35 Burst results for "Fevers"

Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

07:11 min | 2 d ago

Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

"Everyone's been talking about tease or non fungible tokens this week for those in the audience, you aren't sure what those are. If you remember Crypto kitties which were unique collectable digital casn I still think they exist. That's just one example Jake. Can you define what a non fungible tokens and then we can dive into why there's so much chatter about them. Now, absolutely, I mean the simple definition of a non fungible. Is a token. That represents a unique asset work to crypto currencies where we have many units that are all worth the same like if I had one ether Laura when ether those are you know they're the same value but if I had one crypto kitty and you had another Crypto Kitty, they actually might be valued totally differently your crypto kitty might be really scarce and valuable might be resume common, and so non fungible tokens they really represent this this. This class of unique assets that's out there. Into what's been going on with them recently, why has there been so much chatter. Well. As someone who's been watching the space for for a very, very long time for from the very beginning. When Rare Pepe? Images were to be traded on counterparty with it seems like about Elian. Years ago. It's a long time ago. How is before Cryptic Eddie's? I think what's what's actually happening is that the space of non fungible assets is maturing a little bit and what we've seen is actually a little bit of interesting early conversion of digital creators are creating art and collectibles and other kinds of NFC assets, and they're starting to trade them on marketplaces in the volume on these marketplaces is going up a bit and related to that I think investors have matured a little bit in their thinking about the NFC space and they've started to position in. Make investments a venture style mostly so far? In companies that are that are in the NFC space in it's been very exciting. And there's even a little bit of the yells farming thing going on within fifteen. So I think that's another reason people are getting excited because even though the crees has died down from the fever pitch, I still see. In it But you actually wrote a really interesting blog post about an of to any you had like another definition that you gave, which is you said that NFC's liquid intellectual property for digital content. So what do you mean by that? Yes. This is exactly. What I've been sort of saying is like most people have so far rushed off the NFC spaces. People trading funny pictures on you know on blockchain's. and. If you sort of thought experiment a little bit in you in, you start to understand a little bit of a kind of financial use cases that NFC's enable. You start to realize that if you take this view of teas as strong ownership of digital contents. Things get quite interesting and the first thing to observe is that there is just like a lot of different kinds of digital contents. Certainly there's certainly there's collectibles. But there's also three d models or metaverse assets. There's also stock photography. There's also blog posts that people right and then monetize through syndication. There's music on which artists earn royalty. There's movies which get distributed on platforms like Netflix on and so forth, and if you start to count up the number of digital objects on the Internet and in the world, you actually start piling up quite an asset classes of objects, and if you start to think of NFC's is being kind of a very fitting technology to denote ownership of these objects to denote the royalty streams of these objects on the start to get away from a little bit of the speculative aspects like, Oh, I buy Crypto, Katie I'm going to. Flip it to somebody else later, and you start to get into the more fundamentally valued aspects of of non fungible assets, which is like, Hey, maybe, I'll own the revenue stream to Taylor, saw Taylor swift song or album or something like that or maybe I'll own the movie rights to certain like digital character that I'll be able to license out and when you take that view of. NFC's as liquid intellectual property. What you start to realize is that most intellectual property doesn't live on secondary markets today, it's kind of liquid and what blockchain enables is the liquidity of these markets, and so the reason that I'm super excited about NFC is as an investor is I think that we're about to unlock a whole lot of value that previously has been in these non-traded like. Paper rights, but as about to get a lot more digital. So I have so many questions about what he said. But before we can into those, I do just want to make one comment, which is I notice near blog posts that you had a chart of different kinds of content and one of them said written content. And underwritten it was like movies and videos, and I was like what about articles and e books as a writer? I just had a point that you missed. Right there because I would not call videos and movies written content and and also like even just knowing your example when you mentioned blog post. So is like their professional writers to who like a living writing But. Anyway. Okay. So we were talking you were talking about if he's from the Creator's perspective, but I wanted to ask also. So right now as a consumer I already have you know multiple libraries of music that I can tap like you know music stream from apple or spotify or Pandora Soundcloud, etc or you know I can go into these different stock photography sites or whatever. So what's in it for the end-consumer like what would get them to make a switch? Because basically democratize is the ownership in in this kind of content, right? So if if you think about of stock photography site today like getty images or shutter stock or something like that, I mean you're talking about a private business that is facilitating marketplace between stock photographers and purchasers of stock photography like designers or making websites, and so on and so forth. And this marketplace model is exactly the thing that blockchain. Technology in my opinion was really born to to disrupt and what basically wh what can happen is we can replace that proprietary provisioning of the marketplace with a decentralized smart contract based system, which is exactly what marketplaces like like recently wearable have done, and we can give the ownership and the governance of that system to the community of people who are participants in that marketplace, and that's really really powerful value proposition that blockchain's in general

NFC Blockchain Jake Pepe Laura Netflix Eddie Taylor Apple Writer Spotify Katie I
Fauci details lesser-publicized side effects of COVID-19

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

Fauci details lesser-publicized side effects of COVID-19

"Experts testified today before a Senate committee Dr Anthony found, she notes some Kobe 19 patients are exhibiting post recovery health issues. A number of individuals who viral logically have recovered. From infection, in fact, have persistence measured in weeks, the months of symptom Atala Ji that does not appear to be due to persistent of the virus. They referred to As long haulers. They have fatigue, my Algeria fever and involvement of the neurological system as well as cognitive abnormalities, such as the inability to concentrate. The doctor also said there is

Atala Ji Dr Anthony Algeria Senate
Arlington, Boston, 4th Grader Sent Home From School After Sneezing

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 4 d ago

Arlington, Boston, 4th Grader Sent Home From School After Sneezing

"A nine year old boy and Arlington is sent home from school after sneezing. In class. The fourth grader told he could not return to Bishop Elementary School until he receives a negative test for covert 19. His father says his son has no symptoms and no fever. And his feeling fine. Dad says he hopes he will get the test results quickly so his son can go back to school. The school says the decision was made out of an abundance of caution. After

Bishop Elementary School DAD Arlington
The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | Last week

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
Oxford vaccine trial pause isn’t bad news – it’s the process working

Hidden Wealth

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Oxford vaccine trial pause isn’t bad news – it’s the process working

"What do we know about this specific vaccine for a master's Annika and Oxford University? Because I know that some of the front runners they're developing different types. Some they're using our M Rene and different other platforms for the vaccine. What do we know about this one specifically So this vaccine you this on a dental virus that carries a gene for one of the proteins in the virus that causes co 19 into. The idea is that Theodore virus will induce the immune system to generate a protective response against the virus. And this is a platform that hasn't been used in an approved vaccine. So there's nothing on the market using this platform, but it has been tested in experimental vaccines against other viruses such as Ebola. Well, I mean, it's interesting to know that at least we were able to catch something put the brakes on In all of the early reporting that we had out of this vaccine candidate was slightly positive. There was other side effects, fever, headaches, minor things they were deemed mild or moderate, and everything kind of went away over the course of the study. So hopefully what happened with this one could be an outlier and that they can get back to it and see the larger part of the trial through Yes, I think everyone's hoping for Ah vaccine that safe and effective And I think, while there were certainly some concern in response to this news, it can be very reasonably seen, as is the system working the way it's supposed to.

Headaches Oxford University M Rene Theodore
Fever confusion: How to tell apart COVID-19 and the common flu

WBZ Midday News

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fever confusion: How to tell apart COVID-19 and the common flu

"Many of us will phase, especially this fall and winter is a cove it or is it the flu, CBS's Christine Lazare spoke to a specialist, both influenza and covert 19 are highly infectious respiratory illnesses. And Dr Jason Care. Kino with one medical in Beverly Hills, says the symptoms of both are very similar. We're talking fever, chills, muscle, a cough, fatigue, shortness of breath, runny eyes, runny nose. But there is a key difference. The incubation period for the flu is quick about 1 to 2 days from exposure with Cove it it could be anywhere from two days. 22 weeks where symptoms that we don't see with flu Influenza we do see with covert 19 is a loss of sense of smell and taste for both covert 19 and flew. It is possible to spread the virus for at least a day before experiencing any symptoms. If a person has cove it, they may be contagious for a longer period of time than if they had just the flu. The

Influenza Cove Christine Lazare Dr Jason Care Beverly Hills Cough CBS
No more temperature checks? CDC changing COVID-19 screenings for international air passengers

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

No more temperature checks? CDC changing COVID-19 screenings for international air passengers

"The international. The majority of travelers say they don't understand why temperature checks would be discontinued International travelers or not, I recently read that fever was the very first symptom that you got. You might have other symptoms that you don't even know about it. It's pretty hectic as it is. One more thing isn't gonna you know. Don't make it any longer way run temperatures for a lot of different reasons, So I think that's probably unfortunate. But there's something very simple to do Teo identify at risk individuals. The new CDC guidelines that will take effect on Monday. Focus more on educating passengers letting people know arriving from international destinations that air high risk what they need to dio things like self isolating staying away from other people. At

TEO Fever CDC
Kool & the Gang co-founder Ronald 'Khalis' Bell dies at 68

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Kool & the Gang co-founder Ronald 'Khalis' Bell dies at 68

"A musician with a popular band has died the man who helped put the cooling the cool and the gang has died a publicist for the bands as cool school founder and singer Ronald police bell died at his home in the Virgin Islands with his wife at his side no details on the cause of his death were released cool and the gang was one of the big recording groups of the nineteen seventies with a popular blend of jazz funk R&B and pop and after a brief lull they returned to stardom in the nineteen eighties the group won a Grammy for its work on the Saturday night fever album they'll road and compose some of the group's biggest hits including celebration cherish and jungle boogie bill was sixty eight years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Founder Virgin Islands Grammy Ronald Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ronald 'Khalis' Bell, Kool & the Gang co-founder, dead at 68

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ronald 'Khalis' Bell, Kool & the Gang co-founder, dead at 68

"A cofounder and singer of Kool and the Gang has died at the age of 68. Belle, who also went by his Muslim name police by on died at his home in the U. S. Virgin Islands. That's according to his publicist, who did not release the cause of death. Bell and his brother, Robert, formed the band with their friends from Jersey City in 1964. They went through a number of names before becoming cool in the gang in 1969, Bell wrote. And composed some of the group's biggest hits, including Jungle Boogie Celebration and Summer Madness. The group won a Grammy for their work on the soundtrack for Saturday Night Fever Back in 1978, composer, singer

Bell U. S. Virgin Islands Kool Grammy Belle Jersey City Robert
Xbox Series S Revealed

Beyond!

05:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Xbox Series S Revealed

"Nintendo announced a cool breath of the wild prequel that is a high warrior sequel both the sequel and a Prequel, but it is not the pre sequel borderlands. And of course, Xbox also announced you know the the price and date of the series ass and actually confirmed that box after a week and playstation. PUT UP A blog post yesterday that said we're going to be highlighting PS VR this week, and there won't be ps five announcements now that could. And that could just be related to be. Without. was sure a down note to really start the week on them and the like by the way no ps five stuff. It definitely made me go this week thinking, okay. There's going to be a quiet normal week and then a bunch of stuff leaked or broker was you know a officially announced from the other guys over the weekend but they also put up a a Haiku of. A. Video of from go SUSHILA which I love that game is awesome. I think one of my favorite things about that game is that every time somebody plays it for the first time they flood the timeline with photo mode pictures you're consistently reminded of just how breathtaking and wonderful that game has But. They put up this thing and it was basically just like take some time to relax and was a video of a Haiku and we want to do that. I assure you fans. But if you look at the We are a fever pitch excitement for next Gen right now and I think we just want some news so. If, it's definitely been a weird forty-eight hours. It was funny because this morning as all the series s news was coming out and we will talk about that. I think in conjunction with Sony. But it was funny that like on my trending terms on twitter Sony was the top one on my list like it was not xbox Sony and that's like now there is this question, the room of like Yes for those who didn't see it xbox confirmed this series ashes real thing they confirm the price of it at. To Ninety nine and the release date November tenth, they didn't say anything about the series ax which is weird to me that after all these months, they would only reveal the lower price system that they hadn't talked about officially in any capacity, but we're leaking via like inserts in controller boxes right but not not the box that they've been advertising to you is the thing to buy. They still haven't told us anything about that Yeah, which is crazy because it's like we have been in this game of chicken for. Ten months now I mean yeah. Yeah if you think about the the the. Series It was revealed that the game awards last year in December gressier and. That day or I would say that or this this entire generation, we've had a pretty good idea that the PS five was a thing or was going to be thing. And so he spent this entire year in this you know cat and mouse game of chicken nonsense between the prices in over the weekend somebody leaked the series s price and release date forcing Microsoft's hand at I believe three, am yeah. Redmond that Yeah. Sorry. Yeah. Like props to that social team at like three. AM The they just tweeted out like one of those means like, oh Yeah about that, and then they official information and then they came with Mike they reacted so much more quickly than I would think a major corporation could act three at three am on a Monday on Labor Day holiday weekend. Yeah. Most people were asleep Europe was wide awake and ready to rock and roll. So if They officially announced the the price and everything, but we also got the release date, which is crazy to me because that is like leaker has finally forced the hand of the next Gen console conversation to begin for the first time in now six th whatever eight weeks away from when this hood. Considerably come out and said, that's an November tenth, and so that is I believe like the first possible. I like next date we have at Sony could either. Cut off as before or come after like. It gets super weird. Now it's so strange. So like looking at this as just a random like, let me do the math of my calendar November. Tenth is a Tuesday. We have seen consuls release on Fridays so. I don't the weird thing about xbox not announcing the release of the series acts, which is frontier purposes the like the competitor to the PS five the two things that we're seeing go head to head. I. Think Series SS planning to a different market and we can talk about whether or not that will end up in their favor but that's releasing on a Tuesday. It would be weird to me if they're like the series XS out Friday on the thirteenth. Right, I would assume they're going to be the same day but I don't know my guest then is like I'm i. Pretty confidently, I'm going to stick with the idea that Sony goes to the week after. which is that's kind of where I'm at the Sixteen Sixteenth through the twentieth. So either seventeen to the twentieth would be it's still before the shopping rush that occurs around Thanksgiving North America. or in the US so. It's before all that it's before cyber Monday it's still gets them to like be within that conversation, but it also gives them as much time as possible before that. Right I mean I. I, don't. Will a couple of things? One I think you're spot on a to it's weird to see a console launch on a Tuesday like you said I don't know if historically that's happened before I remember being really annoyed growing up in New Jersey because we this thing called the Blue Law which meant that you couldn't most most stores in our county or closed on Sunday sort of like in an observation of. Religion but also because a lot of people just didn't want to deal with New Jersey. Traffic and so people who aren't even you know religious like my dad would vote for this

Sony New Jersey Nintendo Microsoft Europe Twitter Redmond Leaker United States Official Mike North America.
AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine trial paused after 'potentially unexplained' adverse reaction in participant

Here & Now

05:17 min | 2 weeks ago

AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine trial paused after 'potentially unexplained' adverse reaction in participant

"Hobson. I'm rather young. It's here and now and let's start the hour with the news that the drugmaker AstraZeneca, which is in partnership with the University of Oxford in England. Has put its cove in 19 vaccine, one of nine potential vaccines in a face retrial on pause after discovering that a trial participants in the UK had a serious adverse reaction. Adam Feuerstein is covering this for partners that stat. The health and medicine publication and Adam Hearing that a Koven 19 vaccine study has been put on hold is concerning, but you say This also means the system is working. Yeah, Obviously, these vaccines that are being developed recovered 19 are being very closely followed. This is probably not the news that people wanted to hear. But I think you're right. Robin in that, you know, clinical trials are set up to not only determined the efficacy of the vaccine but also did determine its safety. And in this case, you know you want a clinical trial to be able to Pick up an adverse event, a safety issue if one exists, and and all of the company's behind these potential vaccines, has signed a statement saying that they will not release anything under any pressure before they think it's completely safe. So this is in fact kind of underscoring that perhaps But in a statement, NPR, the company said the next step will be to determine if the illness is related to the vaccine or just a chance event. How did they do that? What do we know? So far? All right, As you can imagine, the participants in these clinical trials are closely monitored. You know, the ultimate goal of acting clinical trial is to determine whether the vaccine can protect people from infection. From Cove in 19. So you monitor these patients, and so when an adverse event comes up, you know some sort of side effect that is unexplained. That will be communicated to the people who are monitoring the safety of the clinical trial. And then depending on the severity of the seriousness of that of that side effect, you know, certain steps will be taken now in this case. AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford have paused their clinical trials. So what that tells you is that this was a serious adverse event. I mean, if a patient just like, for instance, if a patient has reported a mild headache, That wouldn't stop a clinical trial. Well, even if it's more than that we mentioned before we have a colleague whose husband is in the fight, sir. Trial he got very, very alien vertical couldn't sit up. He was nauseous, Terrible headache. And it didn't have a fever, and it was not of concern. In other words, it was one of the reactions that was expected to a vaccination. So this must have been A serious reaction. But when you say pause the trial we know that thousands have already had their two doses of the vaccine. When you say pause. What does that mean? Stopping new enrollments? What does that mean? Well, what what That means, And it's not entirely clear. But based on our reporting what it means is that particularly the US based clinical trial, and that's a trial that AstraZeneca Just recently started at the end of August that patients who have been who've been enrolled in that study or scheduled to receive their first vaccinations have been told had basically been put on hold. They've been told to, you know, call later, we will reschedule your appointment. So at this point, no one is getting vaccinations until They determine, you know the cause that the patient who who experiences adverse event was in the UK, so presumably was in the UK based study, and that's a study that's further along then the one that was in the U. S, which recent would just only just started well, and we know it was going well in the UK because the Lancet reported in July that there'd been no adverse Effects there. But now that there is this pause, what does it mean for other companies? Trials? We know AstraZeneca ultimately hopes to do the same thing. The other drugmakers hope to do, which is encouraged the body to produce antibodies to fight off Cove in 19. But they have different delivery systems you know, into the body the way they're, you know, asking, sells Teo to do that. So what is the fact that AstraZeneca has paused mean for the other companies? Trials? Just remember that they're different vaccines using different technologies, right, So not all the vaccines are going to have sort of the same side effect profile, And that's one of the reasons why these clinical trials are important. Because we will sort of get a sense of what the side effects are for each individual vaccine. So what this means for the other drugmakers? I think it's just a reminder that you know, safety is just as important as the efficacy of these vaccines, particularly when you consider that potentially they're going to be given to millions and millions of people. And it's the reason why The drug makers are running these really large clinical trials, right? We're talking about tens of thousands of participants because when you do clinical trials of that size, that's when you are a better able to suss out the safety of these vaccines. If there is some very rare side effect that occurs, you know, it's very difficult to find that potentially if you on ly have let's say a dozen or maybe even 100. Participants. But when you have tens of thousands of people, that's where you are better able to identify a potential risks. And Feuerstein, senior writer it stat. The health and medicine publication Adam, Thanks so much. They should have me, Robin. The photos out of the San

Astrazeneca Adam Feuerstein UK University Of Oxford Robin Adam Hearing England Hobson. Adam Fever NPR United States SAN Writer Lancet TEO
Philadelphia - Pennsylvania Health Officials Urge Everyone To Get Flu Shot This Year Amid Pandemic

KYW 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia - Pennsylvania Health Officials Urge Everyone To Get Flu Shot This Year Amid Pandemic

"Health officials are preparing for their annual battle with influenza this year. It is more important than ever to get a flu shot, Health Secretary Dr Rachel Levine says. Next month, Covert 19 will collide with influenza when the official start of flu season gets underway and it may be difficult to distinguish one from the other typical flu symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, headaches. Really the very same symptoms that can occur with covert 19. Last year, a record number of Pennsylvanians were diagnosed with the flue nearly 130,000. So, Levine says her department is going all in to prevent that from happening again. We have requested and expect to receive more than 860,000 doses of the flu vaccine. Anyone older than six months of age to get a flu vaccine unless they have a medical condition that prevents them from getting one.

Flu Vaccine Influenza Dr Rachel Levine Nasal Congestion Secretary Fever Official
New Fitbit Watch Tests Your Temperature  And Your Stress Level

Business Wars Daily

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

New Fitbit Watch Tests Your Temperature And Your Stress Level

"The last few months chances are you've had your temperature taken more often than you had in the last few years from the hair salon if you're allowed to go there to the doctor's office, a quick forehead scan is often required before you set foot in the door today more than ever having a fever means you shouldn't be around others. But by the time you actually get to your destination and find out that you're running hot. You've probably been in contact with other people that includes the person holding the thermometer. And if there's one thing we do know about Couva, it's that contact can spread the virus wearable device maker fit bid is trying to cut off such exposure before it happens. The fitbit sense is equipped with sensors that may be able to detect covid nineteen and flu symptoms before you can even feel them the device has a new temperature sensor. It can also you monitor your breathing heart rate changes and blood oxygen levels. FITBIT has been part of ongoing research in Covid nineteen prevention. The devices are already being used to detect symptoms at health organizations like Stanford. Medicine, and in May, the company launched the Fitbit Cove Nineteen study. fitbit users can opt in the devices apt to answer a few questions and share their biometric data goal is to help it build an algorithm to definitively detect covid nineteen before symptoms start and speaking of Covid nineteen fitbit cents is also designed to help you manage stress levels one sensor measures, small electrical changes in your sweat, which can help you monitor your body's response to stress. The FITBIT APP can help you understand your response and then take action maybe a guided meditation or a long walk perhaps. The did sense will ship later this month as far as pricing the device will set you back three, hundred, twenty, five bucks. That's about seventy dollars less than its biggest competitor. The Apple Watch apple still dominates the wearable device market making up more than half of global smartwatch sales. The Apple Watch six is expected to be available for sale later this month. Apple cider predicts that the watch will have improved heart monitoring capabilities. No plans for adding temperature sensors were reported just how effective wearables could be in preventing covid nineteen spread remains to be seen. But as device makers learn more about the virus and its symptoms, they may be able to pinpoint the biometric changes that matter.

Covid Apple Fever Couva Stanford
The price of rare plants

On The Ledge

06:08 min | 3 weeks ago

The price of rare plants

"Right. Now it's time to talk about rare plants and when this turned into a ranch, I wanted to be a reasoned argument but I hope that this will give you pause for thought about what's happening in the house blunt world right now, I guess I got really alarmed about plant prices. When applaud the I've been lusting after suddenly went up in price. As many of you know through the podcast I've been looking for a piece of Panteli sensation, a cultivar of tons of area. Correctly Justina As been moved to the dressier genus, the snake plant, I've been looking for. Peace or a plant of this particular offer longtime. Now, for some reason, while they're common in the US, they just aren't that common here in the UK and I haven't found a shop selling them I think couple of people found a plot shop in Poland selling them, but I still do not have one of these plants. So I. Put an Ebay search save out there. So that anytime anyone put one of these plants on Ebay. I. Would know a few months ago the last cutting that I had been watching the last pup that I've been watching when I think he has for about twenty five pounds and I missed out on time because I thought that's a bit expensive. Anyway another pop came up from the same seller I think very recently about two or three weeks ago. I was Kinda getting excited because the price was still quite low are and all watching the countdown and the price was still about ten pounds and I thought. The chance here? How much did it go for? It went for it went for about eighty seven pounds. For a tiny stick of a snake blunt. Thanks to the listeners by the way who offered to send me a piece of their bench Elson session from the US very kind of you. But I don't think it's a good idea given plant health and spread of diseases to be importing individual plants from the US plus. Don't think it's worth it for the air. BYLES. Of course, there are other house plants that are going for much much more. The headline in The New York Post recently was some sucker in New Zealand just spent five thousand dollars on a house plant. There was a variegated rafic for a test drive perma with variation, the basically split relief in half between the regular caller and sort of golden yellow. and. That plot went for eight thousand, one hundred fifty New Zealand dollars on the site trade me nuts about five thousand. Dollars in other words, a lot of money and there is a track record for plants on this trade me site going for a lot. There was a Hoya I think it was a Hoya compactor with the reverse fair Gatien the way for six and a half thousand New Zealand dollars. A before POPs a couple of months before I'm, and of course, we all know about the variegated monster at unsown. With those little holy leaves marked with cream the have also gone for some really interested. High prices recently, this has been building for a while. Now, this trend towards rare or Unicorn House Plaza cost a lot of money but I think that lockdown has exacerbated this desire for plants as lots of people who want to. Live and up their Home Office of got into the House plant thing during lockdown adjust desperate for these very, very rare loans. And I think we've really got to take the long view about this in that planck. Crazies are really nothing you. My first thought is back to the fern craze in the mid eighteen hundreds I wasn't there I'm not quite that old over my children would probably beg to differ. So in the mid eighteen hundreds around the world. There was a firm fever that really took of people and lots of women in particular were going out and bought an ising and looking for funds in the wild and buying. Funds from nursery such as the famous and now defunct lodges of London with the huge glasshouses, and these were really desirable things to own back. Then the talent teradata mania was coined by Sir Charles Kingsley and he wrote your daughter's perhaps I've been seized with the prevailing Tareyton mania and are collecting bind funds with wards cases where into keep them for it's you have to pay and wrangling over unpronounceable names of species which seemed to be different in each new book that they buy till the territory mania seems to you somewhat of a ball. So that might be familiar. Scenario of of wrangling over the names and buying the special equipment, the wards cases, which is just the original server terrariums plots in. So that is an illustration of the fact, this is not a new a new thing. Plunk raises a bit around forever I mean even Coleus those cheapest chips plants that you can buy very very easily are certainly not subject to a premium. These days were at one point something, very new, exciting and expensive. If you check out Dr Catherine, Horwitz Book Potted Histories, you'll find out that a dozen new coleus hybrids sold at auction by the RHS's one, hundred, sixty, eight when for three, hundred, ninety pounds. How much three hundred ninety pounds is worth today about thirty thousand pounds so As I say it's not new and equally even further back in history chilly fever and sixteen thirties same time citrus trees also massive status symbol mainly because you needed an orangerie to keep them in. So. Wild prices for applauds are nothing new

New Zealand United States Unicorn House Plaza Justina The New York Post Teradata Plunk Elson UK Sir Charles Kingsley RHS Dr Catherine Poland London Tareyton
Dwayne Johnson, his wife and daughters test positive for coronavirus

The Adam Carolla Show

02:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Dwayne Johnson, his wife and daughters test positive for coronavirus

"The biggest man in Hollywood taken down. But ever. So briefly, by Kovic Nineteen Dwayne, the Rock Johnson has revealed that he and his family all tested positive for coronavirus he broke that an eleven minute video on Instagram the rock has wife. Their two little girls having two years old four years old contract the virus they've recovered. He said the girls had some sore throat issues. It sounded like you know fever like symptoms but there okay. Ru-. The Rock and his wife got the brunt of it. said he said scratchy throat and that was it with the kids the kids he never even said fever like. All the clip I saw he just went they had a scratchy throat. I mean like sniffles and Jews lugging nothing for them. And then he said that him and his wife got it but he didn't really get into detail about what their symptoms were. I don't at least in the At least in the snippet I saw Oh, you didn't. You didn't hunker down for all twelve minutes of. I watch depar- talking about this I mean he said it. He said they felt worse than the girls did the girls were you know it was just basically like being sick? But But. Here's a clip of Johnson giving advice on what to do to stay healthy right now because he wants us all to be healthy. Older. Everything we can to boost our immune system antioxidants taking vitamin staying hydrated goes back to have my own two hands. It's got to control the controllables, and in this case, we can control the controllables might to hand philosophy, D-. So the takeaways be disciplined be disappointing when it comes to people coming over to your house, get them tested you never know. Be, extra cautious don't let your guard down. Boost your immunity. With antioxidants vitamins, things of that nature, and if you're already doing that thing great great word if you. Are Out there and you're like, well, we're GONNA do it when the new year comes or want to do it I know I should do it but what should I do? It's really easy. The effort is really minimal. It's just a slight tweak in how you approach

Fever Johnson Hollywood Depar Kovic Dwayne
Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

"Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver has died at 75 from dementia and Cove in 19 and Calistoga, where he owned Seaver Vineyards. Ah, five time 20 Game winner a 13 time. 15 Gamewinner spent 12 of his 20 seasons with the Met's most notably in 1969 when he led them to their first World Series title after they averaged 107 losses. During their first seven years as an expansion team. I have first really got to know him when he moved to Calistoga in around 99 or 2000, and you started working weekend games for the match. He would come into our broadcast booth because he would drive to and from SFO so he would listen to Giants games on the radio and my crew go and I would occasionally talk about why? Because Kruger was a big person in introducing me to a wide and teaching me about one and fever was starting the wine business. Well, then I go to the mess get chance to work. Tom and then had the incredible honor a couple of times of being invited up to his home to see the passion he put into the wine business. This is whats admirable about him. He sold everything that he and his wife, Nancy. Oh, they sold everything in the late nineties to buy this piece of land in Calistoga. Tom built a house and then he planted the grapes.

Tom Seaver Calistoga Seaver Vineyards Giants Kruger Nancy Fever
Flu-related death reported in Riverside County, its first of the season amid fears of possible 'twindemic'

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Flu-related death reported in Riverside County, its first of the season amid fears of possible 'twindemic'

"Already underway in Riverside County, where they have confirmed their first death Now, Ah man in his eighties from the San You Sento Valley, who died last week in a hospital. We're still a few weeks away until the flu season really begins to rant up, so health officials are urging everyone to get their flu shot before October if you can. They also note that some of the same measures used to curb the spread of Corona virus may also help stop the flu, like wearing a mask and frequent Hand washing. While we're talking about the flu, with so much emphasis on the search for a Corona virus vaccine, it's important to remember that now is the time to get that flu shot. The fluids here. Case is already being reported across the nation, including here in Southern California. But there are those who still just don't want to get a flu shot, even though they're readily available. Here's how Dr David Vegas puts into perspective the argument over taking it or not. Do you want a little bit of inflammation in your arm, which is the flu shot? Versus inflammation in your lungs, which is getting the flow and the answer. Obviously, as you wanted in your arm, there is no downside. With the exception of feeling potentially a sore arm and maybe a little bit of a fever for, you know, a few hours after a flu shot That's it. The downside of getting the flu can obviously be death but also can be other long term ramifications. Health officials say the flu shot is even more important this year because of the Corona virus pandemic.

FLU San You Sento Valley Riverside County Inflammation Dr David Vegas Fever Southern California
Birth Story with Britt Nilsson Byrne

Babes and Babies

06:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Birth Story with Britt Nilsson Byrne

"I would love for you. To share I guess did you have? Like a birth plan going into it or were you just super open? Both. So. Good. That's and yes. So yes and yes and you know what I have so many friends and I'm a little crunchy I'm not the crunchy have lot of friends who are like do a home birth and better? and. I really respect people that do actually get. So cool I've heard like the best stories of people were like I've just had it in my bathtub and like my family's in the kitchen having snacks and cheering my husband was in the bathtub with the and I'm like that is so romance amazing for me every time I prayed about I felt like I was supposed to be in a hospital I just did and like well, that's not as sexy. I was like that's what I feel like I'm supposed to do. So that's what we did and You know I did a little birth plan in my I went to this the health place that I've been going to like my my My bursting crew are amazing. They're so sweet. So they gave me they're like fill your birth plan but just know that it's probably not going to end up like this and so I felt very prepared in that way like don't go in. It's going to be two hours vision into of this and then do the you know. And so for me actually I was I was way overdue like Noah was not coming out I actually had to like I wasn't di- lady all I've gone to my checkups and I'm sure you've heard of a fully bowl. that you put in, I don't know if people listening. It's essentially like a little sailing balloon that they just stick to your cervix to kind of down in begin contractions. If you're not opening up which I wasn't, and so I got that done and how Are, you when you did that like almost two weeks, it was getting to the. Yes exactly. As two weeks pass YEP YEP exactly. So, I. had that in the over that night, I had contractions. Now all this is like what all the other people have been feeling this whole. You know like my body is working. And so I went in, they took it out and they measured me and they're like, Oh, you're at five centimeters now's like okay. Great. So I'll just start having contractions naturally and I felt really peaceful about it, but I never did again. And so they had my inductions date set and I went in and it was actually Two days after forty, two weeks I went in to be induced in the morning. And I haven't had any more contractions and then the nurse measured me I'm on the hospital. And she's like you're actually back down to. God and she and she's like I've never seen that before she's like your cervix is actually going back. You know she's like it's regressing and I was like you know and it's just one of those things where it's totally like a mind battle and you're just like do not go into fear right now gonNA panic don't go you know what I mean just I was like, oh my gosh sounds like interesting news like do I put that I don't know but. So anyway. I I. Don't know why exactly that was accept. It crossed my mind and I'll never know but. I actually got healing because I used to have, I, got HP and I had actually the beginning of cervical cancer, and so I got a biopsy and stuff but they're like you need to keep getting checked and you know all this stuff than I actually was prayed foreign had healing for it and I had someone pray for my cervix and like bringing it back to news I was like maybe I just have a really fresh cervix in. Sided won't go downhill. So I'll never know, but anyways, I have I have an interesting survey that was not dilating. So then they they gave me a Tolson they induced me and I labored naturally for like eight hours. And it was like contracts every two minutes like a minute and some long and I was just doing all the yes. Jesus is good. She's coming down like trying to you know positive positive positive every time. But by about eight hours I was literally my body was shaking and it was just like mentally I keep it up anymore so. I was planning on not having an epidural. That was my whole thing I was like I'm GonNa go natural women have been doing this forever You know my husband's here God's here. I'm have my worship is on it's going to be this like amazing female experience and then like literally my body is shutting down and I'm like dying. So it's like. A general. I like look feel like I'm GonNa movie where you're like, okay I'm good up through. So after eight hours of of those contractions I, just my body was having a really hard time. In my mind. and. So I'll also they had to break my water and. There was there was Makoni in a little baby poop because I was so late she's been pooping in there for like two days. So it was. So they're also telling me if if. She's not out soon, we're going to have to do a C section. So there is so many points where I was like don't give into fear like just you know Jesus this your plan housing even if act against the second, that's okay. You're going to be with me but I'm like afraid of blood and surgery so I was just like no, but okay. But okay. This mental mental that else. So I got an epidural and then it was about twelve more hours and then I, pushed for one hour like of active labour and to be honest it was it was like incredible fifteen minutes after I got the girl I literally I was like shouting. I wanted to use her. Because I was then able to look to rest. Yeah, and actually enjoy and be a part of this thing instead of just like these waves of don't give up here how who don't have been out out out out for eight hours. You know it was just exhausting and I'm actually glad and went through. It sounds like it's a human experience to me always worth having but. Joe was such a relief I was like. Oh. My God you know the nurses aren't allowed to force you to do anything, but I was like you guys should enforce you. Why do you let me sit on the bed and paper radars you crazy but anyway so so that was really a relief for me for me and everybody you know it's so personal for everybody but. I kind of had humble myself and I was like, okay, take it, and then I was so grateful So then even my pushing I'm like I had one nurse named Wanda was holding one foot in Jeremy, my husband's holding by other foot and I'm pushing in. We're like laughing because I'm not feeling any pain able to laugh like her head's coming out nearly giving your Mohawk and making jokes and I'm put. Such, a such a joyful wonderful experience and I didn't feel the ring of fire like I didn't feel you know all of these things that people have scaring newest. and. So for me, it was just it was beautiful. It was a really wonderful experience know when she came out, they had to suck all the amount of her. And they were just amazing. So for me like I had to be in hospital and I also had to have antibiotics getting fever. There's Poop, India so. For me like God's new, that's how mine was going to go down and so a hospital birth was great for me. But I, I heard great things other ways but. For my first house that list as it was meant to be it ended up being great. It was a wonderful experience.

Cervical Cancer First House Noah Sided India HP Makoni Wanda JOE Jeremy
"fevers" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"fevers" Discussed on The Talk Show

"Only I've told this story before but it's still my favorite is and I'm not. I'm not a like a radical on the issue. I just staunchly believe that. Fahrenheit is a better scale for for For weather because it's based on the human condition. Not who gives a crap? What the boiling point of water is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard in my life that that's within a problem in Celsius is not precise enough right if it in the car like it adjusts it by point five because a single. It's too much for car. So yeah it's it's a Fairways Fahrenheit it's more finely greened in a positive way right. Well we're talking about this. This was and as this As we learn more about the COVID nineteen you know. We realized that fought. Fever is still very common symptom but it is an absent. You know there's plenty of people who wind up terribly ill who never have fever. You know. So it's it. It doesn't prove anything but in the early days they were like it was it was a lot of Make sure you don't have a fever. You know and even now you know like an it like I think you say that you guys go out to eat you get like temperature check and I know that. That's a worldwide thing at airports as as airports prepare for the return to some semblance of normalcy with travel that passengers will be given temperature checks. Just you know. Anybody has a raging fever. Let's let's get them out of the get them out of the queue. But I don't understand how you know you do it here. You get you two degrees. Hi Hey you might have a fever. You know Celsius. It's like what are you like a tenth of a degree often in. You've got a fever. I mean it's crazy. It is funny because that's one. I've had a harder time but it's weird because I think because I paid much more attention to fever temperatures once I had kids then before and so it's super locked into my head. The Celsius numbers that are relevant for fevers and actually have a hard time with Fahrenheit was like oh one hundred and three temperature. What does that mean is that bad? Honored Water go poor ice into the TUB and you know I mean you gotTa. You're in big trouble one hundred. No it's Nice 'cause one hundred one hundred major probably have a fever right so one hundred one hundred hundred is a thirty eight point three degrees Celsius in its thirty seven. Thirty seven is ninety. Eight point six Fahrenheit. Well what is it? Ninety eight point four and I. What is the fair? Well See. That's the thing I just linked to this for. Over one hundred years it was considered ninety six and ninety eight point six was considered normal. And and now they're saying experts are saying the average healthy human temperatures actually lower than ninety eight point six. But they don't tell you what it is. They're not saying it's ninety eight point two. They're just like Oh it's nights not ninety eight point six and the reason we've said ninety eight point. Six one hundred years was that there was some guy like in the eighteen ninety s who like went around and did the hard work of taking the temperature. Like five thousand people figured out the average is ninety eight point six but the consensus now. Is that everybody back then was actually sick all the time because right but this is an example easier thirty seven is normal and thirty. Eight is a fever. You don't get there's no decimal points necessary so maybe just by sort of my by luck in happenstance. It happens to be numbers. One hundred sounds dangerous. You know what I mean. That's the thing see. That's the thing that I love about. Fahrenheit and arguing with people about it is that the beauty of the metric system. Is this idea that you know it's based on.

fevers
"fevers" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

02:13 min | 6 months ago

"fevers" Discussed on Family Secrets

"In our house around that time. I was instructed to never answer the door even if I knew who it was after the mail went. Missing the phone got shut off a vulnerability that wasn't there before seemed to permeate our daily lives. Anyone and anything outside those drapes those limestone walls possessed intentions. We can never be sure of the only trust one another. My Dad becoming increasingly convinced. Mom was right that someone was out to get us. Entrusted me was keeping the property. Say we started saying things like if someone crosses the gate they're yours. You have to protect the property at fourteen. I became hyper vigilant. Always on guard at the end of each day. My neck and shoulders ache from fatigue from long hours. If Keane attentiveness I heard each passing car. Search the is if every strange and familiar face at the store that my no nonsense father and brazen spitfire mother had failed to protect us. Only convinced me that they needed my help. Paranoia became an obligation a twisty kind of duty to my family. That's accident bets Hamilton. Reading from her book the less people know about us. A memoir of betrayal family secrets and stolen identity stolen identity. I can't imagine anything more unsettling than having your very sense of self hood the thing. We all think we can count on stolen. The financial ruin is just the tip of the iceberg primal terrifying personal stuff to have your identity. Stolen is to be handpicked by an invisible malicious force singled for ruin. That's what happened to access them. From the time she was a kid. She was told that her parents were being targeted by a mysterious identity. Thief Years Later. She found out that she had been targeted. To and was the last person she possibly could have.

Keane
"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

02:36 min | 10 months ago

"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

"Going to jail whatever anyway speaking of aliens what else is going. Oh I on hug so bad and they just remember and it's so funny. Okay so speaking of my conspiracies about aliens let's take it back to Round two thousand ten. Maybe maybe nine when Animal Planet came out with their Mermaid series. Talk About The fucking mermaid right now as I was a nice ride nine year old. Okay maybe ah you know by the time like dessert came out with two or three think and I was watching those from the time. I was like seven to like thirteen team and I remember vividly. I go on this family vacation every year to this little beach town. Actually the exact Shannon my fucking gene track meeting where I met my curly hair that in the last episode of this episode. Oh well if you want to hear about that the town that I had a track meet in there. I'm well just listen to my last episode. I basically that was my first real of my life. I met at that track. Meet so feel free to that anyways. Same town We go there every year for like family vacation and all my cousins all of us are you know. We're around the same age and we're watching this animal planet special about Mermaids all of us being so obsessed with that we loved leg all loved all of us love like marine biology at that time we're obsessed with the ocean in Mermaids and all those things so I actually me and my cousin wanted to be marine biologist. Then I stopped caring about that I I mean I still care but he says I don't want to make that my job I'll let the other kids do that That care but anyways so basically if you don't know what it is it's basically this documentary that it's kind of a reenactment of what was supposed to be a story about basically some guy saw this mermaid on a beach h and then he took it with him or something or he got a video or something and then they found the remains. And it's basically this whole story about how the government stole that evidence improve of Mermaids from him and then it just dissipated into Finnair and now everybody he but then somehow the government took the evidence but somehow he still has photos of. Yeah so animal planet made this documentary. Well Me Thinking Animal Planet was strictly factual I I was like I fucking.

Finnair
"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

02:18 min | 10 months ago

"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

"By giving you fever. That's kind of the same answer as the last one. Honestly you clarify your really close. I'll give you that. I just want to hear me okay. So so when your body temperature rises because an infection. That's how the beavers are caused by chemicals called pyro Jen's flowing through the bloodstream. HYDROGENS are substance typically produced by a bacteria hydrogens make their way to the hypothalamus in the brain surgeons bind to certain receptors in the hypothalamus body. Temperatures rise one purpose of a fever is thought to be to raise the body's temperature enough to kill off certain bacteria and viruses sensitive to temperature changes. Okay so far but yeah I'll take it but I'm just gonNA kindly as my high both album issues too. It's a little bit better because I can't be getting fevers ever again. I quit that yeah. I can't don't do that. I don't think there's anything having a fever like I really can't name one thing. I've gotten hundreds of Migraines in my life and Migraines migraines version really bad. That sucks too. I'd say migraines in like Migraines constipated. Fevers nothing comes close to those just absolute tears and I deal with all those things you know. And it's God gives his toughest battles to strongest soldiers in me. Being concentrated in once a week is just that okay. He's like you know what you know. this no one else can handle those things like me with a lot of mental strength. It takes off mentoring. It's not easy anyway. Well League next no. Next time I get a fever I will definitely be posing it on mainstream story tomorrow. When you're coming out of my mouth fishing for compliments you will see it not even fishing for homeland fishing for somebody to come over and like rub my back or something? That sounds weird. I I love that though I league of my friends like if I'm like are you caring. You know what I mean like. They love that. I'm very sensitive. Thank you just wore off ski for sponsoring this episode of stupid genius. Have you been naughty or nice. This year Swarovski is just the SPARGO for you. Celebrate this holiday season with must have designs for every style and personality that are perfect forgiving or self gifting.

fever Migraines
"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

03:16 min | 10 months ago

"fevers" Discussed on Stupid Genius with Emma Chamberlain

"Hey guys welcome back to Subic genius. Hobie having a good day that was smooth last is episode. I really really stumbled there and I know that because I filmed the two seconds ago so anyways recorded it. faulk Uber Hearts for life. anyways today we're talking about fever's raise your body temperature. You know a year ago today I had mono and it was. It was the worst thing that ever happened to me like easily model. I hope you never get it guys. I don't drink from your friends. Water bottles like just don't do that. It was awful like I literally fever for nine days straight. It rarely went away breaking breaking. The fever was a nightmare I was at the ER literally every other day for because they could not figure out what it was. 'cause Manos are defined in your body like you'd never find it so basically basically yeah. I'd like a terrible case mono luckily didn't get tired. That was a weird thing so it was like I had mono but I didn't have a lot of the symptoms but it was really bad so I had a fever for nine days and then actually this year around my birthday I added some sort of virus again. The gave me fever for almost two weeks and I was really for the count. y'All I did not get outta bed for two weeks. I literally was on my couch and I would just be like like literally. Like half finagle on my couch under a blank with a heating pad but sweating with ice pack at the same time and I would be sleeping but I'm like drenched drench through the blanket. My couch drenched there. My couch like my heating pad was literally ruined one of my heating pads. I think because I sweat on it so so much that he just like died like I was wrecked. I get like really my ass kicked. So today we're talking about fever's make your body raisin as in temperature which for me is apparently something that has affected my life a lot because I've gone some shitty fevers especially within the last year and and I really really hope. I don't get sick anytime soon because I like that shit will white. I wiped like some people will be like have sick with like in half do it like they can have function like like for me. I get the most incredible four fevers that literally like magazine that I can't walk and like I can't even do anything to sleep so I'm very familiar with fevers. And how they affect my body so I wanNA know why it makes your body temperature like why am I. Add a solid one of four. Every time I get sick almost going to the hospital. Why does that happen to me? You know by Zapping to you. We're GONNA find out but before we do. I love dogging like fucking looking family feud host. It makes me feel something or like. I'm a fucking news anchors but before we get to that it's handbag over to Jeff over here. Jeff yes see I definitely do that Shit. Oh my God if I ended up like being like you know candy you anymore. I'm just going to be a news. Announcer odds are although I think they have to wake up super early not down for that. So the word of the day it's Let me try to pronounce this hypothesis have Pasta. I'm sorry sorry go ahead do.

fever Subic Jeff
"fevers" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"fevers" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Governor Tony fevers decides to put political ambition. for Democrats ahead of common sense and taxpayer dollars it's it's an amazing story that's gonna it's kind of in the weeds but but it's again it's one of these Amazing Stories Sean Duffy is of course the he just stepped down yesterday he was the congressman that represents kind of the northwest portion of the state huge district it is a solid Republican district all right but YVR is doesn't want it to be a solid Republican district so here here's what's going on and it's just it it just it makes you trust roll your eyes involuntarily okay Duffy steps down so there needs to be a special election to fill the remainder of the feast term okay so here here's the deal in Wisconsin we already have a spring primaries set up for it's going February eighteenth February eighteenth people all over the state are going to go and they're going to vote in a spring primary election for non partisan offices the clerks offices could be open people are going to be voting there is a general election April seventh and that's going to be for all the non partisan offices there's going to be a Supreme Court race that's going to be on the ballot and there's going to be the presidential primaries it's gonna be a big deal a lot of people are going to be voting Iverson could have easily scheduled the Duffy a lecture the special election for the primary for February eighteenth and the general election for April now whoever wins is gonna have to turn around and run again in November so they're only gonna be constant for a few months but but regardless you you could do it you wouldn't have essentially any extra cost because the clerk's office you're gonna clerk's office is gonna be open in February and then you can have the big election in in April delivers to that no what did he do he's announced that he's going to have the primary. election get this on December thirtieth which is a Monday. it we we always we always have elections on Tuesdays but he's decided that Tuesday is new year's eve so he's going to have the primary if you need one on the week between Christmas and new year's he's going to do it December thirtieth and then the general election is going to be January twenty seventh now keep in mind also what this is going to mean for their this congressional district involves about like eighteen counties are so what our clerk of courts doing around the end of the year cruel and not even a make you go on the radio answer this there's this thing called property taxes clerk of courts offices are swamped with trying to get property taxes out get you you've ever seen of clerk of courts office on the thirtieth and the thirty first people running to pay their property taxes well now in all these counties in addition to having to deal with this thanks to governor Tony Iverson they're going to have to be also dealing with conducting an election on December thirtieth a Monday between Christmas and new year's while you're trying to deal with property taxes and then they're going to have the general election it's scheduled for January twenty seventh now on the one hand you get I guess a congressman theoretically sixty days earlier right because the somebody's gonna win in January as opposed to having to wait till April seventh so you you get seventy two months earlier but really you're going to have a huge cost you're going to have a huge inconvenience and the point is you know kind of so what so what's really going on here what's driving this well I believe in this comes back to the state Supreme Court election if you have a congressional race that's going to be going on April seventh well then you're going to have that's a heavily Republican district at the solid Republican district you're going to have more Republicans motivated to come out to the polls they're going to vote for whoever the root. the nominee is and they're more likely to vote for the conservative Supreme Court candidate that's not something that Iverson wants to have happen so by rushing the election having it two months earlier putting the clerks of courts through all this stuff you argue ability to press the vote the partisan vote for that spring this spring general election maybe less Republicans turn out you know some people would say okay if you're over thinking this no that's exactly what what's going on here it's a solidly Republican district I am appreciate that it's important to have representation but the truth is Congress isn't going to be doing that much between the end of January and early April of next year anyways will the people in the district be horribly hurt if you don't have somebody that's filling that seat then the answer is no we could save the taxpayers thousands and thousands tens of thousands maybe more in dollars but we're not doing it because I think the governor wants to play politics go figure this is Jeff welcome to the team check stick around Jeff Wagner is right around the corner. you expect me to you this is Jeff Wagner he is not a home improvement expert thirty two to furnish just.

Tony fevers congressman seventy two months sixty days two months one hand
"fevers" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"fevers" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

"Relapse. Some of them never improved completely and unfortunately also about thirty percent died of malaria area right because it's so bad yes because malaria especially there wasn't always control for which type of malaria and sometimes they'd get it wrong. They thought a patient had one type and and they really had a different type of malaria and some of them are more aggressive than others or more fatal chill. Malaria may have that really bad stuff. They just want to the fund malaria and it was hilarious serious malaria. Why would you need to get out of a field trapper. You dream circles that malaria so he <hes> he continued to do these these treatments and as he published results it became <hes> so interesting to the rest of medical community that a lot of other people started following suit and and they tried other types of fevers. They <hes> tried something herat by fever. There was a an african relapsing fever all kinds of things that we probably would identify different names today but basically let's let's give our patients something to make them sick and then get a fever and then maybe it'll cure their tertiary syphilis <hes> in some places instead of giving them inoculations of blood from other patients they would actually like get mosquitoes does that carry malaria and like capture them and just put them on the patient like put like a little cup or something over it so it had to sit on your arm until it home plate you home pleasant. It's also kind of exploitative for the mosquito right. What do you want me to just perform on command. I'm not a robot. I e on hungary. Maybe a little while by this dude but gimme a sec. You know they've done this. I may have mentioned this in our malaria upset but they've done this in places to look like the density of like mosquitos in an area like they'll have people just sit out and get bitten and count how many mosquito bites they get period of time tonight work if you can get it but <hes> i love science <hes> but anyway for all of this work and then all the people who followed in his footsteps zia he won the nobel prize for medicine for the discovery of malaria therapy for tertiary listen 1927 voice and this was this was used for quite a while eventually they they started creating something called fever machines. That's a good. I got a bad name rank. I i don't know i don't know it's a good name. Definitely definitely a more exposure. It's a it's a good name. They start getting these fever machines or fever cabinets <hes> and they use this technology based on all tra- sounds to like heat up these big. They look kind of like iron lungs. It's like a big thing you lay in like your head sticks out and they get they make you really hot. They induce a temperature of one hundred and four and four hundred and five they want to get you really hot like a very serious fever <hes> to to treat at the time it could be any kind of infection like it was tertiary syphilis but they tried it for other infections that were resistant to any other treatment <hes> they tried it for cancer when we can diagnose but had no idea what to do with cancer. They started using this kind of treatment for cancer. <hes> you can find a lot of cool pictures of this online. If you're interested i would recommend google. Oh it is cool sittard either call. I ever gonna think they're cool. They also do this and that showed the nick. The they cure a case of tertiary souflias john hodgman's the neck they cure case of syphilis with a fever cap and i remember thinking like no way but you know the thing is there's enough data to say there may have been some people who went into remission from this from this therapy <hes> from heating people up <hes> it is possible bull that this did work somewhat sometimes <hes> obviously it wasn't an ideal treatment <hes> and fell out of favor for multiple reasons and this was used. I should say this was was used standardly until like the fifties but of course antibiotics came around in the forties and that would that would be the death knell for a lot of <hes> interesting justin but ineffective treatments actions so with the rise of antibiotics. We had a much safer. Orioles antibiotics much safer much more effective treatment for syphilis. <hes> you know also we you know consider giving patients infectious diseases intentionally <hes> unethical ethical grab so we would not give a patient malaria today and it's and it's an interesting conversation because he did i mean his justification is what a lot of bad science is based don well. We don't have anything else and you're gonna die of this so i might as well try this and that's i mean that's unethical. There's a reason we don't we don't do that. That's not good enough for sure. I are b- approval you gotta do better. You can't just say well. We don't have anything else to try it <hes> but this came out of the heroic era of medicine so when everything was a little higgledy-piggledy legal the penalty i mean it was just like i have no idea what i'm doing but i'm dr so let's go look at this cool mirror. My head come on. I'm gonna give have you malaria now. So obviously we don't do this anymore. <hes> there is some interest in like the concept of elevating the body temperature richer to help alongside other treatments for infections or for cancer. I saw that there's some of that research that's been done but none of this is like standard right now. So if anybody's offering you fever therapy for your cancer fever therapy for an infection. I would raise an eyebrow at that. That's not real because i mean this is all just an interesting area of research and it would all be used in conjunction with real monreale madison antibiotics or chemotherapy or whatever the these these are the ways in which this research is being done but nobody is advocating to give people malaria or any other infection. <hes> please don't do that <hes> but generally speaking fever fever. I think this is one important point to make about fever. It has been scary throughout history because a lot of times people got fevers and died and we had no idea why and there was nothing we could do right. We have many many treatments. Now i still think fevers are kind of scary. <hes> fritzy for your parent yes especially in kids they can be they can make you feel really helpless and it can be really scary but it is important to know that the fever in and of itself is generally harmless to your body audie <hes> obviously very high temperatures or sustained fevers. You know if you're getting temperatures up over one zero three. I i would be concerned about that. <hes> there are things like febrile seizures like a seizure associated with a fever usually happen in children and they can be quite upsetting although generally they are harmless. They can very scary <hes> and things like that. I would get evaluated for of course you're going to anyway <hes> but fevers that you don't know where they're coming from or whatever but but a lot out of the time this idea i see a lot of people like we've got to get you on the cycle of tylenol and then ibuprofen tylenol an ivy proven in an ice you down and do a cold bath and <hes> all this stuff to like fight a fever and we've been those parents. You really don't have to do that. The vast majority of the time treating fever can make you feel oh better and that's worthwhile. I'm not saying it's not but you don't have to you. Don't have to most of the time it's not. It's not necessary. It's gonna it's you need to address the underlying cause and once the underlying cause is either being treated or in a lot of things like the common cold allowed to run its of course. You don't necessarily have to do anything about the fever so so. I think that that's that's useful to remember <hes> <hes> folks. Thank you so much for listening to our program to play us out <hes> this week from their two thousand and eleven album living in oblivion. This is the fever machine so.

malaria fevers relapsing fever cancer syphilis hungary google nobel prize john hodgman Orioles zia ibuprofen thirty percent
"fevers" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"fevers" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Who have fevers and abdominal pain, it is more common as we age. So the treatment you mentioned is antibiotics so in general, the ones you mentioned Cipro ciprofloxacin and metronidazole are antibiotics in severe cases, where the infection isn't treated someone actually may have intestinal surgery to remove the infected part of the intestine I wouldn't say in your case. The main concern is that someone can get quite sick from the infection. So if they're on antibiotics and still having fevers or chills a few days later, we would just be worried that the infection isn't controlled that someone has what we might call sepsis where they have fevers or getting sicker. So the first treatment would be to get IV antibiotics and in severe case. Diverticulitis is treated with surgery. So I just keep an eye out for worsening belly pain, ongoing, fever chills. If those are the case, you need to seek medical attention. Dave, thanks for the call six five one nine eight nine nine two two six text is eight one eight zero seven see if we can find another text. We have a bunch of those. Let's see what you can find there. All right one person asked. I've been told that I have low T or low testosterone and need therapy. What are the concerns with this somewhat new therapy? So in general, most people don't need to be tested for testosterone levels in men testosterone levels drop as we age, but unless you're really having symptoms from this. This isn't something that needs to be treated replacing testosterone can increase your risk for heart disease among other things. So it is important to talk to your doctor about the benefits and risks of this idea to know more specifics to give you advice about should I be treated or not? But it is an area where we don't have a lot of long term data. So you want to proceed with caution? Now, the Texas about a month ago. I lifted something heavy the area around my elbow has been sore since then when I lift anything is there a chance, I tore a muscle. What do you think? It sounds more likely that what's more communists that the tendon is bothered rather than the muscle itself. Usually when you tear muscle. You would have a lot of swelling at the time a black and blue area where there would be bleeding around the joint. So it'd be more common to have tendinitis or inflammation of the tendon. There are ways to brace the elbow. So you've heard of having someone having tennis elbow, and there is a brace that could support this area. So I check it out with your doctor and see if just wearing a simple brace or doing physical therapy might help. I'd worry less about a muscle problem. Six five one nine eight nine nine two two six align is open to take advantage of that. Or if it's easier send a text eight one eight zero seven Catherine is calling from Blaine with a question, Catherine. What is your question? Komo news. All right question is I try answering. It's a it's a diuretic, Tennessee. Is that known the cars diabetes. If too long actor, I've been told us says so I wanted to ensure that I know what it's like. Sure. So the caller is taking triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide which is usually abbreviated by doctors to h c TV it's a very very common blood pressure pill. You are right that over time. HGTV does raise the blood sugar slightly. I think it's an overstatement to say it causes diabetes because in most people if it raises your blood sugar from a normal level to a little bit higher. It won't make you diabetic in some people who are right at the borderline of diabetes. It may you know, put you over that edge. Most of the time. There are a lot of different blood pressure medications, including this HDTV with triamterene side, talk to your doctor to say, you know, would you rather be on a different medication, but usually on balance, we don't take people off of this because of this relatively uncommon side effect. So it may raise your blood sugar. That's correct to say that it's causing diabetes is a little bit different. It raises a blood sugar slightly, but in and of itself, it's not gonna take someone who's normal and healthy and just instantly give them diabetes. All right, doctor. We need to take a quick break here. Thanks Kathryn six five one nine eight nine nine two two six a text is eight one eight zero seven keep in mind here around the twin cities and surrounding area. Winter storm warning goes into effect this afternoon at three o'clock goes until noon tomorrow and then dangerous wind chills come up Tuesday through Thursday, you stay tuned to see CEO a few clouds now twin city temperatures heading for seven above. But right now, it's eight below zero. Corey weekdays.

testosterone diabetes tennis elbow abdominal pain Diverticulitis triamterene Komo fever ciprofloxacin tendinitis Catherine CEO Dave metronidazole HGTV Kathryn Corey
"fevers" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"fevers" Discussed on WTVN

"Fevers, the main difference between cold and flu? So even accurate thermometer. The extra temporal scanner back to my well, more than seventy clinical. Studies is quick and easy to use traffic and weather every ten minutes on the tens powered by. Tempstar starner's heating and cooling. The next update at six forty. I'm Johnny hill. Newsradio sixteen WGN ABC six first warning weather winter storm watch is in effect or central and northern Ohio kicks in tonight runs all day tomorrow and early Sunday. So we've got flurries and thirty-six today. Clouds overnight, snow moves in for northern Ohio overnight, twenty eight below. And then tomorrow, we get it all snow and ice and rain rain. A better chance south southeast here might see a mix finishing his all snow. Heavier snow melts to our north. It's going to be windy as well. Tomorrow. We get to thirty four early Sunday only nineteen and then overnight Sunday night into Monday single digits may be near zero three keeping you up to date forecast. Powered by the basement doctor downtown right now, very mild thirty six thirty five here at your severe weather station. News Radio six ten WTVN. C airlines began issuing travel waivers for passengers yesterday. With all the storm coming in. We'll talk to our aviation expert coming up at six forty three right now to the newsroom, Scott Jennings joins us, and here is the big story with John expect broke crews to be out all weekend with that forecast for snow and ice across central Ohio. Most forecasts malls show areas north of Columbus getting more snow and a layer of ice possible right along I seventy corridor getting early Saturday area, south of Columbus will see more rain before that snow begins today's.

Ohio Columbus Tempstar starner Fevers flu Johnny hill Scott Jennings ABC John ten minutes
"fevers" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"fevers" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Fevers is going to have his own priorities. Differ. No holds barred skirt off with the fact that it was just incredibly unpopular Steve's fees. Friday for every Friday at eleven only on WTMJ. As the seasons. Change smart, accurate weather. Forecasts are what you need is important to us that you know, what's coming. We don't want you to get caught in the storm. So we're here to help we -sconsin radio station. Newsradio WGM Jay. Time for WTMJ sports update. College hoops today.

Newsradio WGM Jay Fevers Steve
"fevers" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

16:17 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on KTOK

"Davis. Welcome to the program. How are you? Georgia's it's good to hear your voice. I greatly enjoyed it. It's a heck of a ride. I wonder, you know, not everyone is would be willing to come forward and tell that kind of a story you must have thought about it. Oh, I've been thinking about it for years. I definitely spent the bulk of the last two or three years my entire life has been eclipsed by this event that actually as you mentioned took place in two thousand ten, but it really ramped up and the intensity of a Bill as the years go on and that's one of the things that depicted in that documentary. But yeah, I mean, the short answer is I've not wanted to speak publicly about this at all because I've been spending so much time and attention trying to discern what the nature of these experiences actually is. And and to what extent I can glean the meaning behind them. It's been a very very tricky ride. So this is the first time I'm going to have this conversation publicly. I'm glad to be with you. Yeah. I'm glad you're here. I you trace in the documentary you trace or the the roots of this to your childhood when you. Had some medical experiences that you think probably contributed to it. Yeah. It's a very strange intersection. But that's exactly correct. We when I was a kid for probably almost a decade of my life. I had chronic ear infections, which resulted in me having to go in for repeated surgeries. I had tubes in my ears over and over again. But chiefly the way it manifested wasn't high fevers, and I would have high fevers, you know, anywhere between three and six or seven times a year of around one hundred and four hundred and five and in those fever states. I became strangely. I almost skiers states, and I came to know them as a almost another realm and inside of those realms as a kid, I very vividly remember trying to get myself to remember what it was that. I was experiencing inside of the fever states. And then the fever would break, and I was not able to recollect what was special about them for me after the break. But I did remember. Vividly that fevers were specialty me and so later on in life when I started to meditation practice, and when I became a Buddhist practitioner, I immediately had this impulse that. I wanted to try meditation in a high fever state and oddly, right as I began the meditation practice, I stopped getting high fevers, and I I didn't get sick for about almost another decade. And so a lot of time passed before my first opportunity came around which wasn't two thousand ten on New Year's Eve. And that's where that audio doc sort of picks up at the beginning of the precipitating event, and that New Year's Eve in two thousand ten I did get this high fever, very high fever, and I realized and remembered it was my opportunity. So I did I began meditating around eleven thirty at night and as the midnight hour approached and got closer. I had this spontaneous impulse to ask the fever. A question, you know, in a lot of Chamonix traditions or other esoteric spiritual traditions, fevers Camby communication device. They can be kind of altered state that can sometimes carry special information. So I just spontaneously I ask the fever. I wanna meet my spiritual guides. And that is in that moment. I think I was expecting or maybe hoping for some discounted Buddhist monks or something from in my tradition. And instead what happened was this eight foot tall praying mantis entity was definitely mantis. It didn't have intense. So it was not exactly insect toyed. But it was clearly mandated in a purple robe with a high collar, it just appeared directly in front of my bed and immediately. Shop some kind of current some signal it felt like being hit with a current of electric city or maybe like being electrocuted. But it was not painful. There was nothing uncomfortable about it. It just was sort of like, I became a conductor for this signal and transmitted some strange combination of pops and clicks and a lot of powerful powerful emotional current. But there was nothing verbal. So it was a strange experience of like having a very strong transmission of some kind, but it was not accompanied by any linguistic content and the whole thing lasted for less than a minute. I would guess and then it vanished. And the last component of the experience was that. There was one English phrase left reverberate into my head. And that was remember who you work. For so hoping lasted less than a minute. And I honestly I had this strange, hyper lucid feeling I was like intoxicated on clarity or something when it was done. I still had the fever, but it was an indelible vivid electrifying experience, and my wife was gone. I was alone in the house at that time. And when she came home, I told her about it with a lot a lot of animation and excitement, and but both of us just thought like that is very strange didn't know what to make of it. And you know, that kind of brings to a conclusion that first precipitating events. I'll pause there and kiss. Well. In the audio documentary. We suddenly hear your wife. We figure it out. It's a female voice has your wife giving her side of it. And the next day. I guess is next day is when you tell her the story or it was right? As soon as she got home. I it might have been the morning when I woke up because you know, when one of the things that goes on with this. And the reason it was so important for me to have my wife and about a dozen other people that are in this documentary is I had. It's like I almost made this documentary to to help me see that. I'm not as crazy as I feel about everything that has happened to me because luckily, I suppose from my perspective other people have experienced almost every component of this with me with the exception of that initial event. So yeah for sure by the next morning. I had told my wife about it, and you know, from her view from that day forward. I have sort of conducted myself in a different way, I've been consumed with this mystery, but cheaply there was a pause after that it was years before the next chapter in the story happen, which was I was in Amsterdam we had moved stamps for them to live there for a couple of years. And when I was there, I met an artist named jasmine MOVA and the first time that I met her. She was sixteen years old singer-songwriter I ended up signing her to my record label and releasing her record. But. What was going on sub textually while that was going on is that as soon as I saw her. I just saw this entire movie in my head. And it was her in it, and the whole story was predicated on this character finding this mantis insect and having that redirect her whole life. And then she ends up in this very strong paranormal relationship with the larger version of the mantis entities. The non human intelligence entities that story culminates. And I thought that was so strange, and I knew emotionally I knew somehow semantically that the film. I was seeing when I was looking at her was tied to the initial event that happened on new years. But I thought it was so strange, and I had just met this artists that I didn't want to freak her out and say, hey, I'm seeing this whole movie in my head. So I didn't bring it up. I just went and wrote an outline of the film and set that aside, and basically waited years. Even bring it up to her that I had put together this outline because the other thing that was going on in my head is that this film is so strange. No one's gonna wanna buy it. It's really what kind of my my own unique thing. Yeah. The line that you use in the documentary is there is no way someone will make a paranormal sex trafficking movie in Russian. Exactly. Right. And the funny thing is her first language is Russian. And so I just the whole film felt formed in fully complete and tied to that initial experience. And so I just said I'm gonna write an outline of this. I'm going to set it aside because clearly that is just an aberrant anomaly of some kind, and then you fast forward to when we return to the United States we come back after a couple of years in Amsterdam. I have signed that artists to my label. I have written the outline of that film, but not the script and I'm at home in Colorado. And I'm down at the dog park in front of my house with my dog, and I'm lying on my back. Just waiting for my doctor to its business, and I see there's nothing visible in the sky. There are no stars out yet. There's there's nothing and I see an orb that is about the size of my fingernail. If my arm is held out at arm's length and this orb is moving. Horizontally across the sky. It crosses a large portion. You know, if you think of viewing the sky in front of you, it's kind of a hundred and eighty degree spectrum. I would say this thing cost maybe thirty degrees of that spectrum, and then it stopped and then it moved straight up at a right angle. And when that happened I again, I had the same kind of emotional experience that I had with the initial visitation. I was just completely electrified and shocked. It's the most shocking thing I've ever seen in waking awareness. I just knew that whatever it was it had moved at a right angle and stopped. And then continued to do this for probably ten minutes. It was doing a a grid of some kind at of right angles. And very simple demonstration that you know, I don't I'm not saying that there's no explicable accounting for it that it could be manmade. I didn't know. What it was? I just knew that, you know, airplanes don't move at right angles. They don't stop in the sky satellites don't move at radicals and stop in the sky. But I was also so worried that if I wanted to go get someone because I was just me and my dog as worried if I got up it was going to vanish and Finally I couldn't take it anymore. And so I ran home, and I got my daughter, and we went up on the roof, and this is all recorded and accounted in detail in the audio doctors and my daughter, and I go up on the roof, and she sees the same thing, I do, and we starts recording and filming this object. It's the craziest thing and and through the camera because actually I was filming a documentary about my family Wemyss event happened. So by chance I had a camera on the rooftop that had a pretty good lens. And through the lens. You could see and you hear my daughter recount as well, but it's actually not an orb. If it's three distinct spheres of of light. Appoints of light, and they change and configuration to a triangle. And then there's a section where they're horizontal this goes on for a long time. And and we get my wife, she comes up on the deck, and in my opinion, very hilariously look through the lens. And sees the same thing we see, but she's tired. It's like midnight or it's very late and she just wants to go to bed. So she looks lands and reports seeing the same configuration of life that my daughter, and I are watching, but she just goes back to bed because she prefers sleep overseas is strange experiences. So that was kind of the next chapter in this. And what was happening for me emotionally watching this display in the sky was that I just felt this uncanny sense that that events was also tied to the initial encounter with that man mantis entity, and you know, to be honest with you even up to this point and further I was still feeling like there was. An explanation for that initial mantis encounter that might have been somehow tied to my own imagination my own imagination capacity or a hallucination from the fever etcetera. And as these events continue to build it just becomes harder and harder to have that explanation. Fully fit the range of experiences to happen because more people enter the picture. And so after this of your phone, then I made a producer in Hollywood. She buys the script. Even though I ardently tried to talk out of buying the script actually for a while. Because I had all of these other scripts that I thought were quite makeable, and we're much more viable projects, and she just felt crazy passionately focused that she had to have this script. And this mantha story was the story. And so against all odds she buys this paranormal film about sex trafficking, featuring. In a Manfred. Manfred force is one of the pillars of the story. So I ended up writing the script. And I think well, this is cool at least still get to write the script. I don't think there's still probably get made. But I'm excited to write it. And then while I'm writing the script that is when we begin to hire people to come into work on the film. She moves forward. Her name is CNN she's out of based out of LA, film producer. And she moves forward quite aggressively and starts hiring line producers, and and other executive producers and a staff of you know, fluctuating between ten and twenty people begins work on the film, and before we get into that part of it because there's a whole sequence of events that happened that are it's amazing. You know through the the documentary. I thought one of the most interesting aspects was your own in credulity. You know, you're laughing at this thing at how crazy and ridiculous. It must seem you're kinda enjoying it. But you can tell your questioning getting your own head is as real or not. Completely. I find one of the most fascinating elements of all of this is my own inability to accept my own experiences because they have grown so strange. And so crazy that if honestly if it weren't for the fact that other people had experienced many of the things that will relate is as our conversation unfold. I I don't I wouldn't be talking to you. If it weren't for the fact that these were verified and shared experiences, I wouldn't be able to have this conversation. I was so reluctant to admit what was unfolding over the last two years that I have spent at least half of my time trying to metabolize and calm myself down into admitting that these experiences are the ones that I'm having and I don't interpret them. I'm not here to make pronouncements about what mantis entities want for planet earth or something. That's not what this is about. It's really been. My name credulity of you know, I was friends with John MAC. I've known lots of abductees I've five mingled in this world for many years. My world view is that these strange phenomena do exist, and I believe people's experiences, generally, if they're if they're reasonable people, and they have accounts that are sensible. I'm willing to believe people's experiences. But I could not believe my own..

fever Amsterdam mantis Georgia producer Davis. United States Colorado jasmine MOVA CNN Manfred John MAC executive Hollywood
"fevers" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Retired to fix up his fevers are on top of the college baseball that's karl ravaged with the call on espn how 'bout that kevin able brilliant tonight to adly richmond with rbi singles in the first and third michael gretna her with two runs batted in for oregon state zack taylor and rbi single in the ninth for five nothing when as take two three in fact last night the beavers are down to their final strike arkansas was one out away from winning the world series when a foul pop dropping three between three arkansas players then a base hit on the next pitch and trevor lorna calmer to right after that the beavers won the game fired three learning from college park high and tonight oregon state celebrates the third national title under head coach pat casey beavers won back to back titles in two thousand six and seven congrats to cal freshman our first baseman i should say andrew von name the winner of the golden spikes award is the nation's top player led the pack twelve hitting four zero to fourteen doubles at school record tying twenty three home runs rockies with two and the ninth on dj lemay hughes two run home run off sam dyson beat the giants ninety eight and the as win in detroit four to fact they sweep the tigers oakland's one ten of twelve sports at fifteen and forty five and all news one oh six nine am seven forty kcbs music fans we all.

detroit tigers cal pat casey trevor lorna oregon michael gretna adly richmond karl oakland college baseball giants sam dyson beavers arkansas zack taylor kevin espn
"fevers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Now east of the rockies and west of the rockies dave and bakersfield california we'll go to you david go ahead dave debut with us nope let's go to cathy in idaho welcome to the program hi cathy thanks thanks for taking my call well it happened to me when i was five or up until the time i was fine we moved to a nice house in denver wise about three and i spent a sickly childhood in that house as i recall and i would run high fevers like around one hundred and four and when my favorite would spike i would i would be come very on edge not just because i was physically ill but it was emotional too and then i drift off to sleep as i recall and then i'd wake up and sit up terrified and i'd start crying and i was in such great fear that i would get out of bed as sick as i was and start running and i know the feeling i was running for my life and i was being pursued and some entity or entities and i never saw or heard anything but it was just as terrible terror that i can't explain it unless you've ever experienced it so what would happen as i'd run around the house and rouse the whole house and my brothers and my parents would start running after me to catch me because it was as if i was out of my head i was just so so afraid and crying and yelling.

rockies california idaho denver bakersfield david dave cathy
"fevers" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on WEEI

"Fevers with the largest lead at seventeen yes a seventeen point edge for the retrievers of unbc on the number one team at sixty one forty four they wouldn't let the foot off the panel ninety seconds to a sixteen beating on sixty nine fifty two seventeen point lead here's grant i had the lyles lyles run from right to left along the baseline back to lamar in the left corner lavar going baseline bounces it into the right corner open three for jordan with three fingers from here you nbc knocks off virginia seventy four fifty four this has hit its peak sixteen feet so one for the first time he didn't see a history the calls from the westwood one ncwa radio network a sixteen seed never had taken out a one before friday and it was a one hundred and seventy seven ranked team that's what the number was on the retrievers of unbc maryland baltimore county right one seventy seven here's some more perspective for you because this was a rob by twenty points on january twenty first they were beaten by albany the retrievers eighty three to thirty nine eighty three to thirty nine they just took out the top seed in the tournament jarrett's lyles scored twenty eight joe shelbourne fourteen r kelly lamar double double twelve points ten rebounds before friday the most points virginia had allowed in a game this season was sixty eight they were held to thirty four straight games where they held opponents under seventy points this is the shocker of all shockers and it's time for straight talk brought to you by straight talk wireless best phones best networks no contracts ryan ota gms earlier on freddie and fitz simons he's the head coach of these retrievers with freddie coleman and jeff dickerson on his connections to uva and this story upset and keep this in mind he's a former assistant for the cavaliers coach your doubts a former assistant at virginia you were a ballboy for this university what does it been like knowing that you have this connect with virginia and yet you pulled off history with your team tonight yeah it is truly incredible it really is.

fitz simons cavaliers uva jeff dickerson kelly lamar albany maryland nbc freddie coleman Fevers virginia joe shelbourne lyles jarrett baltimore county westwood jordan ninety seconds sixteen feet
"fevers" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"You're listening to his steve singer warne g seventy seven four nine t and the attleboro czar fevers neville because we're to convert him live in the event i i'm the vendrell list of talk radio i'm going to convert carl carl i know you're listening to me were converging bro and by the way i'm a phenomenal financial adviser in back in two thousand eight carl's name who's who in america as a financial adviser so maybe put your political differences aside take me to dinner take me to sids over there at the west gates we can has great prime rib and then let me help you double your money yeah absolutely all right let's go back to our calls stephanie in law excuse me in california threw up next welcomed program um i eat when we donald trump have to accomplish in the first two years of his presidency and the reason i say two years is because if we lose their house stanek instant noodle obtained last two years could be um a total wash and if that happens he probably won't you we elected i will venture to say he's not gonna lose the house on the senate in two years at all unless he just becomes a fool which i doubt lincoln why i can see if he's working harder than i think anybody um as overwork um already but he knew way i see it he has got to dramatically improve people's lives dramatically within two years and i'll tell you why they have to stop struggling they have to have more money in their pocket if he has to build that wall and put it on good border security that will have a direct effect on the or communities namely the black community but will probably stop at least sixty percent of the drugs and guns coming in and go into those black community how keith ellison so much for him the do i eat kids gone and do within ten years because we can you just can't lose their health service summit let me let me tell you.

carl carl financial adviser america california the house senate attleboro neville donald trump stanek lincoln keith ellison two years sixty percent ten years
"fevers" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"It's a better experience work much for electronics because you're not going to buy a tv without having seen you're going to go in there and what these guys it worked on with samsung and some of the other big manufacturers they have best buy line so you can find it cheaper brand but it may not be there and therefore they're going to get your clothes i repeat i mean these guys they decided what the game was they went to war and these guys are competing on price yet you're not going to go and orb this stuff online you may go to walmart put you you're going to go to best buy if you really want electrons beyond the list at the top of the show are there winners this year that you would fade well here's the we talk about semiconductors a little bit but we started to have this micron is the top former yes i think the fevers broken the micron again the fact that they actually i know you disagree but that is the the up five percent now it's lower than where it was i think you're seeing a lot of charge like that and semiconductors maybe not yet in the short term in the short term we have seen this very aggressive rotation visavis buying energy stocks bank beaten down retail names and selling to a degree or outperforming semi's they're down about six percent over the last month in contrast to energy up almost eight percent so fair point but that's just one month think about what we've done over the course of a year and let's just talk once again about the macro it's hard to see gdp picking up these are very cyclical companies so how does the economy going to pick up which is our call but cyclical names like to semiconductors are not it just doesn't make sense the charts are there by them on the pullback this is a pause this is not a breakdown i i i agree with that but i would say if you think of an invidia and even if you think of some of the gaming stocks people believed that these guys are of found created the the new will whatever you want to say that they had found magic and a bottle that no one else can touch and i think actually a lot of that is priced in i think there's a lot of.

samsung walmart energy stocks eight percent five percent six percent one month
"fevers" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"fevers" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"That there's not any that original substance but it helps to move the body in that direction of healing and you're using a substance that in a in can of natural form create symptoms that you're trying to heal so it's really hard to get your mind around that i'm here in silicon valley a lot of you know can engineering scientific minds um that question however it is evident space there is some really good evidence that heavy pat medicines can work for fevers and fluids and ear infections and trauma and even chronic illnesses and so for lowgrade fever and for ear infections the number one homeopathic medicine is fareham phosphorylcholine i'm i did read a blockposts in some of these medicines so katie links to the block was you can look that up to now had a spell that a fair bus work is basically the homeopathic antiinflammatory it targets the station to ray your ear canal to help with the fluid drained is that's causing pain and that's causing inflammation and so that's your goto for your infections in your goto for lowgrade fevers and then there are herbal remedies like elderberry syrup and i know you have a block with how to make elderberry serb elderberry syrup is great it's antiviral it helps to bring down fevers in fact for fluids they found that elderberry syrup was affective in killing the h one n one flu virus that with the you know the big scare years ago so elderberry syrup is a great herbal formula to give.

fevers