17 Burst results for "Fermilab"

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:04 min | 5 months ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Uncertainties will shrink and our knowledge of this quantity will improve and maybe it will reveal something new in the universe influencing reality awesome like maybe a new flavor of ice cream or chocolate. Or i i guess as always. The answer is stay tuned. If you're still a little bit confused about this whole topic you can read the comic. I drew for physics. Api journal and phd comics dot com slash new on m. u. n. And checked it out but we hope you enjoyed that. Thanks for joining us. See you next. Thanks for listening and remember that daniel jorges the universe is a production iheartradio for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to.

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

08:11 min | 5 months ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Let's talk about what the result was. And what it can mean about the universe but first let's take another break Good afternoon would you like to try a free sample of our double fudge brownie. Sure that's very good. I'll just take one more just to be sure. Yep still very good. Some things never change like never being able to take just one free sample and geico saving of on their car insurance that macadamia nut. I taste take one more sir. I thought so fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more to show you how easy it is to file a claim with geico. We hired a soap opera star. Gracious me my car has storm damage. And i had to file a claim could possibly get worse when my claims team leave me for someone else. Someone less intense new actually play with geico. You get your own dedicated claims team. Who promises to stay with you throughout the process. I've never known such loyalty. I can't wait a second season. Geico great service without all the drama. All right so it. A government physics experiments suggest. Something unknown is influencing reality. Daniel did shady government physicist distorted our understanding of the universe in reality. I'm trying to influence reality by eating boxes of chocolates seems to affect the reality of the size of my behind increase your magnetic field or a decrease magnetism just influenced my effect on the universe. My personal gravity. It might be shrinking. Your magnetism will have to ask your yes. So they found that the theoretical and experimental results do vary either different as it was suggested twenty years ago but now we know kind of more for certain these numbers have improved both theoretical numbers have been improved and the experimental numbers have been approved the uncertainties on these two numbers have shrunk but the gap between them has not. So there's still this opening between these two numbers and you know renew this number but it's crazy is just a very specific in the differences are in the last couple of digits of the twelve digit number. But you know the scale of it is like the theoretical value is to ten thousands of one percent smaller than the experimental value. That's like how we've calculated and measured these quantities. Wait so then. You're saying that the difference between the theoretical and experimental is to ten thousands of one percent. That's the difference is really tiny difference so you need really precise experiment and really careful calculations to even be sensitive to this. That's why it's so impressive that they can even ask this question. It's almost like you flip the coin and you got heads. You know fifty point. Oh one times more than you've got tails and norway delay in the noise but maybe you flip the coin like a gazillion times to know that like yeah. There's something a little bit biased about this. That's right and if you're gonna do that measurement you have to ask well. Do i expect fifty percent mean the shape of the heads is not exactly the shape of the and maybe that influences with the air currents and you've got to be like really precise about all of those calculations if you want to claim that it's unfair or that it's fair and so that's what they've done they've done like a tour to force of these theoretical calculations and the experimental calculations so both of these results have changed like the experimental result. We now have a new number from fermilab as of yesterday but also the theoretical results have changed for example. They found like a mistake at one point where they made the wrong sign likely changed a plus to a minus accidentally and that changed the result. And so they're constantly like improving doing these things better because neither of these things are easy. It's a pretty tough thing. Like even the theory they takes supercomputers to compete these numbers. Yeah well there's actually a big controversy about how to do that. Theoretical calculation and some folks are using supercomputers to try to calculate this thing from scratch out of all of these diagrams and include. What happens when the head drawn. Particles feel the strong force are created out of the vacuum. And all this kind of stuff and there's another group that are trying to just like not do those calculations explicitly but take them from other measurements like other experimental results and extrapolate from there to figure out like what are the bits and pieces and then use theory to sort of glue them together into a measurement so sort of two different approaches to doing this calculation. And there's some controversy there because the soda traditional approach where we extrapolate from other experimental measurements in use theoretical glue. That's the one that has the discrepancy the observed but there's a new result that uses like pure computation and these crazy supercomputers in europe in it actually agrees with the experimental result pretty closely. But we're talking about this result from fermilab days confirmed that it's the theory and the experiment are different and so you know assuming that they're right or that gets further confirmed and all the theory checks out. What could it mean about our model of the universe will you right that the fermilab experimental result is the new shiny thing in. Nobody's suggesting that it's wrong. But it's only interesting and is only suggestive of new physics. It's different from the prediction and we have to predictions one that agrees with fermilab result. And one that doesn't and that's with a four point two sigma is so the picture is a bit cloudy on. The theoretical side as usual is a spectrum of possibilities. You know from the most boring to the more interesting to the totally crazy and potentially bonkers idea as the most boring possibility is that it's just a mistake somewhere you know. Maybe one of these. Theoretical groups has made an error or they've forgotten includes something or is the minus sign wrong You know this is really really hard. So a personally. I like this guy. Collision done by the european supercomputers because done by the collaboration called bmw. 'cause they're in budapest marseille in will tall. And it's sort of like independent. They start from scratch and they're doing the calculation so we'll just have to see what progress is made there in the future but there comparing to the same experimental results so it really sort of like a blow to this discrepancy to have a new theoretical calculation. That doesn't show the discrepancy in chasing said like they use some supercomputers in they found that there is no discrepancy with the experimental result. Yeah the prediction. They made which came out. Well before the experimental result is bang on to the new experimental result. So we don't know which of these two theoretical calculations is correct but sort of muddies. The war is harder to claim. The discrepancies decided new physics. New particles influencing reality when we don't exactly know if it's correct all right so that's the vanilla possibility. What's the chocolate chip possibility. Chocolate chips is that there are some new particles out there influencing reality you know. We strongly believe that there must be more particles out there. The story can't be complete. We look at the particles that we've discovered so var in nature. And they just don't answer all questions and we suspect that there are lots more really heavy particles out there the problem with really heavy particles than it takes a lot of energy to make them. You gotta smash particles together. The large hadron collider with enough energy to actually create these things. So you can study them and explore them but if we don't have enough energy in our machines that doesn't mean those particles don't exist it just means we can't make them at the large hadron collider and the only way to study them is to see these little hints. So it's possible that this is a hint of those new particles that are out there that are influencing the mulas magnetic field because they appear in some of these diagrams some of these calculations that changed the moons magnetic field. But that doesn't mean we know what they are right. It's sort of like unspecific like saying we know there's something out there we just don't know what it is the more indirect way of looking for new particles right because you're you're sort of like seeing how they influence other particles which is not a direct measurement. All right so then. That's the chocolate chip possibility. Maybe there are new particles or heavier versions of particles out there and maybe the me on is going through space and it sometimes creates these heavy particles which.

fifteen percent europe fifty percent Daniel fifteen minutes fifty point yesterday geico twenty years ago both two numbers ten thousands twelve digit first one one percent second season one free sample Geico one times
"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

07:30 min | 5 months ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"By government physicist and there is something out there influencing that experiment. I don't know about all of reality. But it's definitely true. So kudos to that headline writer. They definitely took these sort of like movie trailer. Approach to writing that headline and i had the added government physics experiment. First of all non-government visit experiments. Not and second of all. I just makes it more sinister. Doesn't it no. I don't know they're going forward sinister or authoritative this night. Your friend joe's physics experiment. This is like people in lab coats getting salaries initially believe this really any friends. I think they were going for sinister. You know like the government is trying to do something crazy. Oh man. I just totally misread. Read this one. I thought it was like trust us. We got crazy. But instead you're suggesting it's like government about to build a doomsday device. That will ruin your weekend. I think that reveals your attitude towards government and you're like trusting of the government more government. Hey i'm a government physicist so you know you're one of them. Do you wear sunglasses with your white lab coats and everything. Only when i'm trying to influence reality which is basically all the time since i'm part of reality. This podcast his influencing reality if where you found ways in the air then you unless you think our listeners aren't part of reality you know. Hopefully they're real. But we don't have to be real you know this. Podcast is generated by an algorithm a government physics algorithm. It's unreal anyways. It was a pretty big result. A lot of press out there about it. And i have to admit daniel. I didn't know about this weeks before. The actual announcement. Oh wow is that because you have a link into the secret. Science results kinda was commissioned to make a comment about it by journal and so they sent me the secret taper weeks ago. Saying you cash with anybody. Are you telling me you knew. this answered. One of the biggest questions in particle physics for weeks and didn't tell me a sworn to secrecy daniel. They would've revoked. My criteria's license told anyone plus also gave me the paper and they're like you can't anyone it says like i can't even read this. I wouldn't be able to tell you until anyone what my friend. Daniel could read this paper all right. Well i admire your integrity thinking unless you admire assembling but it was pretty exciting thing in physics community. And let's talk about whether or not liz up to the business release something that might influence our view reality or is it sort of an incremental result in the physics endeavor of humans. You will you know. It's an important moment in particle physics. Because we've been desperate for a discovery for quite a long time. You know i would say decades. We have known for a long time. That our theory is incorrect. That is completely. It can't be the final answer because there are so many unanswered questions in so many parts of our theory which is seems like at hawker put in by hand or unexplained. So we've been casting about for a new discovery to give us a clue as to how to change our theory or what the new vision of physics should be and the main strategy for doing that has been things like building. Mid particle accelerators to try to make. New particles can adore table in the give us a sense of the larger patterns. But that's been coming up kind of dry. We haven't found anything. The large john collider other than the higgs boson which we already believed existed. So now we're sort of like looking under every rock. Is there any experiment out there. They can find something. New is there any measurement government services can do to find some discrepancy between our theory and nature. Because we need that kind of discrepancy in order to find something new. So that's why this experiment is sort of like one of the last best hopes for particle physics that we can figure out something. New find a clue that reveals a new idea about the nature of reality. I guess for some of our listeners. Who may mean did not see the headlines. Let's just talk about the announcement so this was an announcement coming out of fermilab which is a particle physics laboratory outside of chicago and they've been around for forever but and recently they announced some new results regarding the mu on which is a particle right. That's right so you're familiar with the electron. It's part of you at orbits all your atoms. The electron has a heavy cousin. It's much heavier than the electron but it's otherwise totally identical and the very existence of the milan is sort of a mystery. Like why do we even have him you on. We don't know but it's like this copy of the electron and is a good place to do precision measurements to try like see if there's anything weird going on because the mu on has this little magnetic field and magnetic field is very sensitive to the stuff going on all around the you on the after. They've been studying this article for a long time and they just did a new measurement of its magnetic moment and the results are. What's kind of interesting with regards to what it means for our youth. The universe that's right and you might be wondering like what is you on. Have a magnetic field. How does that even work will remember him. You on is this tiny fundamental particle. We don't really know if it's made of anything smaller. We sort of imagined it to be a tiny little dot. But even though it's a tiny little dot we also think it has this thing called quantum spin which means that in theory it has some angular momentum and because it has electric charge in england momentum at means it has a little magnetic field and that magnetic field is a really nice way to probe what the particle is doing as it flies through space. Is it just flying through space or does it also shoot off of their particles briefly and if it does shoot off other particles that even though these are virtual particles that only exists for a fraction of a second. They can change the way the magnetic field works. and it's sort of a great way to figure out what kinds of particles can exist without their on nature's menu because it's quantum mechanical every kind of particle. They can be shot off. The milan will be created an influence. The magnetic field so don't think of the particles out there waiting for them you on their like possible particles at the moon briefly creed as it lies if you like fields instead of particles than another equivalent way to think about it is that the one is flying through a bunch of quantum field than its energy confide briefly into those fields and then come back since that influences. The milan's magnetic direction. You can tell when it happens. Which gives you a clue if there are fields and particles in. You don't know about as what they do is they. Take this mu on and they spin in a certain direction so they know the way it's going sort of like a gyroscope and then they send it around in a circle a bunch of times until it decays into an electron. Because you don't actually last very long. Their unstable particles and based on the direction the electron came out. They can tell how the mu on with spinning so now they know how you on spin changed from when they created it to win it decayed and that tells basically how all the other little particles out there were pushing on the magnetic field of view on which tells you something about what particles are out there. they're measuring the magnetic field meal on. And i guess maybe a more basic question is like. Why do particles have midfields. Isn't that weird like our particles little magnets. Yeah it's kind of weird because you think of little particles as these little dots and you know they have like spin and charge and mass and stuff but anything that has spin. Quantum spin and has electric charge also has a little magnetic field is remember. That's where magnetic fields come from like.

Daniel chicago england daniel one First this night boson second weeks ago One of joe collider milan
"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Wherever you get your podcasts or hey do you know today's Wednesday it's wednesday april seven. Today's like christmas were particle physicists. Really but what. If you don't celebrate christmas well then. It's like christmas and hanukkah.

"fermilab" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Is the intervention I don't think it works, but you know it's sort of all the stars of fruiting and some kind of viscous fluid type thing. Not necessarily because again it's it's With what we don't know what dark matter is but our best. Well, first of all, we know what's not. The we we know it's not made of. of ordinary matter the stuff. So you and I are fundamentally. Were made know we have molecules made of Adam's Adam's have your nuclei electrons spinning around the nuclei. Are Made of protons and neutrons protons neutrons are made of quirks. And and we know that the dark matter is not made of of anything like that. It's not made of Cork's it's not made of electrons because we we we know from other measurements, how many quirks or Adams there are in the universe and there just aren't enough. So we so we think. Our best guess is that the dark matter is some new kind of elementary, particle? but that simply doesn't interact very strongly with the particles that we know are made of So these are a sort of standard candidate for dark matter. Is What are called and -tracting massive particles or wimps. That's not the only candidate but that's a popular class of candidates to these particles that could be perhaps as heavy as the Proton perhaps tend to one hundred thousand times heavier or perhaps much lighter than a proton. But unlike the Proton or neutron or quirks, they don't interact with the particles that that we are made of or that are detectors are made of at least not not very strongly. Right, right and so I know that there were some other like primordial black holes ideas around us but but the status call today as we sort of know the distribution of this thing but we don't know what exactly, right? Yeah. We know where the dark matter is. We know how much of it there is in the universe about twenty five percents. We can measure quite accurately. Now it's distribution in galaxies and clusters of galaxies, but you're right. We don't have a clue of what it's made of it could be the Williamson, could.

Adam Proton Cork Williamson
"fermilab" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"fermilab" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Is that the Fermilab south of of Chicago and they've got a big cyclotron there and and so we they've kind of been eclipsed by the by the stern lab over in in Switzerland for the big stuff and so they're they're more focused on specific things that we do with the tree house and so we went into one of those sort of caverns where they're shooting neutrinos through all these metal plates and they can fire the one neutrino you know the impossibly small particle through these plates directing through magnetism all the way to Minnesota to a salt mine in Minnesota where they can pick up that very neutrino because they know that nothing will block its way from one place to the next just a crazy crazy idea you get into that realm and you're like what ended up here you know like that this is science of course it's logical and all the rest of it but it's magical as well it's so crazy and so all these thought processes kind of mashed together in your head as you try to figure out how to talk about it well you know in and I was thinking when I was watching some of your your series how how interesting it is that we're learning that there may be an upside down or there may be a doppelganger universe a couple doppelganger to the tabernacle back in the days of the Bible and an idea that you know if they are doing what they're doing and if they don't want to say it is because it has a religious romantic romantic kind of taxation to it saying that they've opened the bowels of hell or they've opened up figuratively the the window to the anti virus the anti universe that's a big deal you're the person I want to talk to because I've been on this day's journey for the last six months I won't really from September to January we shot around the world and did all these different kinds of things from everything from M. vampires to witches to cursed everything in our lives the I receive the cursed D. I find out from from the druids and when they were killed by the the Romans many of these experts that I talked to talking to her in terms of time portals and fails and so forth and so my understanding of that because it seems almost too simplistic to me it seems to me that you're you're really into the realm of string theory and that kind of stuff as matter and anti matter right is that it in fact the thinking well yeah I mean when you're dealing with you know when you're dealing with it wasn't until I think after there was a there was a guy who was with the department of energy the same is the earnest money as he was the head of the partnership one time I think during the Clinton ministration he was on Chelsea handler and that they were talking about stranger things or talk about the upside down and they they said will you know they they were talking about how the department of energy was focused on how they were going deep within the earth to find the upside down and they said oh you know that's that's funny isn't it and money's didn't laugh when he said we do go into the upside down we do do these experiments we do we have found a parallel universe and yes it is quantum it is the idea that the you know somewhere down below us as you've been showing you know what your new series you go down deep into the series especially your vampire hunting which I want to talk about coming up it's just the idea that you know we're learning more and more about the underground returning more and more about the abyss we're learning more and more about what.

Chicago Fermilab
"fermilab" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"fermilab" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And then I gotta say the more he explained the more it's slowly started to see Mike okay maybe he's right one factor no back David before we go any further his PhD in physics worked at Fermilab on subatomic particles was on the team that discovered the top quark in this whole thing between him and me began when he told me to download an app on my iPhone it's called university splitter okay so never opened it up and there's like a gray steel fake steel background it says in white type on top of it universe letter quantum induced universe bifurcation what do I do now right so tell me something you are having trouble making up your mind about what to do you're not a recording this on December thirty first yeah and I've had a week off I grew a beard I noticed him and I'm trying to decide if I should shave it off and so that's something I'm trying to decide I have an opinion on that but what's your opinion I think it looks pretty good right now okay so what is this universe splitter do it lets you do both I can create a duplicate of this universe so that in one you get to grow the beard and in the other you shave it off wait that's what we're gonna do yeah a pretender for real no not for real maybe this is a thing it's called the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics not a lot of really smart physicists who think this is probably what's happening okay so how does this work like what do I do next right so so two boxes there yeah in one box it says in one universe I will now okay so put shave off beard tonight anon shave off feared two nine eight okay and then the other boxes labeled in the other universe in the other one I will now put keep beard keep beard okay and then what's below it in them but there's like a button with like an atom drawn on it so what does it do when you push the button so if you push the button it sends a signal to a fancy piece of scientific equipment at the university of Geneva in Switzerland equipment these days can be tiny like a little box you can hold your hand.

Mike David Fermilab beard university of Geneva Switzerland
"fermilab" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's why to see another underground neutrino experimented Fermilab called Nova. We had to take an elevator into a subterranean tunnel. Main elevator here. Just press down. Start going down said comfortable ride, but lose rather slowly. We only have two three hundred feet. We let our ideas up top in case, we get stuck. So people will know where we are. And we had to get trained to use emergency breathing devices. Just in case. At the bottom. We find a cavernous tunnel with water trickling down the sides of rock walls. There are rows of computers and a semi truck sized box acrylic bars filled with a special oil that measures the path of charged particles affected by the neutrinos passing through from this tunnel. Neutrinos are being beamed to a detector in Minnesota. When will this experiment be done? Or will it ever be done? Thing. Running for number of years since fourteen and has several more years of data. Taking the dune experiment is under construction and noble finish running around the same time scale that dune will start up and dune will run for. Decades, really producing results along the way, I set of results after certain number of years for the beam physics part of the experiment dune law. So look for Trina sources from all parts of the cosmos to learn about neutrinos Antolin about the cosmos to look for neutrinos from supernova when stars explode what they can tell us again about the neutrinos and about supernova, and that I think we'll go on for a long time. Would you say that this research is sort of in the same category? As our space exploration. You are looking into the farthest reaches of the universe through the eye of neutrino interaction and the neutrinos the come from all those different parts of the universe. And then that's absolutely. You're looking back in time and using the neutrinos to be able to do that. Up. We go. One thing you can tell at Fermilab is that this kind of research doesn't come cheap. There are four thousand scientists here one thousand working on dune which will use seventy thousand tons of liquid argon the detectors have to be kept at a temperature of minus three hundred degrees Fahrenheit, the dune project alone will cost around a billion dollars in all. So why pay such a price for this research to first order understanding what remained of where we came from? What we do. In particle physics is break things down to the tiniest, building blocks of matter. And we see this beautiful symmetry that are twelve building blocks of matter that make up all of what we see. So what's the main focus is doing experiment? Trying to understand if neutrinos can explain some asymmetry that happened in early universe which left us with a matter dominated universe. Which is why we exist and. Fundamentally. That's a really fascinated. An interesting question it requires big experiments in big science to be able to answer. But knowing the answer to it tells us something about how the universe was created. How everything we see was created. That's fantastic. Scientists engineers and technicians are already working on the electron IX hardware and computer programs for the gigantic particle detectors of.

Fermilab Trina Minnesota three hundred degrees Fahrenhe two three hundred feet seventy thousand tons billion dollars
"fermilab" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on This Week in Science

"I sometimes preceding the seven hours, and is that is that is that perhaps some of training relating or like distance or. Yes. So I think the well, it's tricky, right? Because to do it to determine both the photons and the neutrinos traveling light, right? The delay in time is actually because the the burst is so dense that photons themselves are trapped in the dense material only the neutrinos they can make their way out what it will tell us an enormous amount about is the his of the supernova birth process itself. Right. We we have these models, and we can see we expect this particular shape of the flux of neutrinos over time where we start to see the beginning of of the collapse. In words, the nutrients come out because you know, a supernova taking star full of protons, and neutrons and turning it into a single gigantic nucleus that is chock full of neutrons, and that process of converting protons, neutrons creates neutrinos lots and lots of them because there's a lot of protons. Right. And so you see this beginning of that process. And then you'll see it stop for a while as the info stalls in the sudden, huge versus it is all of a sudden all at once instantaneously on economical time-scales, all of the protons, neutrons and all the new street between those burst out of that burst out of that star. So so the neutrino experiments, this, this experiment. We're hoping to learn a little bit more about this matter. Anti-matter disparity that allows us to be the next to have to have precedents in this universe. And is it going to tell us anything about dark matter or about expansion of the universe? Are there? Any other big questions that it that? It's potentially going to answer. Right. So. Yeah. So we probably probably not gonna tell us much about dark energy the expansion of the universe. But there is potential say something about dark matter. Right. So the big challenge. These dark matter matters that the obvious models are starting to get pretty pretty tightly coming more or unusual things. And that this this big firm and actually has multiple detectors. There's the far attackers. When we've been talking about a lot down to the Homestake gold line. But we're also gonna ask and we call a new detector that's going to be on-site here at Fermilab, the whole nature of an oscillation experiment. Is you wanna see between one? Type turn into a different type. So to see that process. You put a detector nearby before the oscillators have happened, and you put Integra far away with the oscillations have happening compared the to look for the oscillates, but you can use that nearby detectors do all kinds of other stuff too. Right. You know, we can for example, you know, you can remove the target that produces the neutrinos from the my and instead just collider your protons straight with the we call the beamed up, but it's a big block of material to absorb the protons..

Integra Fermilab seven hours
"fermilab" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on The Science Show

"Which brings us elegantly too, dark matter what could it be and where would you find it about from everywhere? Dan folk reports, the first thing you discover about Fermilab the Fermi national exceleron laboratory is that it's a big place. The site is sixty eight hundred acres quite a lot of it is undeveloped what we're going to be driving through then is the village area which is where are visiting scientists from around the world stay while they're here under a assault from the Fermilab media office is showing me around the sprawling site. It's easy to forget that downtown. Chicago is just fifty kilometers away out here. It almost feels like you're on the prairies. We have large areas of the site that are protected, woodland and wetlands restored prairie and these trails are very popular souls explains that Fermilab even has its own herd of bison. One of the few that you'll find this far east in the United States usually about twenty eight or so. And that is a huge public attraction. People come just to see the vice in. We have bison because our first director, Robert Wilson was from Wyoming and bison her frontier animals. So he wanted to add them to the mix. Here is sort of his part of his larger metaphor about the frontier. Fermilab is named for the late Enrico Fermi the Italian-born nuclear physicist and Nobel laureate for half a century scientists at Fermilab have been building on firm his legacy, probing the bits of matter and energy that make up our universe for more than twenty years. Fermilab was home to the world's largest particle accelerator the Tevatron. But the Tevatron was decommissioned in two thousand eleven, and now the world's biggest atom smasher is the labs European competitor. The large Hadron collider, but Fermilab is still on the forefront of particle physics research these days. Much of the work being done here is focused on a tiny and still poorly understood particle the neutrino, and it would be nice if we got to know the neutrino a bit better because. They're really common. They're basically everywhere. The only problem is that the really hard to detect and measure. My name is Deborah Harris, and I am a physicist at Fermilab right now. So there are a million times more almost a million times more neutrinos in the universe than there are protons. And the only thing that there are more of in the universe than neutrinos is photons of light. So if you want to say you understand the universe, you'd better understand neutrinos we know so little about them because they interact. So rarely. So it's not that they're exotic, it's that they are very shy. Much of Deborah Harris's work is connected to an ambitious project called demon the deep underground, neutrino experiment. Physicists hope that June will finally answer some of the most urgent questions about neutrinos, but dune is going to take more than a decade to build. A lot of that work will be happening below ground, which is weird. Dr. Harris is taking me. All right. One size fits all. Harris leaves me into an elevator to ride down some hundred meters below the ground to something called minnows. Yes, it's another acronym and yes, you eventually get used to them. Minnows stands for that main injector neutrino oscillation search. Very slowly. It's about a two minute elevator ride..

Fermilab Deborah Harris physicist Tevatron Enrico Fermi assault Robert Wilson Dan folk United States Chicago Wyoming director sixty eight hundred acres fifty kilometers hundred meters twenty years two minute
"fermilab" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on The Story Collider

"So I hope that you'll listen and one more thing before we continue on. I also just want to say quick, thank you to everyone who has reached. Out with messages of support after last week's episode. That was the first time I cried my podcast hosting, but let's be honest, probably not the last so things bearing with me. We really appreciate it and we really appreciate that y'all trust us with your stories without you, we wouldn't be able to do. We do. So on that note, our next storyteller is Herman, be white junior. This story was recorded in may twenty eight, teen Fermilab's Ramsey auditorium as part of a show we produced in partnership with the Fermilab arts lecture series. The theme that night was naturally physics. I've often wondered how you make decisions about doing new projects that is things that you don't know, it's going to work things that may actually fail. And what arguments do you make the decision makers who are not scientists about why they should support it? I have a little bit of experience in this. It turns out that. Being able to actually talk about the science and how the science is used is equally important. This is important to me because I grew up basically because I grew up in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, the deep south, and this'll become important as I go on with this talk. My parents grew up in rural Alabama on farms and settled in Tuskegee city, fairly famous city and in the middle of Alabama where I grew up my father served in World War Two in the US army. And when he returned from Europe where he served during the war, we had a international perspective a world perspective that I hadn't seen. In many people, but I benefited from it as a result. Tuskegee was an unusual place at that time as well. And so science and the Tuskegee airmen. If you remember them were individuals who actually were trained in Tuscany. So I had a, I was around it by essentially science and technology, and the ability to do things and had a really good time actually as a high school student with the college and with many people who are relatively famous terms of what they did. Alabama at that time also was very important because of the testing of the saddened, five booster. This is the the rocket that actually took people to the moon, so you can see that it was probably not on heard of that. I would probably wind up doing science for my career. Nuclear science was new in that time. And so I decided that nuclear physics actually nuclear engineering would be something that I should pursue. Let me point out also that Tuskegee was an interesting place also not only for how science was done, but Howard was actually used. We have science that was good enough and and innovative enough to produce an atomic weapon that would stop war. But we also had the legacy of the Tuskegee experiment and which poor men in a segregated community. We're allowed to suffer. Untreated for disease, so that signs could find out how that disease would actually ravage their bodies. This is the my basis for being able to make the case for science. Now, I could say all the great things in the new things and the wonderful things that we actually get out of science get out of research and that drove me into science. But my humanism is remembering what I actually learned from my hometown. I left Tuskegee and went off to a number of universities and Sern lab as you heard and various places around the country and wound up at Fermilab the highest energy celebrator in the world, and it was wonderful..

Tuskegee Alabama Tuskegee airmen Tuskegee city Fermilab Fermilab arts Ramsey auditorium Europe Herman Howard Tuscany Tuscaloosa US army
"fermilab" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on This American Life

"About this a lot i got sad about it on the training in this morning it comes at totally like random moments you know that david kessler inbound what did the produces our program and understand what he's been said about i think it's not gonna make any sense unless you know that he's a physicist like he's a phd in particle physics he was on one of the teams that discovered the top quark at fermilab back in the nineties before he became a journalist so he thinks like a scientist and he recently stumbled across the street he'd never heard before about enrico fermi the physicist that formula is actually named for so the story goes that this is nineteen fifty for me visiting los alamos los alamos with a developed atomic bomb yeah and they're sitting around at lunch it's fermi in a handful of others physicists and they start talking about extraterrestrials one of the scientists who was there remembers that they talked about some new yorker cartoon which had flying saucers and cheerful ilian stealing our trash cans they about it and then kind of out of nowhere for me says something like so where are they meaning the aliens and do people know what he meant yes somehow everybody knew exactly what he meant the idea was basically that like the galaxy is this huge place right hundreds of billions of stars it's been around for billions of years if you believe that intelligent life is something that just arises given enough time where is everybody there've been billions of years where civilizations could have developed and become way more advanced than we are and traveled from star to star sent signals or something where are they if that's right where are they this question became known as the fermi paradox which goes like this if it's so likely that intelligent life exists elsewhere where is it why isn't anybody showing up of course as simple answer to that would be nobody else exists and i had never thought like it made me think maybe we're alone like i really thought that for the first time yeah it made me really sad like i'd never thought about it seriously before i had always assumed that life was everywhere but he's making a really serious point here like he's raising a tough question except for months now when david's brushing his teeth or doing nothing in particular it'll hit him again maybe we're alone in the universe like this morning on the train this this specific thought i was having listed this would mean that there's nobody out there who knows more than we do like about science about i know better songs books like this is it you know yeah like what we know is it like what we are as it.

david kessler fermilab scientist enrico fermi los alamos los alamos
"fermilab" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"You can watch their videos on a tv a laptop a tablet or a smartphone or you can even now stream audio on the great courses plus app so that you can listen while you're at the gym while you're driving all those places where you need to keep your eyes wide open guys lately i've been listening to the course the theory of everything the quest to explain all reality it's taught by dr dawn lincoln from fermilab yeah that fermilab and he kind of goes to the basics from newton to einstein and then moves on it to really this quest to develop a unified theory of everything and the places where different aspects of physics play really nice together and the places where we haven't yet figured out how to make them play nice together there's so much to learn and i want you to experience it i want you to go to the great courses plus where they are offering my listeners there's a free month of unlimited access to enjoy all their courses not just the theory of everything all their courses you've got to go though to this special you are l the great courses pluscomnerdy that's the great courses pluscomnerdy and finally this week i would like to thank blue apron for their continued support of talk nerdy the number one fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country blue apron is so easy and it's so delicious let me tell you how it works go online you choose your meals it is less than ten dollars per person per meal and you get exactly what you need to cook a delicious homecooked meal and i'm talking everything you need every single ingredient perfectly portion so you can't screw it up a beautiful fullcolor step by step recipe.

dr dawn lincoln fermilab einstein ten dollars
"fermilab" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Brains On!

"Jasper and i spoke with konica such dove she's a physicist at fermilab in chicago where they try to detect smaller and smaller particles comical specialty is very small she looks into particles called neutrinos i was wondering i am are we done finding smaller particles i mean i know we found allotted now all of whom but is it possible they're smaller things there actually are uh some small particles that we are still looking for so the reason me go looking for things is that be study nature and then we find something that happens in nature that we can't quite explain with all the party goes if you already know about so dark matter is one of those things so and we look out in the universe we find that uh the the rate at which the galaxies are uh rotating it means that the they must be more mass and the galaxies than we can see so then we hypothesize wound there must be something else out there the b consi and that's what documented it so we there certainly are more party goes in nature than we have discovered so far and the reason we go looking for them is because the would as we observe a dozen quite make sense without you know imagining something more than rewarded he observed so far from done other ways of measuring particle is like small learned dan electrons an early protons neutrons stuff like that uh so it depends upon uh what the properties of that body good so there are certain particles which are quote unquote smaller than electron one of those particles is owned neutrino and thus the one that i woke with so the way we study these spotty goods is most of these particles you cannot absorb directly so if you want to see a body good in your detector that particle has to have some charge so you know electron has an negative charge says electron goes through your detector it produces some light and then you can see it similarly if a positivelycharged particle goes through your deduct that you can see it but if a particle is neutral for example a neutrino is a neutral body good did that is it does not have any positive or negative charge so it it buses your detector you cannot seat adult it just blew blows right through it and you would never see it.

Jasper physicist fermilab chicago
"fermilab" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Science Friday

"On another thing is that neutrinos are involved in astra physical processes and if you're interested in how stars live their lives how they're boren how they die at neutrinos are are um deeply involved in those processes and you have to understand the properties would you soon as if he wants to understand those event and um and effective he wanted to detect them to so much fun you have a longterm love affair with treat yeah i love nutrient have certainly true why why pick neutrinos woolly subatomic particles well i love the mall of course that neutrinos are um they're especially their their elusive they are um there involved a touch so many corners of the universe that it's uh they're they're just really feeling do they do they deserve the name that the ghost article oh i i think so i i mean there are um they do just tip rate through everything and theory very few of them ever interact um the chance of the neutrino uh from the atmosphere the sun interacting in your body over your whole lifetime as maybe 50 percent so uh very rare but there's just literally uh hundreds of trillions of them going through you all the time so it's uh yeah they're they're really exotic on but they're real and we we can we can see them in our detectors talking to you from fermilab which must let's rentals along with your yep well good good luck in a police were we'll we'll check in with you when you uh you know gets more results.

fermilab boren 50 percent
"fermilab" Discussed on Tell Me Something I Don't Know

Tell Me Something I Don't Know

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"fermilab" Discussed on Tell Me Something I Don't Know

"That had 64 wheels and it took up an entire 3 lanes of the highway so in the middle of the night we shut down the highway and barely squeezed it through one of the open road tolling stations and delivered it to to fermilab were and did you plug it in yet yesso we do that in 2013 by 2015 we pluggedin the electromagnet and turned it on and saw that everything was working and we'd been building the experiment and justice spring we started taking data looking for these new particles in the universe tesicnoi think chrischristie could use that the the highway down jessedukes moving the gigantic mu on magnet halfway across the country find any problems with brennan story at the it happened there are photos and but i fear is that the new on is kind of like gotta be one of the most boring of atomic particles like the work that you do does look really interesting you're looking for other things but then you on it self is sort of like a fat electron is that a fair characters asian fat electron yeahit'sa200 times as heavy and and and it two ksand since we've studied it really well we understand what it should do and so we can use it as a really precise probe of things that we don't know about in the universe we don't know about trump into it in make it act differently is my explanation but from you on jokes there are like 33 higgs boson jokes and there's only one meal a joke do you know it okayi'll knock knock.

shut down fermilab brennan