18 Burst results for "Fidelity Brokerage Services Llc"

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Com slash wealth. Investment minimums Apply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. President Biden visited a memorial this afternoon for the victims of the Champlain Towers south collapse in Surfside, Florida. As we wait for more updates on the search, which is now suspended and for answers about why the tower collapsed. The town of Surf site has hired the structural engineer who investigated the 9 11 attacks to help uncover how this all happened. His name is Alan Kilshaw timer, and he joins us now from Surfside Welcome. Thank you. Hello. Okay, So let's just first talk about why the search and rescue effort was suspended overnight. There were concerns that the rest of the building might come down. What can you tell us about that? There was a one of the hanging columns on the outside faces a building that had partially collapsed. Moved. For some reason. There could have been wind. It could have been lots of things. Uh, so the the thing is to make sure that the building that it was still attached to wasn't starting to fall. Because if it did, it would fall a onto the pile where the guys are all working, and it could further collapse the garage underneath that pile. Okay. And how soon do you think the search and rescue can resume at this point? How much of how much longer? How long will the delay be? You think before the search and rescue effort can resume. There's no way to answer that first have to Essentially try and figure out why that column mood and then What needs to be done about it to try and make it safe again for them to do the work, So I don't think there's any way to really answer that question. Okay, So what are some of the key things that you will be looking for? As you're trying to figure out What exactly contributed to this collapsed last week. We? We got here Friday and we started then doing what we're doing, which is whenever we get Called into a collapse and we don't just do things where bombs and planes that things we It collapses that just happened and I come up with, you know, 20 or 30 things that I think might cause something like that. And then we begin. Doing computer program, engineering, computer programs and models. And taking the original drawings and evaluating the original design based on what they were supposed to be able to accommodate. We look at the foundation systems. We looked at all that stuff and and then we eliminate because is that we can prove we're not part of part of the collapse. When we're doing that, we generally will come up with more ideas as we uncover things. Um, we do material sampling of pieces of the building. We look at the concrete reinforcing scale on the soil and the foundations and all that kind of stuff. What you're looking for is a trigger because Every building. There's not one that I've been involved in, which is probably 40 more than $40 billion worth, that there aren't mistakes that are done. What is being built. There aren't mistakes that they're done while it's being designed Buildings we designed. We make mistakes and you know, because you just can't do everything perfectly. But the idea is whatever those things that might have been going wrong in the building were going wrong. It stood there for 40 years. Something was the trigger that set it off. So the idea is to try and find the trigger, or at least get it down to two or three possible triggers. And then begin looking at well, if this one thing that was wrong wouldn't have been wrong with this triggers still have caused the problem. Well, let me ask you because over the past week, documentation has surfaced showing that town officials to some extent new of structural concerns and did not take immediate actions based on what you have seen so far. Is it clear that officials and the condo association should have done more and done it sooner to address the need for repairs? Based on the information that I have seen so far. I don't think there was anything that as a structural engineer that would tell me the building was in any imminent danger of collapse. And the way condominiums usually work, um, that they don't have a bunch of money. And so they get the money from the residents, the owners, and usually they try and say, Let's do this much this year this much next year. There's much of your after they take it out of their budget. And the engineers or architects that are helping them figure out what to do. Tell them what in their mind are the priorities of what ought to be done, so they do them in a staged event. All right. That is Allen Kill shimmer a structural engineer who is now helping with the effort in Surfside, Florida Thank you very much for your time today. Thank you. The federal government announced today that it is deploying special Covid 19 surge response teams to try to snuff out new hotspots that are emerging around the country. NPR NPR Health correspondent Rob Stein joins us with details. Hi, Rob. Hey, there are Why are these teams being sent out now? And what is their goal? Yes, so they're being deployed because health officials are getting you know, increasingly alarmed about the highly contagious Delta variant. That's triggering new outbreaks, especially in places where lots of people who still haven't gotten vaccinated. Here's what White House coronavirus Response coordinator different science said today at today's Covid 19 briefing today, given what we are seeing, with the spread of Delta in some communities in the country We're intensifying our efforts to help states prevent, detect and respond to hot spots among the unvaccinated by mobilizing Covid 19.

Ari Shapiro Ailsa Chang Alan Kilshaw Washington Friday Los Angeles Rob 40 years Rob Stein two Champlain Towers last week next year 20 today Surfside, Florida NPR Fidelity Brokerage Services LL 40 more than $40 billion 30 things
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. Campbell listeners and supporters of KQED public radio 88.5 FM. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Here's an unexpected upside to the pandemic. For more than a year, we've masked up limited social interactions, skipped vacations. Those efforts were meant to keep the coronavirus at bay. And now, scientists say those actions also may have driven certain strains of the flu to extinction. That could make it much easier to develop flu vaccines in the coming years. Helen Brands Well wrote about this for stat and joins us now. Welcome. Hi, Ari. To start with some background remind us the flu is not just one type of virus. There are multiple strains. That's right. You know, your listeners may know that every year when they get a flu shot That it protects against three or four different strains of flu. There's H one N one, which they'll know from the 2000 and nine pandemic H three and two. And there are two components that protect against influenza B viruses, B Victoria and be Yamagata. And so I guess each year the people who develop flu vaccines sort of have to I don't know. Make an educated guess about which strains are going to be circulating that year. And if they're wrong? I mean, you report that in a recent year, up to three quarters of people who got the shot actually were not immunized against the flu. Yeah, so what they have to do is sort of look Within each class of viruses to see which strains are the most dominant. But they're doing it months in advance, like for our flu shot in the Northern Hemisphere, they're deciding in February. What should go into the flu shot. We're going to get the following autumn, so they have to look and see what seems to be dominant. What seems to be receding and make some choices. But it's been very hard in recent years, particularly with H three N two viruses because they've been so But it now seems like you know, the diversity has been diminished because there's been so little circulation of the viruses. So how does a strain of the flu go extinct? Well, they have to continue to infect people or they won't you know, they don't just sort of live out there. They have to pass from person to person to continue to exist, And because of the measures we've been taking in the pandemic, the distancing the masking closing of schools would be big because kids are major amplifiers of flu. But another thing that will have had a big effect on this will be The huge reduction in international travel, You know, flu moves from the Southern Hemisphere in their winter and our summer to the Northern Hemisphere when it's our flu season. And that just doesn't seem to have been happening to the degree that it normally does. And as a consequence there just fewer of these viruses around. So what does that mean for developing a vaccine? Well, it's early and at this point, you know, the scientists who are looking at this are Really interested in there, hoping that some of these strains have gone extinct, but it's still early days. I mean, they're going to have to watch that for a while to feel confident that they really are gone. Does this findings suggest that maybe even after this pandemic is over, people should consider wearing mask and taking some of the other health precautions we've gotten used to, especially during cold and flu season. You know, I think they're going to be a lot of people who are going to think about that. You know, Some of the precautions that we've taken to suppress covid are not sustainable or desirable. Sure, we're not going to keep schools closed. Exactly. We're not keeping schools closed. International travel will return. Eventually so some of these things will fall away and should fall away now, you know, should people who aren't feeling well next winter stay home from work. Probably should people who have six kids Keep them home from school. Definitely. And should people be thinking about wearing a mask? You know, I think that will depend on And individuals level of comfort. I mean, clearly there are people who can't wait to Dolph their mouse, and there are others who are hesitant about it, so I think we'll probably see a mix going forward. Helen Brands will is a senior writer at Stat covering infectious diseases and Global health. Thanks for your reporting nice to talk to you. The U. S economy is bouncing back fast, and many business people complained they were having a hard time finding enough workers to keep up. Yet millions of Americans are still unemployed. Some Republican governors argue that enhanced unemployment benefits discourage people from looking for work. More than two dozen states now plan to cut off those benefits early. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Mississippi is one of the first states to phase out benefits at the end of next week. That's bad news for Nicole Jones of Jackson, who lost her job at a head start center to the pandemic. Since then, unemployment has been helping keep her family afloat. I have a mortgage. I have the car No, I have made Bill Gas Bill Water Bill Internet Bill. I think it's really unfair that they are taking that away from households that are not able to get back to work right now. Jones says. She's wary of going back to head start, Mississippi has the nation's lowest covid vaccination rate. And while Jones acknowledges she's yet to get the shot herself, she's nervous about passing the virus on to her Children. They're not looking at the fact that a lot of people are not able to go back to work because of health issues, or childcare is an issues. Unemployment in Mississippi is still higher than the national average. But as far as governor Tate Reeves is concerned the pandemic is over, and it's time to put people back to work. If you go around anywhere in our state, and you talk to small business owners, you talk to large business owners. You talk to employees. You talk to consumers. What you hear repeatedly.

Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Scott Horsley Ari Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Jones February Nicole Jones Helen Brands H one N one Tate Reeves six kids B Victoria Campbell Republican NPR Northern Hemisphere Jackson Mississippi More than two dozen states
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Investment Minimum Supply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC and from the listeners of KQED Public Radio. It's 4 36. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish. India is grappling with a devastating surge in covert case is sending its health system to the verge of collapse. Now, the Indian government has ordered Facebook and Twitter to take down post, many of which show just how dire things really are. And the social companies. Are complying. NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond is here to explain why and China Grand start, of course by noting Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters help us understand how the Indian government has made this approach to social media companies. Right. The government says it's ordered Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to take down about 100 posts and according to local media reports, the government says these were cases where it said people were miss using social media to create panic during the pandemic. And so sources familiar with the company's tell me that Twitter and Facebook have complied in some of these cases, but not all of them and what that means is for some of these posts. They're blocking them from appearing on their services in India, although we can still see them outside of India. Can you give an example of the kind of post that might have been taken down? Yes. So many were critical of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's management of this crisis. They've been sharing pictures of the devastation in India, pictures of bodies lying on the ground. Some were showing burning funeral pyres side by side with these big political rallies that were held in recent months, and some of these were from really high profile users. So these were people like journalists and even political opponents of MODY. Now, of course, body. India is the world's largest democracy. But this is an escalating pattern that we have seen from Modi's government of stifling dissent. Want to come back to that? But first, these companies are always talking about freedom of expression, Right talking about it like a core value. Why are they saying they're complying with this request? Right. I think they're in a pretty difficult situation here. You know, if they want to operate in a country like India, they have to follow local laws. So, Twitter said in a statement. It's complying with Indian law. That's its policy. So even if a post does not break Twitter's rules if it breaks local law, Twitter will block the post in that country. You know these? They're real consequences here. Just a few months ago, India threatened to throw Twitter employees in jail when Twitter refused to block some of Modi's critics on the platform Now. Facebook declined to comment on this and A little hard to know much more about what's happening inside the company's Indian law limits. What the companies can say about these government orders, so we don't know exactly how many of these posts actually have been blocked out of, you know the total number of takedown notices the government has issued Clearly this is a case where this order is in conflict with the values. These companies say they were found on like free speech. The this idea that you're they plant pride of platform for anyone. Is it fair to say It's also like a major profit market, right? Yeah. I mean, India's a huge market hundreds of millions of users Facebook, It's what's that best interests are very popular there. Twitter is less so, but you know Moti himself. He's a big Twitter user. He's actually now the world leader with the most followers, and at the same time these companies in their products they're providing really powerful tools to people in India right now, you know, raise money. Crowdsource urgently needed medical aid. In this moment of this covert crisis, and of course, people are using them to criticize the government. But we're seeing that criticism is clearly before being received by Moody's government as a threat. So we're seeing this increasingly aggressive pattern of crackdowns on dissent by his government. And you know, this is just the latest example of that. That's NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you. Thanks so much. Audie. Support for all Tech considered comes from C three AI c three. Ai software enables organizations to use artificial.

Mary Louise Kelly Audie Cornish Shannon Bond Modi NPR Moti Twitter Instagram Facebook KQED Public Radio Investment Minimum Supply Fide Prime Minister first hundreds of millions India Moody's government C three few months ago about 100 posts Narendra Modi
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Investment minimum supply. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang. Demand for travel in Britain continues to grow despite the pandemic, vacation bookings are up even as the government tightens travel restrictions. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London. After months of lockdowns and canceled plans. Some people here can't wait to get on the road again. Do you kind of took booked to South Africa and late march turn into kept on and then we're gonna travel up to garden roots support. Elizabeth we put all the day to go to Amsterdam. Primarily to see the bulb fields from the cook and half gardens. That was Greg White, who's 33 works in finance in London and Judy Peel. She's a homemaker in her sixties and county, Kent. Who was talking about her 2022 plans. And then there's Kelly Newton 49. She owns a small clothing business in South London. This is her ambitious wish list. Suffolk for five days, Easter, then Portugal for five days in June. Transfer a week in August with the family five days in Mykonos in September with some girlfriends and then a week in the Maldives with my husband, Sophie Groupers and its travel Trade Desert, the world's oldest travel trade magazine, she says, there's a lot of Up demand and cautious optimism in a nation which is already delivered first vaccine doses to more than 15 million people. A lot of people didn't get to go away last year that itching for their holiday, and I think we've seen a real boost amongst the travel industry since news of the vaccine first came out in late November early December, and that's now playing out with new bookings. To eat. The German based travel giant says bookings last month were up 70% compared to December with people prepared to spend on average 20% more on vacations than last summer. Griffith says. The quicker a country distributes vaccines, the faster it's tourist economy might recover. Israel, for instance, is talking a big game in terms of wanting to get all if they're over 16 vaccinated by the end of March, so that might make Israel more popular as a destination. But new, more infectious variants are making flying even more difficult, confusing and time consuming. The UK is now requiring three covert tests. Plus mandatory quarantine at home or hotel for all arriving passengers, including those returning from vacation. British Transport Secretary Grant Shapps issued this warning on the BBC. People shouldn't be good looking whole days right now, not domestically or internationally. Vaccine passports could be a long term solution. The trade group, which represents some 290 airlines, is developing a phone app. It would link people's covert test results and vaccination records to a digital version of their passport, which the passenger could share with airlines and immigration. Allain Marie Hayden of the association explains how it would work on a flight from London to Washington, D. C. If you share that with British Airways, it means you don't need to be checked at Heathrow when you arrive in Dulles if the U. S government were to accept the test results from us You would need to show your paper vaccination certificate it doubles airport. What's at stake financially suddenly put survival on that's we can implement these type of technologies. We will not be able to open up travel again. And if we can't tell from the travel again. And airlines will go bankrupt. If people cannot access or cannot afford covert tests or vaccines, then their freedoms would be the fact of restricted and produce key worries about the fairness of a system like this. She teaches law here at the University of Exeter and co authored a study on the impact of health passports on human rights. Imagine that public authorities would start to require everyone to routinely display that health status. To access public transport restaurant churches. Some people could start moving freely. Others would not be allowed to travel and to access specific places, which could simply be based on where they live and their government's ability to obtain vaccine doses. Importance that vaccines are accessible to all and tests are affordable by all before any large scale deployment of this digital health, passports or vaccine passport. But that could take years. Well, yes, that's coding did take years, but at the same time you would find a situation in reach. The already existing inequalities in the society would be even more exacerbated. Airlines think a return to mass travel will hinge on vaccine distribution and more efficient ways to verify passengers or covert, free or vaccinated. The Air Transport Association.

Frank Langfitt Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Greg White British Airways South Africa South London Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Dulles Mykonos December five days Kelly Newton BBC Amsterdam September Washington, D. C. University of Exeter Britain Elizabeth
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot com slash wealth Investment minimum Supply, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang. Demand for travel in Britain continues to grow despite the pandemic, vacation bookings are up even as the government tightens travel restrictions. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London. After months of lockdowns and canceled plans. Some people here can't wait to get on the road again. Do you kind of took booked to South Africa and late march turn into kept on and then we're gonna travel up to garden reach support. Elizabeth. We put all the day to go to Amsterdam. Primarily to see the bulb fields from the cook and half gardens. That was Greg White, who's 33 works in finance in London and Judy Peel. She's a homemaker in her sixties and county, Kent. Who's talking about her 2022 plans. And then there's Kelly Newton 49. She owns a small clothing business in South London. This is our ambitious wish list. Suffolk for five days, Easter, then Portugal for five days in June, France for a week in August, with the family five days in Mykonos in September, with some girlfriends and then a week in the Maldives, with my husband, Sophie groupers and its travel trade desert towards all this travel trade magazine, she says, there's a lot of pain. Up demand and cautious optimism in a nation which is already delivered first vaccine doses to more than 15 million people. A lot of people didn't get to go away last year that itching for their holiday, and I think we've seen a real boost amongst the travel industry since news of the vaccine first came out in late November early December, and that's now playing out with new bookings. To eat. The German based travel giant says bookings last month were up 70% compared to December with people prepared to spend on average 20% more on vacations than last summer. Griffith says. The quicker a country distributes vaccines, the faster it's tourist economy might recover. Israel, for instance, is talking a big game in terms of wanting to get all if they're over 16 vaccinated by the end of March, so that might make Israel more popular as a destination. But new, more infectious variants are making flying even more difficult, confusing and time consuming. The UK is now requiring three covert tests, plus mandatory quarantine at home or hotel for all arriving passengers, including those returning from vacation. British Transport Secretary Grant Shapps issued this warning on the BBC. People shouldn't be good looking whole days right now, not domestically or internationally. Vaccine passports could be a long term solution. The trade group, which represents some 290 airlines, is developing a phone app. It would link people's covert test results and vaccination records to a digital version of their passport, which the passenger could share with airlines and immigration. Allain Marie Hayden of the association explains how it would work on a flight from London to Washington, D. C. If you share that with British Airways, it means you don't need to be checked at Heathrow when you arrive in Dulles if the U. S government were to accept the test results from us Would need to show your paper vaccination certificate at Dulles Airport. What's at stake financially. Seven people Survival on that's we can implement these type of technologies. We will not be able to open up travel again. And if we can tell from the travel again And airlines will go bankrupt. If people cannot access or cannot afford covert tests or vaccines, then their freedoms would be the fact of restricted Hannibal do ski worries about the fairness of a system like this. She teaches law here at the University of Exeter and co authored a study on the impact of health passports on human rights. Imagine that public authorities would start to require everyone to routinely display the health status. To access public transport restaurant churches. Some people could start moving freely. Others would not be allowed to travel and to access specific places, which could simply be based on where they live and their government's ability to obtain vaccine doses. Importance that vaccines are accessible to all and tests are affordable by all before any large scale deployment of this digital health passports or vaccine passport, But that could take years. Oh, yes, that coding it take years, but at the same time you would find a situation in reach. The already existing inequalities in the society would be even more exacerbated. Airlines think a return to mass travel will hinge on vaccine distribution and more efficient ways to verify passengers or covert, free or vaccinated. The Air Transport Association.

Frank Langfitt Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Greg White South Africa British Airways South London Dulles Mykonos five days Amsterdam BBC December September University of Exeter Washington, D. C. Britain NPR Maldives Portugal
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com slash wealth investment minimum Supply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and under well King. Good morning, the CDC says. Vaccine hesitancy is dropping. That means fewer people are saying they won't take the covert vaccine. And yet some people are still suspicious, including some people you might not expect. Dr Asif Merchant works in a cluster of four nursing homes outside of Boston. He's also an advisor to the governor of Massachusetts. He told me that some of his nursing home colleague Are still hesitant to take the vaccine. Despite everything they've seen since last spring. It was hard. I mean, you know, we were still trying to understand the disease. The transmission what the best practices are. This is all new. And it was almost learning to fly in the middle of a flight or building a plane the middle off a flight. It was extremely difficult. Patients were falling sake staff was calling out Some staff was sick. And then you know, you had almost a perfect storm, where there were very few staff members taking care off multiple, multiple sick residents. And because it was so busy with such poor staffing levels, it was extremely difficult and it was, you know, very painful sight. Did you lose patients? Doctor Merchant? Yes. Unfortunately, I lost a lot of patients. During the last year. And it was heartbreaking because You would see somebody who was sick and we wouldn't get results in time. You know the beginning of the pandemic. Testing was done only if somebody was symptomatic, and many of these residents were not symptomatic initially, but then they suddenly when they got symptomatic. It was a sudden crash. Almost Like falling off the edge of a cliff. You've been a doctor for many years. You've obviously lost patients before throughout your career. How different was covert, though? Being the Giri Christian working with the elderly. I see a lot of death, but this was You know, four or five times off that it was at such a rapid pace. You know, you didn't have time to sit and think. If I just sat and thought about it, I would have broken down. It was it was that bad. And then, as we headed into the winter, we learned all of us. Basically, at the same time that vaccines were being approved. You had some colleagues and who wanted to get the vaccine. But you have also written Publicly that you had many colleagues who did not want to get the vaccine, which seems surprising to me what was happening. It is surprising, but not really because you know, in the early 2020. The whole code pandemic was very political in many ways. About different treatments. You know drugs that were not really studied for it, being pushed by certain politicians and talking about vaccines before The election in November, and it almost seemed like you know, scientists are being strong, armed into, you know, getting something out and available to the public, and it created a lot of mistrust. I was skeptical at one point because you know, no other vaccine has been developed this quickly and the history off modern medicine. It seemed, you know, rough estimates it could take. You know, at least a couple of years before we got a successful vaccine now, couple that with the political jargon and world which that was spread We'll have a vaccine before the election. It seemed like more of a political stunt, then real science and I think that was you know why I was skeptical when you had conversations with your colleagues and you spoke to people who said I'm not going to take this thing? What were some of the reasons that they gave There were a lot of reasons and a lot of it could be boiled down to mistrust didn't really trust. You know the science behind it didn't trust you know the politicians and government You know who works in nursing homes and who are the CNN's and nurses? You know, in Massachusetts, at least we see ah, large amount off Haitian Creole speaking co workers that I have or blacks and Africans who worked as CNN's or nurses and They haven't been billed mistrust of the system due to historic reasons. Also they were concerned about how can a vaccine be developed this quickly when there is no cure for many of the other illnesses, certain cancers even influence off the influence of vaccine is not very effective every year when they take it, so there's a lot of historical perspective to some of their concerns. At the end of the day. Do you believe that you're convincing people that the vaccine is safe? I suddenly think I have made a difference. Dr Merchant. Thank you so much for your time today. Thank you so much. Dr. Asif Merchant specializes in geriatric medicine and teaches it toughs. He also works in a nursing home community outside of Boston. People in Myanmar are finding more ways to protest a military coup and the military is seeking new ways to crack down. The armed forces were always powerful in Myanmar, and they took full control of the government started this month, detaining civilian leader Aung San Souci. Michael Sullivan reports on the day by day struggle for control of the streets. The demonstrations Monday and today were smaller than most of those that preceded them muted by the military show of force over the weekend. The Internet was shut down overnight for the second straight day when service was restored. There were even more military vehicles and Morte troops on the street. Demonstrators are demanding the military step aside, and for the release of unsung Souci and others detained in the coup. Activist group, The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners says more than 425 people have been arrested and says it's worried that number will grow. Now that the military has suspended legal constraints on detaining people without a warrant. The United Nations special envoy on Monday warned of severe consequences. If the military cracks down hard on demonstrators. So far, violence has been limited. Police used rubber bullets against protesters last week in the capital, Nikita and again yesterday in Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay, with several reportedly wounded. Richard Horsey is an independent political analyst based in Yangon. What I've been witnessing over the last days in the streets of Yangon is truly inspiring, You know, it's not just the protesters out on the streets. It's also government officials declining to go toe work. The train workers are striking. The doctors were striking. This is a genuine on Or inspiring out part off public rejection of this coup. On the other hand, he says, nothing. The Myanmar military having lived through years of military rule in Myanmar, I worry that should they choose to, and I think there's a high risk that they will that the military does have the ability to restore order and to complete their coup on there's probably not very much anyone else can do about that. If they're determined.

Richard Horsey Michael Sullivan Steve Inskeep Aung San Souci Monday Boston CNN Myanmar Asif Merchant Yangon last week four yesterday Mandalay November Nikita early 2020 last year CDC NPR News
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on KCRW

"Build a plan for cash flow so they could go from saving toe living Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. The Navajo Nation extends across parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. And last spring, it had Mork coronavirus cases per capita than any U. S. State. Now the infection rate is even higher to talk about the challenges of fighting the disease on the Navajo nation. We have Dr Loretta Christiansen on the line. She is chief medical officer of the Indian Health Services Navajo area. Thanks for joining us. My pleasure. Thank you for having me as you try to get this crisis under control. What are your biggest pinch points right now? Yes, This second wave has been extremely challenging for us, and it is much more intense than the first major things that we're dealing with right now is a critical nursing shortage because we are competing with the entire United States, who was also surging. But we're very fortunate that we have a very exceptional staff, and they have found ways to create more ice you beds. One of our other really big challenges, however, is the neighboring states are also surging. And we do send our most critically ill to tertiary centers in Albuquerque, Flagstaff, Phoenix and Tucson. So as that gets tighter, we have to keep more patients in our facilities, and we do have finite bed capacity. One bright spot is your contact tracing program I understand is really strong. And so do you have a clear sense of How the virus is being spread right now we actually do and the majority of this wave right now has been due to gatherings. The Navajo people are very social, very family oriented, and what happened was a lot of gatherings for family celebrations that have been put off for so long. During this pandemic. They felt safe to go and meet with their families, however, that resulted in Numerous clusters. At the same time, it just became overwhelming. The numbers just kept getting higher and higher order with cases spiking all over the U. S. What of the unique challenges to fighting this surge in the communities of the Navajo Nation? Well, I think we have to look at the extreme reality that we live in every day. And therefore resource is take time and effort to bring into this region. For example, supplies like high flow, oxygen and equipment, critical equipment like that. It is not right here. We have to really make a concerted effort to get our resource is here for us to use. You talked about the extreme reality of the Navajo Nation. I know that this is the size of West Virginia that we're talking about, and only 13 grocery stores. I mean, how does that complicate things? Well, it Does because people all have to go out and get food. So if you are all hitting those 13 grocery stores, there's a gathering of sorts of people just trying to get food to survive. We've had a really successful food delivery program to get food boxes, hygiene boxes. We take them to the families and say, Please stay home. We're giving you what you need to quarantine or isolate for 14 days, and that's worked very well for us. But still you're looking at a food desert. You Healthy healing food to be what people have. And they don't have great access to that in the Navajo nation. I know that many people who live on the Navajo nation don't have running water on do you have also run into challenges using hand sanitizer as an alternative? Tell us about that. Yes, we asked to make over 30% of our homes don't have running water in. Some of those also don't have electricity. Either. Ri just environmental, health and engineering services have really created 59 water transition points and given out 37,000 storage containers, So where we are aggressively addressing our water issue, But as you imagine it makes hand hygiene very challenging. So we do welcome in hand sanitizer as an alternative, but we had a lot of hand sanitizer that came into the nation that was contaminated with three days you're substances, and unfortunately because some of our people that are addicted to alcohol do drink hand sanitizer. They were becoming extremely ill. And some Did not survive. So we have clean that up. We now have available testing to test everything that's brought in the area and donated and we're confident that we've really am reduce the risk of the hand sanitizers because we need them. You grew up on Navajo Nation lands. How do you think that informs your ability toe helped lead the response to the pandemic there? Well, I do believe it gives me a different insight to our challenges I understand are now the whole culture. My family and I have been in this area for a very long time. And so I think I have an unusual viewpoint in that. I know what our normal is here. And I know what our challenges are here, and I Have found ways to address them along with my very excellent team that I have, and I think we've done a very, very effective job of working within the limitations here on Navajo Nation. That is Dr Loretta Christiansen of the Indian Health Service. Thank you for speaking with us today. Thank you. Uber is getting out of the self driving game. The ride hailing giant has sold its autonomous vehicle research unit to a startup. It hasn't quite given up on the idea of robo taxis, but it is recognizing it can no longer afford to spend billions of dollars on the technology. NPR's Camilla Domina ski reports. Uber has always aimed big. It wanted to operate around the globe. It wanted to replace personal car ownership. And when it came to self driving technology, uber wanted to play a starring role in that revolution and make a fortune off of it. There's a huge huge Like positive impact of society when driverless cars become a thing that was uber co founder Travis Kalinic at a World Economic Forum event in 2016, and after Kalinic was pushed out of uber because of numerous scandals, new CEO Dark Khazar shot he was still optimistic. He spoke at Davos and 2018. We will have Autonomous cars on the road. I believe with him that the next 18 months not as a kind of Ah test case but as a real case out there just a few months after that remark, a self driving uber on a test run, struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. After that deadly crash, Uber pulled its test vehicles off the road for a while, but research into self driving software continued. The goal was to eventually offer rides without needing to pay drivers. But while self driving technology has been improving, it's not close to making uber any money and that research is very expensive. They put a lot of money. It's in the billions. Daniel Ives is with Wedbush Securities. After all these years, Uber's recognizing its limitations. It's never turned a profit and the pandemic has it. Bleeding money. Self driving could still be part of Uber's future and years to come through partnerships, but the company won't be developing the technology in house. This is a shitty Jake vision, but ultimately going to really play out. They were gonna need to sell this business. They could not support that level of our Eddie needed to make this successful. All that expertise is heading to a startup named Aurora that's working on self driving trucks. Uber isn't getting any cash in exchange. I have says this transaction is all about getting a money loser off the books. It's a sign the company that always dreamed big is narrowing its focus. Uber is doubling down on ride hailing and food delivery as it chases that elusive profit. Camilla Domina Ski NPR news.

Navajo Nation Uber Indian Health Services Navajo Dr Loretta Christiansen NPR Arizona Camilla Domina Ski NPR Mork coronavirus Ari Shapiro United States Los Angeles Elsa Chang Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Washington medical officer West Virginia New Mexico Davos
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Build a plan for cash flow so they could go from saving toe living Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. The Navajo Nation extends across parts of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico. And last spring, it had Mork coronavirus cases per capita than any U. S. State. Now the infection rate is even higher to talk about the challenges of fighting the disease on the Navajo nation. We have Dr Loretta Christiansen on the line. She is chief medical officer of the Indian Health Services Navajo area. Thanks for joining us. My pleasure. Thank you for having me as you try to get this crisis under control. What are your biggest pinch points right now? Yes, This second wave has been extremely challenging for us, and it is much more intense than the first major things that we're dealing with right now is a critical nursing shortage because we are competing with the entire United States, who was also surging. But we're very fortunate that we have a very exceptional staff, and they have found ways to create more ice you beds. One of our other really big challenges, however, is the neighboring states are also surging. And we do send our most critically ill to tertiary centers in Albuquerque, Flagstaff, Phoenix and Tucson. So as that gets tighter, we have to keep more patients in our facilities, and we do have finite bed capacity. One bright spot is your contact tracing program I understand is really strong. And so do you have a clear sense of How the virus is being spread right now we actually do and the majority of this wave right now has been due to gatherings. The Navajo people are very social, very family oriented, and what happened was a lot of gatherings for family celebrations that had been put off for so long. During this pandemic, they felt safe to go and meet with their families. However, that resulted in numerous clusters. At the same time, it just became overwhelming. The numbers just kept getting higher and higher order with cases spiking all over the U. S one of the unique challenges to fighting this surge in the communities of the Navajo nation. Well, I think we have to look at the extreme reality that we live in every day. And therefore resource is take time and effort to bring into this region. For example, supplies like high flow oxygen and equipment, critical equipment like that. It is not right here. We have to really make a concerted effort to get our resource is here for us to use. You talked about the extreme roar aladi of the Navajo Nation. I know that this is the size of West Virginia that we're talking about, and only 13 grocery stores. I mean, how does that complicate things? Well, Does because people all have to go out and get food. So if you are all hitting those 13 grocery stores, there is a gathering of sorts of people just trying to get food to survive. We've had a really successful food delivery program to get food boxes, hygiene boxes. We take them to the families and say, Please stay home. We're giving you what you need to quarantine or isolate for 14 days, and that's worked very well for us. But still you're looking at a food desert. You Want healthy healing food to be what people have. And they don't have great access to that in the Navajo nation. I know that many people who live on the Navajo nation don't have running water on do you have also run into challenges using hand sanitizer as an alternative? Tell us about that. Yes, we estimate over 30% of our homes don't have running water in. Some of those also don't have electricity. Either. Ri just environmental, health and engineering services have really created 59 water transition points and given out 37,000 storage containers, So where we are aggressively addressing our water issue, But as you imagine it makes hand hygiene very challenging. So we do recommend hand sanitizer as an alternative, but we had a lot of hand sanitizer that came into the nation that was contaminated with three days you're substances and unfortunately because some of our People that are addicted to alcohol do drink hand sanitizer. They were becoming extremely ill, and some did not survive. So we have clean that up. We now have available testing to test everything that's brought in the area and donated and we're confident that we've really am reduce the risk of the hand sanitizers because we need them. You grew up on Navajo Nation lands. How do you think that informs your ability toe helped lead the response to the pandemic there? Well, I do believe it gives me a different insight to our challenges I understand are now the whole culture. My family and I have been in this area for a very long time. And so I think I have an unusual viewpoint in that. I know what our normal is here, and I know what our challenges are here. And I have found ways to address them along with my very excellent team that I have, and I think we've done a very, very effective job of working within the limitations here on Navajo Nation. That is Dr Loretta Christiansen of the Indian Health Service. Thank you for speaking with us today. Thank you. Uber is getting out of the self driving game. The ride hailing giant has sold its autonomous vehicle research unit to a startup. It hasn't quite given up on the idea of robo taxis, but it is recognizing it can no longer afford to spend billions of dollars on the technology. NPR's Camilla Domina ski reports. Uber has always aimed big. It wanted to operate around the globe. It wanted to replace personal car ownership. And when it came to self driving technology, uber wanted to play a starring role in that revolution and make a fortune off of it. There's a huge huge Like positive impact of society when driverless cars become a thing that was uber co founder Travis Kalinic at a World Economic Forum event in 2016, and after Kalinic was pushed out of uber because of numerous scandals, new CEO Dark Khazar shot he was still optimistic. He spoke at Davos and 2018. We will have Autonomous cars on the road. I believe with him that the next 18 months not as a kind of Ah test case but as a real case out there just a few months after that remark, a self driving uber on a test run, struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. After that deadly crash, Uber pulled its test vehicles off the road for a while, but research into self driving software continued. The goal was to eventually offer rides without needing to pay drivers. But while self driving technology has been improving, it's not close to making uber any money and that research is very expensive. They put a lot of money in the billions. Daniel Ives is with Wedbush Securities. After all these years, Uber's recognizing its limitations. It's never turned a profit and the pandemic has it. Bleeding money. Self driving could still be part of Uber's future and years to come through partnerships, but the company won't be developing the technology in house. This is a shitty jik vision. But all to Mori Bird to really play out. They were gonna need to sell this business. They could not support that level of RD needed to make this successful. All that expertise is heading to a startup named Aurora that's working on self driving trucks. Uber isn't getting any cash in exchange. I have says this transaction is all about getting a money loser off the books. It's a sign the company that always dreamed big is narrowing its focus. Uber is doubling.

Navajo Nation Uber Indian Health Services Navajo Dr Loretta Christiansen NPR Ari Shapiro Arizona Mork coronavirus Elsa Chang Los Angeles United States Washington Fidelity Brokerage Services LL medical officer West Virginia Mori Bird New Mexico Davos
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Find out what it takes to really change someone's mind. And as our Thursday evening line up, it starts tonight at eight on 93.9 FM. But of course, you could always ask your smart speaker to play W N. Y. C. Tonight. Rain It's possible probably after nine PM Otherwise it'll be cloudy tonight Low 61 degrees shall responsible tomorrow afternoon Cloudy still high near 67. It is W n my sea at 5 20. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from C three c three dot Ai AI software in Abel's organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems Learn more at sea three dot the I and Fidelity wealth management. Providing perspective on a client's entire financial picture, investment, minimum supply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. It's all things considered on W m. I see. I'm Sean Carlson. There is yet another twist in the wind the road to re opening New York City's public school system. In a surprise move today, Mayor De Blasio says there will be a staggered schedule for in person learning with only three K pre K on students in the special education district, known as District 75, starting on Monday. Elementary schools, including those that go through eighth grade, will start in person on September 29th and middle and high schools on October 1st. All other students start on Monday with instruction online. So after several changes and delays in the last two weeks, many school employees and families say their heads are spinning to make sense of the latest W and my C and Gotham is Jessica Gould and Sophia Chang. Join us now. Hello to you both high Haitian..

Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Mayor De Blasio Sean Carlson NPR New York City Sophia Chang Abel Gotham Jessica Gould
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Need an arch problem. Toe love how they feel See all the styles of machine washable arch bit shoes. Now, with sketches dot com Change is constant. That's why with Fidelity Wealth Management, you're dedicated advisor will work with you to create a personalized plan for your full financial picture. One that can be adjusted as your needs change to help you stay on target. Plus, they can let you know what you're paying for. And why learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth Investment minimum Supply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. This is Dan Rayburn. If your roof needed repairs, would you fix it? Now? Wait till it starts raining. Why would the financial future of your family be any different? I'm here with Phil in Marine of the Commonwealth Advisory Group. The longer you wait, the harder taking these important first steps will become. Would you agree? Nobody wants to think about getting sick or passing away. I can't tell you how many times people have come in to us and somebody's in a nursing home. And it's extremely stressful Time. Everyone seems tto. Take the opinion that listen, I Really good right now. I don't need to do it. You have to do this when you feel good, because if you would stop this when you don't feel well, you're gonna lose what you have, And that's the kind of stress in financial trouble that can be avoided. With a little planning in Massachusetts. Lars told us that the middle class can protect themselves through a trust. It's so easy to protect your family with help from the Commonwealth Advisory Group. Just call 1 807 05 14 15 for no stress consultation. That's 1 807 05141 Third floor study off my dining room table for Monday and Tuesday by living room Wednesday to Friday. Wherever school happens for you this year, Staples.

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Happens when workers have to supply their own acey relevance on another day of triple digit heat in parts of the West? From American public media. This is marketplace. Marketplaces supported by progressive insurance, comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers, so shoppers can evaluate options in one place. Now, that's progressive comparisons of a level of progressive dot com are 1 800 progressive. And by ex chair office chair dynamic variable lumbar support and tenor economic features for maximum support and comfort at x chair dot com or 8444 Ex chair. And by Fidelity Wealth Management, where advisers work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that evolves there needs change. Fidelity dot com slash well, Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. From Baltimore today. I'm Amy Scott in for Kyra is doll. It is Monday, the seventh of September. Good to have you with us this labor day? The holiday weekend brought a record busting heat wave too much of the West Los Angeles recorded its highest temperature ever with part of the city reaching 121 degrees yesterday. And it's been a hotter than average summer across the country, one that many workers experienced from home instead of in their climate controlled offices. So how have remote workers been coping without industrial grade? H VAC systems from the workplace Culture desk now located in one very hot apartment marketplaces, Meghan McCarty Carino has the story. The decades old window. A C in my living room has been a godsend while working from home this summer, but it sounds sort of like a jet engine..

Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Fidelity Wealth Management Meghan McCarty Carino H VAC Los Angeles Amy Scott Baltimore Kyra
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fall. Only about 1/4 of families have registered students to learn exclusively from home when schools reopened when I sees Jessica Gould's reports The deal. We had asked families to let them know if they wanted to opt out of in person instruction by the end of last week. In a survey, 26% of family said they plan to enroll their Children in remote learning exclusively. Mayor de Blasio says that means the other 3/4 of students are choosing to attend school in person. Part time officials counted those who didn't respond as opting into the hybrid plan. But that's not entirely clear. Yet Only a fraction of the school system is more than a 1,000,000 families filled out the survey. Some say they need more details and families can opt for all remote learning at any time. One of the former highest ranking women in the NYPD, is suing the department for Gender Discrimination. The New York Times reports achieve Laurie Pollack, who ran the NYPD crime strategy. Had requested to be considered to be chief of detectives after commissioner German Shay was appointed last November. Instead, she alleges she was demoted after being re assigned to the office, overseeing partnerships with other city agencies and youth programs. Pollock retired last week after 33 years with the NYPD. The lawsuit accuses the police Department of systemically denying women top jobs, and it aims to force the department to be transparent about how senior leadership is chosen. And the NYPD spokesperson says the department is reviewing the lawsuit. 84 degrees. Now we're expecting sunny skies all day. Today with high around 90 degrees. It's 106 Support for NPR comes from Fidelity Wealth Management, where advisers work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that can evolve as their needs change. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. This is all of it on WNEW cm Alison Stewart. Thank you for sharing part of your day with me here. Some of the stories we're working on, will speak to the director behind the new documentary Margie Ella, in his own words about the mysterious and enigmatic fashion designer who's shied away from being photographed his entire career. Plus author Isabel Wilkerson will join us to discuss her new book cast, which looks at the parallels between white supremacy in the states, the Indian caste system and Nazi Germany. And our Siri's on What work will look like in the future continues with a look at room how remote work is affecting men, women differently when it comes to work, Life balance. Now to our daily 62nd meditation called I need a minute. We want to encourage you to take a moment a minute for yourself to quiet your mind, blocked out the chatter and breathe. Here is WNYC Meditation leader Lorraine Maddox. Close your eyes. And find a comfortable seat. Take the next few seconds to scan your body..

NYPD police Department Isabel Wilkerson Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Mayor de Blasio Jessica Gould Fidelity Wealth Management Alison Stewart Lorraine Maddox Nazi Germany Laurie Pollack German Shay commissioner Pollock NPR Margie Ella Siri The New York Times director
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Com slash wells Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Stacy Vanek Smith in New York and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. While the country's attention has been focused on the Corona virus, the Trump administration has been making big changes on immigration, especially at the Southwest border. Since March, immigration officials have turned away tens of thousands of migrants seeking refuge in the U. S. Immigrant advocates say it is the culmination of a three year push to end asylum as we know it. NPR's Joel Rose covers immigration and joins us Now. Hi Jul. Hey, Ari to start with Will you just described what the Trump Administration's view on asylum is? Yeah, well, the administration has always argued that these asylum seekers arriving at the southern border are not like the refugees who are fleeing persecution during and after World War two, which is really where US asylum law has its roots. Instead, the administration argues that these migrants are really trying to escape from poverty stricken countries in Central America. And to game the immigration system to get into the U. S President Trump himself has said that asylum is the scam. Our system is full. We're not taking them anymore. Okay? Can't do it, and his administration has been working for years to chip away at asylum protections. Now they have effectively closed the border to asylum seekers. And how did they justify that? Is it the pandemic, right? I mean, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an order in March when the pandemic was just taking off and closed the border to migrants, saying this needed to be done to protect public health. Advocates say What's happening at the border with asylum is unprecedented that these migrants are expelled from the US quickly, most with no access to due process, sometimes not even really, an explanation of what is happening to them. Let's visit the border and hear some voices from their stay with us. Joel our colleague, Mallory Folk of member Station K. E. R. A Has been talking with asylum seekers. Here's her report when a Salvadoran woman grabbed her four year old daughter and fled their home country Corona virus wasn't yet a global pandemic. She was escaping an abusive ex partner, the girl's father, who had threatened to kill her. That was in late February. The woman asked us not to use her name out of fear for her safety. She recounts her story over video chat from a government run shelter in Juarez, Mexico. Her daughter pops in and out of the screen. By the time they arrived at the U. S Mexico border. A month later, President Trump had shut it down on Lee letting in essential traffic, so she crossed the Rio Grande planning to ask for asylum. Border Patrol picked her up and took her picture and fingerprints. Then she and her daughter were taken right back to Mexico. Standing on an international bridge. She says she begged immigration officials not to send her back. She says they threatened to press charges if she didn't leave the bridge. And they told me they didn't care. They didn't care what happened to my life that I had to go whether to Mexico or tell Salvador to wherever I wanted. But I wasn't getting into the U. S. Since late March, immigration officials have turned away thousands of migrants like this woman and her daughter. They've carried out some 70,000 title 42 expulsions through June. That's a reference to a federal law that's been around since the 18 nineties originally meant to stop boats from entering American ports if they came from places hard hit by smallpox or cholera. Before these migrants would have had a chance to ask for asylum here, and Children who crossed by themselves would have been pleased in a shelter, then released to a relative or sponsor in the US Now they're just turned away. They have been basically Pushed away from United States with no process whatsoever. That's Tanya Good. Eto Awada is based immigration attorney with the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, she says U. S officials dropped thes asylum seekers in the middle of the bridge at all hours of the day and night, they're left to fend for themselves in an unfamiliar city confused about what just took place. The first question Toe always answer is What happened to me? They have no idea what happened. Everyone explains it to be extremely fast and that they're not able to express their fears. That's a big deal because it means they don't have an opportunity to seek asylum. Customs and Border Protection, told NPR. These cases are handled on a case by case basis. But a spokesman declined to explain how they determine who gets a credible fear interview while the border is closed because of the pandemic. Normally that's the first step in the asylum process. The Salvadoran woman never got a chance to ask for asylum. She says U. S officials didn't explain anything to her. They just told her to leave imposes very Hera. It doesn't go your way. So I started to cry and left the bridge. Mexican officials asked What was going on. I told them I didn't have anywhere to go. I didn't know what to do. She and her daughter ended up at a shelter run by the Mexican government, where other asylum seekers have been waiting for their U. S court dates. That shelter has been on lock down since March. But eventually Corona virus still got in. A dozen migrants tested positive in the outbreak for NPR news. I'm Malory Falk in El Paso and NPR's Joel Rose, who covers immigration is still with us to reflect on some of the issues that story raises. And Joel first I want to ask you about public opinion because NPR just did. A poll with Ipsos that found this border shutdown has broad bipartisan support from Americans who Desperately want to stop the spread of Cove in 19 So what a public health experts say about that. Well, physicians and health experts are skeptical. They say the closing the border to these migrants might make sense on its face, but Commerce is still flowing freely across the border. That means truckers, students and others are still crossing the border every day, and public health experts say those people are just as likely to spread Corona virus. And several dozen public health experts signed a letter accusing the administration of using public health as a quote pretext for denying asylum to these migrants. Has the administration responded to that? Well, the administration is standing behind this policy. In fact, the CDC has extended its order indefinitely, and the Border Patrol says it's working. Texas public radio asked Agent Rafael Garza about what thes public health experts have said, and here's how Garza response. Whether it's six hampers or six agents. I mean, who you gonna trust? Just because they have an expert title in front of the thing. It is a good tool at the United States government.

US NPR Border Patrol Joel Rose Trump Administration Mexico Southwest border Ari Shapiro Trump CDC President U. S Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Catholic Legal Immigration Net Stacy Vanek Smith U. S. Immigrant Washington
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Really been possible. The homes are starting to go up. Now it's part of the river to river festivals. Echo Exhibit We do have a heat advisory in effect until oh, just about eight o'clock and otherwise we expect severe thunderstorms into the evening and we could have damaging winds along with those Currently it's 85 degrees at the South Street Seaport. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Amazon studios with radioactive starring Rosamund Pike, based on a true story of Marie Curie, the first woman to win the Nobel Prize. His discoveries changed the face of science starts Friday on Prime video and Fidelity Wealth Management, where advisers work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that can evolve as their needs change. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I Mary Louise Kelly on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia. All the statues of Confederate leaders have been removed All except one. The biggest one. The four story tall monument of General Robert E. Lee stands there today, as it has every day since 18 90. Its fate is in legal limbo, though today a judge heard arguments on whether to keep it or remove it, but did not issue a final decision from the bench. Whitney Evans, a reporter with member station BPM was at that hearing in Richmond today and joins us now. Hey, Whitney. Hi..

Fidelity Wealth Management Whitney Evans Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Richmond South Street Seaport NPR Rosamund Pike Marie Curie Ari Shapiro Nobel Prize Mary Louise Kelly Robert E. Lee reporter Amazon Virginia
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And safety of his family and employees. A majority of farmer surveyed say they're concerned about the mental health of a family member friend or neighbor. Tonight. Here in our area. Showers and thunderstorms are possible about a 40% chance of that mostly after midnight. Otherwise partly cloudy. Tonight's going to stay pretty warm with loaf about 76 tomorrow. Good chance of showers and thunderstorms, mostly sunny. The heat wave continues tomorrow high near 91 by the afternoon with the humidity, though that could feel as high as 95 degrees. It's 88 Sonny right now in Central Park. It's 5 35 Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Amazon studios with radioactive starring Rosamund Pike, based on a true story of Marie Curie, the first woman to win the Nobel Prize. His discoveries changed the face of science starts Friday on Prime video and Fidelity Wealth Management, where advisers work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that can evolve as their needs change. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. It is back after a three month hiatus. President Trump says he's resurrecting his nightly briefings about the Corona virus. We have had this big flare up in Florida, Texas, a couple of other places. And so I think what we're going to do is get involved and will start doing briefings. What's left clear is whether the briefings will take up the old format, a panel of the nation's top public health officials updating the American people about testing and treatments and vaccines or Whether the briefings will be more of a one man show a chance for President Trump to reclaim the primetime spotlight once again tuning into tonight's briefing, our NPR health policy reporters Selina Simmons stuff in congressional correspondent Susan Davis and White House reporter Aisha Roscoe hate all three of you. Hey there. Hello. Hi. Aisha, Let's start with you for a couple of months. It seemed these briefings were the main way that President Trump got his message out. Remind us why did these briefings stop in the.

President Trump NPR Fidelity Wealth Management Aisha Roscoe Fidelity Brokerage Services LL Rosamund Pike President Mary Louise Kelly Marie Curie Nobel Prize Central Park Elsa Chang Amazon Los Angeles Selina Simmons Washington Susan Davis Florida
"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WTOP

"More. Fidelity dot com slash wealth Investment minimum Supply Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. Thiss just into the w T o P newsroom. The Arlington County School Board has unanimously passed a motion to delay the start of the school year to September 8th. The original date was August 30 1st school system will begin the year with all distance learning. No teachers, no students in physical classrooms, read Maura w t o p dot com Search school to find out what the whole area is doing as we continue to cope with Cove, it It's 10 18 traffic and weather on the H and when it breaks Bob Himmler in the traffic center. In Virginia on 66. Westbound, heavy and slow getting up for the Beltway to appoint before Nutley single right Lane is getting by the work zone and a times traffic has stopped in the works on their eastbound route 50 getting by single file to the right. And then at Notley Street, you get by one lane to the right there as well. 95 North bound in Prince William County of Principle Your parkway. In fact, except 1 58 single right Lane is getting past the roadwork and north out of the George Washington Parkway. You'll be diverted once again up to Memorial Circle because they're working under the Memorial Bridge on the G W Parkway. So you rejoin the parkway on the other side of the circle and continue on your way. Things were running pretty well around the Beltway, both in Maryland and Virginia, even though they do have some roadwork now set up in Maryland on Prince George's The Prince George's County Sign near Andrews interlude after Richie Marble past route for getting by two lanes to the right of the split works on the same on the outer loop. You get by two lanes to the left. At Exit nine and Andrews through the split works on their 2 70 North bound, headed up past Montgomery Village toward Watkins Mill. Two right lanes get by the roadwork and south bound after Montrose rowed single left lane gets by that continues down the 2 70 spur toward Democracy Boulevard 95 Baltimore Washington Parkway, each running without delay, 50 out of the Bay Bridge. That's pretty quiet plan on crossing the Bay Bridge. We'll get current traffic at bay bridge dot com or call 1877 base ban All electronic tolling is now live Get easy passed today, Bob GOP traffic storm team for four day forecast says We go to Amelia Draper a warm, humid night out there with temperatures during the evening hours in the eighties and overnight lows in the upper sixties to mid seventies with some scattered storms around otherwise Partly cloudy skies for tomorrow. Some scattered.

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"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity brokerage services llc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To a year in prison only two people in New York City have died after being struck by bicycles this year more than ninety pedestrians in twenty six cyclists have been killed by motorists during the same time forty nine degrees low light rain and fog right now that rain tapering off over the next couple of hours and then clearing run the freezing mark overnight to near forty tomorrow sunshine and get ready for a freeze watch in effect tomorrow nights from midnight until seven AM temperatures as low as twenty seven this is W. NYC support for NPR comes from fidelity investments taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow preserve and manage their wealth learn more at fidelity dot com slash wells fidelity brokerage services LLC support for studio three sixty come from Babel a language learning app developed by language specialists and voiced by native speakers using speech recognition technology bibles daily ten to fifteen minute lessons are available online at babble B. A. B. B. E. L. dot com support for studio three sixty comes from Atlassian whether it's keeping thousands of people on the same page or managing projects from start to finish Atlassian works to unleash the potential of all types of teams with collaboration software more Atlassian dot com and I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Thomas Jefferson that's I like to have the roasted chicken breast very well done everything is all about.

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New York City Lawmakers Pass Landmark Climate Measure

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:10 min | 3 years ago

New York City Lawmakers Pass Landmark Climate Measure

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Fidelity Investments, taking a personalized approach to helping you grow and protect your wealth. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity brokerage services LLC on the steps of New York City hall more than one hundred people celebrated the passage of a landmark climate Bill last week. It doesn't target cars or coal it regulates big buildings. New York mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to sign the Bill into law soon. He says it's the first law in the world require emissions cuts from existing buildings, and it could serve as a model for other cities NPR's Camilo, Domino's ski reports think of New York City's famous skyscrapers. Now, imagine the power it takes to heat and cool and eliminate them. And maybe it's not so surprising. That buildings are responsible for two thirds of the city's greenhouse gas emissions. New York City mayor Bill de Blasio called it. The mother load in an interview with NPR buildings are the single biggest piece of the problem that hasn't been addressed. And we have the tools to do it right now. Everything about this. New law is big it focuses on big buildings and calls for big cuts to emissions ultimately eighty percent. And if buildings don't comply they will face big fines recuse the biggest buildings if these goals are not met the fines can be one. Million dollars per year or more even so what does it take for a building to slash its carbon emissions? Take a ride on the Empire State. Building's elevator. The world's most famous and you get to see Bill. Flakes to the last ten years. This landmark has gone through an ambitious energy efficiency overhaul. Tourists visiting the hundred and two storey landmark can't see them. But retrofits are everywhere. Insulated windows dim -able lights upgraded air conditioning, tools for tenants to cut consumption. Even that elevator is more efficient. There is no silver bullet these are lots of little pieces. So we call it silver buckshot, Anthony Malkin is the CEO of the Empire State realty trust which owns the building when you were deuce energy consumption, reduce carbon up. It's very simple. The Empire State building has dramatically slashed both energy use and emissions. But New York City's new legislation ultimately calls for even more cuts. This is absolutely a step that goes beyond anything that we've even accomplished in our buildings. The new law will carry a hefty price tag collectively the required retrofits will cost an estimated four billion dollars. But that's just looking at the costs. There are savings too. From lower bills over time. I'm the Empire State building spent millions on those retrofits, but it is already made back the investment, and then some so some of the required retrofits will pay for themselves, but de Blasios technologies that won't always be true. They are the kinds of mandates that assum building owners will find to be stretch goals, and we'll find to be difficult. But that's the point. That is the law is designed to push owners to make changes they wouldn't. Otherwise, New York is already a very expensive city large commercial landlords are frustrated that they have to make changes when other buildings don't and suggest the law could drive business away. But the mayor emphasizes that financing will be available and the bill's supporters respond to concerns over cost by pointing out that climate change poses an existential threat to this coastal city. They recall the devastating effects of hurricane sandy muddied Silva. Feral runs a nonprofit that pushed for the bill's passage the knives over kids and our grandkids are steak, and we really need to. Take bold actions. She asks anyone running a cost analysis to remember to account for those human lives. Camille, domino, sqi NPR news, New York City.

New York City Bill De Blasio New York City Hall Empire State Building NPR Empire State Fidelity Investments Bill Domino Services Llc Silva Camilo Anthony Malkin Camille