37 Burst results for "Fidelity"

Fresh update on "fidelity" discussed on Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:54 min | 37 min ago

Fresh update on "fidelity" discussed on Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

"Gonna get to questions? We are live here today. Friday may 7th glad you're with us. 16 363 11 10 6 10 363 11 10. We're gonna get to calls. Let me go to Richard Richard's going us from Arkansas. Hey, Richard. Hi there. Good morning. Quick question. Good morning. My wife works for an employer. She quit that employers, she transferred her for a one k two vitality for a higher a account. And, uh, we did a transfer, so there was no cash taken out. Do that, But we're getting a 10 99 are from her previous employer for that for one K. Um, is that just something they do? Uh, my concerns is that trigger desire I arrest thinking we should be paying taxes on it. No, I mean you rolled it into a traditional Ira Wright. Yes. Okay. Yeah, No, that Z nothing. You have to worry about. So we just ignore that 99 are nothing to do with it. Well, do you do your do you do your own taxes? Yes. Okay, so you'll have to file that. But as a you know, roll over, there will be a box for that to file, but it's not a taxable event. The only you know. Did a quick look over the tax form. I did not see a box that showed roll over, But there is something that just doesn't look very enter that correct. Yeah. Yeah, that should be. You're going to have to Okay, file. But if not call H and R block or something and ask him, But I think you need to file that. But It is. It is a roll over. It does ask you in the tax form. Did you have any qualified distributions? You did not, or did you have any non qualified distributions? That would be 4 59.5. And that would be not true, either. So it wasn't a distribution. So director all over and you'll be fine. Okay. All righty. Thank you. And and by the way, the reason people aren't working is because of global warming. You do know that I You know what? I never thought of that until I heard Christine Lagarde this morning. Yeah. So that must be what it is. It's too hot to work. It's too hot to work. I'm in Arkansas is getting hot already. So no terrible Um God. Help us, Richard. That's all I could say. God help us. Thank you, brother. All right, we'll see you. Yeah. Um, let me go to John. John's going is from South Carolina. Hey, John. Hey, Uh then this is, uh, my wife and left me a trust. It's a considerable amount of this trust is with Marilyn Church, the investor and, um I'm at a standstill. I've got banks, including me. Want to One. I was telling me the cash in because the way the taxes are coming up. And they start all over. Which distrust is with Marilyn Chin. There's a portfolio probably two inches thick on investments with utilities. Uh, gasoline. Automobile. I'm new with all of this and I get a portfolio from them every month, and it's got me confused. I'm talking to the investor now, and he's helping me get my trust set up to just roll it over into that trust. Under a Type of trusted acted, Uh, Take care of myself. Which, um, I understanding, you know, I have total control over. What? What? What is your suggestion with this? Wouldn't don't listen. It's frustrating to me, of course. They want you to sell out of its start over because then they get all the commissions. And they're going to make a ton of money from that. And the individuals going to make a lot of money. You don't do that. That would be ridiculous to do that. Just leave it alone. If it's a good trust, and it's set up in a positive way, and you've got some good holdings in there, there's no reason to be moving in and out and churning over. The account. You shouldn't do that The account should stay in the trust and be done with it once it's in the trust name. Of course, the other thing is you could move it anywhere you want. It doesn't have to be a Merrill Lynch. You could move it to fidelity. You can move to TD Ameritrade. You move it anywhere you want. So keep that in mind. I'm not saying you have to do that, or you should do that. But there's no there's no issue with that. Either is you don't have to be there. But, um, you would have tol. I would have to know all the things that are in there. Are there some things that you ought to move or there's some things that you want to combine. Probably. I don't know how many positions total Are there. There's probably some things that might serve you better in the long run, But but not not because somebody wants to Make a commission so I would not I would leave it alone if it has been performing well. Over the last. You know, several years. I wouldn't. I wouldn't be concerned about it. I mean, I would like to see you at a place where you could maybe manage it, you know, or or look at it. A little bit different. It's hard to do anything so moral inches of full service broker. They're getting big commissions. You could have that account in Fidelity and It would be wouldn't cost a nickel to make the changes. So I just think that you you leave it alone right now, until you get more familiar with what's in it, or maybe you are familiar with it. If you have some bad things you can. You can sell them, But, um I wouldn't. I wouldn't be looking to turn the whole count over. Her dad is set this thing up back in the eighties and invested in it, and it is had grown tremendously. But he was a low risk investor. And I think when we went to the bank, and they set up a portfolio off of it, it wasn't using. But like 3%, because he was He was a low risk investor. Uh, also, um They're advising me to put it in the Revokable Trust. That way, I'll have control over myself. You mean you mean it? And have revokable or did they say you're revokable? Revokable. That way. I'll have control over that. That was my understanding, you know, So it's a brother should be a revokable living trust. But it's probably it's probably that now. Well, it was when her dad was under the the family name and care of her and her brother with her brother passed away with her and she passed away and it goes to me as the Beneficiary. Um So it was a revokable. And then I think he changed it to a revokable. Their amendment. Uh so They want me to say that? Well, it was the remarkable but they want me to set it up. Revokable. That way I could handle Could have control of my investments along with Marilyn. Sure, I could decide to set myself up on a monthly budget. Send it to me, you know, and still invest whatever I got invested. Well, let me just say to you, Apparently, Merlin change. Doesn't know this which would be Crazy. If it's already.

Richard Friday May 7Th Td Ameritrade Arkansas Christine Lagarde John South Carolina Marilyn Ira Wright Fidelity Today 16 363 11 10 6 10 363 11 10 3% Merrill Lynch Two Inches Eighties This Morning Marilyn Church 10 99 Richard Richard
Trump, Other Top Republicans Back Stefanik to Replace Cheney

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:19 sec | 4 d ago

Trump, Other Top Republicans Back Stefanik to Replace Cheney

"Truth and fidelity over the Trump ideology. Party leaders are calling for her removal as conference chairs. Some Republicans, including former President Trump are now back in New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik to replace Cheney and her leadership role. President Joe Biden will push the case for his

President Trump Elise Stefanik President Joe Biden New York Cheney
Fresh update on "fidelity" discussed on Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:52 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "fidelity" discussed on Best of Financial Issues with Dan Celia

"Get to questions? We are live here today. Friday. May 7th Grader with us 16 363 11 10 6 10 363. 11 10. We're gonna get to calls. Let me go to Richard Richard's going us from Arkansas. Hey, Richard. Hi there. Good morning. Quick question. Good morning. My wife works for an employer. She quit that employers, so she transferred her for one k two vitality for a higher a account. And, uh, we did a transfer, so there was no cash taken out. Do that, But we're getting a 10 99 are from her previous employer for that for a one K. Um, is that just something they do? Uh, my concerns is that trigger desire arrest taken. We should be paying taxes on it. No, I mean you rolled it into a traditional Ira Wright. Yes. Okay. Yeah, No, that Z nothing. You have to worry about. So we just ignore that in 99 are nothing to do with it. Well, do you do your do you do your own taxes? Yes. Okay, so you'll have to file that. But as a you know, roll over, there will be a box for that to file, but it's not a taxable event. The only you know. Did a quick look over the tax form. I did not see a box that showed roll over, But there is something that just doesn't look very enter that correct. Yeah. Yeah, that should be. You're going to have to Okay file. But if not call H and r block or something and ask him, But I think you need to file that. But it is. It is a roll over. It does ask you in the tax form. Did you have any qualified distributions? You did not. Or did you have any non qualified distributions? That would be before 59 a half? And that would be not true, either. So it wasn't a distribution so directoral over and you'll be fine. Okay. All right. Thank you. And and by the way, the reason people aren't working is because of global warming. You do know that I You know what? I never thought of that until I heard Christine Lagarde this morning. Yeah. So that must be what it is. It's too hot to work. It's too hot to work. I'm in Arkansas is getting hot already. So no terrible Um God. Help us, Richard. That's all I could say. God help us. Thank you, brother. All right, we'll see you. Yeah. Let me go to John. John's going is from South Carolina. Hey, John. Hey, Uh then this is, uh, my wife and left me a trust. It's a considerable amount of this trust. And it's with Merrill Inch the investor and, um I'm at a standstill. I've got banks putting me want to One. I was telling me the cash in because the way the taxes are coming up. And they start all over. Which distrust is with Marilyn Chin. There's a portfolio probably two inches thick on investments with utilities. Uh, gasoline. Automobile. I'm new at all of this and I get a portfolio from them every month, and it's got me confused. I'm talking to the investor now, and he's helping me get my trust set up to just roll it over into that trust. Under a Type of trusted acted, Uh, Take care of myself. Which amount understanding. You know. I have total control over. What? What? What is your suggestion with this? Wouldn't don't listen. It's frustrating to me, of course. They want you to sell out of its start over because then they get all the commissions. And they're going to make a ton of money from that. And the individuals going to make a lot of money. You don't do that. That would be ridiculous to do that. Just leave it alone. If it's a good trust, and it's set up in a positive way, and you've got some good holdings in there, there's no reason to be moving in and out and churning over. The account. You shouldn't do that The account should stay in the trust and be done with it once it's in the trust name. Of course, the other thing is you could move it anywhere you want. It doesn't have to be a Merrill Lynch. You could move it to fidelity. You can move to TD Ameritrade. You move it anywhere you want. So keep that in mind. I'm not saying you have to do that, or you should do that. But, um, there's no there's no issue with that, either is you don't have to be there, but, um, you would have to. I would have to know all the things that are in there. Are there some things that you ought to move or there's some things that you want to combine. Probably. I don't know how many positions total Are there, but there's probably some things that might serve you better in the long run, But but not not because somebody wants to Make a commission so I would not I would leave it alone if it has been performing well. Over the last. You know, several years. I wouldn't. I wouldn't be concerned about it. I mean, I would like to see you at a place where you could maybe manage it, you know, or or look at it. Ah, little bit different. It's hard to do anything. So moral inches of full service broker. They're getting big commissions you could have that account in Fidelity and it would be wouldn't cost a nickel to make the changes. So I just think that you you leave it alone right now, until you get more familiar with what's in it, Or maybe you are familiar with it. If you have some bad things you can You can sell them, but, um I wouldn't. I wouldn't be looking to turn the whole count over. You hurt her Dad is set this thing up back in the eighties and then invested in it, and it is had grown tremendously. But he was a low risk investor and I think when we went to the bank, and they set up a portfolio off of it, it wasn't using. But like 3%, because he was He was a low risk investor. Uh, also, um There by the meat to please the Revokable Trust. That way, I'll have control over myself. You mean you mean it?.

Richard Marilyn Chin South Carolina Arkansas Christine Lagarde Td Ameritrade John Ira Wright Fidelity Today Merrill Lynch Merrill Inch 3% 16 363 11 10 6 10 363. 11 10 Eighties Richard Richard Two Inches This Morning May 7Th 10 99
How to Save for Your Retirement

Motley Fool Answers

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Save for Your Retirement

"Every once in a while you may read about or hear about including on this very podcast guidelines. What how much you should have saved for retirement at this point in your life and they're generally expressed as multiple of your household income. But of course is there's just general guidelines right and there are many variables that will determine how much you answer listener needed to be saving to retire. How and when you want so in this. What's up bro or web as we call behind the scenes. I'm going to highlight two of those variables. The age retire and your income. So let's talk about. Perhaps the best known guidelines they came from fidelity you could find them. Just do an online search for a report called. How much do i need to retire. And you'll find them but just so we review them very quickly here. According to fidelity thirty you should have one times your household income already. So if you make fifty thousand dollars you should fifty thousand dollars in your 401k's in iras age. Forty should have three times or household income six times at age fifty eight times at sixty and ten times at age sixty seven so the guidelines that you often read about or hear about from fidelity they assume you're going to retire at age sixty seven however that's higher than the average retirement age these days. These people are still retiring at sixty four sixty five. How much should have saved up before you retire. If you're retiring at age sixty five. According to fidelity it's twelve times your household income because retiring earlier that's too few years of contributing to your accounts and you're claiming social security earlier which results in a smaller benefit. That's a pretty big difference right. Eight retired a sixty five and he twelve times household income. But if you just wait two more years you only need ten times your household income. That shows the power of delaying retirement. Just a couple more years.

Fidelity
How to Have Strong Ideas

Badass Agile

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Have Strong Ideas

"Let's talk about having strong ideas. Any business lives or dies on the strength of its ideas. It doesn't matter where those ideas come from and those ideas don't have to be just new products new services. They don't have to be marketing ideas. They don't have to be gigs or schemes. It can be as simple as solution through problems in unique ways so while ideas can definitely impact your product and service development is an organisation. They can just as easily impact your processes your people your blockers your opportunities your markets and they can happen at every level of the organization. There is no problem too. big too small. We will always need a fresh supply of strong ideas. Ideas that enable survival culture market domination expansion. All these things are crucial to a business's growth especially in the time that we live in. I care way less about your fidelity to any agile or scrum process and more about your ability to execute on ideas to have ideas to have visions and then convert them to execute -able backlogs quickly. I don't care what you say. Speed to market matters. And don't let anyone in your organization tell you different. So how do you have strong ideas. Great ideas influential ideas. Here's some tips for you number one. Never wait for perfect ideas. They're not coming. I've said this many times before going to say it one more time if you're not in the practice of writing your ideas down every day for fifteen minutes and whatever you got if you don't get up fresh in the morning and somehow record the things that pop out of your head. It really doesn't matter when you do it but try to get in touch. With what time of day is your most creative time and build the important habit of just writing this stuff down

Fidelity wants to launch a bitcoin ETF

The Breakdown with NLW

01:09 min | Last month

Fidelity wants to launch a bitcoin ETF

"Fidelity becomes the latest to file for a bitcoin. Atf yes fidelity have added their hat to the ring as the sixth live etf application. I jokingly tweeted yesterday that i think the is going to have to allow one just because they get sicker reviewing them. And i don't think that's far off the wise origin. Etf has fd funds management as the sponsor with fidelity service company as the administrator and fidelity digital as custodian. Here's a fun. Easter egg as well. Alex thorn formerly of avon ventures which was a fidelity investment group. Pointed this out. He tweeted out fidelity's bitcoin. Etf is named wise origin. Why souto she in kanji means wisdom or sense. Nakamoto in kanji means base root or origin. Pretty lit if you ask me. Interestingly this wasn't the only. Etf news apparently goldman sachs also filed for notes. The pay out to an etf that may have exposure to bitcoin or cryptos. This is definitely toe dipping. Compared to what twitter excitedly reported from the start but still fidelity and sort of goldman getting in on the bitcoin. T.f game in the same day is pretty back

Fidelity Service Fidelity Alex Thorn Avon Ventures Fidelity Investment Group ATF Souto Nakamoto ETF Goldman Twitter
The number one way to show you care and connect with clients

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

05:09 min | Last month

The number one way to show you care and connect with clients

"Eileen welcome to the show as a way of getting status tolls about yourself. Thank you hello. Brian great to meet you. Thanks for having me on this show. So i am the founder and ceo packed with purpose. We are a corporate gifting company with a social mission so we provide an alternative to the traditional corporate but all of the products in our gift boxes do good so they create a social impact in how to come up with this idea. Yes so my background has been wonderful. Dance between social impact in business and marketing. So a few stops along the way. I was a peace corps volunteer years ago in paraguay then also worked in social impact advisory work so right. Before i started packed with purpose i was actually consulting to chief sustainability officers in marketing executives. Trying to help them figure out how to invest their corporate social responsibility dollars to both have a business return but also a societal impact so it was a typical cold day in chicago in december and our office was riddled with ubiquitous holiday. Gift and i was just looking around saying there's gotta be a better corporate gift. There's gotta be way for a vendor or a client to say thank you. And that's when. I had the initial idea behind putting together gifts where all products had a really unique story and actually contributed to the greater good in their community. Cool and so. How do you start. Where do you start. Well i i always say you just have to start somewhere and it's definitely not perfect but you have to start and if you start talking out loud and getting people's feedback you can hopefully start taking it down the path of what eventually your target market is going to be interested in so I actually founded the company in two thousand and sixteen. And the way i got it. Initially off the ground was put together a really low fidelity prototype so i- crowd. Sourced logo came up with a name but together that was passable and i had a first birthday party for my daughter and is a parting gift to all of my friends in the adults there i gave them a pack perfect gift and i told them that i'd be following up with them for a five to ten minute market research call to basically elicit their responses into get their thoughts so that was the first version of packed with purpose as we know it. Obviously it's evolved a lot. Since then where do you find the people generating the gifts. Yeah so we affectionately. Call our suppliers purposeful purveyors and our purveyors primarily are based all over the states so their social enterprises or purpose driven companies in l. a. Detroit chicago miami. I can give you a few examples because it really helped bring it to life so that people can and how are gifts created an impact so we were with the wonderful social enterprise. Right outside of washington. Dc that works with women who might have previously been homeless. They might have various various to To employment they could also have been survivors of abuse in their part of this incredible social enterprise at basically teaches than baking and cooking skills through the production of various products that they make like granola cookies which we then source for gifts. And it's a way for them to get their safe certification so that they can find gainful employment actually land on their feet half financial stability when they graduate from the program so we're the recipients of their products that we carried in our gifts or another example. There's a wonderful organization that provides employment to adults with disabilities and they make a whole range of cookies than toffees chocolate covered pretzels. And it's through both the housing program and a personal professional development program to these adults with disabilities and we source those products in our in obviously in are providing them with all of those amazing opportunities through that organization. How do you find your clients. Yeah so you know. One dominated do the work that i've been doing. I was exposed to a lot of social enterprises through my particular job and it's really a tight ecosystem so we started working with some organizations. Let's say in detroit. They would ask us. We'll have you heard of these other ones or when we worked with an organization that may be served a particular population whether it was youth or women or individuals that were previously homeless. You know there's a tight ecosystem where they wanna help each other. So i would say if i. It was a lot of referrals Also then his evolved towards a lot of the research that we do in that were looking for you know certain types of organizations where they have to have truly a high level of impact. They have to have high quality products. Whether it's something that you're consuming or it's highly functional like a journal or tumbler. it's gotta look good

Eileen Paraguay Chicago Brian Detroit Miami Washington
Tape that: Dutch inventor of audio cassette dies at age 94

TechFan

04:45 min | 2 months ago

Tape that: Dutch inventor of audio cassette dies at age 94

"Let's jump into tech fan here since you know we. We just mentioned about recording stuff off the right. Yeah yeah kinda sad news and we're also doing this as part of our wookey. Trolling thing but I saw this i. I'm i'm kinda glad. I i saw you know five seconds while i was on a lunch break looking on my phone. I saw and i thought. Oh that'd be something we're talking about so go ahead. What well this is This is the guy who invented tightly. Walton's died at the ripe old age of ninety four. Yeah a law people forget nowadays that philips the dutch company invented this stuff named ventured the compaq says as being the lead on the compact disc. It's funny his goal. I'm looking at the los angeles times. Obituary that you linked his goal is making tapes and their players. Far more portable and easier to use because. Look the cassette. Tape wasn't the beginning of Recording to a magnetic tape they had real to reel that that was invented and twenty three And they had a in recording studios in radio. Stations is early as the thirties and it was very complex stuff to use. This guy took that basic concept and although the tapes were a little different And he wanted he had. He carried a block of wood in his pocket and the goal was to have the player and a tape. Take up about same amount of space and you can't really argue with his success And think about you know he. He basically created an entire industry from his invention. So while we talk about this guy. Let's talk about the cassette tape as well. Because it's our wikipedia. Wiki trolling Commonly called the tape cassette cassette tape audio cassette or simply tape or cassette. It would to me. It was always those were always interchangeable. Do you got you got a blink tape you gotta cassatt you got you and you had really two kinds you had the prerecorded cassette which was records like. We were talking about earlier albums Do you remember the single cassettes. It would be one song young. Rip off to me. I think i had a couple of days. Oh everybody hype blank tape. Yeah it was just people people. Some people want to listen to singles call Yeah there's two things that conduct strikes strikes me about except tape. First of all is the miniaturization they something that was expensive and very fiddly a bake. There's something really was only yes. They're professionals or for very rich people. Yeah and they miniaturized it to something that the allowed portability and transform them the way we listen to music but the second thing for me. I you know anybody who's ever use cassette tapes now the every now and again there. We go wrong with tangled up in your player and it used to be the you know if a tangled up. Somebody's car you wonder. If sometimes you just wander around on the street or in accomplish something you need to see. The massive tangle of time resources obviously yanked out they call yanked till the bits that the come off and then and the end it was broken at that point and then just come thrown on the street when people to listenable A new see those long around but generally they were absolutely you know they were pretty reliable. Not particularly high quality but pretty reliable. And i think the reliability they built into that platform it really astonishes me more than anything else because it was completely mechanical and yet You ninety five percent the time. It was relatively flawlessly. It was introduced in september nineteen sixty. Three came in two forms already recorded content in prerecord content. Remember when you found out that you could stick a piece of paper or something in the little hole at the top and record over. A prerecorded tape mess right. Yeah that little tab out so you could. Nobody could record over that. That six you'd make you'd make a mix tape for someone. You had a bus. That little thing screwing up my mix tape. Technology was originally designed for dictation machines but improvements of fidelity led to the compact cassette to supplement the stereo eight track cartridge in reel to reel tape recording in most non-professional applications

Walton Los Angeles Times Philips Compaq
Square scoops up Tidal

Talking Tech

03:31 min | 2 months ago

Square scoops up Tidal

"News in the streaming music business. Recently as financial tech companies square announced a deal to acquire the majority ownership of the music streaming service title as part of the deal according to the associated press square will pay two hundred ninety seven million dollars in cash and stock for title jay z. Who helped start. The streaming service will be named two squares board of directors and he is well as other artists who currently own shares entitle will stay on stakeholders now title has presented itself as an artist friendly alternative to other music streamer square ceo. Jack dorsey who also happens to run twitter. Said they'll come up with new ways for artists to support their work. Now mike i know that you have been a title subscriber for a long time. What's that experience like compared to some other services like spotify or apple music. Yeah well. I wrote about title backman. Jay z created. his artists. consortium overseeing The service back in two thousand fifteen and got the got the service back up and running with a relaunch and i became a subscriber. Right after that I like to support any business. Effort that provides higher fidelity stream music most streaming services deliver. Mp three quality level which can sound brittle just not great It doesn't matter if you're listening on cheap headphones or anything but if you're pipe it out to a good set of headphones you've got speakers from around your computer. Orienteer- home Sound system or if you're downloading music onto your phone or whatever and then putting in the car i mean you just need better quality music and titled gives you at least cd quality or better but there's always been this concern about titles ability to survive long term against spotify another services. I mean i like the experience the software and everything that title has comparable to spotify and apple music. I use all those services. I also use amazon But titled i think probably is my favorite This deal square should help titles ability to survive. You know Because you know squares is a pretty big company Compared to title Meanwhile we've seen spotify announced its own plans to make higher fidelity music available in the near future and amazon music has high risk streaming. So just having titling business seems to be good for music lovers you know and consumers and if square is going to help do more for artists. I think it's all good. And it almost sounds like title was ahead of the game now because now that spotify amazon music or introducing their own hi rez streaming options title. Almost feels like they are way ahead of the game on this. It's really interesting obviously. Didn't start in the us And it wasn't issues. You know once titled control. Jay z and appeal title. Got to look at the books. They were upset because i as many users as was supposed to be there when it started. But there's as the as the cd died off and this is as you know the vinyl the vinyl rebirth or whatever as was kind of growing you had this issue where the services are launching with not a lot of you know bandwidth so you would get these low risk sounding services and you know there is consumer there are consumers that wanna pay more title. It costs nineteen ninety nine a month for the higher quality streams. But you know if you're not playing albums and you're not playing cds whatever and that's the way you listen to music. It's certainly worth it in my

Jay Z Associated Press Square Spotify Jack Dorsey Backman Amazon Apple Mike Twitter United States
Using a Prosperity Picture to Create Your Perfect Life with Ellen Rogin

Agent of Wealth

04:37 min | 2 months ago

Using a Prosperity Picture to Create Your Perfect Life with Ellen Rogin

"Back to the agent of wealth. Podcast this is your host mark on. Today's show brought on a special guest ellen. Rogan ellen has more than twenty five years experience in my world as a financial adviser and now focuses our work on consulting and speaking internationally on generosity success strategies and creating prosperity on purpose after media resource and the author of the bestselling book your prosperity. I recently took a workshop. She hosted which. I got a lot out of looking into talking to her about that so l. Welcome to the show. Oh thank you. I'm so excited to be here with you. Mark great so. I you start off your workshop and even in your your book with asking the questions people. What is prosperity meteo. What are some of the responses that you've gotten from from people because i know it's it's different for everyone it is and that's why i love that question so much. Sometimes people go right into. Oh it's money it's wealth. I often hear security. Sometimes people say it's love. It's flexibility in. It really is all over the map and What is so great about that word is helps people start to envision what they really want for themselves and to realize that money isn't the only a scorecard in it's easy especially as a financial adviser when people are talking to you. They're thinking about their money but when we can have a conversation that really expands the. I'm that i think it gets people excited or thinking about things in a way than might not have other thought otherwise thought about them. Yeah and for me that really. It's home as an adviser. Because you know when i started i used to think it was all about the numbers. And it was all about collecting data and spitting out some fifty page report or giving some advice and one thing that kind of made me realize that it's more it's more than that was. I don't know if it was fidelity or if it was another group put out something called the advice value stack and it was a play on a maslow's hierarchy of needs where they have managing the money is the bottom of that pyramid. And that's really the table stakes. Everyone needs to manage their money needs to pay their taxes. Needs to make sure they have insurance. And then you have your goals after that right in your goals may be to retire at this age. And we're still in the numbers with it or you know. How do i save enough to put my kids through college but then once you start going up the stack you're really looking at what import break in. The next level up is peace of mind. You know maybe for someone it's how can they get organized. Or how can they sleep better at night when not having to worry about a lot of this stuff and then i think the top. Which is the pinnacle or where everyone's trying to get to exactly what you're saying is what is your life purpose or do you want to leave a legacy or what what are you. What is all this that really hits home with. What your your messages on and often. I don't think people widened back enough to say like what this for like. Why is it that it's so important to you to have this. And some of the comes from all these outside forces or other nothing against having lovely things but sometimes that materialism takes away from the true meaning that people wanna have in done in the values that they want to impart on their family. If they have kids so i i love the way you described like i know it's about the numbers and that's where i started and then in your evolution as really getting into being an experienced advisor working with your clients. You saw how the real value add is yes. Of course you have to manage money. Well in advise people on the data but it's really having them have a bigger picture and feel really good about what they're doing with their money. Yeah i use the the scrooge mcduck analogy lot with you brought. Say when i say we can. We can count your net worth as it's grown. Count your money all the time but really what is that money for. What makes you happy. What are you trying to to do and you know. I think you mentioned in the book. A lot of people don't know you know it's it's hard to to just ask that question. Fire that question. Someone expect them to rattle off. I want to do this business. And so i think what you do is a lot of visualization creating. At least one we did in our shop was creating this visual picture map. So maybe you can explain a little bit about what that is and how someone can go about doing that. Great what we talk about his creating a prosperity picture which is a visual representation of your financial plan in some ways so some of you may be familiar with a vision board which is a board or a poster that you put images of goals that you have

Rogan Ellen Ellen Maslow Mark
Spotify goes HiFi

Talking Tech

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Spotify goes HiFi

"Spotify the most popular music streaming service says it plans to launch a higher fidelity level of service later this year. It's going to be called spotify. Hi fi so for a bit of background most standard levels of streaming of music it's equivalent to mp3 quality to better than mp three quality. So that's the range you've got and a lot of people pretty much pooh-poohing mp three now back in the day it was. It was great because you could get can email and download files at our whatever but in these cases the song files are compressed and some dads lost in the process. So that's kinda why. Mp threes pooh-poohed. You know they sound good but likely not as good as if you played the same song on a compact disc but several services have sought to improve sand cloudy with compression that saves all the

Spotify
A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

Clark Howard Show

06:18 min | 2 months ago

A new way to invest that doesn't involve buying stocks hyped on Reddit

"So lately. All the buzz his been about well. Bitcoin and other crypto currencies. Bitcoin recently fifty thousand dollars a bitcoin and people who've been buying the stocks that are being touted on read it and it was all that mess that went on with Game stop and other stocks. That went up like rockets and then like rockets can do crash back down to earth and my son is in this investing group at school. He's fifteen and they're investing not real money but they all have their stock portfolios and wanna read you to texts from him from this morning. They're really funny. Is said in the last nineteen minutes. My stock portfolio dropped by six sixty. Then he texts me eight minutes later and these eh. then it went up by eight hundred dollars. And i the other night. When he was trapped. In the car with me i started boring. I'm trying to talk about how my philosophies investing work very differently than matt worrying about day trading and options and all. That was going to happen up to the minute and if you thought a father could be more irrelevant to sun then i was that minute you you couldn't be no interest in anything i was saying because to him. This is sport and that's what investing has been of late call. Investing is really speculating. And that's not my thing. I mean i'm the dulles person alive and i invest in a dull way because the ideas i wanna make money over time and so. That's why i get excited about really accessible. Investing opportunities for small investors did allow you to build reasonable wealth over time instead of trying to get the quick score and my son's a sharp kid hill. Eventually get it and will not that. It matters what you're buying and selling minute by minute. And by the way he's asked me if he can have a real investing account. Will you know you'd have to have what's called a custodial said yeah yeah where where you were the pretend owner but i'm the one doing the investing and i don't know what to do you know. Give them a couple of hundred dollars and let him play. And maybe learn the value of term investing. But you know it fifteen. What is long term. That's like three days from now. It's hard to explain a concept where you build wealth over time well do you know goldman sachs is goldman sachs is for rich people like crista. People was massive amounts of money. Who work with a personal financial manager. Who handles their money for them. That's right krista. That's what you do with your millions. Yeah no no okay. So there are. There are very wealthy people. That's what they do and goldman sachs has been doing some stuff lately that doesn't fit at all their historical pedigree They're the ones that issue the apple card for people that have the apple credit card and they have Savings accounts and all that kind of thing with no minimums will now. They've launched some cold. Marcus invest which allows people to use goldman sachs incredible financial analysis investment analysis till build robo investing portfolios for you using very low cost funds. And this is something you would ask somebody. Ten years ago if goldman sachs would ever being looking to provide investments an investment advice to everyday ordinary. People they'd say you're crazy. That will never happen. Well they're not doing what fidelity investments does where a dollar is enough to open an account many cases schwab one hundred dollars. They're doing what vanguard. Does you have to have a thousand bucks to open an account but once you have that thousand you can get advice that is tailored to your personal financial goals and outlook. The money can be and a retirement account or an investment account use what are known is exchange traded funds. Etf's and typically for the advice and the investments you pay roughly a third of a percent per year for them to handle your money. So i guess ten thousand dollars be thirty five bucks a year. Is that right. I think that's about right. three dollars. Fifty cents on a thousand. I think that's right so this is an opportunity for you to do. Investing through the nation's big boys big money houses and their whole business plan is pretty similar to what you'd have if you were with Betterment or wealth front that really started this whole investing idea. And i'm sure neither of them are very happy the goldman sachs through. Marcus invest is playing in their ballpark.

Goldman Sachs Bitcoin Crista Matt Apple Krista Marcus Schwab
Clare Crawley and Dale Moss Were Spotted Holding Hands After Their Messy Breakup

Daily Pop

03:22 min | 2 months ago

Clare Crawley and Dale Moss Were Spotted Holding Hands After Their Messy Breakup

"Let's talk claire and dell. They split just a few weeks ago. And the break-up was messy now there have been sightings. I've been hanging out in florida. Do we really think these two could get back together. Yes absolutely you. I have friends that. Go back and forth to their excess. I've done it. I think we've all unless you're a person who's like that's it. I cut him off. Got some friends who cut their and they do not go back no matter what but this couple seems like toxic. I mean what do you really think you really feel about daily. I always tell people don't decisions about your relationship when you're hungry when you're tired win in a pandemic because you will start to second guess where the you really feel their way or if it's the pandemic that's causing you to think that way. I think that we probably got the clare in dallas situation. Ron i think the two had split up probably before he went to new york and probably before he was spotted with that girl. I don't think there was any fidelity. Did her dirty publicly. he basically broke up with her on the internet. It's like the now twenty twenty one of breaking someone on a post it note like visitors not okay and she found out when we found out that that's will remember. I'm going to believe claire. Because she's a she's my age and we are mature and in control of our relationship narrative. That is exactly what happened. She wasn't happy about it but clearly it wasn't enough to turn her off of the relationship because here she is again. I just wanna order. Friends are saying. That's what a shot because if you call them go back your friends don't wanna hear about it. You talk and talk and what he did to me and the next thing you know i cut people off if you have a toxic relationship and i have been through it for cycle one. Two three and seven at eight. I have to draw boundaries. Because then you're talk. Society is coming into my leg with your girlfriend but let's put ourselves in their predicament. We're talking about a man who went on a show met. A woman got engaged after three or four weeks have known each other and then went into lockdown with that person. I don't care who you are whether you were together for a year years or five years before you got engaged. Somebody's gonna get cold feet at some point during that time go on a cruise ship with somebody who just see what happens more people that break up after going on cruises to gather you're locked up and you're like you know i got to know that person way too. Well yes. I think it's the opposite. I feel like corentin. Yes i think it can either break you up and you're done because it pushes fast forward on the relationship right so you're in quarantine. I hate this person or if you haven't had a lot of time together which they did not corentin could have been the best thing for their relationship because now they get to spend all all of this if they were right for each other. I don't think these two long term right for each other. But i think that quarantines should have been the best for

Claire Dell Florida RON Dallas Corentin New York
Microsoft may make its xCloud service available on a browser

The 3:59

11:23 min | 2 months ago

Microsoft may make its xCloud service available on a browser

"Do you play xbox games on your web browser microsoft maybe working on making its ex cloud game streaming service even more accessible writer chang. This is your daily charge here. Talk with us about x. Cloud gaming expert offering zola's so what is the latest with ex cloud. So right now myself is testing the streaming platform on web browsers report game outset company. Employees are currently testing it. And this comes before the big public preview the expectation for that is sometime in the spring where everybody else is going to be able to play the browser and for our listeners. Who aren't hardcore gamers. What exactly is cloud. Ex code is microsoft's streaming service. It's it's like the netflix video games. You pay a monthly subscription and games are available of via the xbox game pass and that could be streamed to your android device. It's a ciccio like having an xbox in the cloud ryan what games are we talking about these sort of current titles as it sort of back catalogue of older titles is anything is basically a free for all. It's a very wide range. Aid comes so you have. All the microsoft owned properties which includes of course like halo Bethesda games like fallout. So you have those games And also a lot of the newer games What the brand new ones and medium that's available and that's an xbox series access. Gabe came out. And you can play it on there. So you have those you have the bigger titles those you have any titles. You have odor games so we too wide range of what's available on the xbox xbox game pass got end in terms of the devices you know. There's the browser that we're talking about today you mentioned android. What about iphones ipads will. This is where the news of the web browser is the big news. This will allow ex class. Actually play on ipads and iphones will. What happened was win. Marks off tried to get x. Cloud approved by apple For the app store Apple said well since this includes two hundred games. Do you need to submit every game to be reviewed and of course that's a that's a paid especially since they switch out games every every mother's new games that come in and new games at go out so instead a string of Indicates amazon. Luna which will talk about embiid They're doing their service via web browser. And that sort of sparked. The idea of marks off of mike up began working on that. So yes this will allow people with iphones and ipads to play to stream games of the x. Cloud and of course people general that have a laptop heavy Chromebook have a would have any sort of windows. Device will be able to stream xbox games to it as long as they have a subscription got in so give me a brief state of the game streaming world. You mentioned amazon. Luna is obviously google stadia. What's what's been going on with the various cloud gaming services out there so let's with the big ones stadia stadium is going through a bit of a bit of a tough time. At the beginning of the month dugal said that they are shutting down their in house developers. So right now. Google is not making any games for stadia. They did say though last week that they are going to have a hundred four games. Come out for stadia. Twenty twenty one in general though it still hasn't caught on So there's not a lot of excitement for it as much as it was with. Google first announced it that people have tried and it's just not capturing every everyone then like i mentioned amazon luna. That's right now. And the early access phase people could sign up board. And they maybe picked to try it out if echoed x. Claude is the net flicks for video games. Amazon is appropriately. The amazon prime video of video games in that. There is the for the monthly subscription. Seven dollars you will get access to a certain number of games. Then if you want you can pay a couple bucks more and you'll get another you'll get you'll get access to another catalog like. Ub sauce games. So that's how they're gonna do it to where everybody's going to be able to sort of pick choose what they want. But they're sort of base line of games that are going to be available for the monthly fee de force that is for. Pc gamers wanna take their pc games and play it on a their their phone tablets or black or laptop if they don't have a gaming laptop that had a stumble row stumble last year when it launch because they invidia put out all these games available for streaming. But they didn't tell the publishers so the allergies publishers kept just pull their games from the g force now So it took a while for them to serve sort everything out now the services going smoothly It's actually free but you only get to play an hour for free but If you pay if you pay or you'll get a better access better better fidelity as well as well unlimited time. So that's also available of o'clock eighty. What about sony nintendo some of the other big players in the gaming world. Well sony was the first one to do cloud gaming. What their playstation now That launch back with the playstation four and not early on in the playstation. Four lifetime and sony just has not put any effort into it They release a few games for for its They'll they keep it. Keep it moving. But there's maybe a million or two subscribers which is hardly anything in comparison acts cloud It's just not not their priority at all I don't know if it will be. They'll if sony will change your mind in the future but as of right apple station is just stare sermon. Afterthought as for nintendo. They don't have a netflix type. Service yet The maybe that's the planning they do have a cloud streaming though For hey different reasons. So games like control. That is a very intense graphic game. It is just very beautiful looking and wouldn't it wouldn't attend all has done is dave. Dave reached out to a they partner up with a few publishers and developers and they are allowing these games to stream to the switch. So you still get all the scrape the -delity like you would on an xbox or playstation But you have it on your switch and that prevents the developers from having to create a very a very cut down low graphics low fidelity version of the game that we've seen with some other titles duke maternal win borderlands where they just have to cut out so much where it's doesn't look as great in it's on his memorable so that available but again that is for very different reason than say x. Cloud stadium got and we just went through or still going through the launch of new hardware right with the xbox series acts the ps five taco middleware streaming fits into the future of gaming well in the case of marcus off especially they want you to be connected all the time they want you to when you're at home they want you on your xbox. They wanted they play games. But they want you to look in netflix. Or whatever when you're on the goal they want you to be on the app so you could play games while your way And you're you know if you're at work the what you pull up your browser sake play while you're not working but So that's who marks off once they want you connected all the time and they have like they have the best option for that It gives everybody else. They're trying to find they're trying to get a piece of this because they know that there's a lot of people that wanna play games that maybe do not wanna spend for five hundred dollars on the latest new york so they're trying to find a way to get in there And it's they're. They're all taking their stamps at offering their takes on what the cloud services going to be. So are we ever going to get to a point where we can drop the hardware and the console entirely like you said there are folks out there who may not wanna drop five hundred dollars on a new system bogut appoint were that just completely. Needless completely out of the equation. Everybody's expecting this generation to kind of be the The real he wanted to determine whether we go with or without consoles. It's i still think we're going to need hardware. Future especially the way hardware is being developed with nvidia An md they're still producing this great hardware that that is really going to produce these even more beautiful games a blitz. It option is likely gonna be there in the It comes down to. Who's going to have the easiest access to stream to your tv. I mean the. Tv's are getting having more hardware than getting smarter but the only way to play on your tv right now without a console is like chromecast but if the if roku amazon smart tv's if those devices integrate completely with ex cloud and luna and stadia Well i mean crook assery works stadium but if all these other smart tv devices if they all start working together with these cloud streaming platforms where it seamless where you turn on your tv and you just switched to the the x cloud channel app and it starts going with all your without the xbox games that hey that may be it But we'll we'll have to see in the coming years how this generation pans out and we'll see what the other companies do

Amazon Microsoft Halo Bethesda Netflix Luna Dugal Sony Apple Google Zola Chromebook Chang Gabe Nintendo Ryan De Force Claude Mike
DApp Programming Gateway with Chris Swenor and Jay McCarthy

Software Engineering Daily

07:21 min | 3 months ago

DApp Programming Gateway with Chris Swenor and Jay McCarthy

"It's early. Twenty twenty one. What are the applications of blockchain's today. That's actually a great question. And the application of blockchain today if you look at purely the number of users actually using it our currency and d fire really where most of the actual the blocks things are being used. I mean there's a lot of lot of large companies looking at Chain and insurance use. But if you talk about actually real world uses users are actually using it. It's his current scene defy and for building applications in those spaces. What do you need to know. Or what kinds of can you go a little bit deeper. Get a little more fidelity on what those applications look like sure. So when i say defy Let's stanford decentralized finance and the type of applications are out there are lending platforms decentralized exchanges in the ability to exchange one token to another without having to go through a central entity the other tool that are built on top of these platforms to be able to automate the generating yield stable coins. Meaning pegging a a token to the us dollar in a decentralized way things are in defy and let me talk a little bit about what they look like in practice from programmers perspective. So when you build the decentralised application today typically what you'll do is you'll really right like three different programs. You're right a smart contract program. Those are the ones that probably get the most attention. These are written in languages like like for example and they are the. That's the program that actually runs on the blockchain under a virtual machine like the theory in virtual machine theory by the way is the market leader in the space the easy to explain things in terms of how it works and then in addition to that smart contract program. What you'll do is you'll right. Like a middleware layer that actually interacts with the blockchain protocol. Because basically every time you make a new smart contract it's like you're making a new network protocol and you don't want that network protocol to be like directly spoken by. Let's say your front end. User interface sealed typically right a middleware layer that will communicate with your specific new protocol. And then you're right up front and application you know on the web or you know natively or something like that into these three programmes all working together. That's what we call a essentially application and then in terms of like from a progress record of what does program look and feel like instantly what you're doing is you can kind of think of as you're making a single object and you have to think about what is the state space of that object and what transitions do you want to allow that object to go through in changing its state space and basically for every single operation that you want your custom protocol to have. You're going to meticulously right down. Which other states are allowed to be in to make this transition and what modification is going to happen next in the role of the blockchain in this program is to essentially guarantee that everyone across the world agrees on the state changes that this particular object goes through and that's what constitutes the decentralised application part of that application stack is the hardest to build you know. The front end is very straightforward. You know there are a few things that are a little bit strange about it because it's so a synchronous but that's pretty basic for full stack developers similarly the middleware. The main thing. That's complicated with it is. It's really a totally separate program that you have to synchronize with the smart contract program so it's almost like if you imagine kind of the old days of web programming where you know you would change your form labels and you had to make sure the updated the form consumer on the server. It's kind of that sort of thing where you have. These two programs that are evolving in tandem or another way to think about it is that you're writing the rpc andrew writing rpc client at the same time. So that's a little bit complicated end. You know there's some strangeness to the way that you have to interact with these networks but the really the most complicated thing is that smart contract and the main reason it's complicated this because sinking about taking a high-concept program an automatic market maker in turning that into a single object with this bespoke post hall of what you know. What transitions do you want to allow went. How do you verify the state and how do you. How do you check it. That's really complicated in a particular. It's complicated because it's so scary because if you do it wrong then you but what is what is doing it wrong. Mean doing it. Ron means that now. You're decentralized application is going to say yes to some transactions that you meant to say no to meaning that you're going to give away money that you didn't intend to give away or you're gonna say no turns actions that you meant to say yes to which means that you're going to lock away money forever. That known will be able to get access to so both of those kinds of mistakes are really common in the decentralised application world. And they're really the source of these headlines that you read about you know so and so lost twenty million dollars or so in so locked away ten million dollars from their contracts. They come from errors like that. So it's very tense to build these programs in particular all of these programs. Something that's happening in the background that it didn't mention before. Is that when you run a program on a theme you basically pay per cycle. It was a way to think about it. So that when you write a function if this function takes one hundred cycles it's gonna literally cost more to run that than another program that takes you know a hundred in two cycles to run into because that there's a whole lot of stress and emphasise in most decentralize application most smart contract programming languages to give you the programmer detailed intricate control over exactly how the program gets compiled so much. So that in the most popular one of these languages which solidity. It's almost like programming. Gpu in that. There's this very concrete difference between different layers of memory in you have to explicitly move things from one layer to another and you even to the point where. The solidity compiler doesn't really abstract way details like variables from you. It's almost as if you have to know that are exactly sixteen registers and make sure that you don't go beyond using those sixteen registers because then the compiler will fail in its failing from perspective for your benefit because it would cost more if you moved away from using those registers. So you know if you're in the audience interested in blockchain programming in some ways. I'm trying to intimidate you by thinking about all of these weird details but it's not a false intimidation it. These are the kinds of issues that many blockchain programmers think about a lot and a lot of stress put on these issues by the current way. People talk about designing blockchain programs.

Blockchain United States RON GPU
Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

How to Money

07:11 min | 3 months ago

Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

"So first of all. Let's talk about how you get money in the first place and that is earn it right and according to the pew research center Women earned eighty five percent of what men earned in two thousand eighteen That pay gap is shrinking Particularly for younger workers which is a positive trend but that is still a meaningful hurdle to overcome. The pay. Gap is partly due to to work history. You know like having kids great you know. But as we mentioned with the fidelity study earlier taking time off to have quetta's like it often leads to job offers in worse income prospects not to mention the years of not generating any income which often reflects years of not investing in a workplace retirement account in particular. If there's a match there right and those are some big disadvantages to overcome yell like you said at the beginning matt that stat also reflects some structural issues when it comes to male and female pay. But here's another thing to matt When we're talking about pay women are actually often averse to asking for more money than their male counterparts. There was a survey from ron saad. Last year the found that sixty percent of women have never negotiated with employer. Overpay women are also more likely to stay at a lower wage job to according to The personal finance web site the balance. And that's not good right because even just a small bump in pay with a new employer or in a job that been in for years can have just a massive impact on your ability to earn more throughout the years and then also save more for retirement. So i think of all of the things in this episode where we see. Maybe you know women as sex falling short. It is in in the ability to ask for more at knowing what they're worth again. This is another instance where you might be listening and you're thinking i've never had a problem negotiating a race like i've never had a problem asking for more money so again. It's important to keep in mind that though the research shows us like we know any totally doesn't apply to everyone. I'm specifically thinking of two conversations with Kirstin and julian saunders. The couple behind rich and regular that was episode. Eighty six and julianne was just bragging. About how great pearson is at negotiating. Evidently she's just like the queen negotiating more. Pay if you had to listen to that upset go back and listen to that one. Is that regardless of your gender. Earning more it's just so important right and all of us could stand to our abilities on that front And we've had lots of different conversations on the show that specifically cover you know not just stories of individuals negotiating but just how to go about doing that. I'm of Ramiz sadie that was Backing up said one ten and he outlined a great process a great method You know when it comes to wanting to up your salary. You know what steps you need to take. In order to negotiate a solid race gam thinking to matt had far new darabi on the show. She is just awesome personal finance expert and at the same time. She is someone who has made a killing as a small business owner. She knows her worth. she knows. how to negotiate. Yes so like you said there are many women out. there are crushing it. Who don't have a problem and asking for what they're worth. Who don't have a problem asking for a raise. It's just when you read those statistics. There are obviously a number of women who do though. And i wanna see. That number changed for the benefit of women as a whole absolutely. Let's about spending to do women spend more. That's an interesting question. My wife personally met hates to shop. I really. She just defies the stereotypes. And actually i don't know i don't mind shopping. A little bit roles are a little bit reverse exactly but there was a study by the wharton school of business that found that women are more likely to view shopping as a recreational activity. My mom definitely fits that bill Most men wanna leave the store with their purchases quickly as possible but even though women enjoy shopping more it turns out men still spend more than women in a typical year so while men might not enjoy the process of shopping as much. They still shopping. Just from a utilitarian standpoint sure yeah also that increase spending with the stats as well. There's there's a survey from wallet hub earlier this year. They showed that men are more likely to max out a credit card. Women are apparently seven percent less likely than men to have maxed out credit card at least once in so while women they might enjoy the shopping experience. More than men do a lot of different stats. Show that women are more cost conscious. They're more likely to shop at alice. Stores more likely to to wait till something they want is actually on sale The store brands more than men. And so you know when it comes to spending this this is definitely a win in this category for sure And so i i of see this as a call to min to stop spending so much money on neighboring items fan. Yeah i feel like. I'm totally guilty of this. I totally fall into the study. I don't like to go looking for the best deal. I do because i'm spending less but like i'll look at maybe two or three different sites and then i just purchase right whereas for you like i feel you are so good at hunting and making sure you're keeping your eyes on the best deals out there making sure that you're spending the the least amount of money possible. I feel that's something that we all need to make sure that we're doing right. And so you know regardless of who you are. We should all work to just become a little more conscious and how it is that we spend our money. I gotta say mets. I don't care whether you're man or woman but store brands should be high on your list because they're going to save you a ton of money it's just like in savings when you go for the storebrand over the name brand equivalent unless it's your craft beer equivalent And you're wanting to spend a little bit more on the because it makes you feel nice. Can't name brand everything though. I think i think sometimes that's a tendency here. Maybe that men have The men just gravitate towards the name brand no matter what it is without thinking about it and that's where we need to shake things up right and we we need to consider storebrand's more frequently also too. I think we've talked about this. The quality of store brand items has gone up a whole lot in recent years. Her kirkland signature brag. There's other ones too man. Like target has some great Store brands that are better than their name brand equivalent. Sometimes so yeah. It's not just costco yeah costco rockstar Let's see let's talk about saving as well. There's more good news here. It turns out that the the savings rate for women is actually higher than their male counterparts. They save a higher percentage of their pay. They spend less of what they bring in and much of. That is due to the more frugal. Tendencies that we just highlighted when we talked about spending differences but even the women are saving a higher percentage of their income on average. They've actually got less than thirty percent of what men have in savings accounts according to data from the federal reserve from a few years ago That is likely due to the fact that overall they're still making less like we discussed earlier which means a smaller amounts of money saved overall. Yeah one of the reasons. Women have a higher savings rate as well Is that according to a survey by. Us bank women of all ages value financial security more than men do. But here's the thing than that. Focus on financial. Security can often backfire. If you keep more of your overall assets and savings and cds instead of invested in the stock market right like savings for saving for long-term goals is really important but so is investing For the really long

Pew Research Center Women Ron Saad Matt Julian Saunders Ramiz Sadie Darabi Quetta Wharton School Of Business Kirstin Julianne Pearson Storebrand Costco Mets Kirkland Federal Reserve
How Fashion Can Leverage the Audio Appeal of Clubhouse

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:44 min | 3 months ago

How Fashion Can Leverage the Audio Appeal of Clubhouse

"Earlier this year. Silicon valley became obsessed with a new app called clubhouse and audio bay social network where people can spontaneously jump into different chat rooms to together launched amid the pandemic since day one. The app has attracted the kind of funding controversy and hype that's ruffled feathers and made headlines. The social audio space is booming. Investors are piling in and recently twitter revealed that it's launching. Its own take on social audio space. That's currently being dominated by clubhouse one of is super users is none other than virgil abloh. Louis vuitton men's artistic director and creative director of off. White virgil joins us at voices twenty today from chicago alongside clubhouse founder paul davidson who is in san francisco. Welcome to you both. Thank you so much. Glad to be here liquors lurk whereas going and run. Get to see you again. Virgil i'm gonna. I'm gonna start with paul. Because i think everyone in the silicon valley world has heard of clubhouse but you know there are people watching who may not yet have understood what this is. So in the first instance. I'm gonna ask you the question you know. Why do we need another social media. What is it that clubhouse offers to the world. That isn't already out there. Yeah happy but that one slight correction the clubhouse house with my friend row on Clubhouse it's a new type of social network. That's based on voice where people around the world come together to talk. Listen and learn from each other about topics ranging from fashion to retail music and sports and social justice. It's sort of like hallways of this conference anywhere where it's all on your phone. There's no video but you can. You can reconnect with people you can learn or you can just be applying the wall and i think that connection is an inherently human thing. We're wired to connect invoice is a very different medium. We've seen it grow recently because of things like airpods and smart speakers an in-car integrations of this technology. But but it's it's in some ways the oldest medium in the world right. We were talking long before we were writing or taking photos or shooting videos but in the world of social media. It's a new thing and we find that allows people to connect in a different way you have all of the fidelity and authenticity and bids an asks an emotion. But you don't have any of things zaidi of video worrying about what you look like. Or how messy your houses and so it creates a different type of experience that is more about connecting with people in and having conversations than about getting likes or follows or projecting a certain view of yourself to the world. So we think it's a pretty different experience in what's out there right now. Burs let me let me turn to you. Because as i mentioned in the intro you've become a clubhouse super user and they might conversations of the. I know you're a busy guy. We were talking michael wolff earlier today. Who says like the average person is spending thirteen hours a day on their technology devices. You know why are you carving out time and you're very busy schedule to use clubhouse what do you get out of clubhouse. That's different from what you can get elsewhere. It's one of those things where i rationalize it like this. I'm in the design community. Which basically means that. I'm a part of the uber. Small percentage of people that get to dictate web pants. You wear next year. Look like you know like. I have an opinion. I'm in a part of a collective that decides. What the in like a trend for your car or your your interior of your home. They look like you know that's to me. Take that as a huge responsibility. This is like shelving away all the things like the fun side of the job or something like that. So i think it's a part of my responsibility of my craft to be knowledgeable to know what's going on in the world like if i locked myself in my studio and i sit in a place where i think from my sort of like shielded view of the world. This is what i think. The impact the lives of others. I think that's the wrong path. So when clubhouse comes around which i believe is a is a forward thinking concept from amazing people with great hearts and good vision. Like it's a no brainer. You know. And i project that out and so my friend told me adjust carballo from heist. Nobody was early user of clubhouse and he was like. Hey this is something i know you'd be into. You should try it out. And that's how. I became a user. An i've been a fan of the operation ever since two other quick. Things said that. I might add one. That because it's audio you can multitask and so it takes advantage of a lot of found time. it's not something where you're staring at a screen and just scrolling for hours and doing nothing else. People are using it while. They're walking while they're driving while they're in bed at night while they're folding laundry while they're doing all sorts of other things and the second thing i'd say is a big goal for us is to ensure that when people spend time on clubhouse it is time well-spent where were they can spend spend time on it enclosed the app at the end of the session feeling better than they did when they opened it because they deepen friendships. They've met new people they've learnt. It's a participatory different experience than than sort of scrolling screen purely consuming got it so virgil let me take it back to you for a minute. Your as you said your top designer in the industry now you can dictate what pants or as we'd call trousers in. Hey what you'd wear. Trousers wear next season. But what do you think. Fashion brand louis. Re tong could use or learn from clubhouse. How could fashion brands make use of this tool. They've found different ways to use instagram other other social media apps. But you know what could a fashion brand us clubhouse for you know. This is just something that i was just like reflecting on an essence. Obviously there's this in the fashion industry. There's hyper sort of like attention. Paid towards digital space. You know e commerce web impressions content photos videos data when at the end of the day. You know it's an extreme metric and tool to engage. And i think with the with the advent of clubhouse sort of refocusing on audio. It's it's an interesting case. Study and seeing like making sure that brands have something to say. You know you when you can't escape to creating an image that looks like fashion so then people consume it as fashion or a video. That looks glossy looks like moving. Image of fashion ambience. Like i for one. Think it's a like a new landscape to hear what brand about you know without the use of image or without that the the adjacency to say a product within that image. Like what do you have to say. And that becomes compelling as a fashion industry when we can use our voice to create engagement. Yeah that's that's really interesting because of course it's like second nature for the fashion industry to communicate through imagery. But how does how does a fashion company communicate through sound. I don't know paul if you have anything to add their think it's such an interesting contrast when you're talking about the fashion industry right. I mean extensively. Fashion is visual. It is curated. this is literally the opposite. You can't fake. You can't have a social media manager post the clubhouse right you're talking and the community aspect is a really big part of it. Because it's so participatory in your calling people from the audience here engaging with the people that care about your brand you have people in the industry sourcing creatives for shoots and and and talking about trends in what's happening in the news it's just a. It's a very different experience. So i love the fact that virgil has it enjoyed using the product because on its surface that contrast is just so fascinating to me like the division curated versus the the raw and intimate. Yeah all all the conversations that i have hosted or been part of on clubhouse related to fashion imron in a weird way. Have been more in depth than than interviews or sort of regular format sort of media. You know because the audience is getting to hear what they can't see on instagram too. Many characters to type. Obviously none of us are person like me. I'm not media trained to be able to like sound by. Have my ideas go through instagram. So that people exactly get the nuance and a medium like like clubhouse is where as a designer i can talk about the inspiration that i only usually talk about press

Virgil Abloh White Virgil Paul Davidson Carballo Virgil Silicon Valley Zaidi Michael Wolff Louis Vuitton Paul San Francisco Chicago Twitter Tong Imron Instagram
Musk in the Clubhouse, & Retail Traders on the Rise

Squawk Pod

03:51 min | 3 months ago

Musk in the Clubhouse, & Retail Traders on the Rise

"Good morning everybody. Welcome the squawk box. Cnbc and i'm becky quick. Along with joe kernan andrew organ andrew. Thanks becky and of course as you might imagine. We are monitoring shares of game. Stop once again. Let's show you where things stand robinhood planning to continue limit trading. In short squeeze names today it's narrowed its list of wounded trades from fifty stocks on friday to eight. Starting today customers will be only allowed to buy one share of game stop or five options contracts. The restrictions coming after wall street's clearinghouse mandated e tenfold increase in robin hood's deposit requirements last week and we should also mention that we're watching shares of or watching watching shares watching the price of silver trading at the highest level since two thousand thirteen. If you've been on read it over the weekend you'll know the red investors say they wanna pile into that commodity and they are doing so the hashtag silver squeeze which trending on twitter last night. That's spilling over into silver mining stocks. So there's lots of impacts across poured meantime sources telling cnbc that hedge fund. Melvin capital management lost fifty. Three percent in january. Melvin capital told us last week that it had closed out those positions in game. Stop on tuesday afternoon after sustaining heavy losses. Those are the losses talking about down. Fifty three percent. Senator and point seventy two infusing close to three billion dollars into melvin capitalist week in a source telling cnbc the point seventy two slid. Ten percent in january citadel lost three percent in january as well and i. I don't know if you guys were up late last night. I was not. But i've tried to listen in this morning to some of it elon. Musk was on clubhouse the social media platform last night. And we're gonna be talking to the ceo of clubhouse a little bit later today. But vlad ten of got on and effectively at of the c. O robinhood wants started affecting we interviewing vlad about what happened he effectively re reaffirmed her reconfirmed. What he told us on squawk box last week but to hear both of them talking about is quite a thing and maybe only speaks to where we are. Twenty four take on. It would seem like what was happening. Was everybody was pushing. On whether sid l. whether there's conflicts whether citadel was pushing on them to somehow closed down because part of the dave portnoy view of the world is because citadel has this arrangement with with them and was losing money themselves that there would be a conflict there where that the regulators are trying to do this or they're trying to protect the small the small guy but in fact that robin hood was trying to protect the big guy. Nice what was really happening there and and plaid stuck relatively to the script. It's appears and again. I have not heard the entirety of it but in terms of what he had said to us last week and very much specifically to the point that clearly this is a liquidity crisis of sorts for this company. The model becomes very complicated. When there's this kind of activity in only a handful of names and that they have to keep putting out bigger and bigger deposits on these names and that if you don't if you don't if you're not a massive bank with a huge balance sheet that becomes very hard. I mean i think it's gonna be very interesting to see what happens this week with robin hood to raise the question but you can make it through this week as an independent company. I think is a fair question to ask. They can keep limiting the trades. They if they limit the trays the flip side. As you'd imagine a lot of these investors will end up on fidelity or tennessee the ameritrade or other platforms. And we'll see exactly so there's sort of push pull that they're going to be grappling. With all week

Joe Kernan Andrew Organ Becky Melvin Capital Robin Hood Cnbc Sid L Dave Portnoy Andrew Melvin Musk Twitter
No In-Person Learning Monday For Chicago Public Schools

Bob Sirott

02:54 min | 3 months ago

No In-Person Learning Monday For Chicago Public Schools

"Is no in person learning today for Chicago Public school students over the weekend Mayor Late put ordered all Chicago public school teachers. Do not have permission to stay home do the medical concerns to come back to the classroom today? Still no deal between the schools and the Chicago Teachers Union. And as of last night, CTU. Let's see. Said all students should continue remote learning CPS CEO Dr Janice Jackson was on face the nation yesterday. Here's a little bit of what she said when asked about re opening in Chicago goal right now is T get a resolution. CTU has made it clear that they want a deal. We share those same sentiments. But we're still far apart on a couple of key issues such as vaccination on D, How we account for accommodations for individuals who maybe are just, you know, petrified to come back into schools because of Kobe. We believe that we have to Reopen schools. We've been closed for almost a year now and as a school system, we're starting to see some of the effects of schools being closed. Many of our students aren't logging on. We're seeing African American and latte next students in particular being especially hard hit, and our goal is to really give every parent and option. Those families who want to remain remote will have that option through the remainder of the school year. But we have thousands of families who want an in person option because there is essential workers themselves. So on that CDC plan. I know this report this week got a lot of attention, really urging schools to reopen on DSI ng that transmission can be stopped if master warning their social distancing, But the same report said there should still be restrictions in the community, and it's cited indoor dining. Chicago has already opened its bars and restaurants. How do you feel about that? Yeah, I think we've learned a lot about re opening from the past spring. Definitely prioritizing the reopening of schools has to be at the top of the list. And our mayor has done that. We have re opened bars and restaurants at limited capacity here in the city. But one thing that was really important in that report is that it showed that community spread does not necessarily impact. I'm sprint within a particular school and that implementing mitigating mitigation strategies with Fidelity. Actually is more successful, You know, lead to more success with re opening, and so we're focused on that We have a solid plan in place that goes above and beyond the guidance that we've heard from city as well, a CDC officials and we believe that we can safely reopen and we've been open for three weeks or we have been over for three weeks with a great degree of success, so the time is now for students to return to the classroom. Go public schools CEO Dr Janice Jackson on CBS yesterday. Interviewed by Margaret Brennan on

Chicago Public School CTU Chicago Teachers Union Dr Janice Jackson Chicago CPS Kobe CDC Sprint Fidelity CBS Margaret Brennan
Chicago school district cancels some in-person classes as labor dispute flares

Chicago Tonight

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Chicago school district cancels some in-person classes as labor dispute flares

"Person. Classes were canceled again today for chicago. Public school students who were attending in person. This as the battle over school reopening is being fought between the district. The teachers union prekindergarten and special education cluster. Students were given the option to come back to the classroom earlier. this month. looming over the standoff is the threat of another teacher strike as the two parties are over. Covert nineteen vaccination plans cleaning protocols and even which data in science should guide the reopening process. About an hour ago. I spoke with mayor lori. Lightfoot and schools chief janice jackson. I began by asking dr jackson. How close is the district to a deal with the teachers union. And what are the major sticking points right. Now as i've said this week we are trying our best to make progress. I think there's no reason why we can't have a deal in cr students back in the classroom on monday. I know so. Many students and parents have expressed our excited. They are about that opportunity. So that's what we're planning for a with regards to the union. I think some of the sticking points that we've been talking about or the past few weeks related to testy vaccination and accommodation still are outstanding on. But we're going to continue to work car because we know what's at stake in. That is making sure our kids get a quality education mayor or jackson at what point does either or one of you arrive at the bargaining table to close the deal. Well i think we've got to make more progress grants. I think it's important for your listeners. To know that since june we've met with the t to now over seventy times. It lasts two weeks every day including saturday and sunday. The schedule time is from eleven to five every day and we would have expected by now to make a lot more progress in the last week alone. We've given them to different on comprehensive plans one plan which we updated and we've given them. I think that covers every single issue. Eight different issues from ventilation testing to plans and protocols what happens if there is a a positive tested linked to schools. So we're serious and we're going to be made it table but we've got to see some progress it. We've got to see a series of purpose on the other side. For example today we got a proposal from the other side. Include things like defunding. The police and having the cpu dictate housing policy in the city. Now obviously neither of those things is appropriate for bargaining on teachers contract. So we need them to get serious to come to the table. We can get a deal done. I am confident that we can. We keep waiting and hoping that we're actually going to have some issues that we agree on the issues that we've been talking about now for weeks. We still don't have agreement on a single one of those issues and every other bargaining experience. I've been in both as mayor but also in my private sector life. You focus on an issue you resolve it and then you move onto the next issues. We haven't been able to do that with you. Which frankly to that by since there is no deal you know. Kindergarten through eighth grade did have the option of returning starting this monday. Do have the option Starting this monday to be back in the classroom but even a large group of aldermen have called on pushing that date back a week. Dr jackson is that something you'd consider to avert a strike and get a deal done in the interim. Yeah as i stated earlier this week we remain steadfast in the fact that schools should re-open for students on monday february first. So we're still there. We're committed to that date. I think that the district has gone above and beyond from a planning perspective as well as all of the planning that has been happening for local school level. We have proven let us not forget. School has been in session with ask three weeks with students in our cluster program in students in our pre k. program in we have been successful. We plan for various scenarios we to implement our plans with fidelity. We know that we can do that for our kindergarten. Eighth grade students nets. Will we intend to do starting this monday. Even if i can add brandis. Let's let's also know that we're we're talking about this in the context of case rates dropping acitivity rates dropping. All of the metrics that we follow. We've been following since march of last year or all trend in the right direction and to those automated said. Let's kick the can down the road and get more time seventy times that we've met multiple times over the last two weeks we can get a deal done on a purpose and putting our kids i at the table and they have that faye mayor's was just going to add. That said you know this was calling for teachers to be vaccinated more teachers to be vaccinated before a reopening. Why not what. What could happen if you just wait for that. We have a. We have a comprehensive plan for getting teachers vaccine which we've had on the table for quite some time. Obviously gotta do it in the context of the reality of the limited supply of vaccinations at all the other. Frontline workers who've actually been outlawed in the grocery store worker sanitation librarians. I mean the list goes on and on absolutely we want to prioritize. I'm teachers and we have a plan to do that but we need to get a deal done. We need some movement in

Mayor Lori Janice Jackson Dr Jackson Lightfoot Chicago Jackson Brandis Faye Mayor
"fidelity" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"fidelity" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We all lined the street and so many contractors in that area. We were all lining that NASA road one while the motorcade passed us and drove into NASA Johnson Space Center for the memorial service and the flyover with the missing man formation. It was very impactful. You figured out at some point. Amy that you didn't want to be an engineer. You didn't want to sit in a small room and code. Yeah I did that pretty quickly. I think during my co OP program didn't want a minute to myself I. still wanted to play all this out, but I realized that this is not really what I wanted to do, and you also determined that you couldn't be an astronaut. Why So at the time as I found out while I was working in Houston. To be an astronaut. You had to have twenty twenty uncorrected vision. Old Problem was I couldn't see the big e on the charge and I could barely see my hand in front of my face, uncorrected corrected and I realized quickly that while that's GonNa be a problem if they don't allow correction. To get to twenty twenty how I going to do that unless they change the rules, this is not really a thing. I can't really do this. And so then in that case of my okay with being an engineer. And my answer and my head was no I didn't know really what else I was going to do. So you've graduated from purdue or you're about to graduate. You'll have a degree in aeronautical and astronautical, engineering. You can't be an astronaut, and you don't WanNa be an engineer. Right exactly a little bit of a dilemma, but there's this thing in your life from your tour of Washington DC. It's an eleven year old girl. Yes I wasn't hundred percent convinced that was really a possibility. But it was always in the back of my head, so in the meantime while I'm in the state of confusion. I decided to apply for the MBA program at Indiana University which had a great reputation. I went there to get my Mba that was my intent and try to figure it out. Sounds like a bit of stalling tack. It was yes, it was. And in that first semester, I thought why am I not looking into the FBI White? Why am I not pursuing that? Let me at least check into it. And turns out. They were looking for scientists and engineers. At the time they were specifically targeting. People with science and engineering backgrounds. What about the vision thing? Amy You have to have good vision to be enough the special agent that's true, not as good as an astronaut and even better, it could be corrected to twenty twenty, so you were fine. I don't know that I'd use the word fine as my story goes, went in for my medical, and the nurse was very nice to me when I went in or initial medical screening. And, I believe the qualification was like twenty, three, hundred correctable to twenty twenty for your eyesight well, I wasn't quite twenty three hundred, but the nurse who was administering this test. Essentially had me look at the chart and she kept asking me she said. Can you see that and I said? Sort of she said if you squint, can you see it? And I. I said I could see a better she has. What are those letters? Look like to you and I read them off as best as I thought, I could, and she said close enough. You're in I'm in or at least you've passed that part of the yeah, there's a whole battery of things of course that happened after that, but that was the initial test. When did you get to Quantico as a brand new FBI special agent that was January of Nineteen Ninety one. It took me a little less than a year to process, which is quick, it is yes, in retrospect..

Amy You engineer FBI NASA Johnson Space Center NASA purdue Houston Washington DC Nineteen Ninety Indiana University Quantico
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"So Rachel. Rosenthal has written a few very interesting pieces for tablet about her own difficulty with infertility. And what it means as part of the observant Jewish community and so I wanted to get her on the show to talk to her a little bit about what she's been going through and how corona virus and the change to the world has affected that as well. I'm here with Rachel Rosenthal. She teaches Talmud at the Jewish. Theological Seminary has appeared in rabbinic literature. She writes frequently about the intersection of Jewish texts and modern life for tablet and other publications. Welcome Rachel thank you so much for having me so until I always loved the articles. You write for tablet just because you bring this really really smart ancient yet modern perspective and you wrote a piece for tablet in January. That was a bit different so the piece I wrote in January was about my and my husband's experiences with infertility in our case persistent miscarriage. I had my third miscarriage in December and I found in addition to the emotional pain of wanting to have a baby and not being able to and also the physical pain that I was experiencing. There is also the sense of isolation because people around us didn't necessarily know what was happening and I decided that there was no reason to feel that third kind of pain and so I decided to write about the experience. I wrote a piece for tablet the experiences with the miscarriages but also in particular connecting yet to the way that our miscarriages intersected with the Jewish calendar and ways that ended up being really challenging my first miscarriage was three days before Sheshona and then my second miscarriage was during Hannukah and with Russia. China being very much associated with fertility and birth both in the traditional Torah readings and also in the liturgy and then Hanukkah being associated with miracles. I felt almost like I was being slammed over the head with what it was that we wanted that we didn't have so the tomorrow for the first brush comes from the very beginning of the book of Samuel and it tells the story of a woman in Tana mankind is married to a man named canine. I'll cannot actually has two wives. He has his wife Con. Who's been unable to have children? And he has his wife Nina. Who's been able to have many children and to end up with a situation where you have one way who's been able to give her husband. It'd be sons and you have the other wife who it seems he favors but who has not been able to bear children for him and it creates this strange dynamic. Where in Elkana says I have plenty of children right and he says to. Hana am I not more dear to you than seven suns and she basically says No. That's not enough for me. I want to be a mother and she has this prayer. That's put forward and that's the story that we read on the first day of Russia and on the second day of Rosh Hashanah after comes from the book of Jeremiah and one of the most famous lines. That Torah is at home. If I caught all by Rachel cries on account of her children and the Rachel there is referring to reach the matriarch from the Bible who similar to and Pnina. Her sister is married to the same manage. She is to Jake up. Pena and Connor sister wives but not sisters but Rachel and Leah our sisters and again what you is the wife that Jacob loves is Rachel the Wife. Who's able to bear him? Children and at one point. Rachel goes to Jacob and says give me children or I will die and ultimately that becomes a self fulfilling prophecy because she dies while giving birth to her second child Benjamin and the understanding of this line in the half tour. Rachel cries for her sons. Is that Rachel? All she wanted was to have these children and now they've betrayed God and moved away but in both of these have to wrote. You really see these very strong images coming forward of women. Wanting children women having children women longing for this experience of motherhood and also the ways in which it doesn't always turn out how they want or expect it to. You're going through this experience yourself. You obviously also have such a rich level of knowledge of rabbinic text. Was that helpful to you to have these examples or was it sort of just another reminder of something that you were already going through since I ever started teaching Torah Twenty Four. I have found that I find comfort when I'm teaching that even if everything in my life is going terribly even after the miscarriages that I was able to sort of pull it together to teach in a way that wasn't always the case in the rest of my life so that's always been something interesting but once in a while you hit a text that really triggers you to actually to give you an example from today teaching taxed from cotton and all about you shouldn't throw fingernails on the floor because women who step on fingernails if they're pregnant they'll miscarry but you can throw fingernails on the floor in the bait need trash in the study hall because women don't go in the City Hall right and it felt I felt like the Thomas is like personally targeting me in that moment of you know well maybe women if you got out of the study hall where you don't belong wouldn't having miscarriages and of course that's not all my theology but those are the moments where it really has all but in another case text. I was teaching a few weeks ago from you have. I'm Oh it talks about how women are not obligated and having children which is really interesting. Only men are obligated to have children. Women are not one explanation for that is that we never give commandments to people. That put their lives in danger. And because childbirth and pregnancy can be dangerous for women. That's why they're not commanded. It's sort of funny how much this comes. Up in your scholarly life but you know these conversations about infertility about miscarriage aren't necessarily something that a lot of people are having very publicly even in the Jewish community. I mean your first articles called talking about miscarriage. This idea that you're actually just breaking the silence in some way and saying we are allowed to talk about this stuff. I'm curious in your life in your community. What is the discourse around children and was a true that you really weren't finding that conversation about infertility there. Those are two separate questions so to answer the second one I. I found that people often spoke about pregnancy loss. Only once they had had a successful life birth so people often talked about that they had had even trouble they had had conceiving once they had a child there. Was this feeling once. You have your happy ending than you can talk about this for the people who are in it hearing about the people who had this really hard experience but then come through the other end and now they're happy that's not always hopeful because not everyone who wants to have children gets to. That's just the reality of the world. But at the same time there's a tremendous vulnerability that comes with getting up whether in front of people and speaking about it or in my case writing an article and saying I'm in this really painful speech and I don't know what you can say to me to make it better. I'm just GONNA put it out there that I'm in pain right now. People don't know what to say to that you're worried about what people are going to say. One of the strange things for me is I now written two pieces about this experience. The first one being the piece about my miscarry doesn't the second piece about the suspension of fertility treatments because of the corona virus. One of the interesting things about it is that people often. They WanNa talk to me about my articles. People who are not in this experience infertility of difficulty having children although I hear from a lot of those people also but for people who are not in that experience often talk to me about it and I find myself feeling reticent to talk to them about it which is strange because in certain ways I've been really public but in other ways it's still very difficult to talk to people who are trying to have children or who already have the children that they wanNA have at the same time I think there's this real hunger among women and men having this experience to find communities where they can talk about it. I have gotten so many messages from people I don't know. In addition to many people I do know who I didn't know had had miscarriages or fertility troubles but I've gotten so many messages from people who are just looking for people to talk to saying that you said something and here's my story. I think I heard from fifty women after my first piece was published saying a version of this was also my Saran. Thank you for saying something on the first question. The question of the reality of the community I live in New York City on upper west side. The Jewish community here is really vibrant which is great. It's a fairly young community and it means that there's a lot of people with young children people having children. After my miscarriage there was a period of time where I couldn't go to synagogue which is very unlike me. I go to every week on time. I've been that way since high school I'm very into going digital. I really enjoy it but just everywhere I look there a little kid which usually is a wonderful sign of the vibrancy of the community. But it's really painful. No one's doing anything to me. I've been luckier than many. Because I actually haven't gotten so many comments about having children but the more you see someone who's your age or who's younger than you who's pregnant with their third or their fourth. That's really difficult because you look at yourself and you. I don't know if I'm ever going to have that because I'm wondering if you could tell us. A little bit about the modern Orthodox community and what some of those broader expectations are for someone who isn't as familiar so I had a friend. Call me the other day. Because she had seen my most recent peace and she had also gone through the. She's the same age as I am. I recently turned thirty. Six a couple of weeks ago and she said you know when birth to my daughter after she had a number of years of fragility challenges she said I realize in the hospital all of the women there were like forty but in our community. I feel so so so old all of the time to the fact that I don't have children yet. I felt old when I got married at thirty three. Despite the fact that in New York City that actually average I went to my first wedding when I was twenty one of one of my friends and I have friends who started having kids at twenty four twenty five so I have friends now. Who HAVE KIDS? Who are ten eleven twelve years old and it's really hard not to feel like you're behind? I'm one of three but my husband of seven. We did not plan to have seven by seven is on the larger side. I know a number of people who are roughly my age who have three four or five kids and so part of me says it's not a race but it's hard not to feel like you're behind and when you live in a world where not. Nobody but most people are not having their first children in their late thirties early forties in the way. That might be happening more in the secular world in addition to any desires. You feel internally I have to be honest I do feel external pressure. I wish that I didn't feel external pressure by the generation gaps are so much smaller in the community in which I live. And it's compounded. By the fact that in the modern Orthodox community women are also. The norm is to like hat professional careers outside of the home. Which again is true in parts of the community? Also but there's all this pressure on us to achieve professionally and academically and also to get married and have children and have many children and be able to send them to Jewish day school. All of these things that are expected. And when you want it yourself you feel those crushers even more even if people aren't actually imposing them on you because that's just the model. Uc around me. When I look around and all the people I see are are in my cohort have multiple children and I'm a wear of the fact that that's not something that I have and that hopefully we'll get to have that one day but it's more difficult for us than it is for many other people when I look at you. You are so accomplished professionally right. You are Super Super Smart. You teach you sort of have this really intellectual pursuit professionally. That is sort of one of the interesting things about the modern Orthodox community right because the word modernist in there you work. You're not prevented from doing anything. Because you're a woman and you're free to pursue the career you want but at the same time this is also true obviously for all women no matter what community there in there. Is that sense of like so. You know what's.

Rachel Rachel Rosenthal New York City Russia Theological Seminary Samuel City Hall Jacob Elkana Nina Jeremiah Jake Benjamin Sheshona China Pnina Thomas Pena
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"And now a little check in from the highlands of Scotland Corp. Neil he thinks I am probably not out of your town jeans. I know Jewish. I did you clean up. And they came minutes and I. The Hebrew school station was mentioned in the context of Anti Semitism or no go in. My head was in Manhattan's wincing at the first thing that committed the cardinal at sounds easy slim you anti Semitic than teaching his Geez can any utterly bigoted manner. Then I think anyone record listening Scott on my favorite people in one and Scottish Jews other base. No well what? Kinda see you sitting the seasons by you and very much. I'll go and listen to that race. Betty basically she's from Glasgow Charles. Thanks for that. Call Charles Hilliard. And yes indeed. Scots are the best people in Scottish. Jews are the best use of the anti-belgian and now finally we get this query from a listener been paid to me is Jewish morning. I didn't grow up Jewish so the first time that I attended. Shiva was last year when a dear friend and mentor of mine passed away. I felt the whole ritual was very comforting but it must be slightly overwhelming for the mourners mourn. Dad died last week and so now I have to confront what Jewish mourning means for me as well as what it means in this very particular circumstance that we found ourselves in. I guess I just wanted to hear from everybody else. What they find comforting about Jewish mourning traditions and see if anything resonates from there with me. Thanks so much bye first of all were. We're very sorry for your loss and second of all were so touched that you brought this question to us Stephanie. What would you say to our listener to keep in mind about this? Virtual era that we're in and it came up with Passover and it comes up again with all sorts of services we hear about is the idea that you can connect with so many more people even if you can't do so physically right like relatives from around the world. You can see an instance. I want you to take solace in this idea that you can have connection. Even though you can't gather traditionally in the way you would want to in these times. I want to think that there is now an ability to to congregate to have community in a way that looks a little bit different but is really really still. I love that I want to add one thing to that which is which is something that I do very often. I try to do it almost anytime that someone I had known or someone who is related to someone I know passes away. There's a really beautiful tradition. It is not that well known I think outside the Orthodox community called studying missionaries. In which after a person dies you study a small part of the mission which is part of the Talmud and you sort of declare and a prayer before you begin that you're doing this basically to elevate the soul and to honor the memory of the deceased. Now Look you could do it with with the parts of the mich- now or you could do it with any other classical Jewish text or frankly you could do it with any texts that means something to you but I love this idea of sitting and taking a moment in complete silence to concentrate on text and tell yourself that you're doing this as a kind of a tribute to a person who meant so much to you and that by doing so you're sort of aiming your Cavanna your your analogy for that person's soul which is also a kind of recognition. I think that you know the journey isn't over. The a very significant part of the journeys over the person will no longer be here with us in physical form. But Y- this is not a good by so much as it is a transition into a different phase of the relationship. That person will always be present will always be a significant part of your life and and by doing so by honoring him. You're you're bringing him in to your soul. I would add only that one thing we do when we can't say cottage because we don't have a quorum of ten and so we can't say the the more Scottish for a loved one who has died. Is We say psalms so. I saw this a lot in Pittsburgh. It's what you do before the bodies buried. It's what you do if you're trying to observe the one year anniversary or other anniversaries of their death but you don't have the corner of ten. You take out a book of Psalms. I mean you can download the psalms onto your phone and just pick one and just chant psalm. It's just it's another taxed and of course it's some of the most beautiful poetry ever written so absolutely we hope this has helped drop us a line. Let us know. Let us know if this got to the heart. You're asking and we wish you much peace in your journey after this loss and we're here for you were here. Our community is here.

Neil Shiva Betty Scotland Corp Charles Hilliard Manhattan Glasgow Charles I. The Hebrew school Dad Scott Stephanie Pittsburgh
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Because it's like a very brilliant very boring work around right. It allows to do something very basic right which is just like carry things from one place to another. But I like being in Manhattan and looking up and you're like what's that string. Serve where you are so you know to say. Oh yeah it's very visible string if you look up on Sixth Avenue you'll see our world and here's the amazing thing about it. The book of the Talmud that deals with the laws of the Sabbath begins with talking about this. And then when you get to think about this you realize that this really does is force you to think about the differences between the private and the public domain. Rather like who am I and what am I supposed to do at home versus outside and what does outside me is my neighborhood is it. My city is my country really kind of puts you in this philosophical mindset. Yeah that's interesting. Never thought about that as we've about on the show before I walked my dogs barefoot when the weather's nice like I would never go downtown. I would stay within about one square is saying you don't put your dogs not very observant. Jew and so is interesting like right. I do actually treat my street which happens to be within the new haven era of as part of my household in a way that. I don't if I'm going to New York City. That's your air so interesting. What a great question. Nick have. We answered your question. Yes I have to sign a bit relieved about the carrying thing because I had always had in my head that it was a string that allowed you to suspend all the drag laws of days all morality. Don't be amazing. I just thought you having a much better time we take it at the upcoming novel will be about a young rabbi walking around Manhattan putting up an era of listening to great music Nick. I wanted to respond to your question with a question which comes in from our listeners. They say that they read somewhere. They puzzles are a part of your creative process. Is this yes completely true? Jigsaw puzzles over by career. I've been with the idea of what you do in between sentences because the book has iky thousand words lawns screenplay his one hundred twenty pages Long right but of course books take a long time to right. So it's what I do. In between sentences that takes care of my mental health bicycling and if you go on the Internet and start watching football matches in between sentences. You'll lost sight. Tried to do something wordy and then. I do the very hard guardian cryptic puzzle. Then I get stopped so I'm stuck on my number. I'm stuck on a crossword and eventually Puzzling summer holiday eventually. I thought you'd never get stuck on a jigsaw. You're always working and you give up bit work on another bit and it doesn't occupy your head in the right at issue occupies your head or the news say yeah. I've always a jigsaw puzzle. The Guy and I really recommend it see were like uniquely prepared for this quarantine because you've stocked up on Jigsaw Puzzles already. Yeah I have decided. According to an has made a huge amount of difference tomorrow night. You're just writing and puzzling just a little less book buying a little more of the reading. The writing actually. Is there like a puzzle brand? You like or something. You could like a secret when you tell us about the New York puzzle companies. Actually pretty good. They have read shapes as well. Let's say the Great District. Sorry ever date was the cover of such peppers which is chef fantastic because you learn a lot all the faces. Is you think that every now and again. I ducked trap who they were. You found said to and for Liverpool in nineteen fifty five or that kind of thing and then the flowers that spell out the Beatles single hardest thing I've ever done in a working day. I mean much. More aggressive does much better by the way than the white album puzzle. Do you remember what book you were working on? When you were doing that puzzle or I think it would have been funny girl. Good Book you tell us about the upcoming novel. Spill all the beans. What's it about? Its brilliantly contemporary was finished right before the virus so it seems now like it might as well be written in the nineteenth century. It's a relationship. It's trade a forty two year old right man an Chiro black guy in the air of the referendum Nick Hornby. You're a righteous gentile. And we would like to invite you into our era of of sin when we construct it. Thank you so much for joining us on North. I hope we come back when your book is out. I would absolutely love to fabulous. We will make. I'm GonNA think a really tricky question. Yeah that's one of our top five escorts.

Nick Hornby Manhattan New York City Great District football New York Liverpool
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"When it's going to be a TV show a podcast podcast? A record white seat for the podcast right and so I had to get on with writing but How do I decide? Well I mean a book is a big project. It's a couple of years and if I can break you up by doing something else. I will sire if there's a movie I dare approach some kind than I might think about in the middle of something in Brooklyn Wild whereby And people came to me to do them and I didn't WanNa miss out and so I took time out and then there are things like volatile show. I write state to the union with Rosamund Pike. Chris diack she's ten minute episodes. That was really fun in between things. I had no real sense that it would ever get made wanted to writes it because I wanted to break by Diaa. Bicycling so look. There's a lot I love about your writing but if I had to pick like one sentence to summit it's the constant struggle of mainly men who are lonely ended odds with society to kind of connect to find their way into create these emotional engagement and these struggles usually pay off in an incredible way because the books really are about the battle for human connection right this hunger to beat with other people which strikes me as so poignant and so moving and so incredibly meaningful and yet as I look at generations who are who are so and this is something we were talking about all about the show. These people are connected in the new version. Zoe Kravitz. They're connected to hundreds and thousands of people via their smartphones and yet they strike me as way more profoundly lonely and alone than the people in the movie version. Twenty years ago would have been because they didn't have all that the actually needed to live in nick. Hornby where you have to break out and talk to other people do you see that. And and as a writer does it kind of like fuck with the process. Do you ask you something. How do I write whenever you online? All Day and disembodied. I still think the same basic issues and problems. Severe the end of the lake chat threat about a record guys. Might we go into some very weird places. Now that to find people who were exactly like us was used to sink. America when I was younger if I met them on. Who New Big Star or in any advice that Fence NERD OUT ABOUT. Of course now you can find them quite easily online but it doesn't really make any difference to the essential sense. The era with everyone who surrounding fail rights at home much in the modern world. It's just made it a little bit more complicated to navigate quite some rich way see. I'd likely Al. You sound very psychologically healthy and unlike me it makes me think of whether Britishness has something to do with it because although you can be a morose people a Lotta the writers. I know who are very good. Poets of leisure of just reading a book or listening to a song are British. I think Jeff Dyer I think of you think Martin Amos very much has that mode Francis suffered has that mode. We're just you'll sort of spend a week or two ambling or thinking or going deep into some new hobby and then write a beautiful essay. Abounded was Americans seem to always be working on their resumes and my onto something there. I tell you what you're talking about. Those particular writers who are of a similar age the difference between being an American Kate in the sixties and seventies on an English kid in the sixties and seventies with so profound. You cannot imagine I mean. We had an hour of television children's television between five PM. Six PM. There was nothing really child. Friendly the rest of the time. Tv in England in the sixties during the day was literally picture of a little girl standing by blackboard which may people in the TV showroom to shop in the picture there was nothing else and I think we were much poorer country. We were suffering from the Second World War and so probably mid sixties and. I think we were both. I mean I think may might Lemus. We probably read rights rematch. Resistance too much music. We weren't driving round in ad that his T. bird. Nobody had a car. We whitey buses in the nineteen seventies. There was a period where there was a three day working week evenings and it was just bizarre to grow up in this country and then everything kind of converged really in the nineties and became more or less the same place but Upbringings were really really different. So you've been so successful as a writer. That number of your books have been made into movies. Is it strange to you? If someone knows your name through a movie version of the book I mean like someone says Oh and Education Juliet naked. I is that strange for you to reconcile true face. A lot of people thought nicest your name on the movies. They night's your night and on the book. I literally once had an argument with a woman on a play about high fidelity about whether I'd written it cause she started asking me questions of what you do. I said I'm a ride search. She said what? What have you written that? I would die last night. I night. Much raid by Is Fidelity she said. I've seen that movie fifteen times. There was notebook. Fast of there is operatives nights. At wral there was wasn't a new did. We didn't speak for the rest of the flight. And you know the number of people exceeded education but didn't have anything to do with it too great movie by the way so good. But sometimes direct today may neither Carey Mulligan it Necessarily I write set. Let's fine so they think you wrote a book about the Boston. Red sox fever then like you really get American culture. Yeah an education haunts me by the way so good. It's like under my skin. I saw it only once. And it's so creepy in a good way. The the exploitation the also the Jewishness the Jewishness. Yes well and and that brings us to your most important role here which is as the gentile in the room We understand that you responded towards mutation to bring a question to this internationally recognized panel of Jews. What can we tell you about air roofs? Because I like the craziest I've ever heard of the wire around a community will ruled suspended within that. Wia and that makes me think well each us live like maiden because got no religion and I have to put a wire up. So what's the deal? What was he thinking behind? So I'll take the first crack between the three host. We can usually come up with one sensible answer. Arab is a rabbinic work around one of the thirty nine. Things you can't do on. The Sabbath is Kerry Kerry stuff. Yeah so this would mean that if you go outside and you're carrying your child or carrying a code or a bottle for your kid around the neighborhood you would be in violation and an Orthodox Jew doesn't want to be in violation of that and so the idea is that you put a string around the whole neighborhood which turns the whole area into one household into one domicile. Erica so you're never actually carrying outside the House because you've created one big house. It's like all your backyard so it doesn't actually mean that within the era of like no rules apply and you can have troubles and drugs and you know and cheeseburgers right. It's not that it's specifically relates to the the Prohibitions Bacon. All the time under there. But what about driving vagus and all that stuff? Now you may not know within an era of no. No no no. It's just carrying stuff. Just carry your bag or your book or whatever it is and I like your idea of an era of that's like a good reform liberal Jewish era a hall pass his idea of an Arab is basically Vegas you go there and do whatever you want other Jews who are saying. Oh it's fine. We're in the era. I haven't checked out what the Lexus today. But I'm sure this is right. I will say that the Jews who say that are probably probably don't know what an Arab is in preparation for today. I looked to errands in Manhattan Manhattan is basically one giant. I mean it's huge. It's huge. Don't tell everyone. Basically it means Orthodox moms can carry their babies on Saturdays around. The era of it was so brilliant. We're not as clever as you think. We are actually. The era of you're talking about is what we refer to as Jeremy Corbyn era which is insensitive to actual Judaism but sort of gently faint at Jewishness. Okay all right well. It's really funny..

writer Rosamund Pike Chris diack Zoe Kravitz Brooklyn Manhattan Jeremy Corbyn Carey Mulligan Al America Hornby Martin Amos Boston Kerry Kerry Lemus Jeff Dyer Upbringings England Francis
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Are gentle of the week is one of the great gentile authors working in the English language. It's Nick Hornby. He is the British author of about a boy high fidelity Juliet naked and one of my favorite bits of occasional rating. Which is the stuff. I've been reading column in the Believer Magazine. We're so excited to have nick. Hornby here as gentle of the week. Welcome Sir thank you so much for letting me be a drug trial if we have you ever been a gentile of the week before never in my life or a little less. I am every every time you leave the room the Jews who have been in there. He's kind of gentle this week. What a week for Nick. Hornby so we WANNA move in deep into your new but let's start with the task at hand. Which is we all. Were were watching the old John cusack movie. And then we watched the Zoe Kravitz reboot on Hulu of high fidelity. Why did this book have such legs like? Why do you think it's become something that speaks to people in twenty twenty as it did in nineteen ninety six or so? It's been interesting watching the skip generations when it came out. I was thirty six or something when it was published. It was pretty much by people of my age and they kept coming to signing says. I write more books and got on night but then I started tonight's They were searching Twenty-five coming to the readings twenty years after the book was written which was kind of cool and then this whole vinyl thing happened find less a contrast. I guess to spotify kids who were really really super music still wanted to a stamp on the world in some rice. I spending money on records. And whoever's idea it was to rebates it so that you could still say things about the mobile world free the prism of the book. I liked the book and the movie both tremendous amount but I remember that when I read the book. I did think that the story was different British than American early. Because you guys have a more calcified class structure right that in America certainly in the ninety s a hipster who owns a vinyl record shop even back before was hip when it was just a medium for music but that could be like a cool person who went to a university and then did that whereas rob the book. He's not someone who could have aspired to Oxford. Was interesting seeing it. Move to a country like America without that. Same kind of class Kassim. Yes it was something I thought about too much A. We had a sorts of mediator in Stephen Phrase direct to his English and I think undisturbed the English Moraga Snicks was Was there to make sure that they didn't get to American happy making it defined job but yeah I think the people that writes it who I became very close to what they wanted to see it. They thought it was about them. In a very good reifer another Taishin by thought it was about then drying up and of course. I didn't save that cross thing so it wasn't in the movie and the things that make no sense to people when they're adapting. Its like you mentioned earlier that the vital renaissance sparked some interest in the story. Yeah we having re washed the movie series and reread. The book had a little conversation earlier in which we basically said look. There's something that strikes certainly in me less. Oh Stephanie as a little bit off about that because we don't think that kids interact with music now even if they listen to it on vinyl we just don't think kids interact with music the same way like when we were young and part of the reason why the book spoke so well to us right as music. Find everything about you and now it just seems to me like disposable background music. Do you buy that or am I just being ridiculous old? Well a huge change. Is the kids walk around with something in their pocket but gives them access to every piece of recorded music clever Mike and the fundamental shift to musical psyche? That makes About you about I know when I was a kid and Was Fourteen I had one record and then three weeks later. I had to records in a year later. I had twenty records and that's how I built my collection. I knew the crackles in between tracks because I've listened to them so often. I'm not necessarily sure that was a good thing in because he can remember that terrible feeling of having to commit to. What you just even if you like you made yourself like look Billy Joel is. The bridge was a very important album for the month that it was my only acquisition from Leach Mirrors Springfield Massachusetts. It was a classic me up. Yeah and you had to make yourself like that record. I remember buying as a result of a review in an English magazine and it was way too out. Ask Me an English progressive. Bad could van de graff. Generates the Hora when I got home and put it on a sit spikes the journalists. Write that revere. My money back in kids school were asking to borrow it and I was like now. I can't spare it because I didn't want them to hear what I'd spent money on and my kids right. Just go off over the place. It's like that of the Rolling Stones Daddy of a remains unequal. Listen they come back. They say I like that was great. Then they move on to something else and I guess. The connection is deep because of a lot more and they've listened a lot more but the thing about the remake. The latest remake the show that works so well is that it's set now right and obviously you know the idea of making a playlist for Zoe. Kravitz is something very different than making a playlist for John cusack the technicality of what that meant but I argued. With my gentlemen co-hosts earlier that for young people music is almost everything their entire lives are scored and it's because they don't have to walk around with a blue box. They have one they have their little. Their lives are just one long soundtrack and so I think that the reason this still works today is because actually music does play that same important role in people's lives it just looks a little different listenable. Music is it because I didn't have that much time or access or music so as far as I could tell my kids. Listen three four hours a day and they can listen while. They're on their bikes. They can listen when they're walking down the street and a lot listened to. I just couldn't do any of that so I do. Think the connections very deep but I do think it's different and I suspect as Superior Leon are GonNa have to rethink everything. Nick Hornby told us that we were wrong because he agrees with me. This is medicine now. We have to re re watch the book the movie and we my seventeen year old just heard stuff that I would never have anywhere near you know because I had to take all the time on am I gonNa like this is GonNa be worth my money. They're a great records. I didn't Odin Tillerson by full cheese because my friends hunted so I didn't need to buy And they don't have any of You wrote a piece for rolling stone. Speaking back to critics. I guess who were very protective of the original high fidelity movie with John Cusak in which you basically said look. It's not for you. It's for everyone who loves the Book and ROB can be a black female. American Rob Justice Rob was British Rob and then White American rob. And did you get some hostility? I mean I. I'm not that insane. I love the original movie but I was excited to love the TV show as well but are there some people who are like you know? Have that sort of rush fan level intensity about the band they love with regards to the original rob. The movie moved to America. People saying how could you let that happen? That was before they even seen the movie. They Cross about SEC. But Zoe is a black woman. So what's he supposed to do if the book speaks to her at her version of and it really pissed me off the idea that they seem to be thinking that someone in Hollywood said. Oh now we go to the other way round. Because that's what the Martin will amounts and I need that. The spirits of it was not like that Zoe had never thoughts about way. So you've written six novels now seven or something like that but you've also written screenplays have another novel coming out next year. How do you decide when the next project going to be a novel when it's going to be a screen play.

Nick Hornby Zoe Kravitz Rob Justice Rob America John cusack Believer Magazine Juliet spotify van de graff Billy Joel English Moraga Snicks Stephen revere John Cusak SEC Leach Mirrors Springfield Mass Kassim Taishin Oxford Odin Tillerson
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Little News at the Jews first of all. We just WANNA point out that the planning commissioner invite Ho California who had to resign his office after he threw a cat during zoom meeting. We don't believe Jewish. We just want to get that out there. We think not a Jew but we did want to ask our cat correspondent. Stephanie Button is is there. Was this an important moment for cat? Lovers wake this fly around the Cat Internet in a different way. A lot of people sent it to me similarly to how a lot of people are sending me all those New Yorker cartoons about like cats during quarantine. So you don't have to send it to me because I've already seen it but so I think the problem is like cats love computers. I recently learned. It's because the keyboards are war. Which I didn't know so. Basically cats like the city. Computers like how does a specially drawn to zoom conversations? It's like he knows when the camera's on I was in both of my calls this morning and if I may Stephanie. I don't know if this is normal but for some reason I always but never his face like you always kind of like a truck backs into the camera like making meals. Sounds like there is not zoom. Colleague hasn't been like he just loves we. So that was for Stephanie. This one's for you Leo. Play me off here. Even commented on the video. I'm just trying to think like. I don't advocate throwing cats but like you can drop a cat like any land. Lots of video. I thought it'd be too upsetting so I can't actually speak to what he actually did. I think I have thrown a cat from time to time. We've had three cats in. None of them have liked me. Some of them have scratched me. And I I'm with this guy. I didn't watch the video. Actually because I thought it might be disturbing but like if you've owned a cat you've probably thrown a cat yes j. crew let us know what that story was tailor made for. Stephanie. Taylor but nick. This one is for Lille Hoshikawa Ben. Avi Ben Seon Russell's Belgium leave the Buffalo Trace distillery in Kentucky has apparently according to your times with Chicago Rabbinical Council which is a very hardcore rabbinical council. I've met like Matthias from their Rabbinical Council. They don't mess around to come out with a line of Kucher. American whiskeys There's a bourbon awry in a weeded bourbon. And they were released April Sixteen and the Times ran a story and are super listener. Garvey Savage Woods pointed out to me is like wait a second all whiskies or kosher like this is kind of a big con because spirits are kosher rights as a spiritual spirit. It's like basically it just means that some guys Chicago. Rabbinical Council are collecting a little cash while supervising. Somebody will write and tell me. I'm wrong here but spirits are kosher so I don't know I support everything about this. I Love Buffalo. Traces also reminds me of the one time where I was giving a talk in Kentucky and I was in a very nice restaurant and I was enjoying suburbans and then I had counted up. How many have had and it was eleven to that point and I figured it would be time to have my Bourbon Mitzvah in which I just a tumour thirteen and had had. I had rabbinic supervision for that moment. You know. Of course my life been different and finally we. I don't know if we bid farewell to but we send our condolences to the other J. crew the outfitter that gave me so many roll neck sweaters in high school which has filed for bankruptcy protection. This week. It doesn't mean they're going away. It just means that they're going to hold their head a little less high any feelings about this Stephanie. Leo I mean if you read the Article. Your first you're like Oh my God. They're shutting down J. Crew. They actually earn. It's just GonNa get sold to something like from one private Equity Company to another and then you still be able to buy J. crew clothing but You know as our fellow Moniker outfitter. We're sad for them. I want to say also. Our plan worked. It took a took an unexpected turn ours. This is what happens when you mess with us. Come up with a Netflix show called Unorthodox. You're going to get bashed in the press you come up with a super named like J. crew taking it from us. You can go bankrupt. Yup Don't Franken with us and I was right out of college and I was in New York working one ridiculous job. I had a friend who hadn't even more ridiculous job. Which is that my friend. Hope Wachter before becoming a high powered attorney was taken a year or two before law school and hope worked at J. crew as a copywriter and I actually walked around their space and I saw the little sticky notes where they were working up the copy like what color to call this. And what adjective to us here and one time. She got me into a sample sale. That was simply to die for you at a sample sale. Like fighting other people for sweater smacking them with a bow tie or the head. That braided belt was going home with no one.

Stephanie Button J. Crew Times Rabbinical Council Kentucky Lille Hoshikawa Ben commissioner Leo Ho California Garvey Savage Woods Chicago Ben Seon Russell Chicago Rabbinical Council Netflix Franken Belgium Kucher Buffalo Trace
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Let's just through the whole jake. Lacy Kennedy Spacey. Is Betty Free Dan? What else is going on in our lives. What else have we been reading watching listening to? The only thing going on in my life is the most amazing thread that has ever existed on our facebook page and basically because this threat exists. I know that we are like doing something right. We we're providing a home for people it's by someone named Beth. I don't want to give too much information. But she says this embarrassing question. Could someone explain the concrete difference between Gula and Bubka aside from shape? I didn't grow up in an nause household and I'm dating a very Ashkenazi man. We are two years into this and at this point. I'm embarrassed to ask so this is like a pastry shaming question. Where like you've been dating and asking you've never asked what the difference was and it's too late so the difference is about eleven hundred calories but so easily there six thousand tonnes threat and people are stepping in to help Beth out there like we will not let this affect your relationship so someone says a regular is a small pastry above gets cut in slices. Someone says totally different people. Some people spell it rogue Alah and somebody will just Roga. Legalizes Singular Vogel the like kinder- lock? Children only never i. I thought it was just people who don't say you're welcome. Wow thank you. We're learning so much. So says is a cookie. Need with a cream cheese dough. Bucket is a sweet brioche type bread slash cake either can be made with assorted fillings. Both are rolled. Basically the whole thing is that Bob Gays. A yeast baked cake. That we get. Rubella is first base buckeyes going all the way how. How about this says. Health teacher once told me. If you're embarrassed I buy condoms. Maybe you shouldn't be having sex. Maybe the same applies to ask about an eating Baabda response to say many regular power goes into like Tom Moody disposition on both of these. And haven't this also note that what Israelis called are more individual size? Bob Goes Really God is absolutely correct by the way are like insanely large so I think this could be like Stephanie. In my country old with very big so finally original poster writes. This threat has blown up so much more than I anticipated and I love it said my boyfriend and I have now split up. Thank you for nothing. What I WANNA know is which she says that. She stated very oschkenat's Yvette. What what does she mean? He's very Agassi is it is now is about he literally subsists on Google brisket and and Philip Roth novel that's what that's all he does. He's actually literally at Terry.

Beth Agassi Bob Gays Lacy Kennedy Spacey Legalizes Singular Vogel facebook Alah Bucket Philip Roth Tom Moody Google Stephanie
"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Unorthodox

"I'm your host Mark Oppenheimer joined as ever by my two CO hosts I tablets senior writer Liebowitz for safe distance. Shalom would physically distance but not but socially I've never felt closer to you. I feel the same way to more and tablet deputy editor Stephanie Budnick. Hello Hello Oh my God so much. Good stuff to day. Remember how we told the entire J. crew to watch high fidelity well we want to go straight to the source so we landed Super Gentile Nick. Hornby gentle of the week and we're going to talk with him. Also Stephanie. Had A conversation with Rachel Rosenthal. Who teach of Thomas at the Jewish theological seminary and she's going to share it with Stephanie her experiences with infertility in the religious Jewish unit and finally Stephanie Stephanie. You're you're interviewer of the week. Busy busy busy busy seventy check back in with Rachel Meyers and her Nanna. Roberta you may remember documentary at Wendy's so so good to to collectively be with you all on this this is a this is my choicest most elite zoom call of the day. I want you to know this is like my fifth in chronology but my first importance. I in your heart. I think that on that call. We were both on earlier Stephanie. I had the great insight. That zoom is the powerpoint twenty twenty. Which is the thing that's indispensable but everyone hates it. Yes yeah. Are you guys at the point of hating it yet true? It's like now for my powerpoint presentation and you're like Oh my God and here's the thing. Those of us who play video games actually realized that there is such a better way to do it. When you're actually in a virtual environment where you can interact and feel kind of like semi embodied and talk to other people and like half the world already does it and for the other half. The world's like we will sit here looking like the Brady Bunch and animal crossing instead. What is what's the answer. We write a great piece in tablet about this yesterday. Animal crossing is the future of mankind. It is how will educate nurture date? Procreate everything in the future is animal crossing just saying all right so while we're on the subject technology enough of this trivial banter. Let's get to the important a couple months back. I assigned everyone high fidelity in whatever form sit in IRA- watching the WHO reboot TV. Show with Zoe Kravitz. I'm a big Fan of the movie. I'm also a fan of the book by Nick Hornby. Let's start with Stephanie. You had experienced high fidelity in none of these media. What did you do? How did you catch up? And what's your tape? So here's the thing. There's something about John Cusack movies. That have all got lumped together in my mind as the sort of like emo kid like sad guy. Romantic like can't get the girl holding the boombox and I think I actually like resisted the prompt because I was like do I really just see another John cusack movie to be clear? There are two of those you mean to movies. You mean this and say anything one of which you've seen. Yeah but also I feel like every John cusack movie is sort of the same. Is that possible like in my totally. There's a little of that. Grosse Pointe Blank. Yeah Okay Okay Veronica. Rainy and he's like genre. I think I do like it but in my mind. I'm like do I need to watch another one of those. Obviously this movie wasn't that at all but it's sort of interesting to me. It's sort of like how John Hughes movies are now. Let me all the same. Like Oh to the breakfast club or you pretty pink or sixteen candles. They're kind of the same whereas that's a flattening of genre that I know is really really important at at one point so it's like for me to confront minimum. Saying point was last Thursday. Point is happened. It was a huge deal. But so I'm confronting my own like modern today bias toward that movie and it was so interesting to watch the new version which is self part of this. Other era of new creations. I I liked it my answer. I think the movie. So did the movie surprise. You mean I was trying to unpack. Why it was that I was like. Oh do I need to see this? Yeah surprising it's funny to see Jack. Black before he was Jack. Black like it's again it's someone I take for granted as being a certain way and being a certain character and you see him. Basically like in his breakout role and you're like oh he wasn't always this except she's the same care. This is where he created the character. Isn't it his music obsessed Weirdo credits? Go right into school of rock. Basically just for those of you who don't know nothing about this and the J. crew was a book by Nick. Hornby in it came out in the mid nineties. Then it was a movie and it's about Kind of sad single guy who owns a vinyl record store and he's obsessed with music but he can't really connect with women and he's trying to figure out why. I WanNa say Actually Stephanie. Listening to say that I thought to myself as I was harrumphing. I thought wait a second. She's actually describing exactly my relationship with superhero movies. Which is like. I know that to someone who understands genre or care or just likes the movies and has released for the movies. They're all quite different and flatten them all into like impossible things happening. Maybe there's some explosions. Maybe there are people flying superpowers Blah Blah Blah. Totally unfair and then Natalie Portman Ruins the whole thing. Well what about you? How is your revisiting of high fidelity? Look you know. This kind of creeped up in our conversation about keeping the faith. I find the sort of nineties and late nineties. Early two thousand movies to be really difficult to watch. Because you want your fifties or the sixties movie it clearly belongs to some kind of like a era totally. This is called the past right like and I understand it to be so actually everyone was in black and white ABS- in real life. That's how you actually saw the world. Maybe it's because I've lived through it. Maybe it's because sometimes I think it is still you know possibly two thousand or two thousand and one but you wash this thing that looks like to use a dumb big word. A SIMILAC Gra of this world right and yet at the same time. It is completely not our reality. Nothing about this movie field feasible to me. Now which is one of my problems of the TV show mark. You and I have gone a lot back and forth and I think we agree on this. Even the basic fact of what music means like when I grew up music was what defined everything. It's how you picked your friends. It's how you picked your dress. You picked your pastime everything now kids like Oh yeah. It's that one single that I heard on Tikva whatever man it's just like some kind of disposable soundtrack of my life and that's why the new show doesn't work for me. I refuse to believe that there are kids today listening to entire albums and feasibly their kids today. Who would even bother being like? Oh Wow I'm gonNA listen to steely Dan or fleetwood Mac or something that came before beyond say went Solo. I disagree with you Leo because I think obviously yes watching the new version I mean I. I enjoyed it. It's also funny. 'cause I'm like really a record store like that's like I have every watch something that's set in New York and also like wait. They went there or are you sure they could have gone there like he started taking part in that way. I found the whole thing very interesting. I obviously love the gender flip the sort of the flip of gender politics and sexual politics interested by. I'm excited to talk to nick about all of that. But the funny thing is you see you see people almost lonelier than ever knew all the characters are so alone even though are so connected twenty four seven by Jillian devices windscreens. They actually still want that connection of music and so I think that there's something really powerful I disagree with your thing that just because you don't listen to a record full start to finish you. Don't have that whole listen to their music on an iphone and then the song gets interrupted by like an instagram update and then text and then facebook still that escape for people. It's still that grounding identity thing for people I think know it's not duke. There was a crowd of people who were identified by like being into this band. And I mean I mean on the show right but I'm saying but it's the L. Sang show is bad fiction for that reason. Well let me ask you this Stephanie. Since we are like talking across this weirdly narrow but also deep generational divide like what ten years apart right and like mercury. This podcast likely fire eighty three and eighty one. And you're only seventy to sixty nine like just old people will be going Chabad it. Wendy is we own Iraq so pathetically nostalgic we're just such cliches. Does anything about this era keeping the faith the hour that Leon I basically think was best which is about this moment in nineteen ninety six does anything about it appeal to you or is it just pure silliness on our part. No eight appeals me because I watch those movies. I was just a bit younger than you were when I watched them so they were a little bit more. Aspirational right. All those nineties movies. I was watching as a as a kid. I mean look I get it. I'm not I'm not saying this movies aren't good or I don't identify with them or I don't find soldier. I mean the era is there any part of your thinks? Oh I would have been happier that then yes of course. I mean when the new high fidelity opens picks a landline. And so I was like oh I guess and I hadn't I sort of purposely. Didn't read a lot about it and I was like Oh cool. Like I guess they're keeping the whole like ninety and then of course. She leaves her cell phone at a bar. I think I think you guys are a little bit wrong. I think that music still. I mean we could talk to me about this right. He knows more about this than anyone. Music still has this role in people's it just looks different. I have two quick takes on this one is the guy who plays the dude that Zoe Kravitz strings along. Jake lacy also in Mrs America and girls and he always plays the same like sweet. Good natured doofus. Who kind of shuffled around in his cute about is just like he has a role at sitted. I are we seeing it but equate. We just saw that dude in something else on a streaming service and the second thing I want to say is and I really liked your take on this one reason. I thought the TV show didn't work as well is. I do think it's important that John cusack is like kind of cute in a number she way but not a haughty and that's obviously plays into the fact that he's had a checkered past with the opposite sex with his love light. Obviously I know that they're hot. People who are lonely and there are people who are not considered hot. Who HAVE TERRIFIC Nope sorry. That's that's factually incorrect. There are no hot people are lonely. But Zoe Kravitz is one of the best looking people there is. It's not just that she's so beautiful she's just like so cool. Like what you're actually saying is like you're like how how she could even be. She can be the lameness person ever and you'd Still WanNa be around her just because she seems so cool. I'm not sure that's wrong. But you're right. That part of the problem is that she's super beautiful and the characters super charismatic. Right so it just didn't work for me like there's just no way you'd be this universe. You're not able to get whoever you want. Married or unmarried doesn't even matter. I do want to say that. Like maybe there's something not sexist about that argument but like it's hard to say that about a woman in the way Li like if it was like a really hot guy that was cast in the remained Brad Pitt could not have played it just. I don't think it's sexist and I'm sure we'll get pushback from some of our listeners on this but I just think when one of your defining traits is the extraordinary. Chiseled -ness of your features. She's so beautiful. She's I wanna be friends with her. Like I WANNA I wanNA WANNA hang around her whereas junk ex character sort of radiates the sense of sort of desperation. Yeah exactly so. What are we doing next? I actually vote. Mrs America gives some Bill Abzug love. So we do that Stephanie. Would you sign on for that? I would do that all right. G. Crew let's all watch Mrs America. It's on Hulu. It's about the fight for the a terrific performances from K Plan Shat. Margo Martindale Rose Byrne as all sorts of Important feminist from the seventies Bella Abzug Gloria Steinem Betty for Dan. Really good stuff. Jake lasala wonder. Gee Jake Lacy..

Stephanie Stephanie Nick Hornby John cusack Zoe Kravitz Jake lacy Stephanie Budnick Wendy Rachel Rosenthal Rachel Meyers Shalom deputy editor Mark Oppenheimer John Hughes Roberta Jack Mrs America Thomas Grosse Pointe Blank Natalie Portman Liebowitz
"fidelity" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on Overdue

"I'm Craig I'm Andrew I'm Margaret I'm Katherine and this is two different shows at the same time crossover event before. No one has ever done this before. Science didn't know if it was possible. Marvel we'll find out if it is possible by the end. So yes thank you for these lovely introductions and for having us here We are going to apparently debate books for Television. Novels versus television novels. I can and who better to do it than a book. Podcast and TV podcast. So we're GonNa send our discussion today on one text of just for you know why not give something all to work with so we are going to be talking about Nick Hornby High Fidelity As well as the Hulu adaptation of the show the movie exists. I'm sure you've heard of it. We're Cusak Jack. Black Joan cusak scandalous. This movie sounds really occur. His Mom Bona so if you never listened to overdo before The main rule the show is at one of us. Read the book and then talks about what the other co host having never read it before. So I I read a high fidelity for today having never read it before. Is there like a? Are we following any of? Atv's rules will mean. Some of US have watched all of it. Others have only watched some of it so yes the inversion is that I've watched all of it. Andrew has only watched some of them. We've all just watched all of it so we're breaking all of ATV's roles so this is going swimmingly Chauhan's who knows high fidelity great. Okay Cool Tian so cool so just to get like a working sense of the story. We want to know what? The book is right. Margaret. You told me that I should do a summary of the book as quickly as possible and then I left the phone I could have done. A countdown with Yeah Great. I knew you would be on it into minutes three minutes. We have three minutes on the clock. I mean when you're ready. I'm summary. I might be able to do it in less than three. We'll see me go. So there's a guy named rob and he talks to the rear the whole time at his perspective. He's kind of a loser. He's British northern London. I think And he opens the book by going through his top five desert island breakup of all time more on that later He's been broken up with at least five times. That's how he knows he's a loser. It builds to the fact that his current love. Laura the same name as my wife. So it's weird read. This book has just decided to leave him. Ultimately for the neighbor upstairs. Who robbed thinks is a jerk. Rob Finds Out and he thinks that this kind of sucks rob also works at a somewhat failing record store with to do the name. Berry Dick Called Championship. Vinyl Berry is like the top five mastery sums up all of his ideas and these top five list. How many time crush less than two minutes left okay? Great thank you. I needed that. I WAS GOING TO BURN TIME. So Barry is kind of a jerk and he like when he sells records to people they like ask for record is terrible. You should buy this one instead. That's his whole deal except he's British so that was terrible you should do. This was Dick is like the sweet one. And he's just a nice guy to hang around he gets a girlfriend later in the book And Berries mean to him about it later. Laura baby breaks up with Ian. There's like Oh here's what it is. Rob Is distressed by the break-up Laura so he embarks on a plan to revisit and unpack all of his previous breakup. It's a mix of facts fact-finding and inflicting damage on other people to make himself feel better. He does have a sort of a relationship with an American musician named Marie. She seems read and played by Lisa. Bonet in the movie. Thank you Margaret Anytime. We stepped interruptions. He has a bad ish relationship with his parents mostly that he doesn't really pay attention to them. He doesn't know how to feed himself into into their lives selfish. Jerk yes and the two big events with his on again off again Girvan Laura Will they get back together? There's a chance maybe in the book Nine percent chance And then her dad's funeral later in the book where they like reconnect over this big event. He goes and then freaks out because he has this real big big bad fear of mortality and then she leaves because she has the same thing and then they get back together and she's like challenging him to be a better version of himself. But you still got kind of slacker loser guy and he's now thirty five seconds and now that I've interrupted you. You have thirty seconds okay. And he's not sure if he can toss off this mantra that he's been living by. Which is it's not how you what is it. It's not the way you are just thought you like you like. It's what you like what you're like what you like. And that's how it starts the book and then the book is really just his journey to the other version of that sentence. Which is it's not what you like. It's what you are like well So so I'm sure. Let a whole bunch of stuff out so if you love the movie then you're like what about that scene where they are going to talk about but I wanNa make sure that we all had a working knowledge of the plot and I usually on our show take a lot longer than that but we have other stuff to talk about so call me. How many seconds left you over? You ran out of time. Un over but like barely over and we were trolling you the whole time. Yeah good I think you crush. They're very proud of yourself. Screaming proud you should feel like you just sold a copy of blonde blonde by Bob Dylan to someone who didn't have it in their vinyl collection and desperately needed thanks. Margaret. That's all I needed to hear today so that we know where this book came from. Andrew wanted to tell us about our author Mr Hornby. Oh you mean Nicholas Peter John Hornby one in the same love to telling you Sean. So many how many I names does the Guy Danny. How First Name Yeah. He is best known for books like High Fidelity also about a boy which both became successful movies and early two thousands published..

Girvan Laura High Fidelity rob Andrew Berry Dick Margaret I Nick Hornby Atv Nicholas Peter John Hornby Marvel Joan cusak Hulu Cusak Jack London Bob Dylan Katherine Chauhan Barry Marie Lisa
"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Which is fantastic there's no categories you have to worry about anything like that neither has an annual fee and so it's the best simple worst straight up deal out there okay so it was city and if I haven't a fidelity account yeah so if you have anything do you do any investing it have any retirement accounts or anything at fidelity investments I do all right Sir fidelity would be an automatic CO two for you and they have a variety of options for their two percent cash back card and if you just sign into your account at fidelity you'll be able to search for the fidelity visa card and it'll talk you through the particulars and then you can pick which kind you want so you can have one of the re as I recall you can have one that just rebates the two percent of everything you purchase in to a fidelity investment account or into a fidelity Roth IRA or if you have any five twenty nine accounts for anybody into five twenty nine account so okay and you said there is no annual fee no annual fee nothing is just and no gotcha this is just the straight to percent I love it and when when do I see that two percent at the end of every month I'm trying to remember with fidelity with city double cash you get it every month you get one percent back on your charges one percent back on your payments okay so it's they're both really simple streamline things but when you sign into your fidelity counts they'll explain the particulars about how they find one of the three choices have for fidelity and I love these because most people don't benefit from airline miles they think they do but they don't value they get isn't worth it and most of those who have to pay annual fees and with these cards you just simply get cash to use as you wish you're listening to the Clark Howard show.

fidelity investments Sir fidelity Clark Howard
"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You have to worry about anything like that neither has an annual fee and so it's the best simple worst straight up deal out there okay so it was city and if I haven't asked the delegate count yeah so if you have anything do you do any investing it have any retirement accounts or anything at fidelity investments I do all right Sir fidelity would be an automatic go to for you and they have a variety of options for their two percent cash back card and if you just sign into your account at fidelity you'll be able to search for the fidelity visa card and it'll talk you through the particulars and then you can pick which kind you want so you can have one of the re as I recall you can have one that just rebates the two percent of everything you purchased in to a fidelity investment account or into a fidelity Roth IRA or if you have any five twenty nine accounts for anybody into five twenty nine account so okay and you said there is no annual fee online you'll see nothing is just and no gotcha is it's just the straight to percent I love it and when when do I see that two percent at the end of every month I'm trying to remember with fidelity with city double cash you get it every month you get one percent back on your charges one percent back on your payments okay so it's a they're both really simple streamline things but when you sign into your fidelity account they'll explain the particulars about how they find one of the three choices have for fidelity okay and I love these because most people don't benefit from airline miles they think they do but they don't value they get isn't worth it and most of those you have to pay annual fees then with these cards you just simply get cash to use as you wish you're listening to the Clark Howard show.

fidelity investments Sir fidelity Clark Howard
"fidelity" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Lowest cost provider the low cost provider when actually I have favorite children. And so it's hard to pick. Yeah. It's like when parents are asked you got you got these these four kids, which twins, really your favorite. Why don't have any favors? So now, you're you're doing that to me with investing. So tell me who it is you feel like I'm dissing fidelity you've mentioned on your show. They have two widely diversified funds. Mutual funds that have come out have a ton of really low cost. No transaction fee each. Yes. No minimums, no account minimums to start. They've really kind of blazed the trail of lowest cost in my opinion. Yeah. The zeros such a brilliant marketing campaign around the fidelity zeros, which have no commission and no ongoing fees that they absorb all the fees. I think this is absolutely great. What fidelity fidelity? Let me tell you why this came about fidelity had found itself steadily losing market share to nachos fan garb. But also to the bigger player out there that most of us states don't pay a lot of attention to black rock. And so the two of them were taking all the market share. There was out there. So fidelity coming up with the new product Fidelity's zero has set down a marker that no one can say they're not the cheapest because obviously fidelity at no cost is offering a better deal than anybody else. And so they have the total stock market index, which is thousands of US companies all in one investment at no fees at all. And then the international index fund, which is thousands of international stocks. Oh, free. So fidelity is. In the game solid. What else they've done? What's that? So fidelity used to have relatively high cost target retirement funds. And now they have two flavors of them. They have an extremely low cost series of target retirement funds. And then they have their old one that still has very high cost will not high cost, but. Higher than a low cost company should be offering. So they have become much more aggressive on the fee front. And so do you invest with fidelity? And you wonder why I always talk about vanguard or were you trying to figure between the two. So I've invested with fidelity and just kind of comparing costs and also kind of was invested in their ecosystems through the two percent cashback card. Good for you. Explain that. Because a lot of people don't know that fidelity offers one of the two best credit cards in America. Percent cashback on every every purchase you run through. I think it's underwritten by a separate Bank. But you get two percent cashback deposited into any of your fidelity account. So. Man's best on a cow or it can be an right or a college savings plan. Exactly. Yeah. So so you want to know, why do I always talk vanguard vanguard vanguard when Fidelity's doing all this good stuff? Exactly on a number of calls. It seemed like people were asking which way to go, and you kind of lean towards telling them vanguard, and I was just struck by that guy. And so I should not be offending fidelity. Because they do a great job Schwab. Does a great job. I mean, these companies are huge companies and they've all become lower costs, but vanguard really set the pattern and set the tone and took the market share. And that's why they are the ones that created the pressure in the marketplace for lower costs, and maybe that's a sentimental thing. But you're probably right. I should be talking about that fidelity is well now offers a series of Oltra, cheap choices for investing. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. You're listening to the Clark Howard show. Nazis, Pershing American history. People fast. Video series. This can be. Watch the new season that the man castle now on Amazon prime video. Here's.

Fidelity US Clark Howard Amazon Schwab America Oltra two percent
"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"The the lowest cost provider the low cost provider actually favorite children and so hard to pick. Yeah. It's like when parents are asked you got you got these these four kids, which twins, really your favorite. Why don't have any favors? So now, you're you're doing that to me with investing. So tell me who it is you feel like I'm dissing fidelity you've mentioned on your show. They have to you know, widely diversified funds mutual funds that have come out. They have a ton of really low cost. No transaction fee each. Yes, no minimums account minimums to start. They've really kind of blazed the trail of lowest cost in my opinion. Yeah. The zeros sexual brilliant marketing campaign around the fidelity zeros, which have no commission and no ongoing fees that they absorb all the fees. I think this is absolutely great. What Fidelity's done? Fidelity, let me tell you. Why this came about fidelity had found itself steadily losing market share to nachos fan guard. But also to the bigger player out there that most of the United States don't pay a lot of attention to black rock. And so the two of them were taking all the market share. There was out there. So fidelity coming up with the new product fidelity zero has set down a marker that no one can say they're not the cheapest because obviously fidelity at no cost is offering a better deal than anybody else. And so they have the total stock market index, which is thousands of US companies all in one investment at no fees at all. And then the international index fund, which is thousands of international. Stocks. Oh, free. So fidelity is in the game solid. You know, what else they've done? What's that? So fidelity used to have relatively high cost target retirement funds. And now they have two flavors of them. They have an extremely low cost series of target retirement funds. And then they have their old one that still has very high cost or not high cost but higher than a low cost companies should be offering. So they have become much more aggressive on the fee front. And so do you invest with fidelity? And you wonder why I always talk about vanguard or were you trying to figure between the two. Invested with fidelity and just kind of comparing costs, and I also kind of was invested in their ecosystem through the percent cashback card. Good for you. Explain that. Because a lot of people don't know that fidelity offers one of the two best credit cards in America. Percent cashback on every every purchase you run through. I think it's underwritten by a separate Bank. But you get two percent cashback deposited into any of your fidelity account. So. Man investment account or it can be an. Right. Or a college savings plan. Exactly. Yeah. So so you wanna know why do I always talk vanguard vanguard vanguard when Fidelity's doing all this good stuff? Exactly on a number of calls. It seemed like people were, you know, asking which way to go, and you kind of lean towards telling them band guard. And I was just struck by that, and so I should not be offending fidelity. Because they do a great job Schwab. Does a great job. I mean, these companies are huge companies and they've all become lower cost, but vanguard really set the pattern and set the tone and took the market share. And that's why they are the ones that created the pressure in the marketplace for lower costs, and maybe that's a sentimental thing. But you're probably right. I should be talking about that fidelity is well now offers series of ultra cheap choices for investing. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. You're listening to the Clark Howard show..

Fidelity United States Clark Howard Schwab America two percent
"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Call them. The the lowest cost provider the low cost provider. Actually, I have favorite children. And so it's hard to pick. Yeah. It's like when parents are asked you got you got these these four kids, which turns really your favorite. Why don't have any favors? So now, you're you're doing that to me with investing. So tell me who it is you feel like I'm dissing fidelity you've mentioned on your show, they have to know widely diversified funds mutual funds that have come out. They have a ton of really low cost no transaction fee. No minimums account minimums to start. You've really kind of blazed the trail of lowest cost in my opinion. Yeah. The zeros is such a brilliant marketing campaign around the fidelity zeros, which have no commission and no ongoing fees that they absorb all fees. I think this is absolutely great. What fidelity fidelity? Let me tell you why this came about fidelity had found itself steadily losing market share to nachos fan guard. But also to the bigger player out there that most of us states don't pay a lot of attention to black rock. And so the two of them were taking all the market share. There was out there. So fidelity coming up with the new product fidelity zero has set down a marker that no one can say they're not the cheapest because obviously fidelity at no cost is offering a better deal than anybody else. And so they have the total stock market index, which is thousands of US companies all in one investment at no fees at all and then the international index fund, which just thousands of international stocks all free. So fidelity is in. The game solid. You know, what else they've done? What's that? So fidelity used to have relatively high cost target retirement funds. And now they have two flavors of them. They have an extremely low cost series of target retirement funds. And then they have their old one that still has very high costs will not high cost but higher than a low cost companies should be offering. So they have become much more aggressive on the fee front. And so do you invest with fidelity? And you wonder why I always talk about vanguard or were you trying to figure between the two. Invested with fidelity and just kind of comparing costs, and I also kind of was invested in their ecosystem through the two percent cashback card. Good for you. Explain that. Because a lot of people don't know that fidelity offers one of the two best credit cards in America. Percent cashback on every every purchase you run through. I think it's under written by a separate Bank. But you get two percent cashback deposited into any of your fidelity account. So. Investment account or it can be an right or a college savings plan. Exactly. Yeah. So so you wanna know why do I always talk vanguard vanguard vanguard when Fidelity's doing all this good stuff? Exactly on a number of calls. It seemed like people were, you know, asking which way to go, and you kind of lean towards telling them vanguard, and I was just struck by that, and so I should not be offending fidelity. Because they do a great job Schwab. Does a great job. I mean, these companies are huge companies and they've all become lower costs, but vanguard really set the pattern and set the tone and took the market share. And that's why they are the ones that created the pressure in the marketplace for lower costs, and maybe that's a sentimental thing. But you're probably right..

Fidelity US Schwab America two percent
"fidelity" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"fidelity" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The the lowest cost provider the low cost provider actually favorite children and so hard to pick. Yeah. It's like when parents are asked you got you got these these four kids, which twins, really your favorite. Why don't have any favors? So now, you're you're doing that to me with investing. So tell me who it is you feel like I'm dissing fidelity you've mentioned on your show. They have to you know, widely diversified funds mutual funds that have come out. They have a ton of really low cost. No transaction fee. ATS no minimums no account minimums to start. They've really kinda blazed the trail of lowest cost in my opinion. Yeah. The zeros such a brilliant marketing campaign around the fidelity zeros, which have no commission and no ongoing fees that they absorb all the fees. I I think this is absolutely great. What fidelity is done. Fidelity. Let me tell you. Why this came about fidelity had found itself steadily losing market share to nachos. Dan, Garbutt also to the bigger player out there that most of us in the United States don't pay a lot of attention to black rock. And so the two of them were taking all the market share. There was out there. So fidelity coming up with the new product fidelity zero has set down a marker that no one can say they're not the cheapest because obviously fidelity at no cost is offering a better deal than anybody else. And so they have the total stock market index, which is thousands of US companies all in one investment at no fees at all. And then the international index fund, which is thousands of international stocks. Oh, free. So fidelity is in the game solid. You know, what else they've done? What's that? So fidelity used to have relatively high cost target retirement funds. And now they have two flavors of them. They have an extremely low cost series of target retirement funds. And then they have their old one that still has very high cost will not high cost but higher than a low cost company should be offering. So they have become much more aggressive on the fee front. And so do you invest with fidelity? And you wonder why always talk about guard or were you trying to figure between the two. So I've invested with fidelity and just kind of comparing costs, and I also kind of was invested in their ecosystem through the two percent cashback card. Good for you. Explain that. Because a lot of people don't know that fidelity offers one of the two best credit cards in America. Two percent cashback on every every purchase you run through. I think it's underwritten by a separate Bank. But you get two percent cashback deposited into any of your fidelity account. So. Investment account or it can be an investor or a college savings plan. Exactly. Yeah. So so you want to know, why do I always talk vanguard vanguard vanguard when Fidelity's doing all this good stuff? Exactly on a number of calls. It seemed like people were asking which way to go, and you kind of lean towards telling them vanguard, and I was just struck by that. Yeah. And so I should not be offending fidelity. Because they do a great job Schwab. Does a great job. I mean, these companies are huge companies and they've all become lower cost, but vanguard really set the pattern and set the tone and took the market share. And that's why they are the ones that created the pressure in the marketplace for lower costs, and maybe that's a sentimental thing. But I you're probably right. I should be talking about that fidelity is well now offers a series of ultra cheap choices for investing. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. You're listening to the Clark Howard show..

Fidelity United States Clark Howard Schwab Dan America Garbutt two percent Two percent
"fidelity" Discussed on The Future According to Now

The Future According to Now

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"fidelity" Discussed on The Future According to Now

"The development of plastics was a revolution in manufacturing that raise standards of living around the world it turned a manmade material into an essential part of our lives that may never change but with the unforeseen environmental damage being caused by the use of plastic we may be ready for another revolution driven by consumer demand the development of new materials that can give us what we need without harming the planet we all share move the future according to now is a podcast from fidelity investments to learn more or to get in touch visit us at the atlantic dot com slash fidelity podcast listen on apple podcast or spotify next time i've seen that face before a look at the news developments in these scanning technology thank you for listening promotional content produced by atlantic rethink the branded content studio at the atlantic for fidelity investments fidelity and atlantic rethink the branded content studio at the atlantic are independent entities the views and opinions expressed by the speakers are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of fidelity or its affiliates information presented is for information purposes only and is not investment advice or an offer of any particular security this information must not be relied upon in making any investment decision fidelity cannot be held responsible for any type of loss incurred by applying any of the information presented these views must not be relied upon as an indication of trading intent of any fidelity fund or fidelity adviser fidelity and the fidelity investments in pyramid designed logo are registered service marks of f m r l l c copyright 2016 all rights reserved.

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