29 Burst results for "Field Museum"

The Prehistoric Path to Flowering Plants

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:50 min | 3 months ago

The Prehistoric Path to Flowering Plants

"All right sir. Peter crane it is an honor to have you on the podcast. Welcome how about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are. And what did you do great. Thanks so much matt. yeah. I'm president of the gun foundation here in up avila virginia and had a long career in botany one way or another starting in the uk and Spending time here in the us and then The few museum for many years and then running role botanic gardens q. In london before coming back to the us and any up here at oak spring in five years ago. That's wonderful and it's a beautiful place for anyone that's never heard of it. I will have all the links available for people but yeah it's really awesome to see some of my favorite botanical institutions early scientific institutions. I realized the field museum does much more than botany. But you yourself are a paleobotanist. And where did that all begin. I mean we're you into fossils as a child or did you just kind of discover your pass along the way through botany and then decided to look towards the past to kind of understand where diversity is today botanically. Yeah so i've I i did grow with an interest in fossils also had a real interesting archaeology actually as a teenager in high school and i was interested. In how archaeologists were able to construct pasta environments mainly through Pollen analysis allow a but also analysis of other plant remains and then that kind of led me to go a little deeper in time with a with an evolutionary perspective rather than necessarily more ecological perspective and so when i was looking at college i chose reading university because they had a long tradition in petty. And that was one of the things that i that i wanted to study.

Peter Crane Gun Foundation Avila Botanic Gardens Matt Virginia United States UK London
Limited indoor dining returns to Chicago bars, restaurants; city under Tier 1

NewsNation

01:15 min | 8 months ago

Limited indoor dining returns to Chicago bars, restaurants; city under Tier 1

"The the suburbs, suburbs, Roll Roll out out the the welcome welcome mat mat for for the the return return of of limited limited indoor indoor dining. dining. WGN's WGN's Rob Rob Sneed Sneed has has more. more. We We ate ate out out a a lot lot in in 38 38 degree degree weather. weather. You won't find frost anywhere near these ladies. They're sitting at a warm table by candlelight. Indoor dining in Chicago in suburban Cook County is back open. Ruth Lyons and her friend Renee Dalton, wasted no time being one of today's first dining customers at the Lira and Lincoln Square, Grateful to be back and energizing the economy again, especially locally, and this needs to keep going. How long this will last will depend on many variables, but one of which is how well restaurant and bar owners Have followed these new restrictions. That's W GM TV's Rob's need, with Chicago entering Tier one, meaning restaurants can reopen it limited indoor dining and also mean Chicago's museums are cleared open. Field museum was open to visitors on Saturday after being close since November, Attendance was limited to 25% capacity. They also needed reservations, and they instituted other safety precautions. Art institute will be open on February 11th and the Shedd Aquarium will reopen two members only on Wednesday and then to the general public. On next Saturday. Tribal casino in

WGN Rob Rob Sneed Sneed Indoor Dining Ruth Lyons Renee Dalton Chicago Lincoln Square Cook County Field Museum GM ROB Art Institute Shedd Aquarium
Limited Indoor Dining Resumes At Chicago Restaurants

WGN Showcase

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Limited Indoor Dining Resumes At Chicago Restaurants

"Indoor dining at Chicago, bars and restaurants has reserved. They can operate a 25% capacity after meeting the required covered 19 metrics how they're Caldera. So the Stacks Cafe in River North couldn't be happier about it than you you think think is is that that we we are are going going into into this this new new year. year. I I think think it's it's good good for for all all of of US US tables, tables, limited limited groups groups of of four four in in Doors Doors and and groups groups of of six six outdoors. outdoors. All All establishments establishments must must close by 11 o'clock at night. Not only has indoor dining resumed at Chicago restaurants, but the field museum has reopened as well. Museum will only be operating 25% capacity. Social distancing will be enforced corner too. Member services representative Calvin Jenkins Jr. So here to meet them. We have social distancing stickers everywhere here on the floor, and also we're encouraging all guests to you book your tickets in advance. So we're trying to limit our person to person contact here to Museum Field Museum offering free admission to Illinois residents on Mondays.

Stacks Cafe River North Chicago Calvin Jenkins Jr. Field Museum United States Museum Field Museum Illinois
Fluttering Feathers Could Spawn New Species

60-Second Science

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Fluttering Feathers Could Spawn New Species

"Charles Darwin is most famous for his finches from WHO speaks he gleaned the idea that a single species might radiate into many but he studied other attributes of birds to like the rhythmic sounds some species made during courtship by fluttering, shaking or rattling their feathers together. Seen Star Wing there has been this fact that birds produce sounds with wings and tails or flight feathers. So there are species of mannequins that that do the sounds and there's hummingbird sent the sound Valentina Gomez Bauman is an evolutionary biologist and ornithologist at the field museum in Chicago she and her team have now observed that non vocal sound production phenomenon in another type of bird, the fork tailed flycatcher the researchers studied two groups of the birds in South America and recorded the birds making these fluttering sounds with their wings during morning courtship rituals. Ending combat between males. One of the two flycatcher subspecies is migratory the other stays put, and by carefully measuring the bird's feathers, the research team found that the migratory birds had longer thinner feathers presumably for some aerodynamic advantage. But that altered feather shape also meant the birds fluttering produced a different frequency, compare the migratory birds flutter. To the stationary birds. So basically, what we think is that because of loss of migration pressures for flight may influence the shape of the individual feathers to the point where the sound quality changes as well. The details are in the Journal, Integrative and comparative biology. Gomez bomb on says they're still not certain what role the sounds play in day to day flycatcher life. If the birds do indeed even pay attention to them, but she suspects the sounds may have some cultural importance to the birds in which case she says, the communication differences between the migratory and non migratory birds could further divide the two types of birds or in other words, give rise to the origin of species.

Valentina Gomez Bauman Charles Darwin Journal, Integrative And Compa Field Museum South America Chicago
Indigenous Artist To Artist

All My Relations Podcast

08:29 min | 1 year ago

Indigenous Artist To Artist

"So I think we wanted to start off by hearing from each of you like why were you? Are you interested in the type of work that you do in museum and cultural spaces, and then what do you see as the challenges from your position where you are in your career the challenges of these museum spaces? And in that sense to like we also, since our podcast is called all my relations kind of thinking about. The ways that museums and curation fit into this idea of being in good relation. So that's like a multi parter. But basically, why are you interested in this work What do you see as the challenges and then like? Any sort of thoughts around these ideas of museums and curation fitting into the idea of being a good relation. well, I so I. This is Jamie and I grew up with my father being in the navy and so my mom Mama's Osage my dad's non-native and he was in the navy. So we moved around a lot but spent summers at home in Oklahoma participating in our launch PGA and being you know with family and relatives there but when I was in elementary school We lived north of Chicago and Chicago has some incredible museums and so you know I would go to museums on the. Weekend with my family's or we would go for field trips and I loved museums The Museum of Science and Industry was split place that release sparked my interest and curiosity I loved the Field Museum where you could go and like go into a pyramid and you know be Indiana Jones which is problematic in a lot of ways to but you know and so in I think it was fourth grade was like the one year where learning about native Americans was part of the Illinois State Curriculum. And so we went to the field museum to the native American Cultures Hall, and I was really excited because I had told my friends that I was native American and they were like, no, you're not. You don't live in t p You know you don't look like you know Pocahontas or like have a pet like a free Koon. And so we go to the museum and they have a case about osage. people and it's like osage men's costumes. And there's like no representation of women and the closet are on view not the kinds of clothes that Mike that we wear today even you know our dances and. You know it was just like a really sad experience, and then my friends where these kids in my class told me like. Well, it's because you're not a real Indian anyway. We didn't believe you and it was just like this really kind of like damaging. Experience for me and so a lot of the reason. Know. The reason I got into museums is because I want kids to go into museums and feel like they're represented in meaningful and respectful ways until like experience the kind of joy and curiosity you know the the can happen in museums and that should happen in museums and non those kind of negative feelings. So there's a lot of work to be done. Things are getting better you know, but there's still a lot of a lot of space for for growth. I had the same experience at the field museum but that was like three or four years ago when I was asked to do a show there and I walked in and there's those totem poles that are in the in the center house and. You know they're like still unnamed polls in like some Haida itis did it or some sense Simpson artists and then I went you know walked into the native area and they had these. What we call square deal is we run square deal for ceremony there these paddle boards and we don't really talk about it's not even something I would publicly talk about here and say this is why we doing what it's for because it's super sacred and it's quiet something we do. quietly and those when you rents could illitch those boards are taken they're putting back inside their boxing they're putting put away. Forbidden for good reason, and then those were just sitting there at the front of the exhibit and I was like, oh no I cannot go I cannot walk in here. You know like I literally turned around and walked in the other direction and the person giving me a tour was like where are you going I said this is I can't go in here. This is inappropriate but you know that was a couple of years ago so I can completely relate to that Jamie. Well and I will say about the field museum they you know have taken down the old native American Culture Hall not the North West Coast but then American you know the other part of the hall and have been working with you know a collaborative team and a native earn indigenous Advisory Group to reinstall that and so you know there is you know some conversation happening there and some there's a great show their curated by a Nina Sanders Uppsala Women in Warriors that you know Sanders did supported by Miranda Roberts who's a curatorial fellow there, and so you know there I don't want to just like bash the field museum. You. Right. Yeah. Actually. Really want to see that show. It looks really cool. Yeah. My heart goes out to Nina and the team because it opened just like literally a week before every buddy needed to be at home and chiltern please Ram. So but it's such a feat in terms of just that that monumental of exhibit with Contemporary Indigenous Artists is there a a real world renown institution so big props to Nina entity. So. I can go ahead and jump in. So you got edge OKLA CIT kiani Bushes Gene Takuji chador begun Annella could though Kanada Show I am connecting in from a the Mayakoba the lands of the the my people in Santa Ana Pueblo, my partner's home in North Central, New Mexico in it's where we raise our son and our family. And so I I think listening to. Jamie Story going back to where I found the magic and the interest in museums I was a young kid in the interactive galleries of the heard, museum and waiting for my dad to. Finish up some consulting that he was doing as a photographer on with the museum. So I would just wait and play all different museums all over the south west and all over the country as he would have these meetings and so It was always a really exciting place to be to explore I when I filled out my application for college I knew that I like art I knew that I like art and I knew that I like history and so I just put the two together. I didn't know that art history is a thing I grabbed. His Kayonza? Shoutout to all the an empty mustangs and and my application came back with my major having been declared art history and it was like, wow, I didn't get returned I. Guess It's a thing in college I love sitting in the dark room like watching slides drop like on the old like slide Kodak carousels and just being like so taken. Seeing the world through Like. Through, like art of other cultures

Field Museum Jamie Story The Museum Of Science And Indu Navy Kodak Chicago Nina Sanders Uppsala Women In Oklahoma Contemporary Indigenous Artist Nina American Cultures Hall Mike Osage. Simpson American Culture Hall North West Coast Indiana Jones Illinois State Curriculum New Mexico
"field museum" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"field museum" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"After its discoverer Sue skeleton went on display at Chicago's Field Museum in May of 2000 and this week in 2003. The United Kingdom records its first ever temperature of over 100 F throughout the month, and intense heat waves scorched the European continent. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening to this week in history. Reon I Heart radio. Afternoon commute so far shouldn't be too bad of 71 North manager destination from the Getty Junction to 2 27 That's going to take it just a little over 30 minutes in that area. Not too bad along 60 forty's Bob Lee Hamilton to Shawnee, about three minutes. There's seven minutes on 60 40 from the junction to waters that only about seven minutes. As I said in that spot, it's not too bad if you're headed along 65 south bound from spaghetti junction of Waters that expressway about six minutes and 65 sound from Snyder to Brooks is only about Three minutes. See in that area. That's your destination. Our next report in 10 minutes. I'm Scott Bradley News Radio 8 40 Nobody Wait. J s nice and quiet out there on this Tuesday afternoon, we'll see that mix of clouds and sunshine. Typical August weather, with high temperatures getting close to 90 Tonight. Clear to. Partly cloudy will settle back into the lower seventies. It'll be hot human again tomorrow, close to 90. But there will be chances for a few late day and evening storms. That's your forecast. Some wook Why Chief meteorologist J. Cardosi, Kentucky. Anna's breaking news, weather and Traffic station. This's news radio Wait 40 W. H A s Your news. Now it's 3 30 whole miles news Radio, 8 40 Top story. There will be no Kobe 19 briefing at the Capitol today, his office says Governor Bashir was feeling ill earlier in the day, and he has now canceled the four o'clock briefing. A statement from his office says Bashir and his family have tested negative for covert 19. Today's update will be delivered by video. The next live briefing will be Wednesday..

Getty Junction Governor Bashir United Kingdom Chicago Field Museum Bob Lee Hamilton Chief meteorologist Scott Bradley Kobe Shawnee Snyder Anna Kentucky Brooks J. Cardosi
Oldest material on Earth discovered

Geek News Central

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Oldest material on Earth discovered

"A seven billion million yes seven billion year old stardust is the oldest material ever found on earth. The Australian town of Murchison Victoria is home to fewer than one thousand people. But it's one of the most important sites in the history of astronomy and eighteen in sixty nine. A huge meteorite fell to earth breaking up in the atmosphere showering fragments of space rock south of the town decades later researchers discovered that locked inside aside. Those fragments were minuscule grains of Stardust. The oldest material ever known to reach the planet reaches his bond grains that are likely five to seven billion eighteen years old older than our solar system which formed four point six billion years ago and they got ejected and wrote around the galaxy until they landed here according to one of the geophysicist. This is one of the most exciting studies I've ever worked on at the Field Museum of Natural History. CHICAGO'S A and he is the first author on a paper bubbly grains said money in a statement. Philip Heck these are older Solomon Tears ever found and they tell us about how the stars in our galaxy so they examined forty grains of stardust. They were taken from the Murchison in meteorite three decades ago determine the age of the grains they studied isotopes of elements neon which interact with cosmic rains raise in space so Anyway cool stop. They've got some pictures. If you WANNA see some stuff that's Four point six to two seven billion years old. It's just a rock but I know that you that study rocks just love this stuff

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

"Sunday morning September. Twenty eighth nineteen sixty nine. A fireball lit up the skies north of Melbourne Australia and people were getting ready to go to church and then his heard this loud. Sonic boom Some of them saw OUGHTA bright fireball. Broad daylight and people were surprised. What's going on? Especially those who were not outside. Area is their airplane. Came down it sounded sounded really dramatic and then suddenly. Shortly after that there was a smell that was detectable. Over the whole area. People describe it as methylated spirits. Strong organic organic smell. COSMO chemist Philip Heck of Chicago's field museum describing this spectacular arrival of what's now known as the Murchison Meteorite named for the village where it was found a portion of the space debris now resides at the field museum and heck says it's our best source of pre solar stardust meaning stardust older than the solar system and the sun itself a scientific treasure trove inside the meteorite is dusty debris leftover from windstar slightly larger than our sun fizzled out out over millions of years. Those dust grains were battered by cosmic rays which slightly altered their composition Adams of elements got broken down into smaller ones like neon on an helium and then some of that stardust was swallowed up within rocks such as the Murchison Meteorite during the formation of our solar system. Those rocks served as time capsules preserving preserving the material for unimaginable ages previous astronomical observations have hypothesized that there was a baby boom of stars about seven billion years ago by studying the merchants ingrains elemental composition HEX team was able to date forty nine Greens and found that two-thirds of them were four point. Six to four point nine billion in years old and that all makes sense because the parents are they farmed seven billion years ago. Took them about two two and a half billion years to evolve ECON Planetary Nabala become thus producing the results are in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Some of the grains are actually up to seven billion years old making them. The the most ancient material on earth delivered here without notice on a quiet Sunday morning fifty years

Murchison Meteorite Philip Heck Field Museum National Academy Of Sciences Melbourne Australia Chicago Greens Adams
"field museum" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Hi I describe it as a black hole you know legislation goes in but nothing comes out right that's why we're already planning carpools to Kentucky to help the woman who's running against him. excellent excellent yes that's what it's going to take it yes take the Senate turning over a because lots of political consultants I've spoken to say you know even if Democrats win the presidency if the Democrats don't win the Senate it's not going to be pretty right it's not going to be pretty they're still going to be this this stonewalling this this the lack of action so you know folks we were gonna remember we got a vote we got to support these candidates we gotta get out in twenty twenty we need to have the house we need to have the Senate and we need to have the presidency if we want life as we know what to continue in a way that is sane and safe. yes sane and safe for sure. thank you so much I really appreciate your coming in here Tanya hello thank you so much for having me moms demand action for gun sense in America six million supporters nationwide more than three hundred and fifty thousand dollars help support the organization and we are very pleased to help them out and to publicize the good work they are doing to make the world a better place that's always important to us here. thanks so much for all of you who joined our conversation today and who listened and thank you for the calls thank you for the texts that we've gotten I know some of you who texted didn't want you your texts to be mentioned on air and to those people I have a pot replied privately now I can't do that all the time but I will try to do it every chance I get maybe during the commercial breaks if I can. tomorrow we have a really interesting show you know all this week we've been focusing on climate and alternate energy and global warming tomorrow we're gonna have a couple of researchers from the field museum and we're going to talk about the Amazon rain forest they've both been doing some remarkable research and have some really interesting things to say about the Amazon rain forest we will of course also let you know what happens with the climate strike which is set.

Kentucky Senate Democrats America field museum fifty thousand dollars
How Millipedes Avoid Interspecies Sexual Slips

60-Second Science

03:09 min | 2 years ago

How Millipedes Avoid Interspecies Sexual Slips

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Bob version. Most animals are pretty good at avoiding the embarrassing faux pas of having sex with the wrong species. But what if you're a millipedes under a cramped dark slippery rock with a dozen or more species all scurrying about looking for love? Fortunately, the critters evolved a solution, elaborate male gona pods literally genital feet with all manner of branches, bumps and bristles, and even with twelve thousand species of millipedes, no two varieties of gona pods are exactly the same. So the little arthropods could immediately tell if they're consorting with the wrong species, convenient not only for the millipedes but also for biologists. So you just have to pick it up and look at it and you see up. Yes, that's this species, and you can identify it. That's millipedes researcher Petra sear vault at the field. Museum in Chicago. The only problem is no offense to any male millipedes. The gona pods are tiny if you look at millipedes it's not that big to begin with. So you can imagine them, modified legs are even smaller now before we go. Any further, you might be wondering who cares about millipedes, let alone, their genitals, and the answer is not enough of us millipedes are believed to be the first land animals. Lord out of the water by tasty dead. Vegetable matter on earth's primeval shores. They have been in the business of waste management for four hundred sixty million years. And that means eating rotting vegetation, that returns the nutrients to the soil. And the healthy soil is what we need to grow our food. But today, there aren't enough millipedes. Researchers to determine if their populations are stable and healthy. In fact, sear volt says there are thousands of unknown millipedes species out there just tapping their many, many, many, many feast waiting to be noticed which brings us back to gonna pods recently sear vaulter ner colleagues decided to shine ultraviolet light onto the millipedes collection at the field. Museum because that's just exactly the sort of thing people who work in museums. Do we found that there couple Terry organs flu arrests and not just with one color, which would have been cool enough different parts of this couple, Terry, Oregon? We'll fluorescent different colors blue greenish, bluish greenish, and yellow the finding is in the zoological journal of the Lennane society as to why the male sex, organs, Fleurus, sear vault, says no one, perhaps, not even the millipedes themselves know, for sure. But the color-coded private parts do make identifying millipedes much easier for scientists. Sear vaulter alternate colleagues are not working to photograph different species. We need pictures of the male gonna pods, and we need them online, and we need them fast so that scientists can help millipedes keep the soil healthful for them and for us. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Bob Hershon.

Bob Hershon Chicago Researcher Terry Zoological Journal Of The Lenn Oregon Sixty Seconds Four Hundred Sixty Million Yea
T-Rex at the Smithsonian

Correspondents Report

05:55 min | 2 years ago

T-Rex at the Smithsonian

"Now for decades, one of the world's great museums has felt just a little inadequate, the Smithsonian in Washington DC didn't have in its collection. A tyrannosaurus Rex the most famous dinosaur all known literally as the tyrant lizard, king. Well, now it has after quite a journey his North America. Correspondent James Glen die. In the newly renovated Donoso hole at the Smithsonian national museum of natural history on Washington DC's famous mall. One sixty six million year old spaceman reigns. Supreme t Rick skeleton is dramatically poised to take the head of a hapless triceratops. This particular animal is found in nineteen eighty eight and it was found by Montana rancher was on a picnic with her family, and she saw just a little bit of the editor arm-bone sticking out. It was a bone of the T Rex that never been found before. That's cooked Johnson, the museum's director and chatting Knicks to the skeletons teeth H, one is about the size of a banana. Can you be a full blown top of the line American natural history museum without a T Rex? Well, that is something I think is not possible. When I joined this museum as director, we didn't have it to your accent. I wasn't the first person to the point that out, but it was something that I didn't want to open this exhibit that having to your ex here because this is the national museum. Mm, t Rex was first discovered early last century. It was once native to North America and vindicates now, the Smithsonian has been desperate to get its hands on one there's two ways to get a T Rex can buy one or you can find one. That's the bottom line, which I did the museum. Well, we spent a fair amount of money looking for one because actually cheaper to find them into by them. Find them into game out. It's not it's not inexpensive. But it'd be better to find your own. And we looked and looked looked, and we found pieces and parts. But when you looking for something as rare as a complete T Rex chances, you actually will find a relatively small, but buying one of the city, also substantially complete T, Rex's is complicated to sue a beautifully preserved lodge. Reynoso is still known by museum staff is the one that got away at an auction that exceeded all expectations in New York in nineteen Ninety-seven bidding started at half a million US dollars. The hammer dropped at seven point six million with commission on top Chicago's field. Museum was the. Lineup and his house, sue since but many paleontologists believe they have been the losers. Is it all Sam kneels felt that'll drastic pox fault? What happened that generally was because if you think about the discovery of shoe happened before Jurassic perk and the sale of sue happened after Jurassic Park, and that was an amazingly, beautiful fossil the skull was in one piece, and it was an exquisite thing when it went to auction. There were many many museums had dreams. What's your personal views about benefit these things to be found on public lands? They along to the nation. Well, United States is the only nation in the world that has dinosaurs, and where it is legal to sell dinosaurs. He other big Dennis are producing nations. And there's like six or seven of them own the dinosaurs the nations in the United States on private land. If there's a dinosaur to private land owner owns Dennis with the increase in the value of dinosaurs. Launched by the su- sale act. Actually has made it more difficult for professional intelligence museums to access private lands because dinosaurs are now money. They didn't used to be money. So this sunny changed tack slightly, and found a third way of getting a T Rex by working with another arm of the federal government, which already funds, most of the museum's costs and the land on, which this dinosaur was found is US army corps of engineers, because it's a reservoir managed by the army corps of the people do all the engineering and they had to Rex's from their property. Both of them were out there with the Rockies Montana. So we didn't want to take Montana's only directs the once they had to both the museum of the Rockies and the US army corps of engineers green benefit to promoting Montana, and the army corps of engineers in Washington DC, the specimen has now been dumped. The nation's t Rex Matthew Khurana is the museum's curator of Donna, Soria. It's important to us. I think that we call it the nation's T-rex because we really. We want people to feel like its they're controversial because there are the big ones, you know what, what what's going to think about that? One of the other new you can play t Rex's around. You know, our T Rex is not a T Rex of sutra Nakata's. It is. But, but our T Rex is not a T Rex of superlatives. It's not the oldest or the biggest or the youngest or the longest, but it has unique position of being everybody's T-rex thanks to the museum's -cation and the number of American tourists, we make a pilgrimage to Washington DC cook, Johnson believes the specimen could ultimately become the most visited horrendous Soros Rick's in the world. I've had T-rex described as a gateway drug. Can you explain that for kids? I actually think I coined that phrase. I think I did of kids really caught on. It's it really the ideas that kids love dinosaurs at a very early age. It gets them excited to go to Zia. Gms gets the meeting, scientists it gets them thinking about how fossils are found right now. We're hiring. The next generation of scientists, and many of the paleontologist, tell me look, I it was drastic parked to did it for me when I was a kid. So I'm seeing that generation come through now and there are a lot of them and every year we're finding something like fifty or sixty new species of dinosaurs, unknown to science, I opened a dentist or exhibit nineteen ninety-five and since then the number of known dinosaurs globally has more than doubled. So there's still lots of amazing stuff out there. Get out in the backyard and get digging. That was our North America. Correspondent James Glenda reporting.

T Rex Rex Matthew Khurana Smithsonian National Museum Of Montana North America United States Washington Us Army Corps Of Engineers Director James Glen Johnson Donoso Hole Army Corps Us Army Corps GMS Dennis Knicks Chicago Jurassic Park
Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

BrainStuff

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Bam here. It's amazing. What you can find. If you shine a flashlight into your backyard trees, a biologist in Wisconsin have made a rather startling discovery that way in part startling because it apparently hadn't been recorded until now three different species of flying. Squirrels specifically southern northern and Humboldt flying squirrel, which are found across North America and into Central America sport light Brown for that when spotlighted with ultra-violet illumination lights up a hot bubblegum pink the phenomenon occurs on both the top and bottom services of the flying. Squirrels though, it's the underside of a flying. Squirrels carriage, including the flaps of skin that spread out when the squirrel glides from tree to tree really glows Jonathan Martin a biologist at Northland college in Ashland. Wisconsin made the discovery in the forest one evening just by shining a UV flashlight into the tree canopy he was looking for lichens, which are certain type. Of frogs and flora that light up in UV light. That's when he heard the church of a southern flying, squirrel as the squirrel glided by he shined the flashlight on it. And he saw a flash of fuchsia. Martin and his colleagues soon found themselves examining the skins of flying. Squirrels at the science museum of Minnesota. And the field museum in Chicago. They took photos of the skins under visible, light and ultra violet light all but one specimen of the gliders glowed pink that has been variously compared to bubble gum dayglo and lycra from the nineteen eighty s there is also the study republished in the January twenty third twenty nineteen issue of the journal of Malecki, the pink is caused the researchers say by the furs fluorescence, which is what happens when light is absorbed in one wavelength and emitted in another you may remember an episode. We did about how scorpions fluorescent bright green and ultraviolet light some birds also have this trait some fish too few mammals do though flying. Squirrels are nocturnal and are most active at dusk and dawn, no other squirrels in North America are known to possess this ability to floor s including tree squirrels like the eastern gray though, there are over. Two hundred and fifty squirrel species around the world and to be fair. The researchers have not yet tested other species for the next question is what purpose could this fluorescent serve. Humans can't see ultraviolet wavelengths except under special lighting, but other animals can one theory suggests the pink is used to confuse als, which as it turns out also have undersides that Flores a similar pink ELS prey on flying. Squirrels among other mammals, perhaps the squirrels evolved to mimic als. So as not to be eaten by them another theory, which is already being challenged is that the pink attracts potential mates a flying. Squirrels have mating seasons. But their flamboyant fluorescence is available for viewing year round. Anyway, it's not even clear that squirrels can see in UV wavelengths. Ultimately, the researchers point out that age old impetus of science, this is proof of how much we don't know and still need to learn the study concluded the ecological significance of this. Trait warrants further investigation. Today's episode was written by Jimmy Allen and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet has to works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Wisconsin Jonathan Martin Cassidy Zachary Science Museum Of Minnesota Lauren Vogel Journal Of Malecki Field Museum Humboldt North America April Callaghan Ashland Minnesota Chicago Jimmy Allen Flores Northland College Apple Tyler Clang
"field museum" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Friday night. He had a great week. Get into your weekend. Big plans this weekend. Jerry, none had a lot going on this weekend. Yeah. A lot been running around like a crazy person. Territory share? I mean, I just went to a huge event at the field museum. Lot of food. I had some really good chicken. Oh my gosh. And I hang out with with bachelor Colton Underwood, and he was just awesome from Washington, Illinois. And he was just really great ask him where he's going to see the Super Bowl. He said his grandma's house. Yeah. So here's a good guy and had a lot of food there. They had at full set down dinner. But I wanted to come here and be with you. So. What part are you thought to yourself? You know, what he probably ended the show by himself? This a rare opportunity. I didn't think about that. Well, okay. I'm out by. No, you love coming in, Jerry. Now. I do have a great time. So yeah. So yes back going on. I went to the singer called, Emily king. She played at Lincoln hall. So it's been a crazy today. There's more tomorrow I've been to Lincoln hall. I saw I saw me play in Lincoln hall with all the clock feel. It goes the oldest person in there, but I had a wonderful time. Yeah. This was really a diverse crowd. I was really impressed with her. She's a little like prince, I I mean super familiar with this artist, Emily king but dressed kind of like pranced at some funky kinda music. A really interesting different crowd of people. So sold out. Talents that you haven't shared yet me. Yeah. I sang in the chorus and Tennessee, and yeah, did you really? Yeah church. I think solos and church and everything Tom. Do you want to hear Jerry sing do? Yeah. If you got the chops, give me a little Ave Maria. Maybe oh Lord. I don't think I can do that. Right. What about the camp town, ladies, that's my spoons outright complaining. Hampton, ladies sing this done. Do you come on? I mean, my greatest hits, sir. George Michael's, faith, brilliant. Now, some little Ricky Martin can sink some living LA, Vida loca. Bo we're here til one. Why don't we table that for now? Let me warm up. Yeah. Those cross earrings that he used to wear. Yes. Let let let's let's let's let's table that. And we're going to jump into the heavy so okay. Tuesday earlier this week, two AM and. All right. So you have an African American man getting off the subway at two AM, jussie smollet popular. Why people watch empire you watch empire. I was on it. Okay. We really empire. I did. I did some extra work in the coming out. So to the first season. Well, so and then I've interviewed Jesse like, okay. So what what the vied with him? I mean, he is just a straight up a really nice guy. Like interviews. His sister for WGN America. Shell called underground name's journey. Okay. But he I just interviewed a few months ago. And then just talk to Terachi who's also on the show, and as they're making statements about it just this is two weeks ago. I talked to her so I feel that just from his vibe. And I think we should get into whether people think it's true or not because I want an admin interested. If people think all of it's true, or there's some problems at the story or what they feel so he leaves a subway restaurant near as apartment in St. or street or Ville, you know, just downtown. Very affluent part of the city. It's two in the morning to people approach him, they're yelling, racial, and homophobic slurs. He's a gay man. I don't know if they knew that or not maybe they supposedly they came up and said are you that from right there? That's how they started. Okay. So and so then they reportedly scratched him up doused him with bleach. And then placed a rope around his neck while proclaiming this is mega country. Okay. So. My we can have the question. Whether or not you believe the story to me. What's more interesting is? That we we all live in the city. Right. Even if we live in the suburbs. And I'm just curious what people think of how Chicago. Has come along has progressed over time. And how inclusive of a city is it. From 'cause I I see some good. And I also see that we're in. We are still dependent. I think we are pretty neighborhood Centric right there. Let's put it this way. I think all of us. And I don't want to make this a right or left or anything seen. I'd just like to see I just think there could be. A lot more diversity throughout the city. Yes. Then than we have now. What what I don't have any solutions on exactly how to get us there. But that's something. I would like to see I mean, I came from the south, and I moved up here because I liked the diversity of the city. Right. So for me, it's always keeps growing and growing. And I love all that. But people were really shocked that this could happen in Chicago that this c-, I don't find it. I find it shocking. Well, look, there's attacks in the city all the time. This goes on a whole 'nother level when you're when you're talking about bringing out a rope. I mean, that's that is that is. So unbelievably uncomfortable, and you can hide behind a red hat and act like. You're I'm I'm aligned with with whatever you think the president's aligned with it. That's that's not. It's just your. It's not it's not. I'm not listening. I'm not the biggest support of the president. That's not fair to him. It's not it's ridiculous. So he did make a comment. Trump made a comment about you know. Which was surprising because people are waiting for them to say something. So he basically said that I can tell you is horrible. I've seen it last night. It's horrible doesn't get worse. Right. And then he moved onto. Yeah. Of course, then he went back to the wall. I just I just people that are hiding behind the red hat and acting like these are things that somehow some way is being told that his okay now, it's completely and utterly ridiculous. Now, the rhetoric could be a lot better coming out of there. A lot of the time. But still I mean, come on your at the end of the day. It's on you. You can't you can't sit there and try to act like this is okay now, let's get an Uber. Driver mad in here. Uber driver. It says that she one hundred percent. The story is real do. You know, do you have any information here? I do not have any information. Let's assume for a second eight was state, which I do not believe you really think somebody would go that far I'll say frame to. Bleach on. Burning..

Jerry Lincoln hall Emily king Chicago field museum president Colton Underwood Illinois Washington little Ave Maria Ricky Martin America George Michael Bo Hampton Tom Tennessee Jesse Terachi
"field museum" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Seven twenty WGN. Friday afternoon, everyone man, it looks like a Friday outside to hope it matches your mood sunny skies and long weekend in store regular size. We're gonna guess you could say, but we got the bears game on Sunday afternoon. So it's gonna be fun action packed weekend. I hope for everyone out there. We got a fun packed show here today on the wintrust business lunch. John Hansen in for Steve Bertrand who will be back on Monday, so fear, not friends and a friend of the show. Always joining us. Andrea heinous editor at blue sky during a how you doing today. Thanh happy new year happy new year to you too. Let's jump right into tesla. Tesla sales are down or certainly at least they created more supply than the demand for tesla. Few things at play here. Right there are they're cutting prices a little bit, which you know, for these store brands that's always a little bit of a psychological hit again. So who still wants to tesla or they're still buyers out? There are people still lining up. It looks like not quite as much. This certainly could be the fact that there is more demand. And supply, but also a federal tax credit is getting slashed in half and eventually going away. Right. Exactly. So it's about thirty seven hundred dollars. So a little bit of that price boost. But is the tesla buyer like that concerned about a thousand dollars here or there? So we'll the price cut help will the tax cut matter those, you know, remains to be seen. It's just like is that glow? Still on the tesla. I wonder if people there's I think there's a certain buyer that will buy a tesla. So when that is energy conscious or just likes the new shiny thing. And I imagine a lot of those people have bought Tesla's in the last three or four years or so cars last longer than that. I think that the customer may not be there. I imagine what tesla needs to do is continue to grow that customer base. Yeah. You need to reach more mainstream buyers. So there maybe maybe price change will help a little bit. But I just wonder like is that is it a show stopper still it probably still is right? And like inevitably you run out of buyers at a certain level you have to get into more mainstream market. So that's what they'll be trained to do. And I think part of the struggle. This is just my opinion that getting into that mainstream market for tesla is challenged by the fact that gas prices continue to go down. I mean, I'm someone that's looking to buy a tesla, maybe more mainstream someone that's not higher end. I'm like, well, I want to save money on gas. Well, guess what guess is under two dollars a gallon in some spots. That's certainly could impact that decision yet. Gas prices have been chief for a long time really overall so definitely impacts buying or let's talk about something crazy at least, I think self-driving food delivery being tested on college campus. We're not talking about Uber's going around or self driving cars. These are little robots that are just to deliver snacks. How does this work? Yeah. So this is coming to us from Pepsi. Okay. They'll be on college campuses starting with one in California, and you can order your like baked Lay's and your son chips and your sparkling water and. You meet you literally go out and meet a six-wheeled robot fifty locations on campus. So it's like a walking vending machine, which isn't gonna say it'd be better than something moving around campus potentially running into people or causing a mess or it not working if you had fifty or so of these things in buildings in a position that you paid and you got a snack from this seems like an overreach. Maybe that's part of it. It almost seems like it's, you know, it's a branding exercise almost I'm speculating here. But it does seem like you wanna tap into that innovative customer. It's something cool. And maybe just the cool factor is something, and I have to say it reminds me of one of the very first blue sky stories five years ago. There was a contest at the field museum where they had like students bring their innovative ideas. And the kids had hilarious ideas. They have no filter and one of the kids winning ideas was a refrigerator that comes to you really in last year. So different a couple innovations of which I would say this is one that is pretty much. Refrigerator coming to meet you. Yeah. I wonder if Gary. Yeah. And I just you know, when you're talking about just snacks to you wonder, what's the price markup on these things and how they're going to be able to do it. But you know, it could be just like you said more of a marketing thing get people interested get people talking. But you never know. Sometimes these ideas that we roll our eyes at turn out to be the ideas of the future something that is a little bit more retro is idea of an online company having a brick and mortar a lot of the companies still see the value in maybe not the big spaces that we are seeing still these vacant places for toys. R us is our office max, but talk is through some of these smaller brands that are picking highly concentrated areas for people to shop in their number of them the business section right about this this week on the retail be we're like companies like Worby Parker. All birds are coming into specific neighborhoods. They obviously want to reach a particular consumer and almost create little shopping districts for some of these brands that we know online. I know we've talked about Pirker in the past which is definitely one that has already done this during my Worby parkers that I got in person. Off. Yeah. I wanted to go in person I have to say so now you've got some of these other brands that want to they want the same. They wanted to display their product. We'll let you come see it. And I think there are still some things I am one of the last millennials to go to Amazon, I admit this fully, I don't like buying clothes online. I wouldn't ever buy glasses solely online unless I had lik physically tried them on do you think that this is still something that that they're I on that? They're still these people a lot of us that just don't feel comfortable buying some that we're going to put on our bodies that are reflect how we look how we feel unless we actually do it ourselves. Yeah. I think that's totally true. And I think there is also shopping can also be an activity, you know, and I think this is as these come together and certain neighborhoods in this case in sort of a sub section of Lincoln park. Like, you can see people going out shopping as an activity like we used to not that long. Right. And what is parachute? I don't even know what parachute. Is you've mentioned that in the story to home stuff. The novo's. I know. Well, yes, mclovin option there. I don't even know what all birds is the might be an Oliver at skylights, those early cool kind of sneakers. Ooh out. That's another thing. I would not buy sneakers online. Yeah. Like totally jumped over on the clothing and shoes I buy tons of that online. I got really weird feed. Andrea then you got to return a lot. That's gotta be adapted like the return process and have your packing tape ready to go. Yeah. You're speaking the exact opposite, Andre where can people find out more about these stories and more Chicago Tribune dot com. Thank you so much. Thank you. Let's take a look at some traffic.

tesla Andrea WGN wintrust Thanh blue sky editor John Hansen field museum Steve Bertrand California Uber Lincoln park Pepsi Worby Parker Andre Gary Pirker
"field museum" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Ologies

"It was overwhelming, but the we whipped it up and made an omelet and it was like the most buttery kind of fatty tasting one, but it was like huge. It looked like a giant avocado. Yeah. So I, I have to admit that that most of my time has been spent with chicken eggs in terms of actually cooking and eating. So some trying to think if I've ever actually, I think I ever have actually. Eaten another bird's egg species. Not even a, I. Yeah, really? I once had deviled quails eggs, which was weird. I just felt like a giant because they're so little. But how do you take your ex over easy? Says that mean runny yolk, Joe? I, why does that gross me out? But it doesn't gross other people out. Should I be out this? It's supposed to soak up what's what's left in the plate. If you've got potatoes on the plate, like makes the potatoes tastes better. I don't know. I don't know why there's something that grosses me out about it. Okay. So another thing that grosses people out the Kaleva now these two coyly white threads that are attached to the yoke. What are they? What are they? Okay. There's just nothing much just ropes of protein. They're actually markers of a fresh egg since they kind of disappear as it ages, but were they, they're like tiny slimy party streamers while they suspend the yolk in the middle of the egg, kind of like the slingshot ride at the county fair. But depending on how you personally feel about. Egg protein squabbles, and carnival rides, one may have more screaming than the other. Also side note, oh my God, I just went down watching a compilation of like gopro footage of couples on the slingshot ride, and it was horrifying. And so so amusing and I only know from the gel Djelatovci episode that it's funny because we know that like everyone is safe in the end, but oh my God, watching adults screaming for their mom's on carnival rides is something else. Wow. Oh, my God also never ever going on that ever. Okay. Back to egged buggers I need to get over it because other people seem to love it. But for some reason, the yoke, the yoke is with the chick eats inside the correct, or is the yoke that chick the yoke is is the is whether it's going to eat, okay. So that's that would be the baby chicks food. So I should be okay with eating that right, right. Go except, of course, that's the stuff that might be. The attrition was always worried about every other year. The cholesterol. It's up when you're cracking hard, boiled eggs. Do you have a better strategy because you understand the mechanics and the anatomy of eggs. That's one of those things that you just go for literally, like I think in a satisfying thing because it's in the end, you have something like solid in your hand that you can eat. I think actually cracking riots is more of an artistic technique that I've never fully developed. I know the people that can do one in each hand. Yeah. Those people like, how do you learned that masters? They should be, oh, Allah gist. To be honest. They need to take up the term as well. And now how many eggs do you guys have at the field museum in collections? So the actual number is probably on the order of about one hundred thousand, oh my God, and but but he. So the interesting thing about eggs is in collections like this is not the number of eggs individually. It's a number of sets of eggs. And so we have about twenty thousand sets of eggs, which means that they're the eggs are. Lane by a given female at a given time, and there's a what's called clutch size, which is how many eggs they've they've laid for that nest. And and that's actually a truly interesting thing about avian biology because there's lots of variations. So we were talking about those elephant birds, click size, an elephant birds was to right, which is like you said, that's probably why there's no elephant birds left. If you think about it, ostriches are another big flightless bird and they have clutch sizes where a single actually multiple females lay in the same nest, but they'll be upwards of twenty eggs in the nest because he's female, lays ten to eleven, and they're basically just headache hedging their bets with respect to producing their young because a lot of them are gonna get picked off by predators overtime..

Joe field museum Djelatovci
"field museum" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Science Friday

"Particularly you know if these things are endangering your job your livelihood or your life you should definitely talk to people about that you know the militant gummy worm is not going to help you it's great great to advice and also really interesting book called his sleep solution why're sleep is broken and had a fix it chris winter who is an md and a neurologist sleep specialist out of charlottesville virginia thank you for taking time to be with us today have really appreciate it thank you so much for having me own and not a fan of medical records i heard that earlier just putting vote in okay thank you have a good weekend science museums hard thing fantastic places you could spend a whole day just one or two rooms at the giant field museum in chicago or the cozy science own in casper wyoming but what if you live far away from the nearest science museum you don't have a whole day the line to get in might be along the entry fee might be steep maybe you don't even think you like science up for to be worthwhile evening in their well one nonprofit is trying to bring bitesized museums to public spaces to increase access to the stories of science and they started with a mullet museum interesting question why is the size of a vending machine and it's covered on all sides with the story of squid slugs and all their kin like the limpet the strongest biological material on earth is the tiny tongue of a tiny critter you step over every time you go.

virginia giant field museum chicago mullet museum charlottesville casper wyoming
Bill Hybels, Willow Creek Community Church founder, quits early amid misconduct allegations

Nick Digilio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Bill Hybels, Willow Creek Community Church founder, quits early amid misconduct allegations

"To the newsroom in vic vaughn thanks nick overcast in forty degrees at o'hare this morning a south suburb of harvey has laid off half its firefighters and more than a dozen of its police officers the city's mayor says they couldn't make payroll a suburban megachurches without its founder and head pastor this morning last night at willow creek community church is main campus in south barrington bill high bills announced his early retirement being careful not to call it a resignation recently faced allegations of misconduct with women in his congregation detroit wease as a member i was here at the first family meeting because there is just no way that bill hybrids would have gotten on that stage and told us ally and looked at us in us ally internal investigation cleared of wrongdoing but he told his congregation that controversy is a distraction to the church's mission in the wake of the surprise raid on his lawyer's office president trump has been openly musing about firing special counsel robert muller white house press secretary sarah sanders said that the president certainly believes he has the power to do so but that's not clear justice department regulations clearly state that the special counsel can be removed from office only by the personal action of the attorney general jeff sessions has recused himself from the russia investigation president trump has cancelled his trip to latin america it would have been his first official trip there since taking office but the president says he wants to instead oversee the us response to a recent suspected chemical weapons attack in syria there's any science fair at chicago's field museum fields noah cruickshank says it's called stand up for science he says it allows attendees voice their concerns about climate change and conservation through a writing campaign premade postcard where they can write to the epa or national science foundation and tell folks there y finds matters to them why they are speaking up for this saturday it's free and runs from one to four and chicago billionaire ken griffin has donated ten million dollars to anticrime efforts in the city the grants expected to underwrite a collaboration between the chicago police department and the university of chicago crime lab through the end of next year we'll check sports traffic and weather next on wgn like drinking and driving getting behind the wheel after the use of marijuana is dangerous driving under the influence of marijuana puts the.

Chicago Police Department University Of Chicago Noah Cruickshank Chicago Official Russia Attorney Robert Muller Detroit South Barrington Founder Nick Vic Vaughn Marijuana Harvey Ken Griffin EPA Syria
"field museum" Discussed on The Limit Does Not Exist

The Limit Does Not Exist

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Limit Does Not Exist

"Those field museum and the brain scoop representing science while our favorite high school teacher myths year of the knowledge brings it home for math in physics this episode is our gift to you it's the gift that keeps on giving ap listen to it a bunch if you forgot a frowned on your holiday list just forward this episode and we've got you covered that some gifting magic right there not much his jump in shali i think we shag quite quite appropriate i think one of the question that i wanted to ask you to buy back as is about your outraged she now it it seems that you're really passionate about outreach you do a lot of that you're working on some really cool projects in it never occurred to me that that idea of legacy does that of her sort of a your passion to get the word out about what you do oh definitely does i think and i don't see this station is great i mean i i know that for example the ten years seems like a very long time and it in some ways it is also feels longer than maybe ask because if you think about apollo right to run the entire gamut of apollo in a decade and you go from you know basically not having a space program to people on the moon that's an incredible commitment resources and so many people doing doing that together but i think that you know even from a you know talking about people kind of dough also spent ten years of lives at none of us are really thinking of this as a as a 10year thing it's the two beer context is of course ten years but in the meantime you know we have the first round is coming up a requirements what sort of space crash of this be what should be able to accomplish and then the next test is okay how do we start building that designing it creating that functionality and the new go to testing the functionality so long those wait were were still spending you know only a little bit of time at a time during this but yeah ultimately i think.

field museum space program school teacher ten years 10year
Mineral Formation

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

00:46 sec | 4 years ago

Mineral Formation

Lindsey Field Museum Cory Moreau Anson Emily Grassley Editor Lindsay Patterson Youtube Sarah Marsha Oscar
"field museum" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"That in the instinct for looking at cool rocks first we have curiosity i think of the foundational um human characteristic and so our brains are structured to see order and things that were disorder before and it's understanding how these things of relate to one another their relative structures and colors and everything else that go with it and let us not this talking about you know rocks and minerals and talking about life itself to you think about in every area of science from biology to astronomy even to the humanities humans have classification systems plea guy keep track of their done especially our knowledge and at something we're still doing to this day is like structuring and bordering what we see in the natural world with the has its foundations in the early days of science and as is the continuation of um are natural curiosity do you have a rock collection or a collection of really anything at home create your own on classification system in waste to describe it or if you're feeling ambitious learn how mineralogical classified minerals and see if you can identify them in rac's around your house let us know at what you collects how he classify it and what you find out email us at humble podcast gmailcom you wanna hear everything blooming thanks to jim hall scheme collection manager of physical geology and meteorite at the field museum in also sarah lawton at the field museum thanks to mary lou until he for their questions and are many other listeners who have asked about minerals rocks ngo dhs we'll have more rockin stories.

rac field museum jim hall sarah lawton mary lou
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"So so i like these like this where you know i read a couple of books this morning in preparation for a new video that we're going to be filming soon and would stand new video well it's a video about native americans and it's a video about the relationship between native americans an natural history museum which is pretty complicated topic to try and tackle in to talk about so oaklawn gulf oregon watched tapsell yeah so that's a an episode we're working on but then you know i gotta chicago sao hotdog at the his hotdog stand for lijun got a talked to some scientists over lunch about some fish papers that they're working on and then i get a beyond podcast with you and we got to walk around for awhile like see where is not a hotdog stand it is it's right outside they have the best chicago style high dogs in the city can we get well after this yeah awesome how do you people find the brain skew while you can find us on youtube youtube dot com slash the brain scoop and you can also find me on twitter at my handle is m e t h m e e you can find is on field museum website thank you for being michelle thanks for having me folks this show that sciences complete bad you can chat there are according docks but before you deal news today is that the salad was manned by sounds like an air for vat com and free assaf's facts dot com.

native americans oaklawn gulf oregon assaf chicago youtube michelle
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"Liz so let's diving beadle and the diving beatles actually carrying arable with them slow and they can breathe under willison over there he goes oh there's another odors shrimp oh yeah there's the show bombay's push yet and the shrimp are those are the beatles eat but where is our friend dragonfly there is there is your dragonfly there's two of them for where so there's this little go oh yeah and he just get bull no this is a different species but he's probably younger than that one this is one of the biggest species of dragonflies ink and what's really cool is that in order to move they shoot water out of their butts and if we bother him maybe he'll do it for us oh did you see it scoot four kakuma water out of his book hitch salt water addresses by that was awesome and then this when does the same thousand gonna she why on its by it may nosed implicitly seen he's a little more easily in their friendly we'll how can we feed take him out of the water you wouldn't like that very much because he breeds underwater asia has led so many times and like us is captured a wider alvear butler and while also bothering him in hills that shooting water out of his but okay careful you will but slow on the far too so we holdover said this did yelled port emily films the brain escape to talk about all so cool things beside fat scarf was routes what was your favorite thing that you saw my own was the repeats of course because i want in a few days i want to go and teach them yeah do you find mila pedes in your backyard.

Liz bombay beatles mila pedes emily
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"It nickel now caused by proteins in their skin that the ultraviolet light excite basic rule showing themselves either through showing themselves to predators and they're also showing themselves to other scorpions of the same species so they can get together and have the and market give others were killing thanks for being you are very welcome thanks for coming to the museum today okay so now let's go to other staff thinks we had the search back but we finally found another one now families feel museum i'm dr crystal meyer isolation manager the bule museum what was your new lakes nice to me unique i'm just as excited as hristo was working in her office when i arrived packaging specimens collected hundreds of years ago and giving them rainy send two other scientists but i was curious about one thing in the back of her off this is what is a plan a new disc that's that's my aquatic insects tank so i work on aquatic insects whereas that big so the big one is in the back there so that's that's a baby dragonfly in new a thorough less scales that another tool nope so he actually eat fish yeah so he it's big stuff there are a little tiny shrimp in there there's also some diving beatles in there the diving beatles uprooting sunland wake up everybody where the dead okay.

ultraviolet light bule museum hristo dr crystal meyer sunland
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"There's a patent leather beadle but don't want me hold him a why not in the beatles they actually squeak doing here with week theorem i'm not going to touch you act europe's week and the reason these squeak they live in rotting logs and they end their babies eat rotting wood but the baby's mouths really small so they can't choose the rotting wood up through the mother and father chew up the rotting wood and squeak through their babies to come and eat so they take care of their babies so there one of the few beatles in the world and actually takes care of their babies in their cool in these live in illinois so this is another local insect okay and thesethese you have to go to southern illinois defined these don't live this far north okay but i am proper all going to stick to the knocking the milky and these don't bite either you on holden allow okay now let's put him away the last creepy crawly let's secre plus but also the coolest okay so have you ever seen a scorpion no let me get my i've got landholding so there he is that's called desert perry score as i can move there is a desert harry scorpion and they live in arizona oh scorpion do something kinda cool what you think you really don't dan if i saw shine this on the scorpion it flows under black later ultraviolet light so in that cool and all scorpions do that and even after scorpions of die keep they continue to go world.

beatles illinois arizona ultraviolet light europe holden perry
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"There you go niccolo got great big job and he floor window pool that kim's finally got the giant pepper cockroach off of me and put him back in his home loan he pulled an orange toolbox down from shelf i was pretty nervous about what was inside no i have other kinds of cockroaches but i'm not going take one of those out in here what i have a miller pede oh thus i exactly the ones live wanna find in the philippines yes so these live in dead rotting logged in these live here in the chicago area and they can be found in leavenworth preserves so if you go out in the fourth preserves and you find a dead tree laying on the ground they live under the bar of the dead trees okay back after recording we are going there so these are our local and they don't bite doing to hold him uh if you're gonna go catch and we all learn how to hold them right there you go okay back details better yeah and they have a hundred and fifty six legs and what a hundred and fifty six and when they move when they walk they move every every ten th leg at the same time it looks like there will legs are moving in a in a wave let's blow up move you'd have over one hundred fifty six legs moving governor hand feels some weird and kind of gulf but the melopees it wasn't the only bug lift again toolbox.

kim philippines chicago leavenworth
"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:26 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on The Show About Science

"Exactly labs stays so bad science this year husni out today we are going to lead going on behind the scenes feel museum and and grass income can be an awesome that says says states hair how are you i'm good i think you are rabi let us add who like first this is emily grassley the amazing host of the brain skin where do you want to go what do you want to be thinking first week the behind the scenes harangue tribal and care caravale it's time for an exclusive shell that sign's behind the scenes and get ready because there's a lot to see real lots of stuff in the statistics tell people is less than 1 percent of all of the questions that are in this museum are on public display ninety nine percent of the other thirty million things are in collections behind the scenes so we're in all season ninety nine percent of thirty million things i don't even know how to do the math for that but i know it's alive staff to share with you one episode so we should get stead first stop is the dr pratt blab and those of you who watched a parade scoop meld that this is where they do dissection so this is the bird prep lab the where we take in thousands of birds that die every year hitting downtown chicago businesses so we take these birds in we record all their information in than we make sure that they can go into the collection forever just pretty cool so i got some stuff out of the barents it looks like some oregon yasser we take the the whole body out of the birds or this rate here is the torso that came out and act has all of its organs inciting is one of those organs heart yeah and side open at heart.

emily grassley dr pratt chicago oregon ninety nine percent 1 percent
"field museum" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Science Talk

"Put it in a picture because because nobody knows where the world's fifth and so ray just he just glommed onto it and he started he wanted to draw at it was a monster in his mind and he loved you know weird ancient monsters and this weird ancient charki thing just grabbed his imagination and so he started trying to find information about it and and uh the paleontologist to originally showed it to them suggested that he talked to uh a retired paleontologist name uh ranters anger all who had worked at the field museum and zero wrote the handbook of paleo at the allah g the volume on kendrick these so the ancient cartiledge and us fish that includes sharks in skates and raise the raffish and so ray called uh reiner and and reiner sort of took him under his wing it was he was a swiss emigrant end and um so he helped ray kinda get started and then but runner wasn't really an expert on hillock prion and so ray found his way to a danish paleontologist spin bendicks on green and he called ray called just he picks up the phone and just cold calls be scientist he called bendicks i'm green who was at dinner in copenhagen one night and said hey early curious about these about these these animals and i happen to see a paper you road in the '60s and reiner and uh then exam green were retired and elderly men by then but ray did correspond with both of them and and reiner was a little bit more um.

field museum kendrick ray scientist copenhagen reiner
"field museum" Discussed on Orbital Paths

Orbital Paths

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Orbital Paths

"It's my use the word relief because i feel that same way you know there's going to be there's gonna be champagne this going to be looking up in the sky and in in some way that i can't really define feeling that something is better today that we know that were not the only life out there there is something about life the house of value above and beyond the interesting science immediate signs that comes out of it though the science is fascinating interesting and this goes back to relating to why do we do the science why is it that mars gives lots of money for exploration because there's the chance of finding life there because there is an emotional side to what we do as a scientist were human beings were notches clever computers we do things for reasons of the heart i wonder if we're actually kind of born lonely because it seems like humanity from the beginning from thousands of years ago we've been wondering could there be life somewhere outside the earth and of course the thing that makes loneliness a little bit more bearable as the idea of connection and this is what the study of these meteorites is giving us you i realized that in my body there are these compounds that came from space and that may be responsible for life getting started here on earth going back to that big meteorite in the field museum that big lump of iron will i actually have iron in my blood it's actually why my blood is red is because of iron so that wasn't something that was a disconnected and distant part of the universe that's a part of me that that's one of the reasons i'm walking around an an and talking today.

the house scientist field museum
"field museum" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"field museum" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Sargus today as the host of one of our favorite youtube channels the brain scoop which is hosted at the field museum in chicago and it just made too much sense to have her on today because she's taught is so much about crazy cool animals emily grassley welcome to parttime genius thank you for having me from so emily i think you have one of my favorite job titles you're the chief curiosity correspondent at the field museum which kind of sounds like you just get to sit around and ponder things but soaps or what exactly does this mean yeah so you know i love my title and in my primary role museum of course you know writing in producing in hosting the educational youtube videos about natural history in the work in research of the field museum but really you know it is kind of my job to hunter around the museum in fine chemical stories of of interesting to help shape those science stories in in any kind of way that a cancer i do a lot of public speaking in a lot of outreach in a lot of uh community engagement type thing for the field museum and yeah i mean i i'm usually there corresponding mac here yasser these are some words is served so this episode where combining the real abilities of real animals to build the ultimate animals superhero and we wanted to hear if you have any favorite animal skills our talents that you could tell us about oh my gosh film man you know like our human real strong ability is our brain right like it it we're actually pretty limited in like physical prowl with just innately of course i'm not like talking of out you know olympic athletes but the one good the physical trade that being by pete all in with the respiratory system that we have we can run really long distances right look we can outrun almost any animal and endurance wise.

field museum chicago pete youtube emily grassley