reputable information on that. So that's another trait these meetings. And why i think this one in particular. I think any job can do this. Nurses good on because you have a summer going to be a better than others because you have the more people. The more potential and the more insider knowledge is needed. The more downtrodden that group feels kind of a negative word. kind of what. You're saying like sort of like they feel that they need to take action in order to like level up in some way a better and so like this work for nurses but it can also work for designers. I could see somebody just making it. A community of professional designers at all these different companies like. Yeah we have designers from fig ma and from hub spot and from octa and from get hub and you should if you're a designer one of these companies.

excel Fifteen million dollars one hundred percent octa one hub spot a million bucks a year Ten million users hundred thousand each one tiger twenty one hundred hub google ma
Washington releases Alex Smith following quarterback's Comeback Player of the Year season

Get Up!

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Washington releases Alex Smith following quarterback's Comeback Player of the Year season

"Quickly. I have some news that has just come in from adam. Schefters twitter feed. And it's not a surprise but the washington football team has released alex smith. Who was this year's choice for the nfl's comeback player of the year overwhelmingly. So he has been released. They save almost fifteen million dollars cap space so in an off season. Where does shawn watson might be available. Dak prescott might be available. Russell wilson might be available louis. How interested do you think teams will be alex smith as he becomes available now. I think alex is a tremendous mentor. I think alex would be a tremendous bridge quarterback at this point in time these people are going to really try and connect the dots between him in chicago given his familiarity with matt nagy and that system that they run in chicago like it was in kansas city. I don't think that's a that's the option that they're looking for but look. I have nothing but infinite. Respect for alex smith at any team would be better served having him in their in their quarterback room for sure.

Alex Smith Shawn Watson Dak Prescott Russell Wilson Adam Alex NFL Twitter Football Matt Nagy Washington Louis Chicago Kansas City
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"So i i'm not optimistic. Although i will say when they signed him to the big deal after the super bowl i was starting to lose hope and then suddenly bam the news hit. They worked out a deal. If you're von miller now keep them these guys. They live in a different world than us. They've different expenses than us. Now right because they make that kind of money bills to pay that you and i can only dream of so. A lot of people are like well. What the money shouldn't matter as much well they. They have a certain way of life that they're accustomed to and they got to continue to afford it whatever. We can argue about that all day. Long if you run miller and you found team willing to pay you fifteen stayed in denver. Four million dollars left. No hell. you've already if you hadn't won a super bowl Maybe but you want a super bowl. I've said there's two goals in this game. I mean maybe three if you're talking about personal stats but it's su- it's winning it all and making the most money possible in no particular order. Some some guys wanna have a super bowl to their name. Some you know look at the nba. It's all about what you're worth your money. You wanna go down. As a when i played i was the top paid guy. It's something about what it says and then stats kinda come into later. If you're close to records than yeah you wanna you wanna go ahead and push for records. So there's three big things that you're really playing for me. If you're vaughn you got about two years left. Do you go for broke. Go out there and see how much money you can possibly get and then join a team. That's like right there. A- tampa bay. I mean we were told that shaq barrett. They're probably not going to be able to afford shack. Who would you pay. Fifteen million dollars to von miller shaq barrett on million you. I'd go on rather than signing shack to like a five year deal. I guess like the same length of contract..

fifteen two goals five year three Fifteen million dollars von miller super bowl Four million dollars three big things denver miller shaq barrett about two years shack super bowl
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Reformed Millennials - Growth Investing Canada

Reformed Millennials - Growth Investing Canada

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Reformed Millennials - Growth Investing Canada

"Okay so and i think that lululemon is so perfect because everybody understands what it is You have to manufacturer piece of clothing. You need to sell it. It's pretty easy to understand possess. But what i think is interesting for a lot of people is actually going digging deep into. Oh this is how much it costs to build a store. And wow this is why they built shrines stores and why they're so beautiful and why they sectioned off different parts of their of lululemon stores and why they put women's stuff on one side and men stuff at the front. And and when you when you're following each one of their ten ks why they decided to expand into the into saudi arabia. Why they decided to move into asia the justification for Cannibalising their store business to push their online marketing business. The reason why they refuse to to bring on massive sports stars and decided to be community. Promoters there's all these unique moves corporate moves that they made that contributed to their incredible run. Because i mean like it or not. Lou lamoriello blue best brand At least in the in the deep peril space the last ten years there is nobody. That has out-perform lululemon. And a lot of it has to do with the strategies that they've implemented and i think that if you follow something like this five years You really start to understand strategy you start understand what's right and what's wrong the right things to do. The proper prices pay for square footage And it gives you a good base to really build a a mental model around when you go to apply to new businesses. That are trying to do something fairly similar and you can point out. What's what's been wrong. What's been right and You can make better decisions and you can develop out your your mental model for making investments. So i really. I really like the lou example because everybody knows and at least if you're in western canada which is the majority of the people listening to this podcast. I've had the privilege of speaking through that model and the only thing i don't agree with is I think you described a fairly high. Growth numbers offline sales. But i don't know. Maybe i can use my own my own metrics to figaro price that stock should be at but speaking of narratives and stories. This is kind of like the last topic. I wanted to cover with you and it is sub stack so for anybody who's not familiar subjects. Actually the the platform of the piece of software that we use not only to publish a newsletter every week but actually hosts the podcasts as well and the founder of recently came up with an article saying just updating people where they're at the creator economy how their publishers are doing and they reported five hundred. Thousand people are now subscribed to one or more newsletters on their site in the top. Ten writers collectively make more than fifteen million dollars a year. So i think the interesting question for me to get answer to talk back and forth on is kinda wear this goes from here. Because i don't know i i it was..

five hundred Ten writers asia Thousand people Lou lamoriello five years saudi arabia more than fifteen million doll western canada each lululemon one ten last ten years lot of people more newsletters
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Celtics Life NBA Basketball Podcast

"But at the end of the day on the margins probably doesn't matter unless alex well funny thing about that. It actually might matter a little bit more than we think. If we are to be believed kevin o'connor of the wringer podcast network has said publicly. And he's a person that is somewhat in the know about these things that danny ainge is reportedly up to something now. of course the celtics. This season generated the largest trade exception in nba history. In the gordon hayward sign and trade to charlotte so they have a lot of space to take in some presumably high contract mid contract or low contract guys to their roster and one would have to think that with the play of the young players lately. It's entirely possible. That one of them or maybe a veteran could be at their position could be moved to acquire a different player which would in turn open up some room for other young guys. And maybe one of these assets as ken mentioned is part of that deal. So we're going to talk about the rest of those candidates Go through Kind of on a bit by bit basis some people that we like for this traded player exception slot and we'll see if any of them pan out. We're going to start off with some guys that maybe are a higher value contract. What do we think fellas. Who can the celtics look to for help. That might be on the more expensive side. So just a point clarity ryan. Bernasconi did this over. The winning plays podcasts healthy. Check my math on this. The tv e. is worth twenty about twenty eight million dollars but Because they use the mid level exception interest thomson. They're kind of hard. Capped so realistically. The season is listed nineteen million depending on if they trade A player greener edwards. They could probably get to twenty one. Twenty one half million importantly either way bradley. Beal doesn't fit into this. So we were not gonna talk about that and it's worth noting that they probably don't want to spend more than fifteen million dollars or that'll push them into the luxury tax situation so depending on some of the players on our list we have to ask ourselves if it's worth the celtics pushing further into the luxury tax or resetting the luxury tax situation for a season. That said. i'll let someone else. Talk before i reveal my big t. p. e. trade target but We suspend reality a little bit. Because i don't know if aaron gordon worth money out of the ownerships pocket but it's fun to think about so we can suspend reality a little bit as a good fall above that. I've been beating the harrison barnes drum for a while now. I didn't say last time he's gotta descending contract which is great but in light of what came was talking about. It's only going to be realistic. I think if you send out either thais or tristan thompson as some of the salary balanced so you can get under the luxury tax. I i just. I don't see them wanting to take on something that's going to be so costly and then have to jettison a bunch more Potentially useful players not very far down the road to keep things in a vaguely. I mean who knows..

nineteen million tristan thompson kevin o'connor danny ainge aaron gordon Twenty one half million bradley twenty one more than fifteen million doll ryan ken thomson alex Bernasconi thais twenty about twenty eight mill harrison barnes charlotte one nba
"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Des Ondes Vocast

Des Ondes Vocast

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen million dollars" Discussed on Des Ondes Vocast

"In opinion on quite an impact on the your meta visitors should have the to selected playing fair on poor math uncle on to join us sundays at home. We don't have why cheat on me shorter new jersey zone. Fifteen million dollars per year. Puerto itchy his. You hoes on we. Don't we We bets on me. You probably yeah keep young. If the these are 'cause you're ska film. The children often know perfect wise at the family georgia to stream conspiracy took ccc komo additional level of june. The poem jadu the adjusting adjusted. Ftse expose petrucci. Don't sit Don't see any the had. You're if you're three quarters mexico job on the sector to deliver Off how are they to be. Hide your deteriorate to leave Did okay there you. Chanel did blache. If you're street to use it only pass before he hoti luckily is. Sean declared the push ways level ten mass shooting data. It's me how you've only appeared again would've worse. For example some designer condo city example.

Sean Fifteen million dollars jadu new jersey zone june georgia mexico Chanel level ten komo petrucci
A Proposal To Burn Ethereum Transaction Fees

The Cryptoverse

09:20 min | 2 years ago

A Proposal To Burn Ethereum Transaction Fees

"So a proposal to ben a theory of transaction fees. This is coming from an e. Ip which i will link in the show notes feliciano e ip stands by theory improvements proposal. So now i'll do is. I'm going to read just the abstract on the summary from this thing. And then i'll give you my comments on it. So i actually came across this on git hub. This thing. was originally created in april two thousand and nineteen and has been in development since then and this is all according to harvard and give hope they've logged all of their calls developing development team and if the regulating the less meeting they had on this particular thing was The thet december twenty twenty. So this roy up to date in fact the less meeting that they had at the summary notes for the goal from the december he says generally feeling is that there was enough robust analysis and research with this improvement to begin discussing the next steps in the process i e how to move forward introducing too old cord avs and the theory of maintenance exciting. So that's how close they says to going onto the maintenance right. I think perfected over the of the last year or something booked with talking yet. So they're improvement. Proposal fifteen fifty nine fee market for one point out so. This is an improvement for the existing chain while ago gates shoes on so the simple summary is this is a transaction pricing mechanism. They includes a fixed pad block network feet that is bend and dynamically expands or contracts block sizes to deal with transient congestion. So what does that mean the problem. We have right now. They've got a difficult forming problems with the existing model. The fed will quote is a mismatch between volatility of transaction fee levels and the social cost transactions. The basically say that you one minute. You can have a Network free that's two hundred times what it was a minute ago right depending on just massive spikes in demand for network resources and stuff like that which seemed ridiculous. It's completely unpredictable. At second problem. Is it ends up. With needless delays for uses so does no good as socially unproductive as they call it. Where was the slack in the system to meet block by block demand while that would be met by so the listrik book sized that goes up if the blocks full and goes down if the blocks unfaithful pretty sweet scandal like the big oin difficulty. Adjustment mechanism is for blocksize. Rather than mining difficulty kind of kind of climate also says the problem is the inefficiencies of first price auctions. So what that means. Is that The minute of its to use sophisticated algorithms to estimate what fee to charge the uses of the wallet. And even though they're you know that just doesn't work. Right you end up overpaying the fee or you think you can get confirmation fifteen seconds and it takes three minutes and then you have to submit the transaction again with a high of face. Just it's just a mess right. And then the third thing is they will they call the instability of blue with no block reward. And they say well think about in the long run blockchain bitcoin. They intend to switch to rewarding minus entirely on transaction fees. You know when the bitcoin blocker would reaches next to nothing and they said will there were no issues with this kind of thing instability and so on selfish mining attack vectors and does no good solution for this at present. So what they're proposing to do is twofold one is have. This elects the block size thing where grows books of fold and shrinks of block saw you know novel and then also introduced a different pricing mechanism for transaction fees which would be that would be to to transaction fee going forward one would be this fixed a transaction fee pueblo. Which again go up and down with the blocksize. So you pay that and that base based transaction fee pet blog which would be absolutely known that would get burned right so like i spent boom johnson. Then if you wanna make sure that said your transaction gets into the blog than you can include an additional minor. Bribe as they call on top of the base fee said the minor didn't get any of the because we know that gets burned but they would get the minor bribe and the block reward so they still get two sources of revenue. The blocker would that remains the same They get the minor bribe and then they base fee gets burned. Okay well you might think well as because she's gonna cause the same problem as we've got now no it's not because was different now. Is that the book. Size is going to expand and contract so even if you don't include a minor bribe your wallet will know what the current fixed block transaction fee is and it will know what the next one is as well. So that means that in your wallet when meta mascow. Whatever will you're using. It will be able to quote you very precise transaction fees and the predictability of how soon that will go through and get confirmed. He's also much more set in than is now so that's does really right. You want the detail on how this works. Technically they've even got technical specification and a bunch of solidity code solidity code of how this will work including houses going to be backwards compatible. And how do you order. Transactions and blahdy blahdy. Bob so does that well. If you want my comments on this area. I think this should have been the design of a theory from day. One in fact. When i stood at dairy month old. This was high worked. A thought will gas right. if it's fuel surely is being burned and destroyed and took me quite a while to find out that that wasn't the case to find out the miners. Who gained all these fees on the blogger would which i four was bombing. The second thing is that if this does get implemented nobody does. It will be a massive economic boom for the theory token as an a theory in token hold. I'd be well pleased with this. Especially this would have a big effect on theory and stop the flow ratio. Which of course is top of my mind right. Now since i'm studying under safety and moose and his new book fiat standard. I'm a fan of the standard at any way. But you know that's what sir. I'm studying day to day right now. So i'm always thinking slow. Soaked floor ratio so this proposal would mean that the stock of a theory and will be constantly being reduced to offset some of the inflation for the mining rewards at the minute. He's just constantly inflating with booker woods. there's no destruction. there's no system level destruction anyway might accidentally send some their into the wrong address or whatever but the system doesn't doesn't create any deflation and this would do so on that point while we're talking about you but if i go to f gas station dot info it does have a leaderboard of the biggest guest banners right so actually lofton's articles the the They put on. The side is cold gas burners but as we know until this is implemented this proposal they don't banning gas at all alley just fees going through the contract to the minus with the number one. Let's call him guest bene- right now on the network is the union contract and in the last thirty days the amount of transaction fees going through that contract is twelve point. Seven million dollars worth of ethereal. Oh near enough to day. Two thousand f has been spent on transaction vs pretty significant amount if this proposal was implemented that would mean that in the last days unique swap would be responsible for destroying the two thousand ethereal just brilliant bending they two thousand theorem just from the fees that uses paint to use union swamp great and then tether another twenty six thousand theory would be banned in the last days because of that. So if you wanna in theory times these they say two thousand if theory of the what would ban twenty six thousand. That ted would ban if you want in. Us dollar terms it means units will be bending fifteen million dollars of theorem everyday days and tether will be betting ten million everyday days. I think those would go though. Remember is the capacity of the network would increase with this elastic book size so every time a block is full the next book slightly bigger so absolutely balmy so when when when the network is congested well more transactions go through every book which means more theory and guest band so the busy of the network is the more fees get panda. The big of the fees is self fulfilling prophecy. So i'm of course i'm talking from an economic point of view. If you're in a theory of togo you'd you definitely want this to be implemented because it it. It makes a theory more scarce doesn't it because it's bending the stalk of a theory all the time

Feliciano Meta Mascow Harvard BEN FED Booker Woods Johnson BOB Lofton TED United States Togo
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | 2 years ago

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 2 years ago

Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

"For many of us, Monday nights sieve Longman, Monday, night football. So today's a good day to consider a shakeup in the football world. The potential revival of a would be competitor to the National Football League last week actor and former pro wrestler Dwayne the Rock Johnson with other investors bought a start-up Football League called the xfl this take some explanation especially to those who aren't avid sports fans. Let's start with the xfl contrary to popular belief. The NFL doesn't football is just had a monopoly for the most part for so long that most. Most people consider it an institution for the last couple of decades though rivals have attempted to build new leagues to compete with the. NFL. The XFL is one of those its roots began way back in the year two, thousand when World Wrestling Federation chairman. Vince. McMahon decided to build a league that could compete with the NFL NBC Cohen the League and planned to carry its games the XFL plan to extend the football season by playing games from just after the Super Bowl in February. Until late April. Now, at the time league owners, hopes were high that the Saturday night games could Wu and elusive audience TV. Teenage boys according to CNN. Vince McMahon. WWF had been almost magical in its ability to appeal to twelve to twenty four year. Old Males who typically don't stay home watching TV on Saturday nights. The xfl hoped McMahon could bring that WWF formula to football and win that desirable TV audience, and for one brief moment, it looked like their hopes were within reach the first game in two thousand, one drew more than fifteen million viewers a massive audience. That gold ring looked close and yet it turned out to be so far away as the season wore on audiences spell like a botched handoff after that single season, the xfl shutdown. Sometimes in life timing really is everything, and so it goes for Vince McMahon who decided that twenty twenty would be the right time to revive the xfl it launched in February, pitching the Seattle dragons against the DC defenders teams played five games among both players and owners. Optimism rained TV audiences varied by geography, but were decent enough that by March believe was well into planning the twenty twenty, one season. And then Kobe came along the League canceled the season March twentieth less than a month. Later, the XFL filed for bankruptcy sports writers added the xfl lists of other WanNa, NFL competitors who'd also tried to make a go of it over the years. The XFL seemed to be just another failed startup, but perhaps they declared the league's death too soon. Let's get back to Dwayne Johnson better known as the Rock Johnson actually started his career as a football player, but never made it to the NFL instead, he joined Vince McMahon's wwf where he quickly rose to superstardom before retiring to become an actor, he's now the highest paid actor in the world according to Forbes. With his business partner Danny Garcia who also happens to be his ex wife, the rock led the fifteen million dollar purchase of the. xfl. Out of Bankruptcy Sports Management Company redbird capital as a third partner. Johnson says the purchase was actually Garcia's idea she loves football and when the XFL declared bankruptcy, she saw their chance to own not just a team but an entire league not to get too grand about this. Consider that the salary of a single NFL football star say. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak. Prescott is thirty, one million dollars. That's more than double what the partners paid for the xfl which has eight teams. Still, the deal made headlines. Perhaps it's a bit of hopeful light entertainment amidst the onslaught of grim. News in two thousand, twenty, Garcia. Johnson. Say They plan to produce multimedia content for fans year round, not just during the active spring season at production time, they hadn't yet said when the League will start to play again.

XFL National Football League Football League Vince Mcmahon Football Dwayne Johnson WWF Twenty Twenty Danny Garcia Partner Bankruptcy Sports Management C Dallas Cowboys CNN WU Seattle Kobe Chairman Nbc Cohen
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson buys XFL for $15 million with partner RedBird Capital

Monsters In The Morning

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson buys XFL for $15 million with partner RedBird Capital

"The Rock Johnson just kicked down fifteen million dollars for this -rageous happened right now, Mona The rock just bought some of the fifteen million dollars. He bought the xfl he bought the X. F.. Portico and a couple other news outlets profootballtalk one other one of the ones that are running with this. And he kicked down they'll pay a total of fifteen million dollars splitting the price equally with who else is he buying it with with? Your Boy Vincent Man Oh Heaven Vincent man going into into together. They're going to basically reform. triangularly and bring the xfl back and I'm thinking that you're commissioner, your voice, your face, your you know you're the guy that's going to sell it and bring it in resuscitate. This is going to be Wayne the Rock Johnson. that. That's a that's a good combination like it Russ you. Don't to like I don't hate the Rock I just think that he should do more in his. Ready to run through his social media for the next few years my God it's all we're gonNA hear Tequila in football hair. Better than. that. COMB. Song. Tequila. Hit Wow what he is he doesn't do things haphazardly. You know like he puts a lot of thought into everything that he does. Something partner with him is actually redbird capital, Dwayne the Rock Johnson and redbird capital of purchased on. This is hours before it was went to auction. He was GonNa go to oxygen today they bow. Press the buy it now price at fifteen million dollars and grabbed it and So I guess it was thirty they're splitting the difference I guess pay. PORTLAND. For we have a pandemic. Was it doing okay. Yes. It was. It was there was doing it was. Okay it was doing. All right. You had a couple markets. The Seattle team was doing really well I think the Saint Louis team was doing really well. So there was a couple of pockets of our teams that were doing really phenomenal. The product didn't look bad. Bad and then they had the you know they had the partners broadcast partners. It's I, mean you know if you're trying to usher this league in and it's a very expensive to try to start obviously professional football league there's been a ton of these guys are trying to start this. And so when you know pandemic hits and you're having to shut down operations in. Many things are going to survive that and especially Startup League. Yeah you get rock involved a lot of people like him her. I'm trying to think if it's you know. Everyone is running with Tequila and football.

Rock Johnson Football Portico Redbird Capital Russ Vincent Man Tequila Startup League Commissioner Portland Wayne Seattle Partner Saint Louis Dwayne
Biden takes aim at Trump's coronavirus response

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Biden takes aim at Trump's coronavirus response

"Seems hard to believe, but as of today we're now within one hundred days general election, which falls on November the third today, the Biden campaign rolled out a new ad that takes aim at the president's stumbling response to the corona virus. The AD is part of an almost fifteen million dollar ad buy in six states at the president one in two thousand, sixteen, Florida, Arizona, Wisconsin Michigan North Carolina and Pennsylvania. The president's failure to address the pandemic continues to hurt him in poll after

President Trump Biden North Carolina Wisconsin Michigan Florida Pennsylvania Arizona
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 2 years ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Rihanna and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey donate $15m toward mental health services via her nonprofit

Rush Limbaugh

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Rihanna and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey donate $15m toward mental health services via her nonprofit

"Riana is continuing to reach out to those in need through her foundation the Clara Lionel foundation announced a fifteen million dollar donation in collaboration with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to several organizations dedicated to mental health services food security and income loss to people in Newark and Chicago the donation is part of Dorsey's hash tag start small initiative

Riana Jack Dorsey Newark Chicago Clara Lionel Twitter CEO
NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

The Topical

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

"The National Rifle Association it may be one of America's most storied institutions, but it's also become a lightning rod for controversy, and that's led to some serious lackluster fundraising numbers. In fact, the NRA is experienced, significant financial struggles losing tens of millions of dollars over just the past few years. That might be about to change today. Thanks to some new fundraising initiatives by the Organization for more return to OPR's national national rifle association correspondent Marcy Hammond Hello Marcy. Hi Leslie allows you mentioned. The NRA has been struggling severely for donations this year, but there seems to be a writing of the ship taking place. Place as the NRA today has reported a massive funding increase from donors held at gunpoint tactic. How much money are we talking over the past quarter? The NRA says it's raised over fifteen million dollars from donors who are awoken in bed with a pistol in their face, informed with a child, and a playground is within an NRA. Snipers range, or simply grabbed armed fundraisers on the street

NRA National Rifle Association Marcy Hammond OPR Gunpoint America Leslie
NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

The Topical

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

NRA Receives Massive Funding Increase From Donors Held at Gunpoint

"The National Rifle Association it may be one of America's most storied institutions, but it's also become a lightning rod for controversy, and that's led to some serious lackluster fundraising numbers. In fact, the NRA is experienced, significant financial struggles losing tens of millions of dollars over just the past few years. But that might be about to change today thanks to some new fundraising initiatives by the organization. more we For turn to OPR's national national rifle association correspondent Marcy Hammond hello Marcy. Hi Leslie allows you mentioned the NRA has been struggling severely for donations this year, but there seems to be a righting of the ship taking as the NRA today has reported a massive funding increase from donors held at gunpoint. Interesting tactic how much money are we talking? Over the past quarter The NRA says it's raised over fifteen million dollars from donors who are awoken in bed with a pistol in their face, informed with a child in a playground is within an NRA snipers range, or simply grabbed armed fundraisers on the

NRA National Rifle Association Marcy Hammond OPR America Leslie
You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:08 min | 2 years ago

You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

"Earlier in this week we talked about how the tech industry should either hire more people of color or invest in them higher or wire on that ladder idea. The past few days have seen a few commitments from established venture funds. Softbank, launch. Day One hundred million dollar fund support people of Color Andriessen Horowitz launched at two point. Two Million Dollar Fund to support founders from quote underserved communities with a plan to expand it to fifteen million dollars over time, but if we're being honest here. That's not that much syrup. Kunst is the managing director of CLEO capital. They are real amounts of money, but compared to the size of the industry and the amount of underfunding that has happened. Black founders get less than two percent of all venture capital dollars, despite being fifteen percent of the population and starting companies at disproportionately high rates so that historical imbalance is certainly not going to be solved with you know these cumulative called one hundred fifteen million dollars in commitments that one hundred. Hundred fifteen million humility is already small, and then when you realize that it's not particularly earmarked for black or Hispanic, underrepresented minorities, you have to question how much is actually going to get into the hands of the people who you know have historically been underfunded the most right, and also, if we were talking about structural change, white year, mark money at all exactly and I think you know my fund cleo capital. We don't have a mandate around gender diversity that being said you know. Know, my portfolio is incredibly diverse. We have a lot of black founders. We have a lot of Asian and Indian in Hispanic founders. You know we. We have a lot of gay founders like we've. We just find great people and we invest in them, and they make us a lot of money are two best. Performing companies in the portfolio are founded by women of Color, and the other one is founded by a man of color and his business partner in both are immigrants the exact. Exact things that people are saying. How do we do it? How do we find it? We have to have this carve-out or this sort of remedial training or whatever it is, there are funds like mind that have just been able to do it and we're making a lot of money from doing it i. mean there's research that shows trillions of dollars is being left on the table by not investing in more founders of color like why isn't that economic argument working if nothing else? I mean we see the same thing with gender right I have been on NPR I've been on these shows a lot to talk about gender and race over the years, and we saw a lot of these same things after me to where you know, there's massive economic arguments right? There's only really two schools of thought you either fundamentally believe that only white men are capable of greatness, which is a really thought that I hope you're very quiet about or you're leaving money on the table, and there's not really another. There's not really another option, and and so I think. Think when people realize that, and when people except that, they say oh, I'm leaving money on the table. And by the way the job of venture capital is not to invest in a museum founders.

Cleo Capital Managing Director Andriessen Horowitz Softbank Partner
Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

"Two a prominent DC based think tank the Aspen Institute is returning eight million dollars it got from the feds as part of the corona virus relief package just yesterday Aspin argue the small business aid was needed to keep its four hundred thirty person staff employed the aspen institute has a one hundred fifteen million dollar endowment and several billionaires are on its board of trustees the decision comes a day after the Washington post reported the institute got the loan it joins the LA Lakers and shake shack and among the businesses that have gotten federal money and then chosen to give

Aspen Institute Aspin Washington Post La Lakers
Applications for Houston rental assistance program closed in under 2 hours after money runs out

Michael Berry

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Applications for Houston rental assistance program closed in under 2 hours after money runs out

"Story the city of Houston's rental assistance program ran out of money within ninety minutes of accepting applications today cities housing and community development director Tom McCaslin says nearly twelve thousand renters scooped up all fifteen million dollars over the next two weeks and Baker Ripley will be confirming these applications within two weeks the applicants will receive a plaque to other and the goal is to have all of the funding I'm out the door and and to to the landlords on behalf of tenants by the

Houston Tom Mccaslin Baker Ripley Director