17 Burst results for "Fifteen Billion Years"

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTRH

"Back to close to close will heart with us well from space deep space how difficult is it to find planet earth and just say Hey that one's a Goldilocks type plan well I don't know I would assume that the super advanced civilization would have the technology we're kind of getting there we're we're able to detect signatures now of water and I'm sure an advanced civilization that got I mean we're not you know the cargo ship scale we're still not even considered okay a civilization one and if they had it he had a going up to I think for which you know you would control the galaxy basically we're going down the line yeah we're we're so far down the line and we think you know we got all this great technology but we're just getting going how long do you think it takes to get up to that for love I don't know but you know if the if the universe will use the fifteen billion years we can assume that there there may well have been a galaxy where conditions were much more favorable to life and it happened quickly and the whole evolution was speeded up so they could have been a turnover you know of a couple of times you know I mean for if if they if it took them four billion years while we're fifteen billion years down the road now and if if they were even ten thousand years ahead of us let alone a million are are more who knows what kind of technology they have that's why I don't see why we you know you're trying to reach signals and so on a server like Stephen Hawking said you pointed out yeah you know that well they would have figured that out a long time ago you know they're gonna mask whatever signals that they send out and we never detect them so that that whole thing to me just seems you know different less I try to conclude something based on that hi I'm Anna and like I said I like to turn around to where we're standing with honors and yeah how we gonna get scientists to do this well you know I just what will here's an interesting question though yeah we send out probes in our you know space program to investigate other planetary systems do you think that there were on and you know I'll make a sound man to the probes whatever they're called but you're just robotic probes to this planet in them where are they if they landed into yep the probes land out I think that's that's a good question you know where where are all the tools that were used to create these ultra sophisticated megalithic sites words tools that's why I can't buy into the lost civilization theory at all it makes more sense that there wouldn't be tools if extraterrestrials did the work why would you leave out ultra sophisticated tools behind if you try the lost civilization and that that to the facts you better find some tools and you don't find them I think that's just the complete that and I don't love to debate the people that proper that theory because it just doesn't wash at all there are no tools look for they've been working for years and there there are no tools equal to the task of doing that we would check us diamond saws right now we could make the cuts there are certain things we couldn't do you know those boxes that are in this rap them there and and Egypt there they can't be made now so without the tools to me it's more likely and I I think there is evidence out there and some of the statues that I see in Mexico especially dead look like robots to me that even have what Lee either looks like a tool or a weapon at their sides put that they're holding on to and they have very large Bochy thing on their chest and I have a blank look in their eyes they just look blankly stature doesn't look human yeah unless you're willing to look at those things and I you know that the tool issue really is a big one you know and it may well have been that robotic probes were sent here and they I have the tools all built in if that makes sense in with another thing that we have to answer is why all of these very sophisticated caves all over the planet wanted to hide under ground and and from what there's a lot of questions yet to answer and yet they're they're really starting to well to pile up and and we need to answer them then I look at all all the look at all the evidence not just one piece of it you know some people like to focus on Egypt that they focus on Peru now look at the whole thing that we have it's a puzzle isn't it if you can you need all those pieces in order to look at the big picture you really do I need to find you do find some things like saw something everybody's notice the the poly gone all the you know the very irregular nobody does architecture it's almost as if somebody was saying this is not something you really humans ever did and this is a reminder that somebody was here before you and you don't do this stuff we do and we look at it and were amazed we're stunned and have been for generations and now we trying to claim it or at least are academics are and I think it's a big mistake because if they do come back you know the civilization would be in for a very cold shock yeah because well for obvious reasons you know FOR overwhelmed by somebody I'm not saying that they're going to come back and wipe out the planet but if somebody that's just so far sophisticated that we see you know we're like monkeys in relation to them or something we handle it I don't know but they could come back and wipe out the plant you can't rule that out could some species Kurt Kurt it depends on what we're doing how toxic or making the planet and this I think one question you have to ask him this is why are the why are the solar systems and galaxies spread so far apart all the planets are so far apart and the systems or say it it's almost as if somebody want to quarantine at you know we have this we have this planet over here and this planet that has like over here in this one or not gonna let them contaminated each other yeah now unless it goes well see I think they gave life to one planet per solar system it looks like that yep and that's very spread out you know as we as we know it very spread out and I want to mention to you a couple things of one is I'm I'm headed down to Mexico City on Friday and failed to walk on to do some research down there a week or so none of the great research yeah well him now now that they found them the mercury underneath dear Matt along with the Mike yeah I was in there in seventy eight in the Mike was what shocked me because I knew what Mike is used for and now with the mercury we have this puzzle you know were mercury tests and it's in China it's in a few different locations and especially at that site that site looks so technological to me there's there's just my chan I'm I'm going to be this time I must sign is helping to tell my force would you I will I will do that yes operatives help and they're good I'm gonna be with an archaeologist is gonna show me some things that people don't usually get to what was the ancients of use mercury for well that's the question really mercury you know is of course a very strange probably dot US metal we have a lot of strange properties to it I mean it doesn't freeze intelligence what forty below or something you know liquid metal it's it conducts electricity very well it does not conduct heat very well also if you start thinking about it you know electrical conductor and if you're thinking it is Mike is used for and it was at the top of the pyramid and underneath they call it a temple I call it a room almost looks like an equipment room they had an underneath the floor the complete sheet of Michael it Mike isn't an insulator so if you're doing high energy.

fifteen billion years four billion years ten thousand years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And then when water appears again, they rehydrate and then continue civilization, and it pushes the questions because what he's imagining the extinction of human beings, but the continuance of other forms of life and how wide our imaginations go. Towards bringing those in and making them feel that they are part of our chain of being and, you know, can we have a chain of being that goes on fifteen billion years that go beyond the earth is extinguished in humanities extinguished, but we still feel there's spirit and some way I don't know it made me think of that. And and I kind of believe in that I found it really beautiful that managed to expand my mind to make me feel that I'm part of life, and that even after human beings are gone that there is meaning in our little contributions. You know, sometimes you are called. I don't know if you're further yourself this way, public health journalist in addition to being a physician, obviously. I'm starting to think of you. I I like this language of you know, citizen. Scientist feel can feel like citizen physician would be a good good thing to call you. How do you like that? The word that I really like to us citizen, and what I'm partly trying to do is open that open the portal both ways that the world of what happens to you in the course of our averaged currently eighty plus year existence is one where the people that are part of that relationship on the clinical side are also people themselves who are journeys through that pathway, right and fumbling for this a little bit. But the the sense that the portal, I that I hope is that. I'm speaking not only as a physician to the outside world. But I'm also opening the outside world to us as physicians, and nurses, and others to think of ourselves as just citizens and to break down that inside outside and to make it all kind of seamless, and it's a sensibility. More than anything. I'm trying to make happen. It's a porous miss though, too. And it's a conversation dude, kind of curing making possible. Yeah. And the sense of. I like getting down into the microscopic of the real stories of what happens when human beings care for one another and entered into these kinds of relationships, and you see everything flows through their money and jealousy in politics, and and and misunderstanding and conversation than etcetera. And then Furthermore, you know, where this interplay of knowledge and technology and trying to make trying to function in a world where none of us have a full handle on it all side a system, and we have to we have to have some agency in that system. And how do we how do we not be powerless? And how do we shape that thing where part of and so I'm interested in not only the sense of inside and outside also interested in sense of the microscopic to the telescopic. And and and starting to arrive at a way that that we've we feel connected, and we know the. Meaning and the feelings as well as the data about what's happening. Yes. I mean, as you write about this is a spear of some of the most cathartic existential and potentially meaningful moments of being human. Of our whole lives. Take place in the context of health care. That's huge. That's why I feel like I have the unfair advantage of of my fellow writers the New Yorkers like I live inside this material that is extraordinary every day. And I got to think about all these really confusing. Interesting sometimes distressing things like. Do we have a right to this stuff?.

Scientist fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And create the asteroid belt Neptune travelling at a different orbit is to do. Wondering about. What are you talking about? Well, those those are all interesting ideas, you seem to have a. A talent for for theorizing. And what you need to do with the various any ideas that you come up with is workout all their logical consequences, and then propose to test them, and the the the success or failure of the tests are what that plus how how well they ferret interpreting all the existing experiments and data are what determine whether we accept hypotheses other scientific table or we don't doctor. I believe looking out a way out as they're now able to do with Hubble or with the larger telescopes on earth. They they look for pulsars, for example, don't they because they are. So a very bright. And then measure the Redshift of the the pulsar's. In order to see how far back there looking is that roughly corrected. Perhaps you might be thinking of quasars quasars. I'm sorry. I always get. I always do that quasars. Yes. Yes. In the big bang theory. Quasars are the active cores of primitive galaxies. That's just a theory. But yes, you're looking at quasars, then you're looking at the most distant objects that we can see. Okay. How far back have we looked? Let's see the look back time is now back to approximately eight hundred million years after the big bang that is according to the big bang theory. Eight hundred million wait a minute eight hundred million years after the big bang. Yes. That's right. The big bang occurred fifteen billion years ago, I think right, right? So you're saying fifteen billion eight hundred million years is our present look back on how can that be? I can understand that at fifteen billion years. There would be something. Quasar maybe or something that you could you could Mark and say, okay, Redshift a half fifteen billion years. But after that. There should be. Nothing nothing that you could see how how could there be? If all matter. Yeah, I'm confused. The answer. Again, goes back to the the nature of the theory. The the the big bang. This is not my idea. Now, explain the conventional big bang theory. Is this an astronomy, I understand an explosion of matter into space. Sounds like an explosion of the big bang theory. Real sense. I I like that analogy, but they're they're talking about an explosion of space itself. And therefore, would you would you had the release of radiation into space that makes the microwave background that spreads all through space? So everybody sees that constantly in all directions, ever thereafter. And when we looking back as far as we can see the further out, we go the closer, we get to be able to see all the way back to the big bang. So when I say eight hundred billion years after the big bag I'm talking about if the big bang was fifteen billion years ago that we're we could look back fourteen billion two hundred million years. Okay. What do you think? Once you get out fifteen billion years. What do you think would be? Beyond that. Well in the big bang theory. The higher the Redshift the closer you're getting to the big bang. But in other theories, the higher the rich shift the more distant you're looking in the universe. Yes. In a possibly infinite universe. So how far away you're looking depends upon which theory, you're using we we can't tell absolute distance. We can only use a theory to infer the distance. Okay. There are those who would think there would be an INFINITI as one possibility and another would be that. If you could look back far enough you will eventually be again looking at yourself. In other words, that it's one large circle. Yes. That's right. Well, the big bang theory make certain specific predictions, and according to the big bang as we look back to these most distant objects. They should be very very primitive just newly formed galaxies with young stars in them. And so far that's not panning out with the observational evidence on my website, which can be linked to from yours. I have just a quick summary of the top ten probably. With the big bang theory. And that's one of them their their problems with the the look back that things don't look younger necessarily as we look further and further out into the universe darn. All right. So folks, you should go to my website immediately. I really mean this and scroll down to the guest names. You will see a doctor van Flanders name there. Click on that you'll go right over to his website, which is fascinating east of the Rockies. You're on the air with Dr van sovereign. Where are you please? Hello. Hello. Hello. Sharon from Madison New Hampshire. Yes, sir. Yeah. This is the professor Frederick runner. Retired research professor of physics from Xavier university in Cincinnati. Yes. Oh, yes. How are you? I just thought occurred this business about the great stone face road man of the mountain in New Hampshire. I think it's just a rock formation. But it sure does look like a human face when you look at it from just the right angle that just inside remark I make the people might be able to test various criteria. Whether it's natural not by using that as a more interesting, if you wanna get evolution going any way. You can get it going how you going. And of course, it can go ahead and do things if you have the time they're fantastic because it can develop out now professor or a Peterson and gave a talk at Xavier university to some of our graduate students. Oh, about three decades ago about cosmic engineering idea that you take the matter around a star instead of concentrating small planets spread it out. So that you use and capture and use the energy coming from that star or much larger area rather than wedding modest all of it. Go by. Missing this ball service of little groves. And he went so far as to suggest that if you had it spread out into Sears. So you catch it most of it then evidence that there's such we're going on would be you'd have a gym heat coming off from the outside of that. Because the energy of being used long way instead of allowing most of it to fly on by now if evolution works and works anywhere, then you wanted to send you wanna an operational definition of molecules and things like that. By say like magnetic radiation by say Walsh ways, which are not subject to the Doppler, shifting effects as John Hart pointed out quite some time ago. And you would then want to communicate the choice of one in four tries to one in four business that way, and so if you wanted to tell somebody at some distant place, how to make some how put together you give an operational definition of the molecules by transmitting through walls, raves which be invulnerable to the excuse me. Excuse me. Dr. Tom, can you translate that for us? Well, I frankly, I was getting lost in the in the last part of that it was a little bit too much too fast. Well, all right. The idea of cosmic engineering that those who cosmic engineer would not want to let the power the energy being released by star lose it. So you'd want to spread the matter out, which was eventually vailable. You may be in the form of planets spread it out in a very soon that wide area energy absorbers and users rather than let it go by now. The evidence that Peterson has pointed out was that such things and you'd have the glow dim glow of the. Fear of these energy using surface using. Operations the cosmic engineered ones rather than just having the matter concentrated so tiny and losing most of it. And so you might be able to see evidence it's such is going on. I say if there is such going on in evolutionist going there, and you'd want to send the specs so to speak of how to do this around. You would say that specs by giving operational definitions. How to make things through a choice of one in four one in four chess. Four trumpets say and do it that way and use Walsh ways. All right, then. Duffy's doctor excuse me. Doctor doctor dodger excuse me. You've said it again, and I still don't understand it. And and I'm sure that's my fault. Not yours. Daca. Van flanders? Are you are you getting this? Well, I would what you're talking about is seems to be what's popularly called Dyson spheres, which basically are. Ways to capture the energy emitted by a star by building a structure all around it. And getting all the energy that we might be able to detect such things if there were other civilizations by looking for infrared radiation leaking out of such things. In other words, if I've got this straight, and we'll all that down. He's saying is civilization that would have learned harness the power of a star. Is that? Yes, that's right. That is right. That then is roughly Dr Kaku a description of a civilization that would be a a type two. Civilization that would have learned to harness the power of a star a doctor have we seen any such evidence. Well, I think the short answer is no nothing that we would credit as being likely to be Dyson sphere. So these things if they exist either don't leak much, or they're they're not very abundant in the galaxy around us. So no evidence of that all of that at all yet. That's right. Okay. West of the Rockies, you're on the air with Dr van and Hello, Hello. This is Darren in Carson city this routine and your phones to kill h you bet. Thank you gentlemen, for another thought enlarging show. I have a question and an idea. I'd like the doctors idea son is your question a quick one question is quick so quick. I can throw it at the end. And and the idea. All right. We'll give us a question. I very quickly. I catching the show, but the. The parent planet. Very to Mars. Do. We know how big it would have been. All right. And on.

Van flanders Rockies Xavier university professor Walsh Peterson New Hampshire INFINITI Dr van Mark Carson city Dr Kaku professor of physics Cincinnati Darren Sears Sharon Madison New Hampshire engineer Dr. Tom
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WLAC

"The cycle would occur and everything would change would anything that we understand survived that change. Yes, there, for example, black holes would any black holes that existed in the universe would which survived that change? They're they're the universe. Heats in this model, not an infinite temperature as one can seize up in the standard big bang picture. They only each to a large but finite temperature and that's enough to vaporize us and protected, but it's not enough to vaporize a black hole. So can you imagine if we knew this was coming with technology billions of years from now that there would be some way that very intelligent technological race could survive such an event. I think it's conceivable again, we're imagining technology that don't exist, but but we have to work on it. And we know that some things like black holes, which maybe we figured out some way ways to survive such an event. Conceivable. Well, then again, you know, I it seems to me then that there if there have already been many such cycles. Some civilizations out there that we've got to imagine exist would have survived or figured out a way to survive which would make them now. As to us. They would be God's certainly it would be in control of forces that we can't even ima- or we can just start to imagine today. They would be to us as gods. Would they not? Well, perhaps the the the issue once again has to do with the vast space and now in addition to thank the university's undergone the Chilean's of years of accelerated expansion has pushed them such a distance surmise that they would even they would be outside our field of view. They would be beyond the horizon the furthest it light that we can see in the universe today. And that would be out about what fifteen and a half fifteen billion light years something like that. Isn't that the the limit that we can look to now? That's right. That's right. The most distant light. We can see is is about was omitted. It comes from sources which today about fifteen billion light years away, and these would be exit exponentially greater distances from all right? Does your theory embrace the inevitability of things out beyond where we can see another words. This is the old how high is the sky daddy question. But I mean is there anything out beyond that fifteen billion light years that we can presently see two or is it what? Yes. I think both in the conventional theory, and in a cyclic theory where we see is just is limited by the fact that we can only. See what light is able to reach us and lights on been able to travel a certain distance since either the beginning of the universe in the standard picture or since the last cycle in in in the picture. I'm proposing. Neil Turek, and my collaborator, and I are proposing. But in both pictures the universe is very likely to stretch way beyond the distant delimited distance. We can see and there to be many more galaxies out there in the cyclic picture if it's really really talking about university existed forever. Going to an infinite number of cycles, really are three dimensions are space would be infinitely. Infinite extend and and we're wanting to sing a tiny corner of it because we can only because when we observe light. We can see lights in the last bang, and that was it. It's bright enough. And that's only had a chance to travel fourteen or fifteen billion years since the last bang. So it's kind of like picturing a theater where events just keep occurring. But the is always there is that fair analogy. That's right. And Furthermore, you're limited to only seeing a spotlight on you. Would you at any given time of a certain size? You can't even see the full theater. You unable to see a certain, right. Megyn around you. Gotcha. But the theater itself in your theory is always there. And these events cyclically continue to occur. It's hard to grasp. It's really hard to grasp. And and at some point when you consider all of this professor, you get to the God question or the the creator question or do you not get their professor? Well, I tend to keep my nose to the grindstone which is to say, I'm really interested into what degree we can explain very vast amount of very detailed observations. We have gathered about our universe, especially in the last decade. So for me. Reason why I should say emphasize the reason why we've come to this series. Not just because we may may or may not like the idea, but rather because we've shown that this kind of. A vision of the standard story these two very efficient way of explaining a large wealth of data that we have today at least as efficiently as a standard model perhaps more efficiently than the standard model. So there was no beginning. There was no. And let there be light. There's no need for that. I mean again as a plan it's not excluded that there was a beginning. But it's not no longer required. Could we could have begun many many cycles ago? There could have been a let there be light moment. And then we settled into the cyclic picture cyclic picture or it could be this picture. Also enables the possibility that it was there forever. How how does the concept of time fit into all of this is there at any point during the cycle that you mentioned an an alteration in in what we understand is linear time as? We measure linear time. Well, the main effect on time is which is really a fundamental issue has to do with whether time has a beginning. So implicit in the big bang model is that there was a beginning of time. There was a if you like. The possibility of time did not exist before a certain moment. In other words, prior to there being two objects one movement, you could measure against the other. There could not have been time. They had simply would not have been. It would be meaningless to talk about it in the standard picture, and in our picture of fundamental aspect is that we're arguing that time is always existed that it was always a sensible item. Because there are always objects there there is always a being therefore time has always been. Yes. Right. And it's always been a steady. Evolution other words. These bangs over and over again, it always we didn't really get rid of stuff in the previous cycle. We simply spread it out to a point that it's not having a big effect and very thinned out. So there's a. The time has a steady progression throughout this. And this kind of natural be call aero to time a natural directionality that the university has in its evolution. Or even cycles. In fact, it's it's it's it's cycling it a certain direction in time. Do you believe that any sort of? Travel in time or communication through time. Could be possible conceivable. I'm not quite sure what you mean. By that. I mean time right now. Well, I I'm gonna make it a lot looser than that. I I meant. Of the events that occurred at a prior time back in the nineteen forties or events that will occur one hundred years from now. Could be viewed. If time has always been and always will be along with your theory of the the cycles. Then might there not be a way to to travel within it to. Truly travel within time. Well. The course we're. I again, we should be careful as to what we mean. Of course, we really are travelling in time right now, it's just that we can't control the rate and. And we can't go backwards. There's certain limit to certain things we can't do. We know the laws of nature forbid us from doing anything that we call a causal as as to say going. It appears it causes must always precede their affect you can't go backwards in time and change the from the second change because you so I think there's there's limitations at the notion of time was altered forever by Einstein who toll taught us that two observers can even disagree on how they measure time. If we're moving right now, we're more or less arrested respect to one another. But if one of us was moving very rapidly respect to it one to the other as speed close to the speed of light time would not be something absolute we would measure it differently. We'd come to different conclusions at the rate at which different things are happening. So again, that's another way in a sense of altering time that that we know about so it's a it's a relationship speed as you got close to the speed of light. If you were to travel out of the speed of light and then travel back at the speed of light to earth, for example. You would be you would've affectively moved in time crash. Right. And you would have it. It would seem it would seem to an earthbound observer as if somehow you've managed to manipulate time your advantage in the sense that you'd come back younger than someone on earth who who is aging along with you as you were going as your gone on the trip. So we know there are ways of doing that. And we actually see that. And they found something hypothetical. We can actually produce that in the laboratory we can produce to identical particles both of which have had a certain well-known lifetime magin it being a fraction of a second. A millisecond sure and one of them we'll keep still and the other one we will accelerate at high speed and the one that accelerates at high speed will last longer by our measure. And the one that was kept still it thinks is living the same lifetime. According to clock that that the one at rest is but relative to our time clock, the one at rest decays is still a millisecond to one that was exceleron could last a long time we actually use that idea for developing accelerator laboratories percentage, how much difference would would we notice from our perspective, presented wise. The closer you get to the speed of light the bigger the bigger factor of difference. You can get a fact imagine a factor of ten hundred thousand that's the kind of number. That's the kinds of values. You can get in the accelerator laboratory for particles, and one could imagine that happening in a more massive scale. Professor we were going to build a this great big exceleron or down in Texas, and somehow the funding dried up for it. And the project got in trouble. Are we going to are we scientifically in the poor house here? In other words. I is this a great disservice to our country that we did not proceed with this gigantic accelerator. Do you see the benefits of proceeding with that? Well, yeah. I mean, I think it was a major step backwards for this country in a forefront area of science. That's really I mean, th they kind of physics. It's being explored. Niece accelerators is is is the most fundamental aspects of the laws of nature, which are crucial for the kinds of issues. We're talking about tonight also the nature of dark energy, the nature of the constituents of the universe. The the the evolution of the cosmos. Also, depend upon those same physical laws. The US retreated in a major way from its historic role is being a leader in this field. And why do you think we did that?.

professor US Neil Turek Texas Einstein fifteen billion light years fifteen billion years one hundred years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTRH

"Cycle would occur and everything would change would anything that we understand survive that change. Yes, there, for example, black holes would any black holes that existed in the universe would would survive that change? They're the universe heats in this model, not an intimate temperature as one can seize in the standard big bang picture. They only eat to a large but finite temperature and that's enough to vaporize us and protected, but it's not enough to vaporize a black hole. So can you imagine? If we knew this was coming with technology. Billions of years from now that there would be some way that are very intelligent technological race could survive such an event. I think it's conceivable again, we're imagining technologies that don't exist. But but we have is truly in years to work on it. And we know that some things like black holes, which maybe we figured out some way other ways to survive such an event. Conceivable. Well, then again. You know, I it seems to me then that there if there have already been many such cycles. Some civilizations out there that we've got to imagine exist would have survived or figured out a way to survive which would make them now. As to us. They would be God's certainly it would be in control of forces that we can't even ima- or we can just start to imagine today. They would be to us as gods. Would they not? Well, perhaps the the issue once again has to do with the vast amounts of space and now in addition to thank universities undergone. These Chilean's years of accelerated expansion has pushed them such a distance from is that they would even they would be outside our field of view. They would be. Beyond the horizon, the furthest it light that we can see in the universe today. And that would be out about what fifteen and a half fifteen billion light years something like that. Isn't that the the limit that we can look to now the most distant like, we can see is is about was omitted. It comes from sources which today about fifteen billion light years away, and these would be X exponentially greater distances from us. All right. Does your theory embrace the? Inevitability of things out beyond where we can see another words. This is the old how high is this guy. Daddy question. But I mean is there anything out beyond that fifteen billion light years that we can presently see two or what? Yes. I think both in the conventional theory, and at a cyclic theory what we see is jazz. Do is limited by the fact that we can only. See what light is able to reach us and lights only been able to travel a certain distance since either the beginning of the universe in the standard picture or since the last cycle in in picture. I'm proposing. Neil to reckon my collaborator, and I are proposing. But in both pictures the universe is very likely to stretch way beyond the distant delimited distance. We can see and there to be many more galaxies out there and the cyclic picture if it's really really talking about a university existed forever. Going to an infinite number of cycles, really are three dimensions are space would be infinitely at infinite extend and and we're seeing a tiny corner of it because we can only because when we observe light. We see light from the last bang, and that was that's it's bright enough. And that's only had a chance to travel fourteen or fifteen billion years since the last bang. So it's kind of like picturing a theater where events just keep occurring. But the theater is always there is that fair analogy. That's right. And Furthermore, you're limited to only seeing cause a spotlight on. You. Would you you're going to get any given time of a certain certain side? You can't even see the full theater, you're able to see a certain region around you. Gotcha. But the theater itself in your theory is always there. Yes. And these events cyclically continue to occur. It's hard to grasp. It's really hard to grasp. And and at some point when you consider all of this professor, you get to the God question or the. The creator question or do you not get their professor? Well, I tend to keep my nose to the grindstone which is to say, I'm really interested in to what degree we can explain very vast amount of very detailed observations. We have gathered about our universe. Especially in the last decade. So for me. The reason why I should say emphasized the reason why we've come to this theory is not just because we may may or may not like the idea, but rather because we've shown that this kind of. A vision of the standard story these to a very efficient way of explaining a large wealth of data that we have today at least as efficiently as a standard model perhaps more efficiently than the standard model. So there was no beginning. There was no. And let there be light. There's no need for that. I mean again as a slant, it's not excluded. That there was a beginning. But it's not no longer required. Could we could have begun many many cycles ago? There could have been let there be light moment. And then we settled into the cyclic picture cyclic picture or it could be this picture. Also enables the possibility that it was there forever. How does how does the concept of time fit into all of this is there at any point during the cycle that you mentioned an alteration in what we understand is linear time as we measure linear time. Well, the main affect on time is which is really a fundamental issue has to do with whether time has a beginning. So implicit in the big bang model is that there was a beginning of time. There was a few like the possibility of time did not exist before a certain moment. In other words, prior to there being two objects want one movement, you could measure against the other. There could not have been time. They had simply would not have been. Meaningless to talk about it in the standard picture, and in our picture of fundamental aspect is that we're arguing that time is always existed that. It was always a sensible item. Because there are always objects there there is always a being therefore time has always been. Yes. Right. And it's always been a steady. Evolution other words. These bangs over and over again, it always we didn't really get rid of stuff in the previous cycle. We simply spread it out to a point that it's not having a big affect and very thinned out. So that there's a good time has a steady progression throughout this. And there's a kind of natural be call aero to time and natural direction -ality that the university has in its evolution. Or even cycles. In fact, it's it's it's it's it's cycling it is certain direction in time. Do you believe that any sort of? Travel in time or communication through time. Could be possible conceivable. I'm not quite sure what you mean. By that. I mean time right now. Well, I I'm gonna make it a lot looser than that. I I meant. Of that events that occurred at a prior time back in the nineteen forties or events that will occur a hundred years from now. Could be viewed. If time has always been and always will be along with your theory of the the cycles. Then might not be a way to travel within it to. Truly travel within time. Well. The of course, we well. Again, we should be careful as to what we mean. Of course, we really are travelling in time right now, it's just that we can't control the rate and. And we can't go backwards. There's certain limit to certain things we can't do far as we know the laws of nature forbid us from doing anything that we call a causal as as to say going. It appears it causes must always PC their affect. You. Can't go backwards in time and change the from the fact and change because you so I think there's there's limitations at the notion of time was altered forever by Einstein toll taught us that. Two observers can even disagree on how they measure time. If we're moving right now, we're more or less arrested respect to one another. But if one of us was moving very rapidly respect to it and one to the other as speed close to the speed of light time would not be something absolute we would measure it differently. We'd come to different conclusions at the rate at which different things are happening. So again, that's another way in a sense of altering time that we know about so it's a it's a relationship to speed as you got close to the speed of light travel out of the speed of light. And then traveled back at the speed of light to earth, for example. You would be you would have effectively moved in time. Correct. Right. And you would have it. It would seem it would seem to an earthbound observer as if somehow you've managed to manipulate time to your advantage in the sense that you'd come back younger than. So on earth who who is aging along with you as you were going on edgy as you got on your trip. So we know there are ways of doing that. And we actually see that. And that's not something hypothetical. We can actually produce that in the laboratory we can produce two identical particles both of which have had a certain well-known lifetime. Imagine it being a fraction of a second. Like, a millisecond and one of them will keep still and the other one we will celebrate at high speed and the one that accelerates at high speed will last longer by our measure than the one that was kept still it is living the same lifetime to clock that that the one at rest is but well to our time clock, the one at rest decays is still in a millisecond to one that was exhilarated could last a long time we actually use that idea for developing celebrated laboratories percentage how much difference would we notice from our perspective? Presented wise. It could close you get to the speed of light the bigger the bigger factor of difference. You can get a fact imagine a factor of ten hundred thousand that's the kind of number. That's there's the kinds of values. You can get the accelerator laboratory for particles and one could imagine that. Happening in a more massive scale. Professor we were going to build a this great big accelerator down in Texas, and somehow the funding dried up for it. And the project got in trouble. Are we going to are we scientifically in the poor house here? In other words. I is this a great disservice to our country that we did not proceed with this gigantic exhilarated you see the benefits of proceeding with that. Well, yeah. I mean, I think it was a major step backwards for this country in a forefront area of science. That's really I mean, the kind of physics. It's being explored. Niece accelerators is is is the most fundamental aspects of the laws of nature, which are crucial for the kinds of issues. We're talking about tonight also the nature of dark energy, the nature of the constituents of the universe. The the the evolution of the cosmos. Also, depend upon those same physical laws so in a sense the US retreated in a major way from its historic role is being a leader in this field. And why do you think we did that? That's a. I think there are many reasons that contributed to it, you know, most of them being political some of them having to do with the the Cold War having ended right about the time. That decision was made and our..

professor US Texas Neil Einstein fifteen billion light years fifteen billion years hundred years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Doug here with some dj investigative reporting are you already for this this is hot stuff right off of the flash fact department did you know and do you care victoria then in mongolia there are thirteen times more horses than humans and thirty five times more sheep than humans that's in mongolia that would tell me i'd probably like mongolia yeah actually that's man here we go the sun the focus now son our sun burns nine million tonnes of gas a second how about that and at that rate it will probably burn out and the next fourteen to fifteen billion years so it's a problem for those of us who are here fourteen fifteen billion years from now the sun were run out of gas expand and swallow up pretty much all the planets at least as far as the third rock is concerned after that because the cold in the spaces i mean just cold right maybe by then we'll have to live on jupiter something there won't be a problem meyers okay back to china for this important fact the chinese people drink an average of eight soft drinks per year how about that coca cola has been trying to advertise to get that number up because they've gone to china but the chinese apparently don't like the sweetness of our soft drinks and apparently don't like the gas in it either i don't know what they what did the chinese used to drinking any of this stuff no idea schilling chinese drink well you've been to china was did anyone drinks soft drinks tea sony soft drinks wondering the water there either nu nu nu nu nu nu do not drink the water there you wanna talk about dysentery or the need of some t the average american casino gambler according to the latest research his white male college educated and in a higher income bracket than most thirty seven percent of gamblers earn more than seventy five thousand dollars a year does that surprise anybody because you'd have to at least make that to proper greg gamble right then still entering isn't that i have on the food chain anymore honeybee here we go here's one farm fact ready ready the honey bill honey boo good honeybee kills more people each year worldwide then venomous snakes because more people are allergic to obviously to the honeybee stinging of bees yeah i know you are and you probably allergic to venomous snakes though to ten minutes for the i just guessed that victoria keelan doug stephan on the dj show.

mongolia meyers china greg gamble doug stephan fourteen fifteen billion years seventy five thousand dollars fifteen billion years thirty seven percent nine million tonnes ten minutes
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"First objects thrown off from this tremendous gigantic big bang that occurred is that roughly correct in other words you're actually looking back in in time as well as space yeah right as you look further out right and the look back time is now thought to be somewhere between thirteen and fifteen billion years or something like that and one of the difficulties now that's come up with hubble telescope they find galaxies that are so far away that there they would have to have been at that time let's see about five hundred thousand years old compared to the time of the big bang and there's just not enough time for the stars to form fact some of these galaxies have what looks like what is it globular clusters which should be something like thirteen to fifteen billion years old and yet there may maybe a billion years from the time of the big bang so you have these major inconsistencies of the theory what do you favor instead of the big bang do you d do you favor a steady state kind of theory in other words it's all here it's always been here or the process of creation is ongoing or ongoing creation right ongoing creation continuous creation well i know the hubble telescope.

fifteen billion years five hundred thousand years billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Motion but motion requires moving through space yes but it could be at very very earliest instance when when when all of the mass the universe was in a region smaller than the size of the atta an atom that space itself the concept of space itself breaks down it's not a good quantity we don't know we know that that if we take the classical notions of space and time and trying to ply them back then then you get nonsensical predictions and so it could just be that a better theory of space and time with give us better predictions or could be that space and time themselves actually grew out of the big bang and and therefore the classical notions that we use to describe the re reality experience don't apply back then just like at quantum mechanical level just like at the level of individual atoms many of the classical notions that are associated with motions of a baseball when a batter hits it don't apply anymore when you're talking about electrons and atoms we've had to learn that you know our myopia our cosmic myopia is one of the greatest things about science it forces us to realize that the way we view the world and what we think is sensible need not always be right the probability of a giant nothingness prior prior to that instant giant waiting theater for the the pains to be applied to it my my favorite picture is probably that in fact well that that our our visible universe is really just part of what might be called a multi verse where regions where there are big bang's happening right now an infinite universe where they're big banks happening they're big crunches universities collapsing down to singularities and and and in these multi verse we happen to live in in a in an incident region by the way it's really hard region which which happened to have a big bang twelve to fifteen billion years ago but there are other regions this multi verse that are just now experiencing make big bang and i think that the laws of physics suggests that that's the.

atta baseball fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"We've had to learn that you know our myopia our cosmic myopia is one of the greatest things about science it forces us to realize that the way we view the world and what we think is sensible did not always be right the probability of a giant nothingness prior prior to that instant a giant waiting theater for the the pains to be applied to actually i my my favorite picture is probably that in fact well that that our our visible universe is really just part of what might be called a multi verse where regions where there are big bang's happening right now an infinite universe where they're big banks happening they're big crunches their universe is collapsing down to singularities and and in these multi verse we happen to live in in a in an infinite region by the way region which which happened to have a big bang twelve to fifteen billion years ago but there are other regions this multi verse that are just now experiencing make big bang and i think that the laws of physics we understand them suggests that that's the most likely possibility but really right now we're talking about metaphysics okay while we're on the subject of multidiverse let's consider time travel and nasty problem with grandma well in a multi verse we go back and we kill grandma and in one time line in one universe you pop out of existence and as grandma is now in the other instantly created universe it's a different story all altogether that's that has been proposed as one of the ways around this paradox is it well it's nice words the problem is is far as i know there's no physics behind it i mean for example we know at people talk about the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics that when you go back and you know it whenever you measure something you sort of have a lot of different levels of reality.

fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"I'm not sure about that i think we need to get the answers that the current cops of spacecraft are going to give us right this is a step by step process you learn a little and then you you try to make a judgment about what the next thing to do and if your if your goal is to find life for example than or understand the formation of the solar system you would send spacecraft to different places do you do subscribe to the big bang theory i bat is yeah i think that's accepted by most scientists i had a lady who called me up not long ago a simple but interesting question she said why are the planets basically round and when you consider the big bang she asked well we're all of these planets in essence thrown out from the big bang in a liquid for much as a drop of the liquid would be thrown out if you were to just toss a glass of water up into the air well those are very very very different questions kp solar system which is the sun and the planets formed about four billion years ago the big bang is believed to have occurred something like fifteen billion years ago a number is debated i factor to write it can be you know half as much or twice as much depending on who you talk to the the creation of the universe what was believed to be created was just the plasma very very hot gas and that all every all the stars and the planets formed through evolutionary prophecies that occurred inside stars over that timbering years and order to set up a situation where the solar system perform.

fifteen billion years four billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"Breaking overnight tributes are pouring in for legendary physicist and author stephen hawking the seventy six year old died early this morning after a life of discoveries that change the way we look at the universe and the battle at l against a ls that inspired us and be himself because monetary and astronomy during that time he was done you disease the debilitating robing immobility confining his body to a wheelchair is eventually to a machine my own than i can use pencil and paper have to by then his mind by that time boundless he's well known for i think it's quantum theory of relativity what are those theory's ideas now when my mind becomes boundless what does that mean now i might be able to postulate a theory or tell you what a theory is but i will never wasted time with theories why because of my mind is boundless i know the difference in the distinction between a theory and now we have a very very smart young man that goes to our church and he's me to the idea that sometimes even with facts you know like scientists say the the theory of of of of gravity they know it's a fact but by and large when your mind is boundless you don't waste time with theory let's let the let's let this gentleman continue and i want to bring out a couple of points of stephen hawking the greatest enemy of knowledge ignorance he once famously surmised it is the illusion of knowledge and that's what stephen had he had the because he believed that the earth started some and it says he concluded in a minute that the earth began fifteen billion years ago someone helped me someone helped me pray tail on what objective evidence to you after finding out what after researching what data was fifteen sixteen with twenty nine forty and if my mind is boundless not only do i not only do i know facts i can prove them i can prove that i can show you that they're truly and this is the thing and we're not taking it way too much credit to the mind of a man exact like it's it's limitless like he has balance this this infinitum i mean this knowledge like he's almost a mission right he knows everything we would we would we would bend the knee to whatever it is and he says like it's it's gotta be true because stephen hoppy center that that.

physicist immobility stephen stephen hawking fifteen billion years seventy six year
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WLAC

"And the psychiatrist or doctor whatever uses saying album i come you don't want to do your homework cause i found out the universe is expanding he says the universe is expanding because yeah the universe is expanding and and eventually it all blow up so none of his matters at his mother yells at em we live in brooklyn brooklyn is not expanding oh dear laughter practical it true in a way you know we don't live fifteen billion years from now or like i tell the joke or you know we don't live in a quantum world where you know adams are all empty space we live in a world that's macro that you know that that chairs are solid you sit on em and and yeah and y you know it's like we live in the here and now so whether there's an after life and or not in a way doesn't really matter we live now not we live in the here and now nothing hereafter so what you do now is really what counts either way whether there's an after life or not it doesn't it doesn't really matter now is what counts so make the most of it so michael do you think religion created the afterlife to keep people in line no i don't think so i mean that's it's it's a little bit of a cynical view by some atheists and people voltaire and other cynics that you know it's a made up story to to keep the boy masses in line i don't think so i think it's a natural byproduct of the of our brains that are big up to conceive of this idea just just being self aware that aware that we're mortal as far as we know no other species are aware of this fact you know we mentioned elephants agree but we don't think elephants are dogs or or chimps are aware sitting there thinking oh my god this is it you know we they may miss agreed one in the sense that they're they're gone they're out of the room but but but we don't think they're thinking you know so they're in the other there on the other side or they're a ghost.

brooklyn adams michael fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WTVN

"And the psychiatrist their dr whatever years is saying alvi come you don't wanna do your homework nieces 'cause they found out the universe is expanding he says the yours is expanding he goes yeah the universe is expanding and and eventually at all blow up so none of this matters in his mother yells at him we live in brooklyn brooklyn's not expanding so go sure it you know we don't live fifteen billion years from now or like i tell debunked choper you know we don't live in a quantum world where you know adams are all empty space we live in a world that's macro that's you know that that chairs or solid you sit on him and and yeah and you you know it's like we live in the here and now so whether it is an afterlife and it or not in a way doesn't really matter we live now not do we live in the here and now not the hereafter so what you do now is really what counts either way whether there is a naturally or not it doesn't it doesn't really matter now is what counts so make the most of it so why call do you think religion created the life to keep people in line no i don't think so i mean that's it's it's a little bit of a cynical view by some atheists and people like voltaire uh and other cynics that um you know it's a made up story to to keep the poor masses in line i don't think so i i think it's a natural byproduct of the of our brains that are big enough to conceive of this idea um just just being selfaware the aware that we're mortal as far as we know no other species are aware of this fact uh you know we mentioned elephants agree but we don't think elephants are dogs are or chimps are aware sitting there thinking oh my god this is it uh you know we you know they may miss a grieving one in the sense that they're they're gone they're out of the room.

brooklyn adams fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Refuses to do is homework says mom takes them to the doctor and the psychiatrist their dr whatever years is saying alvi i come you don't wanna do your homework nieces 'cause they found out the universe is expanding he says the yours is expand he goes yeah the universe is expanding and and eventually at all blow up so none of this matters in his mother yells at him we live in brooklyn brooklyn is not expanding go true it in a way we don't live fifteen billion years from now or like i tell deep october you know we don't live in a quantum world where you know adams are all empty space we live in a world that's macro that's you know that that chairs or solid you sit on them and and yeah and you you know it's like we live in the here and now so whether it is an afterlife in it or not in a way doesn't really matter we live now not do we live in the here and now not the hereafter so what you do now is really what counts either way whether there's an after life or not it doesn't it doesn't really matter now is what counts so make the most of it created the afterlife to keep people in line no i don't think so i mean that's it's it's a little bit of a cynical view by some atheists and people like voltaire uh and other cynics that um you know it's a made up story to to keep the poise masses in line i don't think so i think it's a natural byproduct of the of our brains that are big enough to conceive of this idea um just just being selfaware the aware that we're mortal as far as we know no other species are aware of this fact uh you know we mentioned elephants agree but we don't think elephants are dogs are or chimps are aware sitting there thinking oh my god this is it uh you know we you know.

brooklyn adams fifteen billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Only front special theory of relativity of nineteen point any general theory of 1950 spicy so can trouble any speech like a very very as you on this appeared luke kuhn inflation that the universe awesome and that means that in the fourteen billion years the universe has been around either th what that means that the for the equity of a snow hole team in light years ship about uh tpp inaugural forty two big now when you see the edge what's beyond the edge earning prepping curriculum uh but the fact of universe before route thought i hear her own who him very near the guy annoy upriver nice probably one of the most amazing discoveries in the history of farm but the universe and the type of the universe old means that we can only say the galaxies installs but these the constituents with university and you see those objects it's like it's taken less than fourteen billion years to get to object he's like what takes fifteen billion years to get to it what parts did on where you have the right yet that that there is this whole lawrenson around the union for us what we call the upset before uh so we've been authorized matching it he's like people poppel central fit and within a couple of night to tritium galaxy a case of wants to be on the edge of the pop of what's beyond what we could ally horizon that universal that's an interesting question turns out it's more of the universe in exactly the same way if you you're uh at the fee and you looked at the right and you know the more the option open horizon that's right you don't we know there's more to universe type of dwarfism i think we wait another year more more of the universe will come up with a high because we'll be up to see off to the light on its way uh counting on these why life so if we were to wait another billion years lucille more for the horizon we would expand out what some more to unify i just subtypes picture it demarcus as a wall at the end in notice that something that just you hits you can't get through it but it's not that ways and now everybody every point in the.

luke kuhn demarcus fourteen billion years fifteen billion years billion years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Uh in orbit that is able to look back uh in time you know you mentioned light and god light the word lighten all that they can look back they say fifteen billion years and maybe a little better than better than that right now with a with a newly revived telescoped at least that for fifteen billion years now you're maintaining that everything was was created six thousand years ago and they're saying make look back fifteen billion years that's a big big difference years very interesting explore that gee i received communication from dr david on we read senior academician academy of sciences ussr he's also was at that time a member four other academies of science in the eastern bloc countries is use quantum algebra eu sore or the satellite program over hewing on television and uh if he contacted me you said i want you to be aware of the research that i'm done it took the parameters the einsteinian parameters or all the physical parameters of the universe at our disposal including the einsteinian equations now this is very important in answer to that question in the light of the recent creation of a lot of creation at all of your trying to make it so the average person could understand now got you the einsteinian equations essentially deal with the fact that matter space and time are all enter related if you alter matter you alter space and time if you alter space you alter matter in time if you older time you alter space and matter got the idea right well uh so dr were a ransom quantum elderberry equations and he found that the further back in time he explored it with these equations the more we find the universe became nasa with hope will tell school in refined refined a became more orchestrated more attuned without an with every edward things closer together us closer together more symphonic in fact what i saw when i was at nasa i saw some of the hardware that now is in existence out in space or now is placed in space ships in existence at nasa headquarters and green bay maryland a third time one doctor we found was a further back in time we went the more orcas for the back in time he went in the calculations the more orchestrated the entire universe became what nasa is now finding is a result of.

dr david nasa maryland academy of sciences ussr edward fifteen billion years six thousand years
"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen billion years" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Tori once again carl edward baugh dr ball we have now a revived hubble telescope and you know it's our aids are deep space version that we have uh in orbit that is able to look back in time you know you mentioned light and god and light in the word lighten all that they can look back they say fifteen billion years and maybe a little better than better than that right now with the newly revived telescope at least that for fifteen billion years now you're maintaining that everything was was created six thousand years ago and they're saying they look back fifteen billion years such a big big difference jia very interesting to explore that gee i received communication from dr david aren't we were a senior academician academy of sciences ussr is also was at of that time a member four other academies of science and the eastern bloc countries especially use quantum algebra eu absorb or satellite program arguing on television and if he contacted me should i want you to be aware of the research that i'm done he it took the parameters the argentinian parameters or the all the physical parameters of the universe at our disposal including the einsteinian equations now this is very important in an earlier question in the light of the recent creation of a lot of creation at all of your trying to make it so the average person can understand now gotcha the einsteinian equations is essentially deal with the fact that matter based in time or all enter related if you alter matter you alter space and time if you alter space you alter matter in time if you order time you alter space and matter got the idea ryan well so dr a random quantum elderberry equations and he found that the further back in time he explored it with these equations the more we find the universe became nasa with the hubble telescope or you're in refined refined a became more orchestrated more attuned honor without an with average earn aid worth things closer together yes closer together more symphonic in fact what i saw when i was at nasa i saw some of the hardware that now is.

Tori dr david ryan carl edward baugh academy of sciences ussr nasa fifteen billion years six thousand years