17 Burst results for "Fernando Augusta Pacheco"

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:31 min | Last month

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Can I just say, I'm not into it. The booty goes rampant. That's the lyrics. I mean, as correct as he may be about that. I'm not enjoying 20 four ten. But it's an interesting I was reading about and there was even an article on devout about his career and how he comes across and he's very young 22 years. The video is very well filmed. I mean, he's dressed as a Barbie and he dressed as a bride. Basically has many characters in the video. So perhaps a name to be seen in the German music scene. I don't know if he's going to actually be working any other countries. I don't know. I'm not too sure. It's fascinating when you get this slight outliers. I like the fact that 24 term is only 22. Exactly. He's got two more years to go before he catches up or something. I don't know. Exactly, exactly. Fernando, I always ask you to pick a favorite. I think I know where you're headed, but go on, choose one of those 5 to be the standout for this week. You know what? I'll stick with Nina tuba. She, you know, and she introduced me to the world of lied, you know, which I will try after the show. Can I tell? Please do, cheers, Fernando. Cheers. My thanks to Tom Edwards and Fernando Augusto Pacheco. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James, and our studio manager was Callum McLean. The show's back tomorrow at the same time and don't forget to tune into tonight's edition of the monocle daily, which has at 1800 London time. My name's Georgina Godwin, and I'll be back with you for the globalist, right and early tomorrow. Goodbye and thanks for listening.

Nina tuba Fernando Tom Edwards Fernando Augusto Pacheco Rhys James Callum McLean Georgina Godwin London
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:30 min | 2 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Also an audio media consumer, perhaps people only didn't of the existence of podcasts. And now they're starting to discover, which is good for the market. A lot of Brazilians know the story about your podcast, but I wonder if it can give a brief introduction for our international audience. Sure, gladly so during the pandemic, I moved to this neighborhood in which we are right now. It's called. It's a wealthy neighborhood in downtown São Paulo, one of the wealthiest, so people who live here are TV hosts, a former president, and it's a really wealthy neighborhood, and then weeks after moving to my new place, I discovered there's an abandoned mansion in one of the wealthiest and richest spots in the neighborhood. So the existence of this abandoned mansion made me question why is there? An abandoned mansion in a place where buildings were apartments and buildings cost millions of pounds. So I started looking into the house at first, and after a few months I discovered there was a person living inside this house, a older woman who dressed in eccentric clothes, she dressed in really dirty used clothes and she covered her face in some kind of white cream, no one knows what it was, but she was never seen without the cream. And people just knew her as Mari or Mary, if you will. But no one knew exactly who she was. And then I got into this obsessive and very selfish investigation to discover who this woman was. And it turns out she was a person that had been accused by the FBI in the United States of keeping a house made in slave like conditions of work for 20 years. And in 2001, she fled to Brazil while her former husband was judged in the United States and after a trial was considered guilty and she was hidden ever since in this abandoned house for 20 years she was here and she was never judged by the crimes of which she was accused. So yeah, I guess that's the story of the podcast, the story of me trying to help someone, someone I thought was a poor old lady, but it turned out she had been wanted by the FBI and had flat both Brazilian justice and American justice. And of course, you found the story. And you did the podcast beautifully. You know, people would say it's like a book, you know, in a way, very literary, almost tell me about the partnership with foiled SAO Paulo. Did you approach then were they receptive to the idea? Because perhaps they saw, well, there's definitely a gap in the market for us to invest on that. Tell us a bit more about that. And it's interesting because fully São Paulo is a kind of a newspaper. I know they have a digital presence, but they're more known for the paper, I guess. They're very traditional print newspaper, one of the most traditional in Latin America. And I've worked there for ten years. That's where I learned how to report. And now that I'm a freelancer, I'm writing books on creating podcasts. When I started investigating the story and when I came to the point where I realized Marty was actually margarita Bonet, the person who had fled American justice system and was wanted by the FBI and was here in the middle of the city. I called someone a former boss who now it's the director of the newsroom and I said I got a story for you and it took him 30 seconds to say let's do it. So that's how it took place and then I had to America. I went to the United States to the Washington D.C. region to discover whatever happened there, how the trial had been conducted and where the victim was because the victim disappeared after the trial. And I was able to track the victim down and speak to her and she's alive and she's well. After being a victim of such hideous crimes for decades. And I think your podcast hit kind of a sport to Brazilians because it is a slice of Brazil. You know, there's a little bit of racism, a little social inequality. If I may say, and a little bit of drama, for example, I'm sorry, but I did love a little bit when Louisa Mao went to rescue the dogs. You know, it did became a little bit of a circle. So don't you think, as well, the telenovela elements as well helped with everything. I think that, of course, it helped a lot creating a narrative because margaritas is a really interesting person who almost comes across as a character, because the way she speaks to people who are serving her, she's very kind, but at the same time very patronizing, which is very typical of a Brazilian elite. And the way the neighborhood many people in the neighborhood came to her defense, as if trying to preserve a pact. Trying me not to address this issue, which is a big issue in Brazil in 2022 still, which is exploration of work. Slave like work in Brazil and Brazilian houses still one of the largest in the world. It's a sad record, but we keep it. So yeah, I guess there was a very telenovela aspect to it and after the podcast started airing, it became the world became Black Mirror episode people started grouping around the house hundreds of people and clapping and calling her names and then Louisa Mel, which is a really famous animal activist here in Brazil, entered the house and took both of her dogs and it was on television live two hours a day. So yeah, I guess we do like the drama and we do like which is very talent novella. Even if we're handling a series issues such as this, a crime that represents the whole country. For me, the house represents Brazil. It's the way Brazil still treats domestic workers. It's the way people are still enslaved in 2022. That was the Brazilian investigative journalist Chico felici in conversation with Monaco's Fernando Augusto Pacheco. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James, our researcher was Emily sands, and our studio manager was Adam heaton, and the briefing will be back tomorrow at the same time. I'm Georgina Godwin, goodbye, and thank you for listening.

São Paulo FBI Brazil United States margarita Bonet Washington D.C. Mari Louisa Mao SAO Paulo Mary Latin America Marty Louisa Mel Chico felici Fernando Augusto Pacheco Rhys James Emily sands Monaco Adam heaton Georgina Godwin
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:36 min | 2 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Now Brazilians are listening to the radio more than ever and podcasts, which have been slow to take off in the country, are booming. A man who knows this better than most is Chico Philip, who stunned Brazil with his investigative award winning podcast, which examined the life of a mysterious woman living in a house in an upscale neighborhood in São Paulo. He's been speaking to Monaco's Fernando Augusto Pacheco about why Brazilians have finally fallen in love with podcasts. For years now we have been listening that 2018 will be the year of the podcast in Brazil and 2019 will be the year of the podcast in Brazil 2020. And so on, but I guess it was the first time a podcast really hit the mainstream media and was listened to by millions of people and was the talk of the town. Everyone was talking about it. It was on television. So perhaps 2022 is indeed the year of the podcast in Brazil. And it makes sense that Brazilians would like that because Brazilians are very digital friendly, right? I know you're kind of an expert on that. You look at the memes, I think Brazil, let's be honest, it's the best country when it comes to memes, right? We are a big industry where the biggest meme industry in the world. We are very fond of technology and Brazilians are also very fond of radio, radio listening in Brazil still one of the biggest ways of media consumption. So I guess the Brazilians are used to listening to stories or interviews or there are very not necessarily visual media consumer, but

Brazil Chico Philip São Paulo Fernando Augusto Pacheco Monaco
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Since the first days of the invasion, kharkiv has been one of the main targets of the Russian army. Sparing neither the historical heritage, nor the lives of civilians, the Russian army shells the city every day. So I mean, there are a few more kind of cards that are asleep, but I just wanted to say that this effort and this support helps bring world's attention to these cultural losses because over 400 buildings and architectural monuments all over the country, particularly in the east and north have been damaged or completely destroyed. They reveal a breadth and richness of Ukrainian history and identity. And I think they totally deserve to be the stories that we deserve to be heard. And that was volodymyr sheiko talking to Fernando Augusto Pacheco. And for in more information about postcards from Ukraine head to UI dot org dot UA and I'm more or less brings us to the end of the globalist, but we do have this lunchtime the briefing from 1200 British time and the host of the briefing is with me now, Marcus, are you vibrating with excitement? Absolutely, in particular after the amazing show you have done this morning, so it's quite a challenge for me what to do at midday. A few things we have obviously confirmed for the program already so I can tell you that we'll be following very carefully the process and what's happening today when Boris Johnson successor as UK prime minister will be revealed. That's around 1230. So if we are lucky we may get a bit nailed. I think that's the way to go. We should. And just quickly, we heard from Fernando was supposed to go now and Fernando has actually flown to Brazil over the weekend, so we will be getting an update on what's going on regarding campaigning ahead of the presidential election, Fernando is going to be there for a month, reporting that big event for our successively. It's a tough assignment, but I'm sure that Fernando will cope admirably with it, especially apposite after what we've been talking about today with Chile. And Oscar telling us about the importance of Brazil's election. So Fernando there for us. Absolutely. Indeed, the briefing at midday London times 7 a.m. if you're listening in Washington, D.C.. I advise you strongly to listen in, but that is all for debt of Ted edes program. Marcus produced this one along with Sophie monaghan coombs and Emeril, our researchers were lilian fawcett and tamsin Howard, and our studio manager was Adam heaton. After the headlines, there's more music on the way, the briefing is as Marcus said alive at midday in London and the globalist returns at the same time tomorrow. I've been guided. Thank you very much for tuning in.

Russian army Fernando volodymyr sheiko Fernando Augusto Pacheco kharkiv Marcus Ukraine Boris Johnson Brazil Washington, D.C. Ted edes UK Sophie monaghan coombs London times lilian fawcett Chile Oscar tamsin Howard Adam heaton Emeril
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:58 min | 5 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"She was. And again, I have to say this film defied expectations I had a preconception of how the film would look like. But there's also a sense of humor to it, is because I think people that say, oh, it's an alternative film. That's too simplistic. It's definitely not what it is, right? No, I think it's a field full of life. And the idea of the film was to be on the side of life because the lead character, the father of so much life, but he wants to die. That's the paradox because he doesn't have the opportunity to leave as he did before. And that was all this paradox I wanted to show in the film and each time there was some funny moments. It was important to have them in the film, especially because the father as a kind of black humor, a sense of humor, which is very special with his daughter, so the idea was to make a film about life more than about death. And I think he did such a fantastic job as well. And because the character as I say, you know, he's not kind of this perfect guy. He can be a little bit not likeable at times as though. So there must be quite a difficult thing to portray. He could have come across even worse. But there was a nice balancing there. I think the father is someone very selfish, but very clever and charming at the same time. And I love this kind of complex character. You know, they are not totally black or totally white, is not always likeable. But that's something which is very strong to explore from actor and for me as a director. So we worked a lot with already on the character. And we had a very precious thing to help us to describe this character. It was the real tape of Emmanuel with our father, because in the film, in the reality, the notary asked we Manuel to film our father saying I want to die to have a poof of his desire of dying. So we are at this real tape and it was so moving for us for Andre and I to see it. We saw it together and after we used it to create this character. Did you change much of the script to add some of your elements from the films? You really are not. I met some of research about the family because some elements were not in the book. And I had the feeling that there was some kind of gaps. I needed to fill and so I spoke about with Emmanuel husband and with our sister, we still alive. And we give me some clue elements, which helped me to describe more the complexity of his family. For example, the Holocaust background of the family, which was not in the book, and the character of the mother was not totally described, she didn't really exist in the book and for me it was important to have in the film because she's an artist too. She's a sculptor and a great scholar. And I was surprised that Emmanuel never told me about her mother. So it was important to put her in the film. That was Francois ozone in conversation with Monica's Fernando Augusto Pacheco. Everything went fine is out now. You can listen to the full interview with him on the monocle weekly and you can find that on monocle dot com. And that's all for today's program. Thanks to our producers Reece James Emerson and Sophie monaghan coombs. I researchers Lillian fawcett and Isabel Rosen and our studio manager, Christie o'grady. After the headlines, there's more music on the way. The briefing is live at midday in London and the globalists will return at the same time tomorrow. I'm Georgina Godwin, about to begin the long walk home. I'm the one in pink linen, smoking profusely and frowning at cabs. Thanks for listening..

Emmanuel Manuel Andre Francois ozone Fernando Augusto Pacheco Reece James Emerson Sophie monaghan coombs Lillian fawcett Isabel Rosen Christie o'grady Monica Georgina Godwin London
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:21 min | 5 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Are back with the briefing on monocle 24. I'm Chris turmeric. We had to turkey now, which back in 2018, after the killing of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, became one of Riyadh's most outspoken critics, but these past few months it seems the two countries have been putting their bitter disagreements behind them back in April, turkey's Russia type Erdoğan visited Saudi Arabia and this week crown prince Mohammed bin Salman will return the favor by visiting turkey. Let's get the latest on this now with the Istanbul based journalist and author Hannah lucinda Smith. Good afternoon, Hannah. Let's start with just what we know of what might be on the agenda for this trip. Yeah, good afternoon. I mean, the first thing is obviously this is a really highly symbolic trip. As you say, the relations between turkey and Saudi Arabia have been to be honest terrible since 2018 when Jamal Khashoggi was murdered in the Saudi consulate here in Istanbul. But really the riff stretches back further than that it stretches back to the start of the Arab Spring and Erdoğan's decision to throw his weight behind Muslim Brotherhood linked groups across the Middle East groups that Saudi Arabia considers to be terrorist groups. Now, what we're seeing here in turkey is a kind of, let's say, a quiet reversal of that policy. It is not been a successful policy for turkey to put it mildly. You know, time has shown that those groups have been on the losing side of what's happened in the Middle East over the past ten years. And it's really left turkey and Erdoğan isolated within the region. And I think turkey is increasingly facing economic pressures are in the midst of a mountain currency economic crisis here in turkey and really Erdoğan is really keen to find any way that he can to kind of boost economic relations with states that might be able to help turkey out economically. So we've also seen Erdoğan making overtures to the Emirates recently and now with Saudi Arabia as well. And clearly, at least from turkey's point of view, I think he's going to be hoping that there's going to be some pretty profitable trade deals cut on Wednesday in Ankara. Well, it's interesting the way you describe so the two aspects of that on the one hand, perhaps a political recognition then on turkey's part that it was on the losing side, but perhaps it sounds like that was not enough. Is this really also out of economic necessity almost that it is reaching out to Saudi Arabia? Yeah, I think it's a bit of both. But you have to remember that also Erdoğan is facing elections that are going to fall within the next year, the latest state that they can be held as June 2023. That's both parliamentary and presidential elections. And when you look at the opinion polls here in turkey, they're not looking good for him. He's facing his lowest ratings at any point over the past 20 years. And the main reason for that, the big reason for that is the economy. You turkey is kind of stuck in this economic crisis which only seems to get worse. That's partly of Erdoğan's own doom, but then of course there are international factors playing into it as well. The war in Ukraine kind of hang over from the COVID pandemic as well. And yeah, I think Erdoğan is just really looking for anything you can do to kind of ease that economic pain ahead of those ahead of those elections. Well, it's also interesting, as you say, going all the way back to the Arab Spring. I mean, these countries haven't gotten along for a while and turkey made some very clear choices in supporting the Muslim Brotherhood, but also ideological choices. So I wonder, is it easy for someone like Erdoğan to sort of switch that off and now welcome bin Salman to Istanbul? Do you expect some sort of frictions will there be, will there be talk of some of these disagreements? Will there be mention of Khashoggi while he's there? I mean, it's certainly easy for everyone in one sense. I mean, when you've got a media that is controlled as turkey's age, you're not going to get kind of loud voices of protests coming from the media and particularly also protest isn't necessarily banned, but it's incredibly hard if your protesting against something, the government is doing your protest is likely to get shut down pretty quickly. So although there are people likely to be unhappy about this, particularly the kind of supporters of Khashoggi and particularly people close to the Muslim Brotherhood who formed quite a core part of Erdoğan's support in recent years. It's quite unlikely that they're really going to make their voice known in any way. And also Erdoğan's proved himself really, really adept at kind of making these quite startling reversals in ideological course. He's done it again and again over the course of his tenure in turkey. It's really easy to forget that he started out almost as a kind of liberal moderniser. When he first came into power in the early part of the millennium, he was really trying to reach out to the kind of middle ground reach out to the Kurds, to more liberal people to people who were against military Tuesday. And things really changed since then, he reversed course and went to more Islamist direction at the start of the Arab Spring, reversed course again in the mid 2010s here in turkey, taking more nationalist direction. So this is something he does again and again. You know, it's not certainly not going to be something that he's going to announce, you know? He certainly, I think, not going to openly turn his back on the Muslim Brotherhood. But at this point, there's more important things for him to focus on and the economy is certainly one of those. That was the Istanbul based journalist and author Hannah lisson de Smith. Thank you very much for that. You are listening to the briefing on Monaco 24. And finally, on today's program we are going to have a look through the days. Newspapers with Monica's senior correspondent Fernando Augusto Pacheco here in studio Faye, welcome to the studio. Let's start with we heard already.

Erdoğan turkey Saudi Arabia Jamal Khashoggi Istanbul Chris turmeric Saudi consulate prince Mohammed bin Salman Hannah lucinda Smith Khashoggi Middle East Riyadh bin Salman Hannah Ankara Russia Emirates Ukraine government Hannah lisson de Smith
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:10 min | 6 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Are pursuing them at the moment and really it will come down to how this got started in the first place and what we have to do to stop it now it's causing a few cases. But just finally, Chris, you dimension there that we know a lot about this virus compared to COVID-19 in the early stages, but the one thing that has maybe caught people by surprise as you suggest as well is the fact that it's spread so much also outside of central and western Africa. I wonder why we are seeing this sort of global spread of viruses more broadly that we're perhaps previously contained within certain regions. Is that something we sort of have to get used to? I think so. I think the pattern is intensifying. And as other commentators have pointed out, that the last two decades have seen more action on the virological front than the previous about 5. And I think this is a reflection on a number of things. One, we're much better at finding these things in the first place than spotting them and tracking them. Previously, these sorts of waves of infection would have gone past and we would have written them off as, well, that was a nasty flu, wasn't it or something, so that to a certain extent, there's more vigilance, but we can't ignore the fact that there are more people, and if there are more people who are living close together living up against nature, more urbanization, more travel, better connectedness across the world, then you're offering basically a superhighway along which these infections can spread and you're operate offering through cities urbanisation and encroachment on nature, the sort of catalyst to push infections out of their natural habitat into the human and then across the world. So because the world population is going up and not down because urbanization is intensifying and travel is intensifying as well. It's unsurprising that we're seeing more of these sorts of things. And I think probably we're going to expect to see more of the same in the years to come. Christmas. Thank you very much. That was our health and science correspondent doctor Chris Smith. You're listening to the briefing on Monica 24. And finally, on today's program, it is time for a cultural roundup and flick through the day's newspapers with Monaco's senior correspondent Fernando Augusto Pacheco he's standing by in our headquarters in London, good morning or good afternoon Fernando. Good afternoon, Chris, good talking to you. We have quite a varied list of stories today. We do have a varied list. Let's start serious and then work our way down a little bit to end. You have something from a global that looks at the roe V wade abortion conversation in the U.S.. It's a very interesting one, Chris so basically a global decided to look at abortion in Brazil and the opinion of our female MPs and female senators as well. You know, you know what, Chris, abortion is a hot topic in Brazil. The reason not only because the Rowan wade in the west were discussing this. Lula said a few weeks ago there was a matter of public health. So in a way, he decided to be quiet about the topic because if he nobody, it's almost like a taboo subject in the country, but is interesting looking here at the numbers for no global 73% of our female MPs. They are against abortion, so they would decide to keep the law as it is in Brazil, which means you can only have an abortion in cases of rape, health risks to the mother, and in order very specific occasions. So it's quite a high number and I think in a way it represents Brazilian society, and that's been the old time question for me because I think Brazil advanced in quite a lot of progressive causes like a marriage. We were we had gay marriage before many European countries, but when it comes to abortion, I see no advancement at all. Unlike other Latin American countries like Colombia who legalized abortion, early this year, of course, we have Argentina, Cuba, Guyana Uruguay, French Guiana so it's still very much a controversial topic in the country. Well, let's move from controversial to less controversial topics, or at least a topic that you love very much. The soap opera of Brazil, what is happening there? Yeah, so this is from folia. Remember talking here on the briefing about two, three months ago when the soap opera was being launched because it was a high expectation for that scope punta now is a remake of a very famous Brazilian soap in the early 90s. Pantana is the name of the wetlands region in Brazil. So it's a very beautiful area, a lot of greenery, a lot of animals, and this soap opera is different from the previous ones that we had in recent years, because it's completely sat in this kind of very, very rural area. So there's a river. It's a very gentle, soap opera, and is doing incredibly well. The ratings are amazing, so if people said that the soap opera is that they're definitely wrong, and one of the reasons people are saying that it is quite successful. It is a way for people to escape. This soap opera is not like the ones before. I mean, with just discussed abortion there. A lot of soap operas were tackling those heavy handed topics abortion racism police violence, and I think pantana in a way avoids that is a big production gentle swims in the river, a family saga, kind of a little Jaguar there that has some special cameos here and there in the soap opera. And maybe Brazilians were craving a little bit for that as well. Well, from one nature story, Faye, or nature soap opera story. I should say to another nature story, you have news of the blue Macau. This is the happiest news of the day for me at least. So again, on xiong hero, a website in Brazil. And all across the press in general, the blue Macao will be back in nature in Brazil, from next month. In the state of Bahia, which that's where they are originally from. And it's been very sad, Chris, because 20 years ago, they literally became extinct in nature in Brazil. So they nobody I think the last time somebody saw a blue macaw in the wild was sometime in the 90s. We have some of Dan and Zeus, especially in Europe in Germany and Belgium, but quite a few of dandy being brought up back to Brazil and they will release.

Brazil COVID Chris Fernando Augusto Pacheco roe V wade Rowan wade Brazilian society Chris Smith flu Monaco Africa Fernando Lula Monica French Guiana Guyana London Uruguay Colombia
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:07 min | 8 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And finally, on today's program, we're going to take a closer look at the day's newspapers with a bit of a Latin American flair from Monaco's senior correspondent Fernando Augusto Pacheco. Thanks for joining us as always. Let's start with something we have already been hearing about, but with a Brazilian flair, as it were, what are the Brazilian papers saying about France's election? Well, of course, it's definitely the biggest international story of the day in Brazil. And I have to say, Chris, I think when it comes to Europe, I think France is the country that the Brazilian papers are always looking out for. So there's always excellent coverage and I was even looking even though there's a diminishing number of international correspondents when they are when there exist one. It's usually in Paris, I have to say, sometimes even more than London, that's something that I've been noticing reading. But for example, the main tank, the main take here of folia. It's saying that this is the first time where a potential far right victory should not be discarded, so they're saying, you know, Macron one, with relatively good numbers. But there's still very much this danger of marine le pen, a potentially winning this victory as well. Something Brazil knows very well for that matter. Exactly. We can even teach them some tips as well. They also had a little kind of story about the French community in Brazil. We don't have the results of their vote yet. Last time they vote a majority, the majority to Macron, but this time there's been talk that perhaps millennial one in Brazil, but that's not confirmed yet, but that's what the story was saying. Interesting. Well, let's move on to something that it is very interesting from Mexico. There was this referendum over the weekend on Sunday, a referendum on the Mexican leaders term, a sort of midterm referendum, a new thing in Mexico, what was that like and what happened? It was very unusual. That's what, you know, president Obrador, he decided to do just to check his popularity. And I think that's something he would like to have in Mexico governments in the future as well so perhaps have to two years of the presidency. It's almost checking with the voters. Am I doing a good job? And I think a broader new that he would win at this referendum. So basically, the front page of millennia, one of the main newspapers in Mexico said 90% of voters backed Obrador on that. But then if you look at the numbers as well, the turnout was very low actually 18%. And I don't know what to think about that. You know, of course, it's always a good idea to check with the electorate, how they're doing. But at the same time, I think in my strength, Obrador, a bit too much as well. So I think the opposition might be a bit scared of him and this might give him even more powers as well. So that's something that I am a little bit skeptical of this whole idea. It is incredible like 18% being the turnout essentially was just amla's own supporters that turned out for this. I mean, what did the Mexican papers make of that? Do you expect this to continue in any form? And can this be taken seriously? Because a lot of the opposition parties, they kind of recorded the votes as well. So I mean, I just find it it's an interesting kind of story here, but I'm not sure if the referendum will continue, especially if Oprah does not the president anymore. Yes, exactly. Well, finally, face something a little bit lighter to end samba schools will be featuring Afro Brazilian resilient themes in this year's parade. Tell us about it. And of course, I know it's quite late to be talking about carnival, but it's happening next week. Remember it's been postponed because of COVID. And the interesting story here as well, samba schools they usually have a theme each and they can choose whatever they want, they can pay a tribute to a footballer, they can talk about kind of I don't know the creation immigration in Brazil. Everything is being discussed in December schools, but this year it's an interesting statistic here 8 from the 12 samba schools will pay tribute to alpha Brazilians, could be a little bit of culture, a little bit of religion, and I have to say Chris, this kind of talks about how carnival can be political in Brazil, is not just about fun. So for example, one of the topics in December schools would be about racism in Brazil. There's been racist attacks recently. There's mention of George Floyd even, so yes, people are dancing and having fun, but there is kind of a serious touch behind all of that. Is there a fun way that it's done in that sense even if it's serious topics I know they do this a German carnival as well. They have these crazy floats, for example, that are very political, but also very bizarre. Isn't that the way it's approached in Brazil? It's always fun and I have to say, they are extremely talented. They usually make incredible. I mean, if you look at December, parading real, I think that's one of the most beautiful things in the world. Thank you very much. We'll be watching that, hopefully. Next week, that was our senior correspondent Fernando Augusto, Pacheco, and that is all the time we have. For this edition of the briefing, it was produced by Rhys James, our researcher was Samson and bogo and studio manager Christy Evans. Briefing is back tomorrow at the same time. That's 1300 in Paris, midday. In London, I'm Chris Herman. Goodbye. And thanks.

Brazil Obrador Fernando Augusto Pacheco Mexico president Obrador France Monaco Chris Paris Europe amla London George Floyd Oprah Fernando Augusto Rhys James Pacheco Christy Evans
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:13 min | 9 months ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Coming up to 12 minutes past 7 here in London 12 minutes past 8 in Berlin, which is where we're off to next. The EU issued a fourth round of sanctions on Tuesday, but Germany is understood to have subsequently used meetings with at least three other governments to discuss calling a halt to further measures. Yesterday, Ukrainian president Vladimir zelensky made an impassioned video address to the bundestag. In the emotional speech, he accused lawmakers of failing to live up to their historical responsibilities after the Holocaust enshrined in the phrase never again. He said that there was a new wall in Europe built from bricks that represent Germany's failure to properly stand by Ukraine's side. While I'm joined now by suda David wilke, whose deputy director of the German Marshall fund's Berlin office sit up many thanks for speaking to us again, is Germany trying to row back on sanctions against Russia. Good morning, Georgina. I think Germany is trying to stall on further sanctions because now it's come to a point that if a gas embargo is imposed, Germany could stand to lose on its economy. And this is a country that's sort of fulfilled its role in the world by having a strong economy. That's the sort of myopic lens that Germans use to. Have its stature and Europe. And although the turning point era has been ushered in by Chancellor schulz's speech a few weeks ago in parliament, unfortunately it doesn't mean it needed to help for Ukraine right now. Would you say that we're seeing a split within the EU so you have the sanctions that's frontline countries like Poland and the Baltics that are pro sanctions and then the contras countries prioritizing their own economies like Germany like Italy, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Greece and how dangerous would have split like that be? Well, there are always have been splits within the EU and I do think for the most part, Putin's war in Ukraine has actually equaled a lot of cohesion within the western alliance. We've actually seen impressive coordination within Europe. And I think the point is right now is the European countries that are hedging willing to go those final steps in order to really incur pain for Putin's actions because it will also mean pain for them because these countries are dependent on Russian gas, namely Russia. I mean, sorry, namely, Germany and Hungary, for example. So can you take us through zelensky's speech to the bundestag? Sure, it was actually sort of the last on the list of parliaments that zelensky zoomed into. After moving speeches in D.C., Brussels in London, so landscape really laid into Germany's past choices, for example, the decision to build Nord stream two and also continued links with Russia and he really accused Germany of putting economic interest above all and not seeing the broader picture of what it meant for Europe and for Ukraine. And although he did appeal to history talking about the wall and lessons of the Holocaust, I think the German parliament and the German government here in Berlin had a feeling that blame was to be in this speech. And there was a reason they probably avoided debate immediately after the speech and went right to sort of a different agenda COVID actually, which was a little awkward given the situation. It seemed very odd that the speech ended and they went straight on to other business. Exactly. I think it was very tone deaf and perhaps an attempt to wish away Germany doing too little too late. And there were a lot of calls from the opposition to change the framing of the speech to actually have a debate and conversation about what was just heard in the parliament. Instead, the government simply moved on because they do know they are in a difficult position. They know that zelensky wants more and there are certain things that the western alliance probably won't do, like imposing a no fly zone over Ukraine. But I do think that there are countries within NATO that do want to see a gas embargo or energy embargo Vis-à-vis Russia. I mean, Germany has helped Ukraine though, but what have they done so far? Germany has definitely been a steadfast financial partner for Ukraine before the war broke out one of the biggest donors to Ukraine. But Ukraine also needs military aid. And because of German's history, Germany's history, leaders here had said that they were unwilling to send lethal aid to Ukraine because they don't want to send weapons to conflict zones. But these have these, you know, these sort of taboo topics have slowly or quickly fell to the wayside I should say. You know, before the speech on February 27th, Schultz announced that they were going to send lethal aid to Ukraine and that they were going to halt Nord stream two. But the speech itself on the 27th really means a complete turnaround for this country. A country that had relied on its economic prowess is now going to build up its military because it sees that in order to safeguard democracy, military deterrence, investment insecurity is also important for freedom and democracy and right now Ukraine is on the front lines of this battle. So I mean, Germany's foreign policy has shifted. Do you think this speech will move the needle again? Yes, I do think there is a reckoning going on right now within Germany about past choices. And the majority of Germans do support the government's moves against Russia, politicians here are very weary of how sustained this mood will be because next winter, if there is a gas embargo, costs will go up for heating homes and industry could experience a massive disruption with potential job losses. But if the government should also probably weigh the situation because it could very well be that Russia turns off a valve in order to destabilize Germany and perhaps it's better to get ahead of the curve, something that Germany has failed to do in the past. But what alternatives then does Germany have in terms of gas supply. Well, they are going to build up to LNG very quickly, but that is not going to be done in a time in a time frame that would happen this year. A lot of things have the unthinkable is now doable suddenly in Germany over the past few weeks because they think they realize the threat of how this war is turning the balance of power in Germany or in Europe to a time that people thought was over. And perhaps Germany could consider going back to nuclear energy and using coal as an energy source for the time being until they could transform to a carbon free or renewable energy source economy. That's the that was the transformation goal of this new government and they thought they could depend on natural gas to bridge the energy while turning off the nuclear reactors, but all those assessments will have to be reexamined. Suda, thank you very much indeed. That's David wilp in Berlin. Still to come in the program the day's papers, Andrew Muller's whimsical take on the week's stranger stories and Fernando Augusto Pacheco has an update on the American song contest. This is the globalist.

Andrew Muller Putin Georgina Berlin London February 27th Tuesday Fernando Augusto Pacheco David wilp NATO D.C. Suda EU Europe Vladimir zelensky Holocaust Brussels fourth round Yesterday zelensky
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"People who are interested in various kinds of entertainment young people and old people, people that remember analog days, people that really could care less. And I think that that's what it is. It's a very solid brand. That means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. Well, let's look ahead to the cinema business in 2022 by one estimate this from gare street analytics. Global box office in 2022 will be 33 billion U.S. dollars, which sounds like quite a lot of money. But in the general cinematic context is it, in fact, would that be a good year? I'll be happy if I make half that, et cetera. Well, I hope you spent some on me. That last place we went for dinner was really, I thought you could have spent a little more. In 2017, the total box office was just 40.9 billion. Now in 2020, of course, most of the cinemas were closed. It was 12. Now, this is global 12 billion. So bouncing up to projected 33.2 billion is not the kind of recovery or growth that they were looking for. But it's certainly better than nothing. And also, the business is having a huge shakedown of the relationship between as we are discussing previously. Theatrical showcase and streaming availability. So we really haven't worked that out yet. Because you can't have blockbusters with streaming alone. It doesn't generate the revenue when they release the figures. But they very rarely do. You need the article in order to create these huge hits like No Time to Die, which is at 77, about 771 million right now. Well, let's have a look ahead. I mean, maybe to the first quarter of 2022 at the end of which, of course, the nominations for the next Oscars will be announced. What would you recommend people watch to prepare for that momentous occasion? Well, there's a lot of things that are actually streaming that you can see a number one, the power of the dog which is Jane campion. It's a gothic western, probably not suitable for children. Make sure you see that one. You can see Belfast, if you like, a woman next to me was weeping. I didn't like it, but a lot of people love it. These were both partially recommended by Fernando Augusto Pacheco yesterday, surveying the Golden Globes nominations. No, he definitely knows, but there's a lot of new things coming out as well. And if you want to just ignore, ignore the Oscars. I would just say those two. We've got so much coming up. And I know you've been waiting for this one. I'll just slip this in there. The Shrek spin off, puss in boots. Yeah, unfortunately, the listeners can not see us, but I am literally beside myself. I love that I love the eyes that you do and you look just like put some boots. Thank you as always for joining us. That is all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James and Emerson a researcher was lily enforce it and ask studio manager was Chris a black where the briefing returns at the same time tomorrow and I'll be back with the daily at 1800 London time later today. Amanda Muller thanks for listening..

Oscars Fernando Augusto Pacheco Jane campion U.S. Golden Globes Belfast Rhys James Emerson Chris Amanda Muller London
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Finally, on today's show, we look at the latest work of the Italian director Paolo sorrentino, the hand of God, it's one of the most personal films for the director yet, and in a special interview Monica 24s senior correspondent Fernando Augusto Pacheco spoke to Paolo and Filippo scotti, the lead actor in the film. Paulo, this film is different from your other films is extremely personal to you. How did you feel? It was a little bit more emotional perhaps for you as well. Yes, I was a little bit more emotional, but at the end of the day, the movie I called the other movies. Easy and difficult at the same time, like called the movies. It's easy because every movie could be a chance to have fun with the crew with the people that work in the movie. And at the same time, there is the responsibility of a movie over the money of the producers of the good the final result. So it's like all the movie similar or less. But more emotional yes because it's a personal movie. No, no doubt about that. One thing I would like to ask both of you as well, the film was setting in Naples. And to be honest, it feels like it was another character of the film. I mean, really sold the place for me and I know all of you from Naples, of course, right? What about you, Filippo? I have a connection with Naples. You are actually from Naples as well, right? I'm from nipples. Did you feel very kind of emotional shooting the film in your worry were born more or less? I mean, it's really special because Finley was as a very special place in Italy. It's quite a unique kind of their own culture, almost in a way. Yeah, I should have to say that I was born in the north of Italy, but when I moved to Naples, actually, I liked Naples, but I didn't really enjoy the city. I don't know how to say, but with time, I understood, I tried to understand the city and actually to say that since I finished the shooting of the movie, I literally saw another face on Naples. I mean, I rebuild a dream of my city. I don't know to say, and now it's a completely different and a positive way. And of course, besides Fabio, I love the older characters. What a collection of characters, the whole family. Was there also based on a personal story those characters is incredible, especially in the first hour of the film. It's it looks like you were a painter. You paid attention for every single from the Patriots CO2 it was just fascinating. Was that also kind of personal or you added some touch of kind of known realistic things as well? The tools are my family was composed and more or less that was my family and it's pretty realistic. Yeah, it's not unrealistic. It looks like I'm realistic about it. It was completely the reality of the ages of the south families on Sunday on summer where everybody feels himself like an actor. It's something that belongs to our tradition, and I put on the stage. I think Maradona would have enjoyed the film. It feels like almost like a tribute to him as well, in a way, a very emotional you were there. And he was part of very much part of your life as well. Tell us about this connection with Maradona. Did you ever think about doing something? With him, you have a hand of God, of course. My connection with Maradona is a common connection to many Napoleon people that he was a symbol when he arrived he was a symbol of freedom and hope for many people to have the chance to put again in Naples in the center of the world because Naples was in the center of the world for bad reasons. So for the criminal world that filled our minds during the beginning of the 80s, and so Maradona changed into the perspective of the people to see to do the future of the freedom, the sport is a fantastic not only footballer, but a very interesting man. Of course, I've followed his career as well. But moving on to another topic of the film Philip and I was very curious about that, of course, your character. I mean, he kind of finds cinema as kind of as escape from something very personal sad stories that happen to him. I know that you would like to direct in the future or you are involved already. Tell us a bit more. The thing may be that made you even closer to the character in a way. Actually now I'm thinking just about acting and to focus on this, then I don't know in the future if I will be able if I will have a structure to be a director, you need a structure as to be an actor now I'm searching my actor structure and I'm trying to build it. So I will think about it later. I think there's a space there is a time for everything. Yeah, exactly. Exactly, that's amazing. And also when things in Latino was quite happy, because you know, before seeing the film I've heard, oh, is a person of film very different from the other films that you've done. But one thing remained the same. I mean, there is still kind of this very incredible aesthetics, you know, the clothes, the one perhaps wouldn't one difference if you compare to film like you, for example. It's a little bit kind of warmer in tone, right? It's not anymore, the Swiss kind of clinic is more. It feels kind of quite sensual, sweaty, almost in a way. We would just say so perhaps that's not fully as well for you, right? Yeah, there are several reasons one is able one is our culture that definitely is warmer.

Naples Paolo sorrentino Fernando Augusto Pacheco Filippo scotti Maradona Italy Paolo Paulo Filippo Monica Finley Fabio Patriots Napoleon Philip
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Sure. If you're a Simpsons character, who would you be? I'm going to say most Isla. I love most is like. I would have to say it wouldn't be Barney gumble. That's for sure. I mean, I think I would be groundskeeper Willie. Agreed. Glad we talked about this. And you Tom? It's got to be Homer. I can see that. I can see Tom. Thank you so much, that is Monica's Tom Edwards. Now the world is today. One republic richer. As Barbados celebrates its first day of full sovereignty. Yesterday, dame Sandra mason was confirmed as the island's first president. Prince Charles attended the ceremony to mark the country's historic break with British imperial rule. Take a listen. From the darkest days of our past and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which forever stains our history, the people of this island forge their path with extraordinary fortitude Emancipation, self government and independence where your waypoints, freedom, justice and self determination have been your guides. In his speech, the Prince of Wales also reaffirmed the close partnership between Barbados and the United Kingdom. Earlier, Monaco Fernando Augusto Pacheco spoke to Victor Fernandez, chairman of capital media in Barbados and the longest serving elected president of the Caribbean broadcasting union. He started by asking Victor whether this decision had been politically divisive in Barbados. I don't think it's terribly divisive, really. I mean, politically, you will always get people on the opposing side. That is your job to oppose I suppose. But look, this has been the subject of two national consultations. There was the Cox commission of 19 79. And then there was the sir Henry Ford's commission of 19 99, which was the subject of widespread national consultations on the whole question of Barbados, new constitution, Barbados becoming a republic and that sort of stuff. And so on. So I don't really think there's been some talks some chatter from some sources that perhaps you should have put it to a referendum. But I mean, if this has been the subject of so many national consultations over such a long period, there's been no real protests or anything like that. More of the discussion is centered around the charger of Barbados and the references to God being now the creator, but the prime minister has been a pain to point out that this is not illegally binding document. This is not the constitution, and that the preamble to the constitution, which references God has not changed and will not be changed. So overall, I would say that there has been pretty widespread acceptance. We did some vox pop interviews over the last couple of days. And everybody was very much supportive. But there's not this euphoric kind of feeling in the country. It's very kind of calm. I guess as the activities continue the celebratory activities and we've had quite a few over the last couple of days, there is some excitement building. And as you've said, Victor, it's all been done fairly peacefully. I mean, Prince Charles was attending the ceremony as well. So I think Barbados, I mean, we remain quite a close ally to the United Kingdom in that sense, right? Well, absolutely. And, you know, it was really kind of folly on the part of a British member of parliament to actually sit that Barbados was quote unquote selling out to China, whatever that meant. And then you had a lead writer in The Sunday Times, I believe, erroneously stating that Barbados was leaving the Commonwealth. But I mean, this does not leave in the common laws. It very much remains a part of the Commonwealth much like other Caribbean countries that are republics, much like Trinidad and Tobago and Dominica. And they're likely to be others that will follow to as well. But will remain part of the Commonwealth of countries and Barbados association relationship with the United Kingdom remains firmly strong. We welcome more British visitors to Barbados on an annual basis. Right now our hotels are overpopulated with British visitors. So that is not going to change in any way shape or fashion. And Victor, what can you tell us about the new head of states Barbados first president dame Sandra mason? Incredible woman incredible career. But what can you tell us about her and what would be her relationship with the prime minister as well? Well, the role of the president like the governor general is largely ceremonial. The head of state is the titular head of state. The prime minister remains as the political arm of the country. But look, let's talk about David Sandra mason for a moment. She's highly respected, comes from a rural family, a rather large family in the parish of saint Philip. The people from saint Philip, I think there are more nationalistic than most people in Barbados. They refer to themselves as philippians and to the republic of saint Philip. In fact, they've been using that term for a very long time. She's an attorney by training. She was a magistrate. She's highly respected in her field. She was acclaimed by all sites when invited to become the governor general of barbadoes. And it was with you unanimous acclamation that she was also invited to be the first president of the republic. I was going to ask, especially in the Caribbean, I would say, do you think other countries will follow the lead of Barbados on the decisions become a republic? Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, it's pretty much inevitable. You know, it's part of a process of delinking from the colonial past. There is no disrespect to the monarch or to her successes. In fact, as we speak this morning, Prince Charles is being accorded the highest national honor along with the governor general, former governor general, now president will be the recipient of the freedom of Barbados award, which is the highest award possible under the new Republican form of governance. That in itself should send a message. Now, for me, you may have deduced from my comments that I am very much in favor of Barbados becoming a republic. But it didn't make a lot of sense to me, for example. Let's take Barbados sends an ambassador to Washington. That ambassador could not take up his or her responsibilities. Unless they first had a letter signed by the queen saying, I approve this appointment of my ambassador to Washington. It doesn't make a lot of sense, does it? So I don't think in the normal scheme of things is going to be a lot of change in terms of our daily lives, but it does give you that sense of being now a completely independent of your former colonial master. That is Victor Fernandez, chairman of capital media in Barbados, speaking to Monaco senior correspondent Fernando Augusta Pacheco. You are listening to the briefing.

Barbados dame Sandra mason Barney gumble Tom Edwards Prince Charles Victor Fernandez capital media Monaco Fernando Augusto Pachec Caribbean broadcasting union Cox commission of sir Henry Ford Victor United Kingdom Tom Prince of Wales Commonwealth of countries and Willie Homer Monica David Sandra mason
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Get the latest news from the small screen with the TV critic and broadcast to Scott Brown. Good morning, Scott. Good morning. How are you? Very well, thank you. And glad to hear that Netflix is changing the way it counts its viewers to make it all simpler. Is that right? Well, this is the thing. This is what they're trying to tell us because for a while there have been some frustration about the way that they aren't transparent enough with how many people are watching some of their programs. So for example, if you look at the very success of their squid game, they were saying that more than a 110 million people were watching that show, which is huge, but what they don't tell you is that that counts for people watching two minutes of just one episode. So that's made some people go, well, really, does that really account for people who drop off after one episode? What does that mean in terms of people who might not be deciding to stick with a program all the way through? And the course it doesn't mean that you have that much to compare it to, for example, people who watch programs in the UK are measured differently in terms of how many people watch a show that day and the next day. So what they've now done instead as a means to be a bit more transparent is that they now reveal how many minutes people watch of a program instead. So they used it in regards to some shows that they released just the other week. But the issue is is that they're saying, instead, how many minutes everyone collectively viewed together? So they said that over a 110 million minutes of a certain show have been watched by everybody. But then you go, hang on. That doesn't make it any easier because you're sort of saying now are those people who have been if you're getting the mass amount of views together and counting the minutes together and dividing that by the number of viewers, exactly what number have you got? It becomes a very frustrating process. It does, and none of us see many closer to knowing how many people are actually watching tele. Let's move on to another story about subtitles, something which many believe is a preserve of the old, the elderly, the death, or actually very small children learning to read, because apparently it's been demonstrated as being brilliant at helping tiny people learn the connection between sounds and words. But it's not just them. There's a whole new area of people who we never thought were fans of the subtitle. Yeah, young people. Young people were watching subtitles way more than older people. So there was a study recently by the captioning Chinese text. And he said, that 80% of 18 to 25 year olds watch subtitles compared to a less than a quarter of those age 56 and above. So essentially it means that for young people, they are far far more likely to have subtitles on all the time when they're watching programs. And partially that's down to the fact that they are far more used to having the ability to multitask. I think if you're watching a TV show, you're going to be on your phone, part of the time by having words on the screen you're able to follow a bit more than one at the same time. I think it's also the fact that the technology means if, for example, you're going on social media, TikTok, YouTube. It comes as standard. I think also the success and rise of John is not necessarily in the language of far more popular with people who are younger so that more used to be watching them all the time too. And I think for me just so exciting because it means that they are far more custom to watching shows that maybe aren't tiny English language so they can practically get into a show from anywhere now whilst older generations might think that they have to be reading things on the screen the entire time and might not be finding it more enjoyable. But also I think young people are just a very inclusive. They want shows to essentially be of accessible and be watched by as many people as possible. Scott, thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. You're listening to the globalist and finally on today's show, we'll talk about the sweeping changes at the Grammys. Marlon Fuentes is former head of the Grammys global music set up a new category before he left, best global music performance. He spoke to Monaco's Fernando Augusto Pacheco. I think one of the big changes this year was that there was a new category added,.

Scott Brown Netflix Scott tele UK YouTube John Marlon Fuentes Grammys global music Grammys Fernando Augusto Pacheco Monaco
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Is that his mates come together and try to change the judicial system. It looks really bad. Then we'll have Bloomberg's UN pots bring us the day's business headlines and after that it is Thursday and that means it's time for Fernando Augusto Pacheco's global pop countdown. All that is coming up right here on the briefing with me, Chris turmeric. Now, it was back in 2015 that U.S. president Barack Obama held a breakthrough with Iran on ending the country's nuclear program and lifting sanctions. Then, after Donald Trump pulled out of the accord and reimposed sanctions, Iran two began distancing itself from the accord and restarting uranium enrichment. Talks to talks to revive the deal since Joe Biden came to office, have so far yielded few results and were put on hold since the election of Iran's new hard line president in June. Now, suddenly it looks like talks aimed at reviving the landmark agreement could finally resume in earnest later this month. Let's get the latest on this now with Paul Rogers international security adviser at open democracy. Paul, it's good to have you on there has been, as I mentioned, there's so much back and forth on this. It is now understood that leaders in Tehran are prepared to rejoin fresh talks in Vienna. What can we expect? That's right. I mean, basically it all ended at the time of the election in June, but of course the new government president raisi didn't take off as into August. And then there's been a lot of touring and fraying on either side with no real movement and specifically no offer from Iran to come into the talks again. The assumption being that with Biden in power in place of Trump, the Americans would be prepared to engage in talks. What happened a very recently was that the Iranian deputy foreign minister Ali bahi keena who is also the chief negotiator telephoned Enrique in Vienna and he is the European mediator to announce that Iran would be willing to engage in talks to some sort. And they're due to start on the 29th November and about what four weeks time. So this is where we are. And it's the circus step forward. There's going to be a very tricky on the American side. They have put far higher sanctions on. This was during the Trump regime. And their load really to do make the first move. The Iranians too do not want to make the first move up their requirement to use the old phrase from their perspective the bond closest to the throat is the one you first cut loose. And that is sanctions. They want some relief as sanctions. They've also taken steps over the last few months to state around the agreements. For example, the atomic authority in Iran has announced that he's now enriched something like a 120 kilograms of uranium two three 5 to 20% purity. And the thing is that that does take you closer to both research reactor grades and even weapons grades for 95%. And that is certainly pretty close. If not actually breaching the treaty. But from the Iranian perspective, the treaty is null and void because it's the Americans who pulled out. That's where the difficulty arises. But at least in the starting to talk at a mediators involved, even it sort of going from room to room. There is some possibility progress because basically the Biden administration wants this eased and the Iranians made it from an economic perspective do as well, but they're not going to do it easily. Well, Paul, as you mentioned there, Iran is interested in having the sanctions end and it's really a question of who goes first. You talk there about how Iran has been dealing with this for really the past few years and also on the start of Joe Biden's administration. I guess the question for me is how will Iran's approach change though under this new administration? Are they going to take any kind of different approach to how the talks were going before they entered office? I'd rather suspect that they won't. I mean, the key person here obviously is the suprema avatar. How many? Because he really is calling the shots behind the scenes. I think the Iranians do want to make progress. It is a much tougher regime. They are very resistant to from their perspective being what they see as bullied by the United States. They also are basically find it difficult to understand why the other parties to this agreement haven't played a bigger role. I mean, you know, it's Iran in the United States. We think it's bilateral. It isn't. It's the United Kingdom France, Germany, Russia and China are all involved. It's one of the reasons why it's going to be a delay even getting people together. So the point is from an Iranian perspective, they feel that right is on the side. But across from an American perspective and why do in the west, and particularly countries like Saudi Arabia and Israel, they are basically fearful of Iran, which is one of the reasons why Trump basically eased out at his agreement, unilaterally, because he wanted the Iranians to incorporate negotiations on interference in other countries and also their ballistic missile program. Neither of which was in the original JCPOA, the agreement. So essentially, it's going to be a tricky one. On the other hand, there are all kinds of ways in which these very difficult situations can be eased. The Russians, the Americans and the Soviets did this several times during the Cold War mutual good example or the old grit sermon terminology graduated and reciprocal reductions in tensions. In other words, one side does something, which isn't strictly an agreement, but it shows good a tent intent and then the other side does something else. So there are ways of doing this with really good professional mediators that your key thing really is. Do the Americans and Iranians want to deal, which might be marginally acceptable to each side. That we're not sure, but against this no more its Iranians probably do because they really are feeling the effects of the sanctions. Well, and finally, though you did mention this perception of bullying from the U.S. or Iran's perception of bullying. Trust was so key back in 2015 in these talks, particularly between the U.S. John Kerry and Iran's foreign minister, they developed a strong relationship. I mean, that's part of how this deal was reached in the first place. How will in that sense U.S. officials then approach this do they how much do they have an interest in restoring trust and maybe in that sense taking a first step or doing something to make this move forward? That's a very difficult one. I mean, some of the words that are coming out of the State Department are present up pretty hardline. But that really is indicative of an early state of negotiations. Neither state is wanting to show its cards. Neither state is wanting to show itself as in any sense week. For domestic reasons, it's more complicated in the Iranian case because you have two major senses of power. Parliament and the president on the one hand, the measure east and the presidency on the one hand, and also the supreme leader, plus crucially, the Iranian revolutionary guard corps, who really are calling the shots on the security side. And it's a question of whether there can be some degree of consensus there. Now, the only thing is, the right EC government is closer to the hardliners than the previous government was. So in other words, it's slightly more unified there. And it does depend on whether the Americans at least quietly are prepared to talk informally. And this is where the negotiating system itself particularly in Vienna is so crucial and of course Vienna being the city in which you also have the International Atomic Energy Agency. It's the office place to hold it. My guess is that the first talks of maybe a few days will seem to get very not very far at all. It'll be each side sizing up the other. After that, maybe in December, the more the more deep negotiations might begin one can't really hold Ron's breath, but at least we got the start here, and it was the Iranians who agreed to start up again. That is something I think to be thankful for. And something we will continue to watch once those talks do begin. Thanks very much, Paul, that was open democracy's international security adviser Paul Rogers..

Iran Fernando Augusto Pacheco Chris turmeric raisi Ali bahi keena Joe Biden Vienna U.S. atomic authority Biden administration Paul Rogers Trump Donald Trump Bloomberg Paul Enrique Tehran
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Well, inflation prices currency is such an issue around the world at the moment. You and thank you very much that was you and pots with business headlines. You are listening to the briefing on Monica 24. All right, and finally on today's show, it is Thursday. As I say at the beginning, this is always our fun end to the show with me here in the studio is Fernando Augusto Pacheco with the global countdown fey, where are we going? As I said, we're going to a very mountainous region. We're going to be the last time to a mountainous exactly. It's different mountain range this time. Very different, even different continent. We're going to Nepal and Chris, I think it's interesting to choose in the power because I think people have a lot of preconceptions about the country. But do they know much about a police music? And if they don't, I think they should listen to the stop 5. This is the time for an introduction. That's what we do here at the global countdown on monocle 24. Exactly. And I discovered fascinating things. Let me introduce number 5 and I'll tell you why I think this is fascinating. This is a Nepali singer. His name is bar Santa tapa and the song is zhao jawa at number 5. Okay, that is very different from the other Alpine mountainous region that we were doing last week. What's your feeling? As you can see, this is actually a very traditional music for Nepal, and I was reading about it. It's called the hori. The hor is a very old kind of.

Fernando Augusto Pacheco Monica Nepal Santa tapa zhao jawa Chris
"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Aware that era tunnel. Destination is somewhere rather warmer for her and we learned this from reeves. Governor of mississippi is terribly cheap. Shot honestly do better governor reeves accounting for the laggardly take-up of vaccines among his remaining voters explained that mississippians have their minds on loftier concerns than just not dying of more or less avoidable symptoms of a rampaging virus. The governor's words will now be voiced by manacles. Hellfire and brimstone desks chief fernando augusto pacheco. I'm often asked by some of my friends on the other side of the aisle about covert. And why does it seem like folks in mississippi and maybe in the mid south are a little less scared. Shall we say when you believe in eternal life when you believe living on this earth is just a blip on the screen. Then you don't have to be so scared of. They will now be a short pause while listeners. Take a wild guess. Witch american state has this week. The highest per capita rate of new cova cases in the united states and the second highest per capita rate of overall deaths. No prizes will be awarded at this time elsewhere. We continued to learn of the.

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"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"fernando augusto pacheco" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Of multiple twenty four hours nando. Augusto pacheco and louis hanukkah o'meara though be discussing all the day's big stories and we'll have the latest installment of series considering the olympics from a variety of national angles. Today switzerland stay tuned. All that and more coming up right here on the monocle daily in association allience on multiple twenty four. This is the monocle daily. I'm andrew and i am joined today by monocle. Twenty senior correspondent fernando augusto pacheco and monaco's writer louis hanukkah o'meara to panelists to have enough names between them for a panel of three normal people. But it's it's just two of you. We should do some light introductory banter about the olympics because there will be more olympics coming up later in the show. And i just wanted to say today. I am delighted by two developments. One is of course the vanquishing of team gb by matilda's in the women's soccer which was an absolutely epic win also. This is me kind of cheering on eighteen. Gb athlete which i do not do lightly as an australian gold fa- lighten stone In the women's bmx That he's of course gold zone. London suburb of late and stone. Which is where beth. Rival is from And she won't that's amazing and never to be on his watch that much. Bmx but it's quite interesting. Be dangerous though. But i quite enjoyed watching a little. Bit of that is quite crazy. Also we got There was silver for gp with The men's bmx as well so that was from someone impact. It was from someone in peckham. London seems to be picking up few the medals as we got. It'd be honest about something we were so negative about the olympics are in the whole world was. Let's be honest. there is something positive about it. Even the atmosphere here in the office because everybody is cheering for their own countries. I don't know it's been a happy week There was earlier. I should make clear to listeners literally. Spontaneous office applause at a ten hour old replay of the women's trampoline. Just before we came on air this. That's beautiful you know. But i heard a huge we go up from daniel. H elliott today When everyone looked outside and he was strolling downside. I can only assume that was olympics. Leads dasa that's when he they beat brazil actually. It was very sad but brazil football football. Women's football yeah really very sad but the full the canadian. It's true i mean i. It's humiliating but we did well. We was at the penalties. You know our girls did well as well. you can still get on board and matilda's bandwagon. I will similar colors strong very easy to use the two styles of play as well more on the olympics later in the show the games are approaching their halfway point after year of agonizing about whether they should go ahead amidst a pandemic the first week has been at the risk of tempting fate relatively smooth sailing on the covet nineteen front with just a handful of eleven thousand or so competitors testing positive with all the latest from on and off. The field in tokyo here is monocle. Twenty four olympics correspondent cairn pender the olympics. Go.

louis hanukkah meara olympics Augusto pacheco fernando augusto pacheco matilda monaco switzerland London andrew peckham beth soccer football brazil elliott daniel tokyo cairn pender