19 Burst results for "Felicita"

"felicita" Discussed on The Bible Recap

The Bible Recap

08:18 min | Last week

"felicita" Discussed on The Bible Recap

"By isaiah is primarily concerned with warning. God's people about their sins. Today he launches into the first fifteen chapters of prophetic speeches or oracles to a bunch of pagan nations. And we'll find out why he starts out with babylon which is one of the ruling powers of the ancient world. They're the ones who will take the people of judah into captivity jerusalem falls and about one hundred years and in today's reading. God pronounces eight prophetic judgment on them for the thing they haven't done yet. God's sovereignty shows up right off the bat in this scenario in thirteen three he refers to babylon as my consecrated ones. As far as they're concerned they have not consecrated themselves to yali. No sir but the point of this terminology is to show that god has consecrated them or set them apart for his own purposes. He has a plan to use them and their sinful ways to work out his long term plans to bless his people initially through discipline but then through restoration. Babylon will think they're doing their own thing. But they'll be fulfilling god's plan and the fact that it's written out more than one hundred years in advance serves as evidence that the idea didn't originate with them then even though god is using their sin to accomplish his will as he does with all sin he still punishes it as he does with all sin so he tells them how they will eventually be overtaken in return for what they did to his people. This is the kind of big big picture sovereignty that it's hard to wrap our minds around. Sometimes it's the kennedy thing that can feel threatening to our ideas of self sovereignty and it's okay to wrestle with that but what i always come back to is that ultimately i'm really glad i'm not self sovereign. I know my heart to well to wish that on anyone so bad things you're about to happen. I to judah at the hands of babylon and then to babylon for what they did to judah. They'll both be destroyed for babylon. The end of the story is judgment and desolation. But for god's people the end of the story is restoration and fulfillment the people of babylon which probably represents all the ruling powers of the world will eventually attach themselves to the peoples of the restored israel and offer themselves as servants. That's how juxtaposed things will be from where they are now. Oh how the tables will turn chapter. Fourteen paints this story in an interesting way remember. How prophecy can often speak to or more stories at the same time and how it can also speak truth about things that have happened in the past. Some scholars believe that's what we're seeing here in fourteen twelve to fifteen. What's for certain. Is that isaiah speaking. About what will happen to the king of babylon who will lose all his power and position too arrogant attempts to exalt himself. What's possible is that isaiah is paralleling. The king situation to the story of a high ranking angelic being someone referred to as day star or star of the dawn in most translations some translations listed as lucifer. That's the latin translation of the english. Word were day star or star of the dawn. Either way it's a common noun not a proper name regardless what you call him. This angelic being decided he wanted to be god instead of serve god and that's when he was cast down from heaven. There's some possible. Overlap between this passage and ezekiel twenty eight. Eleven through seventeen which seems to point to the same idea. We'll post a link in the show notes with a bit more info on this. But it's something. I hold with a really open hand moving on from babylon. We continue with oracles against four more nations. Today next up is a syria. The ones who destroyed the northern kingdom and mount a pretty severe attack against judah too. So god is going to punish them and as got his crushing them. The yoke and the burden they've placed on israel will be broken effectively freeing israel. Then we move onto felicita. I say reminds the philistines that got as only promised to preserve and protect his people so even if they happen to see a reprieve from oppression. It won't last as ahah says. God's heart is set on his people and he'll be a refuge to them onto moab their oracle gets two whole chapters and has a distinctly different tone from the oracles for the other nations for instance. We repeatedly see god morning over the destruction of moab this is almost certainly because the mo abides are distant relatives of the israelites. Ruth the moa bite was king. David's great grandmother. And david left his parents with the king of moab wiz live was being threatened regardless these distant relatives have to be judged for their sends like anyone else. It's always interesting to see. God mourn over having to punish sin god is a real person with a real personality. And he's multifaceted just like anyone else though. His characteristics never contradict each other. The moa bites will mourn over their own destruction. Shaving their heads putting on sackcloth and they'll seek refuge in judah. I had to be honest. I kind of chuckled. When in the midst of all their grief we came across this verse mourn utterly stricken for the raisin cakes of cure harissa. Sorry isaiah. I'll mourn for a lot of things but raising cakes are not on the list. Today's final oracle is for damascus. a city in syria. The prophecy opens by saying it will become a heap of ruins and even though it exists today it was conquered at least three times over the next four hundred years and destroyed at least once but god says there will be a remnant here. Why does damascus get a remnant when they're not part of his family. There's something interesting going on here and it helps if we know two things first that damascus shares a border with the northern kingdom of israel. And second that. The northern kingdom of israel was often collectively referred to as ephraim you may recall that ephraim is one of the ten tribes in the northern kingdom in this oracle ephraim and damascus are kind of blurred together the northern kingdom has gotten so far off the path that they've effectively merged with this pagan nation despite that god has mercy on them by preserving remnant who will turn to worship. Y'all way again. My god shot came from the spots. Where god mourned over the destruction of moab in fifteen five is heart cries out for moab and in sixteen nine. He says i will drench you with my tears. It's incredible to see his tender heartedness toward a pagan nation. That has rejected him. Most people don't expect to see compassion like this in the old testament but his character has always been the same god. The father god the son and god the spirit are not only consistent throughout eternity but within themselves as well yesterday today and forever keys where the joy is one of my favorite things i do. Every year is lead small tours to israel. We usually go once a year sometimes. More the chips are usually ten days. Total eight days on the ground in israel plus a travel day on each end depending where you're coming from we visit the places of jesus life ministry death and resurrection where jewish tour guide. Moshe gives us the back story than i take us deeper into the scriptures short devotional. We also have some optional fun. Outings like floating in the dead sea into being on the jordan river. We stay great. Hotels see stunning landscapes and eat the best food in the world but most of all we come home with a deeper knowledge of the word. A deeper love for the lord recap the groups at around twenty five people per trip which is small enough that we can still get to know each other and have a fun group dynamic. Both men and women are welcome to join us. And we'd love to have you on one of our upcoming trips if you're even slightly interested fill out the interest form on our site today and we'll send you more info to help you make a decision. It's not a commitment visit the bible. Recap dot com and click on the israel link or check for lincoln the ship notes..

isaiah jerusalem falls babylon israel damascus felicita syria oracle kennedy ahah ezekiel David judah Ruth ephraim Moshe jordan river lincoln
"felicita" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"felicita" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Being in the south except you're in the north. My favorite one would be pork chop on a stick now. The stick happens to be the bone of pork job. But that's what you enjoy most all of this stuff. That makes you fat. I try to avoid the. That's my problem is is. I used to be half the size. I am and then i got married to a wife that makes biscuit so felicita senator. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. Thank you very much for stopping by investing luck to you guys moving forward up there and thank you very much for letting me talk about why Purdue and leffler ought to be elected january the fifth absolutely. Merry christmas to you. good bye. Merry christmas you. Senator chuck grassley i. I have never talked. I think we've interacted in the hallway in the hart senate office building may be once First time to actually have a detailed conversation with him. What a guy He is the president of the senate. If if things go south and this election he could wind up being president of the united states Senator chuck grassley. He is He's been there. gosh Got elected in nineteen eighty one and has been there since he was in the iowa house. He got to the. Us house in january of nineteen. Seventy five before. I was born and then moved over to the us senate. He's eighty seven years old. The president pro. Tem of the united states senate. Now i'm going to step out here little a few minutes earlier than i normally would reset comeback. We got more to talk about in georgia including andrew. Yang wants to come to georgia and start a universal basic.

Senator chuck grassley felicita senate office leffler Purdue senate united states iowa georgia Yang andrew
"felicita" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

08:31 min | 9 months ago

"felicita" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"You roll. Pinter's everybody roll your tiny little joy yourself smoke john you know at the same time and just like wait. Nobody shares drinks. I'm just like just let's be on top of each other outside ready which was nice and then for people to wonder how you hear the movie they give you a Station to tune into on your radio To some people did it in the car. Some people brought big boom boxes. That's nice The one i had they would rent. You want for five or ten bucks. Oh yeah okay. Ended up having to get another one because it just wasn't quite loud enough yet to So you put when they when they sustained they also have jumpers for ten bucks for people leave their radio on too long. Just go dead yeah. It's just cool. It was so fun lake. It's to be able to hear the laughter but people were having fun and honking their horns during your podcast part. None during the movies because we do like hard comedy. Oh right so. They're honked horns for the lab. Yeah yeah it was. Wild bird shows but like i mean it's not i won't say better with different because there's no like dying down for laughter. People reacted people. That are blessed. Yeah i mean you could hear people because you had phones right the doors are open. The back of your is open your you back into the spot and so it's an suv. Pulled that thing up so even range your phone but when there's a scare you hear everybody going so it's cool. We just part of a group. Superfly everybody i mean. I couldn't believe it. Five under fucking people so the first night we did all newer movies except shakes versus because that's exclusive premiere so we did Actually i think you would think it was really fun. As movies just came out the slashing the final beginning and it's for titles at it's essentially the way that guy pitched it. Because i interviewed him for my podcast. As my friend brent brandon bachelor zach goes midnight spook show. I do a horror movie show. Yeah what do you do. We watch movies and bullshit over him. Oh yeah please. Midnight spook show. Yeah the intro to thank you. And so essentially his idea was to take like an italian slasher giancarlo and put it. In the world of lena dunham woke world. Girls like essentially a mumble core girls economy movie with a killer running around and it's funny as flock. Who do you root for. People were cheer like every death. People were cheering. It was cell phone and then we showed our movie returns in my volume. Two and we moved from portugal. Called mutant blast it literally just an effects piece for an hour and a half could you. Could i just hear this. I would just got an idea could you. Not you could one contact a one of those places the drive through and just like have like some comedians curate. One of those things. But sicom gonna watch three. When harry met sally. Whatever tactically. Yes but if it's a drive through that's on the up and up. Yeah you're going to have to pay for the rights to screen that movie. 'cause i've debated doing a live version of my podcast but a lot of theaters. Don't wanna screen something unless they have the rights to screen it even if you like a little yeah even if you on like a little thirty person thing so when i went to paid whatever heavily heavily for the rights to air. Yeah so even the one. I the mahoning. Our first night was all digital the second night we showed actual thirty five millimeter prints of the three movies. A how'd you get away with that. It was trauma and we showed so. And they'll do. Like i know they bruce campbell. Coming in they're going to do all the evil dead's wow or they have. Felicita rose whose Never really seen them. Yeah so derosa was like you got to see him. That would be the best way to seal. And then they all the sleep away camps with the girl from sleep away camp like they do big business. I've seen i they're doing. They're doing harm weekends. Every weekend can only it's not like amc or whatever they buy or rent a print of the mugabe right up. Batman begins whatever when it comes out and then and they give back after some time or they sell it to seven percent theater for way cheaper. Because they're done with it you know but like they're doing eleven. Am show a one thirty show. Four o'clock show with drive ins. I'm assuming you pay the same amount to get it but like you can only show it once a day while a lot of. That's why a lot of them i think. Do classic movies because it's cheaper right because he's still got it's also like there's nothing like seeing a movie that was shot on thirty five the way it's supposed to be seen grinding like i was talking about bloodsucking freaks earlier. Yeah i saw it. There was a theater you know where wayne lives waiter. Where are you used to be. That used to be a movie. Theater called the pioneer. And i was i used to college and they were very going out of business because they can go fuck and they that last october run everybody was fucked up like everybody was on everything and they showed joel. A blessing director. Who's now dead. He died cove actually leaked him. He was very old. He brought his thirty five from his house. That was not stored. Well seeing the seventies movie with forty years of age on john it and then everyone was smoking in the theater show is projected through the smoke. Damn almost looked three day amid takes you there dude. It was the most fun i've ever had like. We saw that old gentle on second avenue. Second second avenue. About twelve talking about you a klezmer ricotta thing but One of the smaller the taxi driver and thirty five. All eight cool yeah. Those grind house movies were going for the tarantino to see for real. I'll remake of it. It's digital effect of the pops in the scratches. What is grind. How can you explain that to me is a type of theater that would show like exploitation. Movies the giant. Yeah cheapo so like. Rhinos is the feeder yet grind houses where those theatres okay. I like forty second street. Had the grind houses. And that's where you would see like basket case which actually is shot in the neighborhood. Those theaters were in Yet so you would go to the grind house to see like your shitty cheapo triple feature. Usually the last one was more almost more cornish. And you make your money off concessions. Yeah a little bit of a ticket. Yeah yeah and it was like Yeah you exploitation cannibal holocaust ever get. That's good yeah. Yeah yeah so you have. Have you ever heard like the mondo movies. Mondo was like a kind of filmmaking. The predates like the exploitation of the italian expedition where they would go to like these weird almost savage kinda countries and just do fake documentaries and get people to do crazy shit like There's one where they're like. These people wash themselves in the urine of cows and they just paid a bunch of villagers to stand under the cow to through tom green stuff. But it's real and then can you imagine the level of savagery. People leave and go. Like i saw little chocolates documentary. Cannibal holocaust basically put that to a narrative. And that's where you get like your exploitation movies. Wow were they went and they shot with real villagers and shit. Yeah dan that's so cool. Okay so that's how grind house and that's why some of these directors like that time. Yes an era of you know rules dangerous. So make an exploitation blasts. They is just a question of like more or less. Yeah right yeah. I always have. Blaxploitation was taking advantage of black people. It really just taking advantage of actors..

Mondo Pinter lena dunham brent brandon portugal bruce campbell amc Blaxploitation derosa Felicita director dan wayne joel tarantino mugabe john harry sally
"felicita" Discussed on Pray the Word with David Platt

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"felicita" Discussed on Pray the Word with David Platt

"Zeki chapter twenty, , six, , versus seventeen, , and eighteen. . And they will raise a lamentation over you and say to you how you have perished. . You were inhabited from the sees Oh city renowned who is mighty on the see she and her inhabitants imposed their terror on all her inhabitants. . Now, the , coastlands Trimble on the day of your fall and the coastlands that are on the sea are dismayed at your passing. . So this is. . The end of two chapters in Ezekiel Chapter Twenty Five, , twenty six to begin a series of chapters in the book of Ezekiel where God tells Ezekiel to Prophesy Against Not his people in Judah, , the people of God of Israel instead to the neighbors, , the nations, , surrounding Judah, , surrounding his people. . So chapter twenty, , five starts with the prophecy against Ammon and MOAB and seer and eat him and Felicita and then chapter twenty six begins a prophecy against tire and that's what this whole chapters about. . The reason, , I read these two verses WanNa pray according to them versus seventeen and eighteen is because God is. . Speaking to a nation and a people that had prospered. . and. . He's talking about how they were mighty on the sea and imposing terror on others they were renowned. . But now in an instant God says all of that would be taken away. . And he would bring them low and the coast lands would be dismayed at how this once renowned powerful people just like that were gone. . Just like that, , when the total opposite direction and reading these chapters, , these prophecies from God through Ezekiel among the nations is a sobering reminder. . That no matter. . How Great. . Powerful Influential a nation might be. . My claim to be might be perceived to be. . Nations come and fall and can fall just like that at the sovereign decree of God. . And particularly as well. . We think about any nation I, , know people listen to this podcast and different countries around the world many maybe most from the United States? ? I just. . Want us to be reminded from God's word. . No matter what nation we live in and no matter how powerful that nation. . May being or claim to be or be perceived to be. . Is ultimately in the hands of. . An instant everything could change. . So. . God We. . Humble ourselves before you. . As Your people in United States. . And many other different nations. . And we. . Humbly confess acknowledged that you are lord and sovereign over. . All nations that you hold the United States every other nation in the palm of your hand you raise and you make Lo, , and you can do either one in an instant and so God. . We pray that you would turn our hearts to you. . God We pray just compelled to pray based on. . Zeki Chapter? Twenty ? six for spiritual getting in my own nation in the united. . States got we need you save us from ourselves. . We have in so many ways turn from you so much that we have approved is displeasing to you dishonoring to you. . We are not glorifying you in so many different ways to God reprieve for your mercy I pray for your mercy across. . My pray for the spread of your grace and your mercy in the Gospel across my God I pray for that in the city where I live in greater Washington DC God please May Your Gospel Your grace, , your mercy, , your salvation spread among more and more and more people they more and more. . Disciples we made. . More and more people trust in you may more and more churches be planned to pray for this in greater Washington. . DC, , pray for this throughout the United States and whatever nation we might be praying from right now god, , we pray for your mercy in our nation's we know that in instant you could lay it all low. . And so we pray pray for humility before you pray for fear of you pray for this in our own hearts. . We pray for this in the hearts of your people your church got pray for fear of you and humility before you in the hearts of government leaders. . God We pray that you would turn many in our nation's to you by your mercy. . Before we fall into deep her sinfulness and to. . Deeper judgment. . Pray this in Jesus name. . Amen

United States Ezekiel Chapter Twenty Five Ezekiel Washington Judah David Platt Oh Felicita Lo Israel
Nations Come and Fall (Ezekiel 26:1718)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:49 min | 10 months ago

Nations Come and Fall (Ezekiel 26:1718)

"Zeki chapter twenty, six, versus seventeen, and eighteen. And they will raise a lamentation over you and say to you how you have perished. You were inhabited from the sees Oh city renowned who is mighty on the see she and her inhabitants imposed their terror on all her inhabitants. Now, the coastlands Trimble on the day of your fall and the coastlands that are on the sea are dismayed at your passing. So this is. The end of two chapters in Ezekiel Chapter Twenty Five, twenty six to begin a series of chapters in the book of Ezekiel where God tells Ezekiel to Prophesy Against Not his people in Judah, the people of God of Israel instead to the neighbors, the nations, surrounding Judah, surrounding his people. So chapter twenty, five starts with the prophecy against Ammon and MOAB and seer and eat him and Felicita and then chapter twenty six begins a prophecy against tire and that's what this whole chapters about. The reason, I read these two verses WanNa pray according to them versus seventeen and eighteen is because God is. Speaking to a nation and a people that had prospered. and. He's talking about how they were mighty on the sea and imposing terror on others they were renowned. But now in an instant God says all of that would be taken away. And he would bring them low and the coast lands would be dismayed at how this once renowned powerful people just like that were gone. Just like that, when the total opposite direction and reading these chapters, these prophecies from God through Ezekiel among the nations is a sobering reminder. That no matter. How Great. Powerful Influential a nation might be. My claim to be might be perceived to be. Nations come and fall and can fall just like that at the sovereign decree of God. And particularly as well. We think about any nation I, know people listen to this podcast and different countries around the world many maybe most from the United States? I just. Want us to be reminded from God's word. No matter what nation we live in and no matter how powerful that nation. May being or claim to be or be perceived to be. Is ultimately in the hands of. An instant everything could change. So. God We. Humble ourselves before you. As Your people in United States. And many other different nations. And we. Humbly confess acknowledged that you are lord and sovereign over. All nations that you hold the United States every other nation in the palm of your hand you raise and you make Lo, and you can do either one in an instant and so God. We pray that you would turn our hearts to you. God We pray just compelled to pray based on. Zeki Chapter? Twenty six for spiritual getting in my own nation in the united. States got we need you save us from ourselves. We have in so many ways turn from you so much that we have approved is displeasing to you dishonoring to you. We are not glorifying you in so many different ways to God reprieve for your mercy I pray for your mercy across. My pray for the spread of your grace and your mercy in the Gospel across my God I pray for that in the city where I live in greater Washington DC God please May Your Gospel Your grace, your mercy, your salvation spread among more and more and more people they more and more. Disciples we made. More and more people trust in you may more and more churches be planned to pray for this in greater Washington. DC, pray for this throughout the United States and whatever nation we might be praying from right now god, we pray for your mercy in our nation's we know that in instant you could lay it all low. And so we pray pray for humility before you pray for fear of you pray for this in our own hearts. We pray for this in the hearts of your people your church got pray for fear of you and humility before you in the hearts of government leaders. God We pray that you would turn many in our nation's to you by your mercy. Before we fall into deep her sinfulness and to. Deeper judgment. Pray this in Jesus name. Amen

United States Ezekiel Chapter Twenty Five Ezekiel Judah OH Washington Felicita Israel LO
"felicita" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Frequent traffic. It's important to know. What's going on out there every six minutes in the morning? Yeah. They give you an alternate route. They tell you exactly what you can do to keep you around the slow down and to work on time. That's I give my information drive in back and forth. This is Orlando morning news with Joe Kelly on news ninety six point five WDBO. I talked to Brian Kilmeade earlier this morning, and I was trying to get him to tell me about his upcoming Orlando appearance. He's going to be here July twentieth. When he interrupted made ask me a question of we made initial over to the Joe Kelley team. I don't know if that's gotten to you. Would you sacrifice a Saturday to be with your people on stage and helped me out? I'm sure that I could make such a horrible sacrifice. I would be happy to of course. I mean, I'm giving you two months not answer the clubs the appear and say, yeah. And just focus on me per change. I will do my best Brian to fit you into my very, very tight social schedule. If you want to hear the rest of my discussion with Brian Kilmeade from earlier this morning. It's posted right now on our Facebook page, you can go check it out right now. Tate, forty on Orlando's morning news. I'm Marsha Taylor. And I'm Rick computer. A central Florida Representative is getting attention for some comments. He made on Facebook, Paul Halpern from palm basis. State Representative Randy fine should apologize to his face for calling him a June rat on Facebook, June rat refers to Jews who collaborated with Nazis in concentration camps. The comment was made after helper and expressed support for local panel discussion event about Palestine fine. Who is Jewish has made controversial social media comments in the past which include calling anyone who criticized Israel, Nazis or MTC medic this year fine also suggested a potential shutdown of UCF because of the controversy over construction spending Katrina scales. News ninety six point five WDBO. We now know the identity of decomposing body found near a popular Orange County trail, the office confirmed belongs to Thirty-seven-year-old Felicita Nadal a mother of two she was found by a man having a picnic in the area smelled something. That was terrible. Clothes and they're just stronger where it to cover my nose cause of death has not been revealed, but she was reported missing. By her family.

Brian Kilmeade Facebook Orlando Tate Joe Kelley Felicita Nadal Paul Halpern Joe Kelly Marsha Taylor Orange County Randy fine State Representative Florida Representative Rick Palestine Israel MTC
"felicita" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Veto the heartbeat. Bill or the film industry will leave the state. We cannot in good conscience continue to recommend our industry remain. If you're in Georgia if HP four eight one becomes the law, the governor Brian Kemp says he will sign it. We can't change uses a state because we have you know, some in Hollywood that's criticizing the Sunday capital, cedar perish. WSB WSB news time seven thirty four. Actress Lachlan and Felicita Felicity Huffman are expected in federal court in Boston today in the varsity blues cheating scandal. A prominent lawyer. We'll also be there last year. Gordon Kaplan was named a dealmaker of the year. But now he's been put on leave from the big law firm where he's co-chairman following his alleged bogus charity payment to rig is daughters. ACT ABC's. Aaron Katersky says Lachlan's acting career has taken a hit since being accused of paying to get both her daughters into Southern Cal. A Senate committee will investigate FAA safety. Inspectors who cleared the flaw. Boeing seven thirty-seven max jet for service, unless committee chairman Roger wicker has asked the Federal Aviation Administration for documents and other information, according to wicker, multiple whistle blowers say numerous FAA inspectors were not sufficiently trained and black. Valid certification reporter Mike Rossier says the max series remains grounded after two crashes and under six months a new survey by homeland security funds. Many TSA workers really aren't happy with the jobs. The report looked at exit surveys. Foul workers believe their pay is too low management's poor, and there's no clear path for advancement three quarters of those surveyed said they were leaving for a better paying job. The report also finds a high rate of turnover at smaller airports WSB news time, seven thirty five twenty five till eight Eric von has for the gang takeover after Atlanta's morning.

Gordon Kaplan Federal Aviation Administratio Lachlan Roger wicker Brian Kemp Felicita Felicity Huffman Bill HP Hollywood Aaron Katersky Mike Rossier Georgia TSA Atlanta ABC Eric reporter Senate Boeing
"felicita" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

16:52 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Bill James works for the advisers. The Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaders is talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world in by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves that we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Invalid sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done. Documentary and far above the normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started. I was just going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which one hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. That happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great aunt had been was one of the victims of the crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said it reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shy. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. Please. No, the book book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding. A lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in them fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in a hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also trying to create a picture of how they live, and and and give the reader an understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town years ago. I think he did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which re Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism, and you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that in and it brings a fresh context to these murders, you know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks? With me to the point. You were just making that has to do with the the soccer in the case of soccer fans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think one thousand nine hundred ninety nine hundred eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a pickled deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was. But there was conflict testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as the way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Liska city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who is the head of the house after the. After this service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten they'll wanna starting around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. Than that crazed murderers hiding somewhere in this house it as a dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun, no form, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house house in a small, quiet. Western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe. The axe is found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay Walker som came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen Frank Jones of financially the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became came badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Valenica for even though. Walkerton was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Process in the city. I would I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You know, you mentioned the piece about the. The person in whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people start feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of since anal ISM. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. But I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types in Velasco wished to ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Boston Red Sox ballista Bill James Frank Jones Felicita soccer Sako Alaska Hank horton England Rian Vert Jay Walker Valenica Iowa Santa
"felicita" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

17:03 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on 600 WREC

"R, E C and ninety two point one FM. Bill James works for the vises. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves that we don't like to talk about and going on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got up like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bullets murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became. Five or six years. So I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit writing preachers, the ministers that would come to these towns on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons. And then they will get passed around these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in in the deaths of of somebody that one point, you know, we're popular members of the community. Faded happened. Just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. He had always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about that. But it was it was a shot. He said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. And I don't know why it was important to him. I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened, but you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. No, please. No of the book. Book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system is like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived. They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns two hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies in which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happen to you and million people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Hundred years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. I that's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it that always sticks with me that straight the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer in the cases, SoKo invented daddy? One of them. I think it was. Doc, oh had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes. What are the crimes was committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a Khalil. Heels because tickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflicting testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on an ice couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Iowa and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. There was a church service. I a Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this survey, I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity your six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house, the uh. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no form of protection. Olding matches in front of a friend of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The match the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay in Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He can keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided fullest and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Liska for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is you know, the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the Liska authorities, and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James Liska Frank Jones soccer England Iowa Rian Vert Heather Velasco city council Felicita Anna Lena Velasco Baker Hank Horton
"felicita" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

11:33 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"On NewsRadio eight forty W H A S. Bill James works for the e advises the Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can't have that. I was just saying that you were presenting dichotomy of. Working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became five. Five or six years. So they I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? You know, the tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers who was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great aunt had been one of the victims of the crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he'd always pleased that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about, but you said he was tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I I understand. I understand the sense. It was important to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still didn't have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. No, please. No lot of the book. Book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding. A lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred. They Kurt a hundred years ago. And I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in them fifty sixty years ago. Phil it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in spot has a hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and million people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths and also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it always sticks? With me that illustrates the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer in the case of soccer fans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes one of the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a he had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a pickle eels because tickled eagles were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was there was conflict and testimony. That said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on an ice wreck. Couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would. Would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true talion as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of of Jin nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the ballista city council and the power company, so they had city lights street lights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness is this Sunday night. There was a church service. Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims that the woman who is the head of the house after the. After this survey, I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for many couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna. Lena, Jerry, went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the.

murder America Bill James Boston Red Sox soccer Iowa Kurt ballista city council Felicita England Velasco Jin Rian Vert Anna Phil Sako Eddie
"felicita" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

11:24 min | 2 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on WLAC

"Bill James works for the advisers. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports where linguists talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the man from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of. Working in the sports world it by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders. Invalid sky called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became five. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wondered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that one point, you know, we're popular members of the community. The. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I? I understand the sense. It was important to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished is. I I don't know that there's a lot of different. But you still have that reaction to it. Yeah. I think go ahead. Please no book book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred. They Kerr two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me in them. And that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived that? They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths and also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Years ago. You did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks with me that the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer, the case asako and vans? Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think one thousand nine hundred ninety nine hundred eighteen and he had a he had witnesses who said that on that particular day. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a tickle deals because pickled eagles were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was. But there was conflict and testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The. It's a tiny detail that you would. It would never never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there. These little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. That was a church service a Sunday night, check service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was punched into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they.

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James Velasco soccer Iowa Felicita England Rian Vert Anna Lena Kerr Velazquez city council Sako Eddie Henry Moore two hundred years
"felicita" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"All white. It's not chock gay. It's just. It's just the truth. It's not chalk. It's truth, Tom Brady is the greatest quarterback ever and he's playing at an even higher level now than he did five or six years ago, how can you bet against that? That's not smart videos. No, it's not smart. I'm gonna play the odds, the odds. There's only one team that's going to three straight Super Bowls under the Buffalo Bills. Well, there's only one, Tom Brady, just saying you sound playing just your spitting into the wind doing and then this thing, here's a guy. I mean, he doesn't come all the time, but he calm. When guy in Napoli start to get a certain age. Name father time, and sometimes you don't even have to call him who just show up on announced out of nowhere when you least expect it. He's like a Felicita. You sitting down to have a good meal and they ring the doorbell trying to say, you know, I can own it off Amazon if I needed that. So get away from my house father time coming skip Bayless. Okay. How many documentaries he relief, Tom, by the way, we're going to talk about the latest Tom versus time Napa along because he says in the log in effect, I'm just gonna play until I'm forty. Five. He's forty one. That's four more years, not now you're going to be haunted. You're gonna have a four year nightmare. So let's start with the fact that the New England Patriots play the easiest schedule in the NFL by some rankings. They played a photo. Miami in that division. Okay. Buffalo. So that should mean that Tom Brady is going to have a couple of home playoff games, right? All of them at home. Okay. Tom Brady, as we speak is nineteen in three in the postseason at home nineteen. In three, the ravens got him twice in Rex, Ryan, God him once. That's all these lost nineteen and three, and you're willing to say that Philip rivers is going to go to Foxborough and beat him because that's what you just pay. We might have to go go to Philip rivers might be so good. They might have home field throughout how we've been playing this schedule. Don't worry about they're going to have to have a horrendous year. And by the way, the defense it got a little better. Dont'a Hightower is back. I couldn't stop the run their twentieth against the run last year. It'll get better because that Danny Shelton they traded four from the Browns. He gives them an anchor that they haven't had an Adrian clayborn boy, wreaked havoc on Prescott last. Year and they signed it gain in the postseason. I mean, in the preseason he looked, he looked like he was bringing it man. So all of a sudden, I'm saying, you know what? This defense could be a little better than last year and the offense. Would you believe the offense of line is now the lowest paid off of line in all football in? It doesn't matter to convey play. So Tom Brady takes a hometown discount. And the line is the lowest paid. I don't know where it goes. Maybe bell check just pockets for all. I know maybe he's just maybe it's a good way to get rich pay and Tom on the side, maybe they're not..

Tom Brady New England Patriots Browns ravens Philip rivers Buffalo Bills Dont'a Hightower Amazon Bayless Felicita Adrian clayborn NFL football Danny Shelton bell Miami Prescott Napa Ryan
"felicita" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Was pretty cool so Saturday were. Done in Santa Cruz my wife's folks. Place celebrating my wife's birthday I received a call from k. actually. I received a text I from Katie green Call me please it'll. Only take a second So two hours later After texting him. Brian I have news I wanna break to you and I'm. Really, excited about it yeah you say, you said. Breaking news breaking news why do we? Text before we call why do we have to announce that we're, about to call well because I don't want to catch him in. The middle of, something so I usually I usually don't want to catch people in. The middle of something so, I'll, text and say hey give me a call when, you have a, second we pick. Up then we're okay. We reject your call then, there you go again just cutting to the chase. Making so. Much, sense listen Sherri yeah This is, why this show, is so successful. Okay we got somebody. Behind the scenes to saying, cut to the chase enough of the skies to. It come. On Idiot So, yeah so I know I. Did you know what I called? You I you didn't, answer and then I, texted, okay Okay now that makes, that makes more sense, and It is a Saturday. And. I'm just not really paying attention too. Much In terms of media social media communication etc Just sort. Of me, myself and I. And my FAM but anyway, katie's, like. Family, so I finally. See. Like oh okay well I missed it okay I got a caller so I call her up and we, have a, little, routine She always answers my calls by saying yellow And I replied by saying speaking So let's do it right now Yellow speaking congratulations friendy? What what are? You talking about congratulations for what Well I just. Found out that you, won the, Don Sherwood. Award. In. The? Bay area radio hall of? Fame my friend That was, pretty cool Thousands and thousands. And. Thousands of votes awesome so this is a. Listener generated event this it's all about the listeners making their their preference known and there. Were thirty great candidates all pros operas and, the, case Felicita said no we want, this guy to win and and I had said, from the beginning lists, if somebody nominated me I want to be in. It to, win it so guys let's let's make this happen or. Don't make, it, happen you decide, well they decided. Huge huge so cool and so I took to social media right off the bat because they just wanted to if you people mainly our listeners and all of the the wonderful people who are up. For this very award Don Sherwood you gotta. Go back and in radio history in San Francisco he was he was. The morning host on k. SFO this is back in the day, this guy was such a talent absolute genius, radio genius so they they named the award the award in honor of him. I. Never met Don Sherwood but I was one. Degree of separation because one of the guys I think in my in my social media. Video was Dave mcelhatton and Dave and I, worked, together a channel five for years, prior to Dave ever going on television he was, on the radio in, San Francisco and was radio star but he knew. Don Sherwood, so I heard a lot of the Sherwood stories many. Of them, were, hilar- hilarious but, the bottom line. Was this guy was just a tremendous radio talent and I look at the list of people on this bay area radio hall of fame and loaded with stars including Lee Rogers who hosted this show And I would I would, host for him every Monday for years Anyway what an honor thank you case for listeners you guys are just, the absolute best thrilled and there's gonna. Be a. Luncheon in October and I'm excited about that as well, so cool you, can see Brian's video announcement either on. His Facebook Brian Sussman show or. If you go to dot com we haven't, linked there as well so we've got that. For you this morning our case turning the page to..

Don Sherwood Brian Sussman Katie green Dave mcelhatton Santa Cruz San Francisco Facebook Lee Rogers Sherri Yellow Felicita two hours
Donald Trump in Belgium after blasting NATO allies; tension builds

John Batchelor

01:01 min | 3 years ago

Donald Trump in Belgium after blasting NATO allies; tension builds

"Thirty w nfl cumulus station where washington comes to talk line best i'm elliot francis president trump is in belgium for what's expected to be a contentious nato leaders meeting bob costantini in brussels the president of the european union donald tusk is part of the nato leadership meeting here since there is a lot of overlap us because they had a relatively good relationship with president trump but the nations involved are starting off the nato meeting amidst tariffs battle america appreciate your life after all you don't have that learning the steel and aluminum tariffs have prompted the eu to place retaliatory levies on specialized and certainly politically targeted american made products such as bourbon commodities and harley davidson bob costantini brussel meanwhile the trump administration is getting ready to slap another two hundred billion dollars in tariffs on chinese imports ranging from burglar alarms to macro you or the office of the us trade representative published felicita.

Washington Belgium Bob Costantini Brussels President Trump Donald Tusk Donald Trump EU Representative W Nfl Cumulus Station Nato America Bob Costantini Brussel United States Two Hundred Billion Dollars Thirty W
"felicita" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on Upgrade

"All of the information shown very clearly so you don't have to bug people right you don't have to fall off goes with like hey teach you see you'd have to do any of the fresh books keeps it simple that can even automate late payment email reminders as well so you spend even less time chasing payments a mole time working on you'll magic doing what you'll good that's what you wanted to eat only spending all of your time dealing with invoices you wanna just be able to do to stuff as quickly as possible so you can get back to doing whatever it is that you do and that's what fresh books is all about if you're listening to this is still not used fresh books give it a try they're offering a thirty day free trial which is unrestricted felicita this show with no credit card quiet will you have to do is go to fresh books dot com upgrade and enter the code upgrade and the how did you hear about a section we thank fresh books that continued support of this show and relay them so jason what betas are you currently running on your devices on my primary devices i'm right writing nothing i have so i have a i have an iphone that is now running twelve but it's it's an unused iphone and i've got a i've got my external ssd running as it does as it did last summer as the summer before running mojave so i am booting into or picking up a different device to look at the betas but i'm not i've not yet put them on my production machines because to reiterate my statements of earlier in this episode i have a family i have so much deliver for.

thirty day
"felicita" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on FT Politics

"Dangerous at the common to say look very gonna pass this brexit agreement you've made the eu if you see canoe customs union and the e u side has been very clear that they will reconsider that question at any point run up to the exit date so i think that is where the crunch will come to the probably not on these bills but much later on with the meaningful vote on the withdrawal i think the things that you've said henry thing which i think is most relevant is the government needs to get out and make the case for getting out of a customs union there is a case that can be made though some good arguments that if we were to stay in accustomed union our hands would be tied but it needs to decide and it will discuss the cabinet committee next week which of these two mechanisms is the right one for having a fractiousness border needs to decide on that and then nice to get out of make the argument but unfortunately i think once again we see the two minutes i think to some degree of mrs may in pressing this argument i mean she has got a difficult hurdle to get over but she needs to know grab it now let's talk about these two solutions here now our politics felicita advance these both quite complicated but is sense she henry the customs partnership which is the prime minister's preferred strategy but not really anyone else's from my understanding and then is what is described as the max fax situations as brief as possible outlined these two solutions short so i think max factor the second option maximum facilitation essentially involves the uk and the eu agreeing as much as possible to reduce customs checks so that looks at examples like for example between australia new zealand where they've done a lot to agree customs corporation and takes the best examples about round the world packages it up together the alternative option the hybrid model or the partnership model is a clever idea that came out of some people say the treasury other say only robens the prime minister's brexit sherpa and it essentially involves the uk providing e use external customs checks and the so the eu agrees to recognize uk customs checks now the additional sort of.

eu prime minister uk treasury henry australia two minutes
"felicita" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next couple of weeks as well adam in brussels thanks so much just one final thought to you sara the tit for tat obviously already underway with the russian diplomats going british diplomats about to leave horrendous of the moment i mean the language that we're hearing something i've never heard the four no relations have been bad for a very long time but certainly i think it's not going anywhere good at the moment though as i say horrendous the kind of language you can hang the insults in fact that the flying both ways are now unprecedented sarah thanks very much surveys for there in moscow we heard from adam fleming in brussels as well six months since hurricane maria devastated the us territory of puerto rico the disaster quickly slipped out of the headlines but aid agencies say that life for many the islands three and a half million residents remains a day struggle lee mc bull narrow ports from the central town of monrovia's there is resentment towards the us government for what many puerto rican see as a lack of urgency for much of the day felicita rivera who's an eighties lies in bed connected to a respirator the tube going directly into her windpipe she's relied on it for years but never has that felt so precarious as it does now since hurricane maria devastated puerto rico six months ago her home like so many others on the island has had no power little generator frequently breaks down fuel for it is expensive and felicitous daughter carmen has very evidently been living under incredible stress trying to keep her mother alive call me mama i've been crying all the time i thought my mother would die because i couldn't help her this horrible me and her are struggling so much to fight this situation maria was the most devastating hurricane to hit puerto rico in living memory plunging more than three million people all american citizens into darkness and into a humanitarian crisis the problem is many are still living that crisis is widespread feeling here that the us response has been slow now remain friends stand with qatari vega and looked down a slope in central puerto rico just minutes after she escaped it might of the storm pulled away her family's villa from the mountainside and dumped it in a crumpled mess below it's still there the families run tubes from a nearby spring to get water to the.

brussels moscow adam fleming hurricane maria monrovia rivera carmen puerto rico us puerto rican six months
"felicita" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Ktla morning show the crews show or powell no six number one four hip hiphop are you dell go herald is on the phone is going to get a sister be he's going to find out if she's down to store forty goats had her house if the bureau gap lau hey be with them by and all that dry work dude but i got a calm of do them at the whole me housekey just came from may he goal and he brought with him forty gold all but you don't hamas will actually be tripping and i can't keep both at the house in a he will not your house are you kidding me michael up after them i have a kid and that's good enough for me going trip they're gonna they're gonna eat if the sprouts and everything going away body more time to drop off adults who who i sold him adults i don't get after workers five pound sterling i have a pony to you wanna ponies oh my god it will love there may be covered the pony because he's local horley holy please honky felicita them more diesel fuel commune combed the obama and the on laura it helps eight helps of both of you put the horse away it helps if both of you can kinda somewhat sound like of go to because that comforts them folks whole herald can you give me your best go really quit so i normally of normal good people who take you harold now now i'll be can you can you sound like a gulf for me please accept make sure that they're going with good people no without giggling without laughing bryant if those little disrespectful piece of the goals i love them okay go ahead pretty good yeah okay we trust you trust you if they need a little nursing are you prepared for that oh my god no i'm prepared that i would you attach a go to your no oh my god i'm gary now pay pre yes may more of the golds j crew that would we fire now what are we biomed and their europe what else in the morning you're on power what else now go lookie those use them for the dow he was was down i love that long law on sunday on sundays ha.

obama bryant europe powell hamas gary five pound
"felicita" Discussed on Freedom 970

Freedom 970

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"felicita" Discussed on Freedom 970

"Well not already have five but i'm going to deny okay the nine thirty on nick at night is ah the full house but the john stamos' nielsen's windsor and the 30's now and then ten o'clock the lovely connie britain i repeat if nashville that's what beating cnn and prime time at this point and look you call it there are supposed to be playing errorfree ball according to cnn's president lately and threetimes of one day last week they had horrific errors three of nick robertson who is a political reporter saying that end entering merckel actually wanted to schedule the g twenty and hamburg to embarrass trump even though she scheduled this well over a year ago it looked like trump wasn't going to be president courtesy of jim acosta uh a costing the president for saying that only three or four intelligence agencies had agreed that russia metal me election you know it seventeam what are you talking about no jim actually the ap manure york retracted that number and i could go on insurance owen crystal wizard that was the worst one he sent out a tweet sean two seconds worth it it's purposely cut the show the polish first lady seemingly blowing off president trump a handshake where three seconds later she shakes president had the present fan and felicita says and a tweet oh my god oh my god over and over again this with their political editor large acting like a twelve year old justin bieber concert i mean it's amazing every day the cnn continues to act like a news organization that would rather fight with the president then cover him and that's the whole problem of right now they're all trying fundamental a mistake in trying to make them said els the news but i stay right there joe contrary use the media rider with the hill and frequent uh fox news.

john stamos windsor nashville cnn president nick robertson reporter trump jim acosta felicita political editor russia justin bieber joe three seconds twelve year two seconds one day