20 Episode results for "Federal Aviation Administration"

Runway Friction

Innovation Now

01:30 min | Last month

Runway Friction

"The FAA regulates the operation and maintenance of our massive airport system and understanding of surface conditions. Including runway traction is a key element of that system is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future weather conditions such as rain, snow, slush or ice affect braking friction on runway surfaces to better understand how these conditions impact aircraft researchers at the Federal Aviation Administration are using state of the art equipment to measure and record various runway conditions. Hand held laser scanners measure runway texture strain gauges mounted on landing gear, measure, breaking friction other instruments. Instruments directly measure the force applied to the wheel and the hydraulic brake system pressure every time a plane lands data is recorded. The FAA is investigating ways to analyze these big data sets to find patterns in breaking conditions and assess the performance of an aircraft's anti-skid brake system. The ultimate objective of FAA friction research is to provide pilots airports with useful, accurate and timely information about breaking conditions on runways. No matter what those conditions might be for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer pulley ovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

Federal Aviation Administratio Jennifer pulley National Institute of Aerospac NASA
Summer Ice Crystals

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Summer Ice Crystals

"Ice a tropical storm when conditions are right airplane icing can occur at high altitudes in any kind of weather. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. When ice crystals hit warm, aircraft engines, the crystals start to melt and evaporate cooling the engine core surfaces to temperatures below freezing as the melted ice crystals, then re freeze ice accumulates inside the engine core, which can cause temporary power loss stalls, flameouts or engine blade damage. Current weather radar easily detects. Detects rain or hail, so pilots can take steps to avoid those conditions, but identifying smaller ice crystals in the atmosphere can be more difficult understanding ice water content conditions can improve flight safety, so the Federal Aviation Administration is working with NASA and other government and industry partners to gather data about this unusual phenomenon, the FAA will distribute this information to pilots, so they can recognize conditions likely to cause icing and take action to mitigate effects making air, travel, safer, winter, spring, summer and fall. For innovation now I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V..

Federal Aviation Administratio NASA Jennifer pulley National Institute of Aerospac
Target USA -- Episode 206: The downing of Ukrainian Airlines flight 752

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

21:16 min | 7 months ago

Target USA -- Episode 206: The downing of Ukrainian Airlines flight 752

"From podcast one coming up in this episode of target USA as investigators. There's look into why. Ukrainian Airlines flight seven fifty two was shot down in Iran on January eighth by Iranian missiles. One serious question rises to the top. Did the crew know that they shouldn't have been flying several hours. Before being you know the The aircraft took off brand launch missiles against bases in Iraq. And as we looked into this incident this is one of the most whilst telling and disturbing developments we found so the pilots would have been sleeping when this happens and when they is very possible that they had no clue that that has happened. In other words the crew of you I a seven fifty two may have been completely in the dark about what was going going on in the air and the danger taking off post we dig deeply into that issue and much much more on this edition. Listen of target. USA National Security podcast from WTO in Washington DC this is is target USA. Russia could render huge arm to this country North Korea's secret missile capable of reaching the whole of the United States. Dangerous Orissa terrorist. DC is repeatedly mentioned. Is someplace they would like to see an attack. Cyber Criminals America has a target on its back and on this program. We investigate the threats. The people behind them the agencies fighting them and the impact on you this is target. USA The national security podcast. I'm Jay Jay Green it it was five. AM in Tehran. At Imam Khomeini International Airport Ukrainian International Airlines flight seven fifty two had been scheduled able to take off at that hour but the fourteen hundred mile flight. Boris Spiel International Airport in Kiev had been delayed by about an hour. You're until six twelve a m four hours before perhaps unknown to passengers on the plane and maybe even the crew Irani Ronnie and missiles it rained down on to military bases in neighbouring Iran housing. US military personnel and contractor better than it is on B.. Ron was responding to the US decision to kill General Qassim Suleyman and we. We saved a lot of lives by terminating. His life a lot of lives of save they were planning something and we had tremendous information. We've been following Pimm for a long time and we followed his path for those three days and they were not good stops. We didn't like where he was stopping. They were not good stops. We saved Aleta lives Mike. Iran had vowed to respond proportionately to state terrorism. This is an active aggression against it all and it amounts to an armed attack against you and we respond Foreign Minister Zarif speaking to CNN eh. And this was the response. Missiles launched at Iraq. DOC But I- Komeini airport in Tehran. There was a dark circle silence that morning the US Federal Aviation Administration Shen had issued three warnings that morning about flying in and around Iraq. Some Airlines had already made adjustments activity at Khomeini. The airport continued almost as normal as seven. Fifty two only recorded about four minutes took flight time. Most of that was spent taxiing in other words. It only spent about two minutes. In the air the Boeing seven thirty-seven eight hundred reached only about eight thousand feet. Before as we know now it was hit by two missiles all one hundred seventy six people on board were killed. The government of Iran has announced that. It's detained several people and set up a special court to look into the downing of Ukrainian International Airlines flight. Seven fifty to a central question short. Come up during the probe is did the the aircrew no. It was dangerous to take off from Iran. The Iraqi military said that on that day twenty two ballistic missiles were fired from Iran between one forty five. Am and two fifteen a. m. local time seventeen of them hit the Assad base and five at Erbil but after a one hour flight. Delay as we've told you you. I A seven fifty two took off from Khomeini airport at six twelve. Am It according to flight tracking statistics. Eighteen other flights took off as well after those missiles were launched. Well yeah good question. Captain House Durban Retired Commercial Airline pilot. Who flew for thirty years from what I gleaned on the news report this grow incident involving the shootdown of that airplane I think it was scheduled for like a five am departure. That would be bright and early and may have been delayed until six o'clock and several hours before being the their craft took off around launch missiles against a basis in Iraq. And as we looked into this incident this is one of the most telling and disturbing developments. We found so the pilots would have been sleeping sleeping when this happens and when they as very possible that they had no clue that that has happened in other words the crew of Ui as seven fifty two may have been completely in the dark about what was going on in the air and the danger taking off imposed on behalf of all company. I offer deem condolences to family. Members of the people who were on board Ukrainian International Airlines finds president. You've Ganey to everybody who is close to them. When you look at the will it was one of our best planes with excellent excellent trustworthy crews putting the shooting need? We decided to cancel all flights to Iran for an indefinite period of time target. USA asked Ukrainian Airlines if it knew whether the crew was ever briefed about the danger. The airline responded saying whilst whilst Ukraine international does not wish to encourage any speculations and further overstrain the media landscape. The airline does not comment on decisions and activities of the officials and authorities for accident details. The airline cannot comment as well until the investigation is finalized is and the findings are officially released. So in the absence of having anything official we went back to captain how Durbin to find out. What the normal all standard operating procedure should have been so when they get to the airport Starting their day they would be checking. They're briefing the condition on the airplane and the weather for their route of flight and also to note hymns would be disseminated in his. That time you might have noticed not referred to something called a note. Them that's notice to airmen and those are typically warnings and what we learned is that in in between Iran's attack and you I seven fifty two taking off the US Federal Aviation Administration issued three notams warning US aircrews not to operate in the over water. Airspace above the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman also in Iran and Iraq doc. And they said this was due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions in the Middle East. It's important to understand and these notices were transmitted internationally in a statement the FAA told target USA quote the FAA routinely shares relevant information mation on potential or emerging risks with our industry and foreign partners and quote however the FAA also pointed out we have have jurisdiction over us. Aircraft carriers only foreign governments have no obligation to follow our notices and again and it raises questions about what was going on with the Iranian. Aviation Authority. Again captain how Durbin I would imagine what with what has go on on. That should have Probably had the airspace close whether or not they issued an Ode. We're not I'm I'm not sure but that's the type of thing that You really couldn't cover up because it's done electronically and posted in their time and date stamp when it did and considering what Durbin said target. USA Right went looking for any evidence that anotem was issued by Iran. We found none we spoke with. US and international aviation authorities ladies and still found none but continuing our conversation with Durban. Another disturbing possibility arose. It's entirely possible. That in all the information they receive they missed that. That's right you heard correctly. He said it's entirely possible. That the flight crew might have gotten the information regarding the danger in the skies but they missed it sometimes these note and can get out of hand amount of Information Asiana pilot has to glean from his weather For example in in New York I will would get pages of notams then abbreviated or truncated format at Some of those had been posted there for years and So some some cases it's hard to see the forest for the trees. According to Durban during flight briefings. A lot of information is flowing back back and forth while you're a briefing could have received a contact from his dispatcher. Maintenance could have interrupted the slow of the review of this stuff a lot of stuff to absorb it a very short period of time to get your flight going and could have been there and midst by the pilots that would have glommed them or could not have been provided right in which case. I'm not exactly sure but here is what we are. Sure of. Eighteen other flights took off from Khomeini International Airport airport that same morning so were all of those crews possibly distracted or were all of those crews possibly in the dark as has to what was going on in the skies were all of those crews which were most likely from different countries and some of them likely friendly countries to the US and likely in possession of the information not aware that something was going on. I think the in fact the airplane to cough was there is. There had to be some disregarding recklessness on on certainly on the part of the aircrew part of air traffic control to Ron on and I think certainly Iranian military. That's Douglas wise a retired senior official from the Central Intelligence Agency. Who has is a mix of extensive intelligence experience some knowledge of aviation and deep knowledge of the part of the world? That we're talking about right now. I think Ah Without a noticed. Airman anotem being published even even though it certainly not compliant outside the US. But I think most major airlines to pay attention to notice issued by the FAA. I think even without a note him. I just due to the the heightened tension attention and obviously Already the use of kinetic strikes that you know that any prudent Air Traffic Control Network and any prudent aircrew would not have flown On that at that time I think anybody would have considered to be extremely risky and extremely dangerous. The FAA declined our request for an interview. The Ukrainian government said said. It's too early to talk about the situation because they have a very sensitive investigation that's underway as well. There's still a lot of questions to answer the answer. And one of them is how. All these jurisdictions and delegations which operate in different spaces worked together their governmental organizations is there are commercial organisations there are military organisations. Douglas Wise. Put it this way it's an interconnected and kind of situation where you ever traffic control. You have the aircrew and obviously you have the ear defenders in Iranian military. So in the end you you should. He air traffic control Should they be allowed. The airplane to take off I think answer is no And the pilot irrespective of Iranian air traffic control at the option of not taking off. And I think you know reasonably prudent person would have assessed at that time of tension that it might have been a greater risk so I think the the pilot command should Not of has taken off and obviously that the signature data available to the Iranian air defenders. It should clearly clearly showed that this was not a aircraft flying a threat profile normally considered the military aircraft. So I think all three of those parts they are some responsibility for this tragedy. It it's going to be quite a while before we find out where all of this we'll come to rest but in the meantime we've heard from Vedeno Press Diko the foreign minister from Ukraine speaking to reporters about the approach. They're taking king with their investigation. We have so many different pictures and videos right now which we are concerned and not us as professionals we have to know where who short short the individuals who share video what the position was real position on grounds in there. What is the time line? So all of this is now on the lies by specialists. As soon as as they come to the conclusion we'll be able to share and at that say news conference minister. Stike oh was asked why he was hesitant to say that a missile had struck the plane. Yeah well the. US and Canada said they were very confident that a missile had brought down the plane. I we have so many reasons to be fair in all. I used to get personal because we want the truth and through something which will be stopped right away as we speak today. It got this information. This nation's obtain them for themselves and the piece of initially they could share with us. What's we really wants to have his spurs forensic on the ground? We have not been access deep black boxes yet which is a key point in our investigation. We have to have all the pieces owned by this. We could not see all the for example. The chairs very important elder by. They're not cheap. It's not about political. Wizard will lead into one position or another whereas West again somebody else. We want to have the key pieces as soon as we have them. The collectors Everson all the old information which was shared with us and we also have our own information. Don't forget that we're the only nation which is on the ground with very powerful. Not Right now. We later learned that a part of the reason why he was being a bit hesitant to assign blame. Which essentially would fall at the feet of Iran was because they simply did not want to alienate the Iranian government? They had their early suspicions that the plane had been brought down by a missile. Now now we know that there were two missiles but the government of Ukraine Barry intelligently decided not to throw it in the face of Iran at the time because they had had much more information that they needed their cooperation to get and what it all boils down to were the legal elements. He addressed it before the news conference ended. There is the plan. If you have a fund all does visison missile which was short with showdown our showdown our plane. There is a whole legal procedure which will have to go through three different levels of this before this this moment. That's what we are now. That's where we're now considered right right right now and even the international coalition of those who are involved does radio mechanism which can be used. We are considered the UN possibilities on its analogy to immigration to which I hear on your over the Ukrainian territory might come to the minds. One hundred seventy six souls eighty Arabians sixty three Canadians. Eleven Ukrainians four Afghans for Britain's and three Germans all lost hundreds of immediate family members thousands of extended family members tens of thousands of friends. Oh grieving the loss of loved ones wants hundreds of thousands of enraged people in six countries demanding answers millions of people around the world watching it all unfold old asking the question. How could this have happened? A small handful of people likely have or had the answers. We may never know exactly. We want the circumstances. Were that led to the plane taking off but we do know information that should have kept the plane on the ground was was out there. That's going to do it for this episode of Target USA. Coming up on our next episode the deepening cyber problems the US and its allies allies are experiencing so one night around midnight midnight. Shouldn't this tent. I and I had these cyber professionals from different countries in there and I asked him I said hey in this room room has never had the Chinese in your network on inviting. Everybody just kind of looked around. I asked what I thought. Okay who in this room is never had the Russians uninvited in your networks. No hands was like what I thought I said. Hey we the same adversary. We deal with. The same problem sets in this domain yet. We don't have as close a partnership as I think we could command sergeant major William Reinhardt from. US Army South we deal on our next episode with the serious problem that gets worse by by the day militias cyber actors their plans and their big target the USA. In the meantime if you have any questions these are comments send me an email and Jay. Green at W. T. O.. P. Dot Com. That's the letter j the Color Green One word at Whiskey Ski Tango Oscar Papa Dot Com. That's J. Green at W. T. O.. P. Dot com also follow us on twitter. That's at T- He. USA podcast on twitter and subscribe to our podcast please and if you want more information about new national security and international security already developments each week sign up for our newsletter. It's called inside the skiff and you can sign up for it at WTO P dot com slash alerts. I'm Jay Jay Green and this his target USA the national security podcast expeditiously with tip TI. Harris has starting off the new year with two amazing episodes. You won't want to Miss I. He's talking with Taraji. P Henson Star of Vampire about her career in film and television then tip sits down with Mike Tyson for a no-holds-barred interview. That's both areas and informative be sure to subscribe on podcast one apple podcasts and many other podcast apps so you can get the new episodes every week. Now Stay tuned for the latest headlines from the Associated Press.

United States Iran US Federal Aviation Administra Iraq Imam Khomeini International Ai Ukrainian International Airlin Ukrainian Airlines WTO Tehran Durbin DC Jay Jay Ron US Federal Aviation Administra Mike Tyson Ukraine Boris Spiel International Airp
Protecting Wildlife

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 10 months ago

Protecting Wildlife

"Ago Us Airways flight fifteen forty nine struck a flock of geese and faced total loss of engine power forcing the pilots to ditch the the FAA's Wildlife Hazard Mitigation Program has grown wings and taken off this is innovation now a decade searching innovative techniques to reduce wildlife hazards research funding allows the FAA and strategic partners to conduct studies about how the Federal Aviation Administration's Wildlife Hazard Mitigation Program continues to focus on reducing wildlife hazards strike reports are acted and stored in the FAA's wildlife strike database the FAA and United States Department of Agriculture work hand in hand re innovation.

Federal Aviation Administratio United States Department of Ag
FAA Clears First Delivery Drone for Takeoff

Business Wars Daily

04:29 min | 1 year ago

FAA Clears First Delivery Drone for Takeoff

"Business wars daily is brought to you by net. Sweet the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform net sweet has a special offer for listeners of this show and net sweet dot com slash BWI. Ellie be sure to stick around to hear more about it at the end of the show. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. Happy monday. Everyone any parent who's read the classic kids. Book cloudy with a chance of meatballs might instinctively. Look into the sky at this news like the giant food and the book things could soon start falling out of the sky. The Federal Aviation Administration just certified new drone delivery service as an air carrier. This year residents in Blacksburg Virginia should begin receiving packages by air will airdrop the service called wings owned by alphabet. That's Google's parent company at some point it'll expand beyond Blacksburg to other parts of Virginia and then across the country. It's the first drone company to be certified by the FAA under air cargo rules, which allow drones to fly beyond line of sight air. Cargo certifications more flexible than existing drone rules, those regulations only allow drones to fly within line of sight so far wing. Executives say, they will deliver over the counter medicines and food, but not just any packaged food wing CEO. James Ryan Burgess told the Washington Post they plan to deliver hot meals within minutes of ordering in Australia. Drones have successfully delivered hot coffee without spilling to determine additional products to deliver the company plans to ask Blacksburg residents. What sorts of Mana they would like to get from the sky jokes aside, the idea of drone delivery services, actually, pretty controversial some people worry that drones which are quipped with cameras will invade people's privacy. Alphabet officials say the cameras will be used to assure safe navigation, only, they also say only a small number of employees will have access to the footage. People are also concerned about the noise as one Washington Post reader commented daily life filled with swarms of oversize, electronic NATs. Wonderful. Finally, there long been concerned some of the many existing drones could be used as weapons. The prospect of drone delivery provokes other questions as well. Like if the wing drones will only be allowed to fly during daylight, and when it's not raining. How would you get that urgent medical delivery? If a sudden thunderstorm pops up wing may be the first livery drone to get FAA approval. But it won't be the last to enter the skies UPS is working on a drone based medical supply delivery service, Amazon is in the game too. And so are several others cloudy chance of drones anyone. From wondering this business wars daily. How about delivering us rating in review it only takes a second. And we sure would appreciate thanks for listening. I'm David Brown. And we'll see you tomorrow. Every company battles challenges as they grow updating manual processes, replacing inefficient systems getting a handle on cash flow as you scale, you'll need software that can handle that growth introducing net suite by oracle the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform with nets week, you can save time money and unneeded headaches by managing sales, finance and accounting orders, and HR instantly right from your desk or even your phone right now net suite is offering you valuable insights to overcome the obstacles that are holding you back for free. Those insights come and guide called crushing the five barriers to growth, all you have to do to get it for free is to go to net sweet dot com slash b w daily again. Get nets weeds guide crushing the five barriers to growth when you go to net sweet dot com slash. BW w daily now. One more time net sweet dot com slash b w daily.

Blacksburg David Brown Washington Post Federal Aviation Administratio Virginia Ellie FAA Google CEO Amazon James Ryan Burgess Australia
Testing Pavement

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Testing Pavement

"The FAA is paving the way to better airport. Asphalt? This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Airfield pavements must support extreme and ever increasing loads under all weather conditions, and the Federal Aviation Administration, this hard at work, ensuring that our nation's pavement materials stand up to these demands the FAA operates to state of the art pavement test facilities at the William J Hughes technical center near Atlantic City, New jersey, dedicated solely to airport. Pavement research, one fully enclosed indoor track in one outdoor centre are equipped with heavy duty test vehicles that can be used to simulate the action of high tire pressure and heavy wheel loads from today's aircraft on airport pavement embedded sensors on the test vehicles and pavement contained information about, we'll load pavement temperature strain pressure and pavement deflection in. Response to an aircraft load in Janiro evaluate the data and use it to produce improved pavement design and established standards for new materials. What does that mean for you improved paving the Terry will conserve airport funds and reduced the downtime of runways from construction and maintenance for innovation now? I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Federal Aviation Administratio Jennifer pulley National Institute of aerospac William J Hughes technical cen New jersey Atlantic City Janiro
Morning Brief for Tuesday, September 17th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:36 min | 11 months ago

Morning Brief for Tuesday, September 17th

"Are you hiring with indeed. You can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your short list of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today. INDEED DOT COM slash W. J. That's indeed dot com slash W. S. J. I'm Anne Marie for totally for the Wall Street. Journal we work is expected to postpone its stock market debut until at least next month as the shared office space company faces questions from investors over how much it's worth as well as its corporate governance practices. The company has recently slashed its valuation and had been planning a road show for this week and upcoming report by an international panel of Air Safety. Regulators is expected to criticize the initial. US approval process for Boeing seven thirty-seven Max jets which were grounded in March after two fatal crashes so we report that the panel is likely to fault the Federal Aviation Administration for what it calls a lack of clarity and transparency in the process. Boeing has been beset by delays in getting the planes back off the ground they could remain grounded into the holiday season oil prices started the week with a rally following weekend attacks on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure over the weekend the attacks have also stoked tensions between the US and Iran which US officials blamed for the attacks Iran has denied responsibility disability for the latest on this all of our other stories please head to our website wsj.com or the WSJ APP indeed used by over over three million businesses for hiring post a job today at indeed dot com slash higher.

Boeing US Air Safety Iran Federal Aviation Administratio WSJ Saudi Arabia Anne Marie wsj.com W. S. J.
Improving Airport Pavement

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Improving Airport Pavement

"The FAA is paving the way to better airport asphalt. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Airfield pavements must support extreme and ever increasing loads under all weather conditions and the Federal Aviation Administration. This hard at work ensuring that our nation's pavement materials stand up to these demands the FAA operates to state of the art pavement test facilities at the William J Hughes technical center near Atlantic City, New jersey, dedicated solely to airport pavement research one fully enclosed indoor track in one outdoor centre are equipped with heavy duty test vehicles that can be used to simulate the action of high tire pressure and heavy wheel loads. From today's aircraft on airport. Pavement embedded sensors on the test vehicles and pavement contained information about we'll load pavement temperature strain pressure and pavement deflection. In. Response to an aircraft load engineers evaluate the data and use it to produce improved pavement, design and established standards for new materials. What does that mean? For you, improved paving. The Terry Nichols will conserve airport funds and reduced the downtime of runways from construction and maintenance for innovation now, I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Federal Aviation Administratio Terry Nichols Jennifer pulley William J Hughes technical cen National Institute of aerospac Atlantic City New jersey
AP One Minute Headlines Apr 02 2019 10:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Apr 02 2019 10:00 (EDT)

"Another delay for Boeing seven thirty seven max, I'm Jacky Quin with an AP news minute. The Federal Aviation administration's as Boeing needs more time to finish changes to a flight control system suspected of playing a role in two deadly crashes predicting weeks before the jets are ready to be tested for flight. Again, the National Highway Traffic safety administration's investigating thousands of cases of Hyundai and Kia vehicles catching on fire. Our Ed Donahue report complaints have been received of more than thirty one hundred fires and more than one hundred injuries. One death was reported involving Kia vehicle fearing a large influx of asylum seekers coming into the Mexico border Senator Martha mcsally in Arizona says more help is needed. We are at a really a breaking point for capacity within homeland security, the Trump administration's weighing the possibility of shutting down the boarder federal health officials say there are more cases of measles already this year than all of last year. I'm Jacky Quin.

Jacky Quin Boeing Federal Aviation administratio Kia Ed Donahue AP Hyundai Martha mcsally jets Senator Arizona Mexico
Why was Boeing slow to act on 737 Max concerns?

FT News

09:16 min | 1 year ago

Why was Boeing slow to act on 737 Max concerns?

"From the newsroom if the financial times and endan, I'm C semblance. The US Federal Aviation Administration has followed China Europe and Canada in grounding bearings fleet of seven three seven Maxine craft following chief eight crashes raising questions about why it took so long for the US to act Katie Martin discusses what we know so far with Silvia Pfeiffer and just Sparrow. Order of prohibition to ground all flights of the seven thirty seven. Max eighth. Andy, seven thirty seven max nine and planes associated with that line. I've spoken to Elaine Chao secretary of transportation to Sylvia, we just heard Donald Trump making his announcement about the grounding of Boeing's seven three seven max in US airspace on Wednesday. Can you take us through the timeline of events Pap starting with when the max eight I went into service. Yes, sir. The Mike Sade is a variant of the seven three seven aircraft that Boeing launch of the nineteen sixties. It was one what has been one of those best selling aircraft. The Maxine I launched in twenty seventeen. What happened last year in October that line and Indonesia airline crashed shortly after takeoff and killed all hundred and eighty nine people on board. Now, what's happened? This week is our on Sunday. An Ezio piano lines crashed also killing everybody on board. That event has now triggered a worldwide ban of the aircraft. Starting with the Chinese and ending with the Americans yesterday. So air crashes, unfortunately, do just happen. But from what we know so far what are the similarities between these two crushes that are getting thirties. Concerned just a stress we don't know anything definitive. The black boxes are still being examined by the accident. Investigators with what we do know is that both accidents took place in the same phase of flight shortly after takeoff and pilots on the GOP and airlines reported flight control problems, which was the same case with liner back in October. So there's been a lot of debates around the aircraft's automated stall prevention features, she's caught the MCAS after the lion. At crushed some pilots in the US complain they'd been unaware of this feature. What exactly their concerns and how long have they been kicking around for these concerns? I surfaced off of the line aircrash October where a lot of pilots in the US. So that they wanna wear of the feature at hadn't been in any of their training manuals or hadn't been explicitly specified. In the training manuals. Some of them were saying earlier this week that now that they know exists, and they know how to deal with it. And specifically how to counteract it if it does take effect? Some of the were saying to me they thought this aircraft was still safe to fly. Right. So what would you say what would people in the industry say about the way the management of Boeing has handled this crisis? I think there are mixed opinions out there. I think it's a waste difficult to react in these sorts of circumstances. But their reputations definitely on the line and some suggest that burn should've acted immediately. After the crash on Sunday. They should have come out and said, we're banning this aircraft. They have not been to crushes in less than six months. We don't really know what the causes yet of the second one will ban the aircraft and others of sort of made the point that Boeing should've waited for the US regulated to come out and burn them. Which is what happened yesterday is a bit of a mixed view out there, but equally it doesn't look good for bearing in terms of reputation in the moment. No. And its share prices of taken a hit the rating agency Fitch worn. That the crisis could become a systemic issue with lengthy groundings delivery delays in order cancellations. What is the potential scale of the damage to Boeing nobody's really putting a number on it at the moment. I mean, the shares as you say they've tanked or they dropped steeply. They lost about twenty six billion dollars worth in terms of market cap. Nobody has yet cancelled an order for the seven three seven eight, but the entire family, and there are four variance is a very big of for Boeing. It's wrapped up around five thousand order so far worth around six hundred billion dollars. So it's a big earner, you know, big potential hit it speaking of hits. Josh, what are the losses that international airlines that have offered them at seven three seven, you know, what's the impact on them? So those that have them in service already will be facing costs on several fronts. We've had one definitive figure quite clear figure from to the traveler Prater, which has an airliner has five max aids, which is grounded may said is going to cost three. Million euros a week likely. So we know that that six hundred thousand euros per aircraft. That's quite a lot of money. But what that consists of is various things. So a lot of airlines don't own their aircraft. They lease them. And you have to pay rent we have to pay a lease fee. Even if you're not using it. So your paying the FIBA you're not getting any cash in you, go to pay your staff because they call it necessarily transfer from one type of aircraft another you have to pay parking fees is expensive enough to park a car in London Commissioner tried to park and aircraft at Heathrow or ever. And then of course, the passengers you have to reroute them, you might have to put them onto other services. You might be liable for compensation under certain European schemes. So all of these costs mount up and one consultancy has estimated that they think it will cost one hundred fifty thousand dollars a day per craft grounded. Now, there are lots of variables in there. And we have yet see, but clearly the longer these planes are grounded the more. It's gonna cost not that people's holiday plans in a survey of the most important thing in these sorts of circumstance. Mises, but what is the impact on the travel industry and how much disruption as this like to cause unwed? Do we know? There's ever a good time for a crash, but the fact that it happened now in the winter scheduled was the tail end of the winter schedule means that there are fewer planes flying. So there was a bit more spec passively. So if an airline can't use the for Norwegian, for example, can't use it smacks eight so it substituting on some of its roots at seventy seven Dreamliner so that will take some of the strain. But it depends how long this goes on for because if this carries on into the summer schedule, which actually starts at the end of the month when planes when flights ramp-up, then he could find it very pressing. There are other places they can get planes from they can wet lease them as it's called from third parties, which supply them with the planes and with the crew, hence, the wet leasing dry leasing is without the crew those are expensive, and of course, competition for those if all of these planes are grounded means that the prices of those will undoubtedly go up so it could be hugely expensive for them on several fronts and said just doing know who the main customers hair, and where will the buck stop is it the airlines that will end up taking. These will bowing to help them in some way burning. I think ultimately is going to have to help them. But the question is how long does that help take come? Is there a legal case of their contractual wranglings have to happen? I so we know that some of the biggest airlines with ovarian with the biggest orders, I think American United southwest. Norwegian have a tenth of their fleet at the moment. But they also have that eighteen, but they also have ninety two on order now Ryanair's interesting 'cause they have one hundred thirty five on order due to start arriving fairly soon. Ryan has big expansion plans over the next few years is it going to be able to keep up with those in the short term if it has all of these planes. There are some airlines which have very strong balance sheets, and we'll be absolutely fine. They can take the hit because they know they'll get it back. It might look pretty in the short term. There are other airlines not naming any that will find it much harder to sustain this kind of loss on a consistent basis. Finally, sylvia. We know that Donald Trump's budget this week proposed a cut to the Federal Aviation Administration. Inspired. Of the fact that is air traffic control system remains years behind many of his counterparts. What's more the FAA lacks chief after Mr. Trump failed to get approval for his own nominee? What kind of pressure is the FAA under the FAA's definitely under the microscope at the moment. Lot of people saying it was too slow to act notably. The Chinese regulator was the first one on Monday to ban the Akra from his own space quickly follow other countries around the world. And then e so the European regulator on Tuesday, some people saying the agency's understaffed underfunded others are saying that the FAA was right to wait to get some sort of evidence on the cause of the second crash. There has been some mentioned of new satellite imagery, those come out, which might have been one of the reasons why the FAA together with President Trump on Wednesday decided to ground the aircraft in the states. Those people as supporters of the FAA's that are saying it was right that the agency didn't bow to political pressure. That had been building up in washing since the Europeans bound the. Craft not to act into to wait for the facts. Having said that we still don't really know why the aircraft crashed. But we hand say is that the prestige of the eight hundred fifty billion dollar aviation industry in the US has definitely taken a hit this week. That was Katie Martin talking to Silvia Pfeiffer acting industry editor and Josh Sperry transport. Correspondent thanks for listening. Remember, if you're not ready a subscriber, we'd like to discover more T content. He confined our latest subscription of the FBI dot com. Of.

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Monday, March 18, 2019

Up First

14:22 min | 1 year ago

Monday, March 18, 2019

"Hey there. Thanks so much for listening to up first. And before we get started. With today's news. We wanted to ask a favor. We know you listen up. I every morning for the top news stories you need to start your day. But right now, we would also like to hear from you. What do you think about what we do in? How we do it. We've got a listener survey out you can go to NPR dot org slash up. I survey and share your thoughts. We appreciate it. New Zealand's Prime minister vows to tighten gun laws after a mass shooting. They need to change regardless. Avoid activity night will may not have hip and with gun retailers. They will change will anyone stop that change. I'm Rachel Martin with Steve Inskeep. And this is up. I from NPR news. An investigation finds the Federal Aviation Administration pushed Boeing to conduct its own safety assessments, but Boeing's evaluations had flaws what role could a lack of oversight of played in two plane crashes. Plus epic floods across the midwest have forced thousands to evacuate. There's nobody has not been affected. Nobody why are there floods when it's still winner? Stay with us. We'll guide you through this day's news. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from Twenty-three in me, your genes can say a lot about your health receive one hundred twenty five reports on your health traits and more by buying a twenty three and me health plus ancestry kid at twenty three and me dot com slash up. I. They were fathers wives. Sons some had moved New Zealand for a better life. Some had built their lives in New Zealand over the weekend. Thousands of people gathered to remember them an all of the fifty people who were killed in the attacks on two mosques Friday, the suspected gunman survived at his court appointed lawyer tells reporters that the suspect plans to represent himself in court. He is the author of a lengthy screed that described immigrants as invaders a screed that he sent to the office of new Zealand Prime Minister Jacinta ardor, I was one of more than fee, she recipients all Amenophis started. That was mild out nine minutes before the attack took place. It did not include a location. It did not include specific details on that within two minutes of its receipt and laced my office. It was conveyed to wrinkly to pollen Mitri sa-. Curie? But he sure Inci want to go. Visit headed provided details that could have been acted on a mmediately. It would have been. But the, unfortunately, we're north such details and Nettie mile the prime minister's cabinet as agreed in principle to tighten the gun laws. We go now to rob Schmitz who is in Christ Church. Rob thanks so much for being with us this morning. Good morning. I understand you've been talking to survivors and victims families over the weekend. What have those conversations been like, they're obviously very emotional? Lot of crying lot of tears today. I was with family members and friends who are finally starting to receive the bodies of their loved ones from the hospital, the sheer number of the dead and the way they've died has made a denting these bodies difficult and time consuming process for authorities for hospital staff, and what's made the situation. Even more pressing is the Muslim tradition of burying the deceased as soon as possible and made on Mia an immigrant from Bangladesh who lost four close friends. I met on as he was waiting outside the hospital for their for their bodies. And here's what he said about one of them. Or didn't borough Porsche original he's saying here that his friend host name was like a mother to the tiny Bangladeshi community here. She helped each the Koran she helped work as a midwife she helped solve marital disputes. Her husband is in a wheelchair. And she was shot and killed soon. After wheeling him into one of the mosques, he incredibly survived but Cohen says losing her feels like losing his own mother. And there were so many others who are injured right in this attack were still in hospital. Yeah. There were around fifty people injured more than two dozen of them remain in the hospital nine people are in critical condition, including another friend of coke on the man. We heard from the twenty five year old wife of his roommate was shot in the chest twice. And is miraculously still alive? He told me she has a fifty fifty chance of surviving. What about this this debate? Now, or is it even at bait over the gun laws in New Zealand. Well, it's not that much of a debate. I mean, it it is a complicated issue because many New Zealanders own guns. There's nearly one gun for every three citizens here. Many people have spoken to though agree that assault rifles like the fifteen which was used in this attack should be banned. And that very well could be the outcome from New Zealand's government. I spoke to Andrew Taylor today. He owns a gun shop in Christ Church. And he told me he's refusing to sell certain guns as well as magazines at enable them to shoot more bullets. Anyone can buy those magazines. They just not allowed to put them in the gun. But if they do walk can we do? So we've pulled the cells of is pulled the south of all of that. I played from guns until we hear further notice from the police so the government to mowing supposed to enrich all that includes the air fifteen he's no longer selling that. Despite the fact that his phone has been ringing off the hook since the shooting from people who want to buy that gun because they're scared. It's going to be banned. Soon. Sounds familiar we've seen that repeated here in US NPR's, rob Schmitz reporting from Christ's church. New Zealand, rob. Thank you. We appreciate it. Thank you. US officials commonly say this country sets the gold standard for aviation safety. So how did an apparent problem with Boeing airplanes? Allude the notice of safety inspectors the Seattle times was posing that question even before the second of two crashes of Boeing planes. The local paper in a city where Boeing has big facilities examined interactions between Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA inspects the airplane maker for safety concerns, but it works in close collaboration with Boeing, and it came to safety of 737, max planes documents show, the FAA told engineers to delegate wide responsibility to the company itself some engineers identified flaws in the safety analysis of a flight control system that is suspected in two crashes. The investigation of the Seattle times was done by dominant gates an aerospace reporter for the paper. He joins us on the line from Seattle. Dominic. Thanks for being here. Good morning. Rachel. I think it's probably a good. Starting point to just have you explain how how it can be that federal authorities outsource the safety investigations to a particular company in this case Boeing, I mean, how is that even allowed to happen? Well, I have to tell you that that's the norm. These days the the FAA lacking funding and resources has delegated more and more of the work of certification to industry. And in fact, congress has told the FAA to do so the FAA reauthorization act last year said that they should delegate as much as possible unless there's unidentified safety reason, not to the onus is on the FAA to find a reason not to delegate, it is the normal way it works these days in this particular case, you say there was a failure of oversight. Well, when the max when the seven three seven max plan in question was certified by the FAA, a document was produced called the system safety analysis, and that's one of the things that was delegated to Boeing so Boeing Boeing engineers who are authorized to work for the FAA prepared that document now I spoke with current and former engine. Nears directly involved with the evaluations or familiar with the document, and they pointed to three at least three major flaws in the system safety analysis. And so the FAA had outsource the safety assessment. The Boeing comes back with the assessment, but there are flaws in in what the data the reporting and the FAA overlooks them. Well, apparently, they were overlooked actually, these three flaws. Boeing is nice scrambling to fix the the very ones that I wrote about in my story going is not preparing a software patch that will fix all three things that the engineers spoke to me about we know that because last week the FAA briefed people in congress who are connected with the VA shin. Subcommittees about the details of what the fix is. And so they told us, oh, we're we're going to make sure that the system can't be triggered by just a single sensor, as in fact, it was a sense of that was faulty one quick question. About this. If I might your story says that you I told Boeing what you'd learned eleven days ago, which was before the second crash. Are you saying that you had informed? Boeing of what engineers were saying that they didn't seem to know before the second crash in which many people died. Yes, I I sent details of everything I was going to say in the story on March six that was four days before the second crash and Boeing was working on getting me answers. You know, I said this is what the story is going to say I need your input. I need you to comment on on what I'm saying. And they were working on that one the second crash happened, and you at this point, and you his still have you heard from Boeing they go back to me lit Saturday. You know, the evening the afternoon before the story published and they didn't say much they just said that they're able to comment on the details because of the ongoing investigation. They did say there are some characterizations significant mischaracterization in the description, I'd given, but they didn't say what they haven't said anything since the story was published. Dominant gates aerospace reporter for the Seattle times, obviously will continue to follow this. Thank you so much for sharing your reporting with us. We appreciate it. Thank you. Small towns across the US midwest are flooding in a way that hasn't happened in decades. This all started as a late winter storm last week, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Iowa experienced blizzard conditions hurricane like winds and heavy rain. And then came the flooding. Here is Nebraska state Senator Tom Breese by think events like this can be the death knell of some small communities in our state. And yes, the future of these communities does hang in the balance after an event like this Bill Kelly is a reporter for our member station NET radio. He's been reporting from some of the states hardest hit areas and joins us. Now. So Bill you were out. I understand in central Nebraska. What you see? Now. The the most striking thing is how difficult it is to get from point A and point B in the north and east central parts of the state, many of the state highways and bridges have been damaged washed out completely in some cases. What's usually, maybe a half hour drive from town to town in these counties can take up to two hours. On on back roads. And then once you get to towns like Dannebrog and Saint Edward where I visited the streets are lined with household goods or goods from stores. They're out on the curb their muddy their waterlogged and everybody in town has has generators and pumps going. It's all hands on deck as far as volunteers in these communities how to get so bad so quickly because it does seem like it turned fast. It did. And it shouldn't be too surprising. That there are floods in Nebraska, we're used to floods in in concentrated areas. This is a state with eighty thousand miles of rivers. It's more rivers than than any other state in the union, but all these creeks and rivers all lead to the Missouri. And the Platte what was unusual in this case is hundreds of them flooded. All at once. I there was this unprecedented event with a record snowfalls out here, and then this bomb cyclone we've been hearing about added more snow with a blizzard. But on the. Eastern part of the state also heavy rains melted. Two months worth of snow all at once. And the result was all of that melted. Snow entered those creeks and streams all at once and those led down to the larger rivers and the flood waters of pretty much receded on the on the north end of the state. And now the real problem is concentrating down in the Missouri river, and they're going to be starting to feel those affects down in Missouri downstream. How does how does recovery began because we heard that state Senator say that this can be in his words, a death knell to small towns. It's a it's a real concern when there's this much damage all at once that we visited the town of Saint Edward. It's about a town of eight hundred people like said, the volunteer response has been great. But they've every business in town. They have thirty one stores, and and diners and offices along their main street, and then there were a couple of dozen homes that were badly damaged and those may need to be demolished completely. And they're going to have to find new places to live Bill Kelley of any radio. And that is a first for this Monday Martine, I'm Rachel Martin van. I'm Steve Inskeep. Join us tomorrow. And since the news does not stop. When the podcast does follow us on Twitter at up first for your daily round up the most important stories of this dang, thanks so much for listening. You can find more in depth coverage of the stories that we talked about today and so much more on NPR's morning edition. That's the radio show that Steve hosts with me and David green Noel king. You can find morning edition. Andrew NPR station stations NPR dot org. Human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense at least on the surface. I said, would you mind if I give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on and without and see what they choose hidden brain, a spicy podcast about science psychology. And why people do what they do. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

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Morning Brief for Thursday, March 28th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Morning Brief for Thursday, March 28th

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash W. S J that's indeed dot com slash W. S J. I'm Anne Murray for totally in the newsroom at the Wall Street Journal, the acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration is defending his agency's decision to certify Boeing's seven thirty seven max aircraft, which has been involved in two fatal crashes in the past five months, David L. Well, also defended the time it took for the FAA to ground the aircraft even after other countries had done. So investigators are looking into an automated stabiliser program known as MCAS ride hailing app lift prices shares Thursday in preparation for its highly anticipated public debut on Friday, the company upped its estimated range late Wednesday. Saying it expects thirty point seven seven million shares will be sold. For seventy two seventy two dollars. Each thursdays. Economic calendar brings the funnel estimate for third quarter. GDP in the US and the European Commission releases the economic sentiment indicator. It's monthly survey of euro-zone businesses and consumer confidence for more details said to wsJcom or the WSJ app.

Wall Street Journal Federal Aviation Administratio Anne Murray acting administrator MCAS Boeing David L. Well US European Commission seventy two seventy two dollar five months
NPR News: 12-27-2019 2AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 8 months ago

NPR News: 12-27-2019 2AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm amy held a Beck airplane carrying ninety eight. People crashed shortly after taking off from the airport. In Kazakhstan's biggest biggest city authorities say at least fifteen people were killed others are critically injured. The airport says the plane hit offense and building before coming down as president and trump continues his vacation at his private Florida resort. He's been tweeting about his impeachment accusing House. Democrats of rushing the process but the next step Senate trial remain stalled as Republican and Democratic leaders are at odds over what form it would take and whether witnesses will be called the Federal Aviation Administration wants most drones to be tracked throughout US airspace NPR's Matthew Schwartz reports as drone use increases. Regulators are looking to address security threats the FAA's proposal would apply to nearly all unmanned aerial vehicles from commercial delivery drones used by companies like Amazon to toy drones. That could fit in a Christmas. Dismiss stocking any drome that weighs more than about half a pound would need to be able to broadcast its location and the name of its operator. The rule is meant to give law enforcement a greater ability to respond to security threats as these tiny aircraft proliferate throughout the country drones have caused airports to suspend flights and the FBI has warned that terrorists could use the devices to carry out attacks in the US the FAA says that being able to track drones could help prevent those those attacks Matthew Schwartz NPR news Washington on Wall Street Holiday Rally has continued Steve Beck. Ner reports volume was thin and post-holiday post holiday trading. But not so the game. Stocks are making as this record setting year. Nears its end. The Dow climbed to another all time high within four hundred points of twenty nine thousand and has risen nearly twenty three percent for the year the S. and P. is up twenty nine and the tech heavy Nasdaq thirty six percent. Some MHM say the rally is Overdone and do for a sell off. But it's underpinning seem southbound though the economy has cooled it survived a global slowdown to fuel all strong job and income gains low inflation promises to keep the Federal Reserve on hold and while risks remain investors are relieved for now that major your trade and other uncertainties have eased for NPR news. I'm Steve Bucknor. Widespread severe weather is impacting. A busy travel time. The South West is being hit with flooding rain and a lot of mountain snow. Here's meteorologist Andrew Orison. We've actually seen as much as one to two feet of snow for some of the Higher Elevations Ovation's outside of Los Angeles by this weekend. The National Weather Service says the system will move into the plains where significant winter storm is forecast. Snow Snow Sleet and freezing rain. Then expected to spread into the upper mid west. I mean he held in Washington. And you're listening to NPR news in the death. Toll is taking up in the Philippines after a powerful Christmas Day typhoon barreled through the central part of the country. Twenty people are now reported to have been killed others remained missing tens of thousands have been displaced American pianist. Dalton Baldwin has died. He was eighty seven years old. Jeff London has this appreciation for a musician. Best known for accompanying singers. So musicians crave the spotlight but Dalton Baldwin preferred to share the spotlight With singers. The voice is God's instrument he said in nineteen ninety six. I want them to enjoy music. Making that's what it should be about. The new New Jersey born pianist studied at juilliard. Oberlin Conservatory and with Nadia Boulanger. In Paris it was there at the age of twenty two. He began accompanying Baritone Gerard Suze. who also became his life partner? It among the other singers Baldwin worked with were Elliott Melling Jessye Norman and Maryland Horn for NPR news. I'm Jeff London in new. You work in South Australia. Extreme heat is back. A Code Red has been declared in Adelaide extending services to help the homeless in triple digit temperatures farther farther east hot and dry winds are returning to New South Wales. That's increasing the fire risk in a state where dozens of blazes have raged for weeks millions of acres of land. Dan have burned over the past few months in Australia and several people have been killed. I'm amy held in Washington and you're listening to N._P._R. News.

NPR Dalton Baldwin Washington Federal Aviation Administratio Steve Beck trump Matthew Schwartz US Jeff London NPR Kazakhstan South Australia Steve Bucknor amy Federal Reserve Amazon president Senate Adelaide
NPR News: 03-13-2019 12AM ET

NPR News Now

04:54 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 03-13-2019 12AM ET

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast live from NPR news in Washington on trial Snyder more than seven hundred inmates on California's death row are expected to get a reprieve governor Gavin Newsom as planning the issue an executive order in the morning placing a moratorium on executions Moore's Lagos's with member station. K Q E D Nusa maintains that the death penalty has not made California's safer and has been an expensive failure the governor. Who's never supported capital punishment says it's unfair and disproportionately applied to people of color and those with mental disabilities. This executive order will almost certainly be challenged in court voters. Here have repeatedly rejected attempts to end the death penalty. Swoops executive order is expected to withdraw the lethal injection regulations. That are. Tied up in court. It will also shut down the new execution chamber at San Quentin state prison that has never been used. The Federal Aviation Administration is doubling down on its decision to not ground the seven thirty seven max eight aircraft despite a growing number of countries that have grounded the aircraft appears practice Booker has more acting FAA administrator Daniel L will send a statement, quote, thus for a review shows, no systemic performance issues and provides no basis to order. Grounding, the aircraft Boeing seven thirty-seven max plates have recently been involved in two deadly crashes. One Sunday in Ethiopia, another Indonesia in October, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency has now joined several nations in suspending all flight operations of the seven thirty seven. Max jets a growing chorus of US lawmakers has called on the FAA to follow suit GOP Senator Ted Cruz of Texas has vowed to hold a hearing to investigate what contributed to the Boeing crashes. Braxton Booker NPR. News washington. Paean union leaders are expressing disappointment and concern after the British parliament rejected for a second time, the Brexit deal negotiated over last couple of years from Brussels Teri Schultz reports at top e unit gauche eaters have said there will be no new offers from Brussels man who led the EU side in Brexit negotiations. Michelle Barney says only the UK can break the impasse over the future relationship. The EU has done everything. It can't to help get the withdrawal agreement over the line. Barney a tweeted after British lawmakers again rejected the deal Prime Minister, Theresa may brokered with other e you leaders in November British lawmakers will now vote on whether to go ahead and leave the EU as scheduled on March twenty ninth without any agreement governing relations with the e u or to delay, the divorce Barnier says the e u side is stepping up its preparations for the no deal scenario for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. Prosecutors brought charges in what they call the largest college admission scam over process. Cute by the Justice department. Fifty people have been charged nationwide with participating in a scheme in which wealthy parents paid bribes to get their children into some of the nation's most he league colleges. You're listening to NPR news. The Senate is expected to vote Thursday on a resolution to block President Trump's declaration of a nationally -mergency to fund a southern border wall for Senate Republicans have said they will join Democrats surpassed the resolution, but President Trump has promised to veto it in there does not appear to be enough votes in the house or Senate to override a presidential veto dick sporting goods is removing more guns from its stores. NPR's Lena silk reports at the move comes even as a company continues to take a hit to its bottom blind after restricting gun sales following last year's deadly school shooting in Florida. Dick sporting goods is removing hunting Garin guns from one hundred twenty five stores where they're selling the worst. That's in addition to ten other stores, which have been testing the idea. The company's shares fell eleven percent on the news hunting has long been a drag on the company and Dick's has been replacing guns which have low profit margins with more profitable items. Like sports gear at the same time. The retailer still faces outcry from. Mm shoppers who are upset about the company's public stands in favor of gun control and new restrictions on gun sales following the parkland shooting in February of last year the company's sales for the fiscal year fell about three percent though. Dick said sales improved in the gun free stores. Alina Seljuk NPR news intial markets in Asia are lower following a mixed day. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average closed down ninety six points shares near craft maker Boeing led a slide in industrial sector stocks amid those safety concerns following the crash over the weekend yoga involving Boeing's popular playing seven thirty seven max eight. This is NPR news.

NPR NPR Dick EU Brussels executive Federal Aviation Administratio Teri Schultz Braxton Booker Comcast Washington Senate Boeing Michelle Barney California President Trump US Gavin Newsom Asia
AP Headline News Jan 22 2019 20:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

03:30 min | 1 year ago

AP Headline News Jan 22 2019 20:00 (EST)

"Napa know right now, you can get a twenty dollars prepaid visa gift card by mail with the purchase of a Napa legend premium battery. It's durability and power make it the obvious choice for people who hate getting stranded by dead car battery so pretty much everyone the Napa legend premium battery and twenty dollars back quality parts, helpful people. That's Napa know. How know how that participating Napa auto parts stores and Napa auto care centers. Limit two per household while supplies last offer ends two twenty eight nineteen. AP radio news. I'm Tim Maguire two votes guzzled for Thursday in the Senate. I'm Bill that would end the partial government shutdown. Here's the AP saga megani? The first vote there. They will be on President Trump's proposal to reopen the government which would give him border wall funding and among other things provide some immigrants protection from deportation. It would break through this fail mate. Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell's also agreed to allow a vote and a house passed package that would temporarily reopen the government through February eighth without including any money for a border wall. If you're looking for a way to open up the government, this is the way, but despite democratic chief Chuck Schumer's enthusiasm that measures not likely to pass either. In the meantime, roughly, eight hundred thousand federal workers are expected to miss another paycheck Friday saga megani? Washington. Police say three adults in a sixteen year old student plotted to attack Muslim commute. Unity outside Rochester, New York, Greece. New York police chief Patrick falen says Twenty-three firearms and homemade explosives were found had carried out this plot which every indication is that they were going to you'll people would have died. I don't know how many and who but people would have died. The chief says the timing of the attack is not known. An insurance study finds a problem with engine fires in certain Hondas and KIA's highway loss data institute found the fire claims rate for some Kia optimism Sorrento's as well as Hyundai sonata Sorrento Santa Fe, and Santa Fe sport have doubled the non crash fire claim rates last week Hyundai announced they would recall about one hundred sixty eight thousand vehicles to fix a fuel pipe problem that can cause fires results of the study have been turned over to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is investigating but nitsa is impacted by the partial government shutdown. Hyundai says a majority of the vehicles in the study have been or are in the process. That's the. Ps Ed Donahue. This is a P radio news. There's a tentative agreement between striking teachers and the Los Angeles public school system. Teachers will be getting a six percent raise superintendent, Austin Butin are outlined. Some of the other parts of the deal. Reduced class sizes provide more support educators in schools, more nurses counselors and librarians and provide more opportunities for collaboration for all who work in our schools votes by the teachers and the school board are expected today flights at Newark airport were stopped for a while today because drones were spotted flying over nearby Teterboro airport. Multiple news reports cite the Federal Aviation Administration as saying the drones reported at about thirty five hundred feet. Take awesome. Newark one of the airport serving the New York metro area where then halted inbound planes were held in the air. The New York Times reports at the stoppage caused a backlog of flights from other cities too Newark, I'm Tim Maguire, AP radio news. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. No an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive. Gotta take these off. Right. What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations.

Napa New York Jamie Senate Tim Maguire Hyundai AP Newark Chuck Schumer Newark Trump Mitch McConnell Bill Federal Aviation Administratio Ed Donahue KIA Rochester Washington
Morning Brief for Monday, January 6th

WSJ Minute Briefing

02:17 min | 7 months ago

Morning Brief for Monday, January 6th

"Wall Street Journal listeners. Come from all walks of life and business and no matter what type of business urine eighty P is here to help you achieve what you're working king for with. HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people learn more at design don ADP DOT com. Here's your morning brief for Monday January. Sixth I'm Keith. Collins for the Wall Street Journal flaring tensions in the Middle East rippled through markets as they kicked off the week. Global stocks fell on oil prices climbed while gold a haven asset jumped to a six-year high on Sunday. President trump threatened Iraq with potential sanctions and a bill for billions of dollars in reimbursement costs after the Iraqi parliament approved. A resolution to expel. American forces is the measure which is non-binding followed a US air strike in Baghdad that killed a powerful Iranian general Friday erects. Prime Minister had called an lawmakers back actor resolution but it isn't known what his next step will be. Iran's government said it would no longer comply with limits on uranium enrichment under its twenty fifteen eighteen nuclear agreement with world powers however. Tehran stopped short of fully withdrawing from the deal president trump over the weekend threatened to strike fifty two Iranian assets including some cultural sites if tensions escalate further house speaker Nancy Pelosi the Democratic led chamber this week plans to introduce is and vote on a war powers measure to limit trump's actions involving Iran and across Iran on Sunday hundreds of thousands gathered to mourn the death of General Qassem. Sola the money who was killed in last week's airstrike. We report that federal aviation regulators are looking at requiring flight simulator training before US pilots can resume operating operating Boeing seven thirty-seven. Max jets which were grounded. Last March after two deadly crashes the Federal Aviation Administration had previously rejected such a move as unnecessary an FAA spokeswoman declined to comment on specifics saying more analysis and testing is required. A Boeing spokesman said the company would follow the recommendations thousands of regulators worldwide. For more details please. Head to our website wsj.com or the W._S._J. APP.

Wall Street Journal trump Iran US Federal Aviation Administratio Iraqi parliament Baghdad Middle East wsj.com Prime Minister Boeing President Nancy Pelosi Iraq Collins Tehran General Qassem six-year
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 13 2019 17:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:45 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 13 2019 17:00 (EDT)

"Lows knows. You're the type who does it right to keep your home style up to date. We do it right to by offering of the thirty five percent off select bat faucets. Z you can give your bathroom a quick refresh and save doa step further. Make an even bigger impact in your bath with new flooring get timber craft plus wet protects starting at just two seventy eight a square foot your next project. Do it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offer valid through three thirteenth. See store for details. US only. After years have been rolled up within an inch of life. I'm free receipts of a mind of their own go, paperless and manage your travel expenses online with my taxi business, make the smarter choice of might taxi dot com. Planes grounded. I'm Tim Maguire. But the AP news minute, President Trump says the Federal Aviation Administration orders all Boeing seven thirty-seven, max jets grounded, all of those planes are grounded effective immediately acting FAA administrator Danielle well says satellite-based tracking shows both planes that crashed had similar problems track of the airline flight was on very close and behaved very similarly to line air flights. L Bill says the grounding will remain in place. Pending more information from the investigation into Sunday's crash. President Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort faces a total of seven and a half years in prison additional time tacked onto his previous sentence of nearly four years within minutes of his sentencing today, New York state, prosecutors brought mortgage fraud and other charges against Manafort. Facebook says it knows about an outage that's affected. It's platforms including Facebook, Instagram and messenger down detector dot com. Reports the outages started around noon eastern time, I'm Tim Maguire.

Tim Maguire President Trump Facebook Federal Aviation Administratio Paul Manafort US Lowe AP New York administrator Danielle Boeing fraud thirty five percent four years
Democracy Now! 2019-03-28 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:28 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-03-28 Thursday

"Hi, I'm Amy Goodman. Did you know, you can get democracy? Now's daily news hour, including our headlines stories, even special web exclusives. Delivered directly to your Email inbox every day just text democracy now all one word to six six eight six six to subscribe today. Make sure you never miss a single story once again, just text democracy now one word to six six eight six six and thank you so much. I need it written. From New York. This is democracy. Now. Visit the quality of life issue. You wanna tell people that their concern and their desire for clean air and clean water is elitist tell that to the kids in the South Bronx, which are suffering from the highest rates of childhood asthma in the country after Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell pushes for a vote on the green new deal, New York. Congress member Alexandra Cossio Cortes caused the move a bluff vote we'll look at what the proposal is for green new deal with Riyan a gun. Right. One of the lead policy writers for the deal, then after two deadly crashes, the Senate pulled hearings and how the Federal Aviation Administration, let's airline industry regulate itself and whether to approve a former lobbyist ahead the interior department will look at regulatory capture with public citizen's, rob Weisman, the more we learn the more. We're finding out that the FAA is captured in control by boat. Knowing the company is supposed to be regulating. That's not a unique situation corporations and all sectors tend to control their regulators regulators fail people die and as the Nazi James Alex fields pleads guilty to twenty nine counts of hate crimes in federal court for plowing his car into a crowd event. He racist. Protesters in Charlottesville killing one we'll speak with Stanford. Professor Jennifer everhart about her new book violence uncovering the hidden practice that shapes. What we see think and do? It happened in Charlottesville is something that's happening to some extent all over the country. We're struggling to contending with race in in both new and old ways. All that. And more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I made me Goodman executives at Boeing have tacitly admitted that software in the company seven thirty seven max airplanes may have played a role in two recent deadly crashes in Indonesia any THEO Pia on Wednesday. Boeing executives laid out plans for new software. Updates to the seven thirty seven max plane, giving pilots more control of the aircraft many VA Asian security experts. Believe faulty autopilot software was to blame for the crashes of lion. Air flights six ten and eight THEO peon airlines flight three oh two which killed a combined three hundred forty six people all people on both flights. This comes after the New York Times reported both those flights lacked. Optional safety features that could have prevented the deaths on Capitol Hill acting FAA administrator Daniel L well on Wednesday defended his agency's oversight. Of bowling. He was questioned by Massachusetts Senator, Ed Markey. I find it hard to believe that a a safety company like an airline would save a couple thousand dollars on an option that that might improve safety on maybe hot maybe hot for you to believe. But it's happening. The Wall Street Journal reports Boeing sought to accelerate the development of the seven thirty seven max jet by lobbying to reduce regulatory scrutiny while requiring as literally training for pilots as possible we'll have more on Boeing later in the broadcast. A federal judge has struck down rules and Kentucky and Arkansas requiring Medicaid recipients to work in order to receive healthcare under the federally funded program under the state's Medicaid work requirements, which were encouraged by the Trump administration all quote able bodied adults who get health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansion are required to. Prove that they're working studying or volunteering on Wednesday US district judge James Bowes. Berg ruled the requirements were arbitrary and capricious and said they exceeded Medicaid mission to provide health coverage to the needy. The ruling could affect six other states that impose similar rules in seven other states who've applied for Medicaid work requirements at the US, Mexico border customs and border protection says it'll reassign hundreds of agents to the port of entry now Paso as the agency faces a surge of Central American migrants seeking asylum in the US the announcement came as CB BP confirmed that hundreds of migrant families, they confine them behind a chain link fence topped with razor wire in the parking lot of an El Paso Border patrol station. This is immigrant rights activists Christie Valez. The in-coming conditions at the families are being kept in under this bridge on there being kept behind cages and intense and the mothers are being treated very badly. The families are being treated very badly in the children are being treated very badly. This is no condition to keep families and babies and the rhetoric that's being spread about these families is completely untrue. And it's inhumane, President Trump told a meeting of Republican lawmakers Tuesday that Puerto Rico has received too much aid since hurricane Maria devastated. The island. Senator Marco Rubio told reporters Trump said the aid, quote is a way out of proportion to what Texas and Florida and others have gotten is comments came as democratic lawmakers said more aid for Puerto Rico must be included in a thirteen to fourteen billion dollar disaster aid package being pushed by Republicans. A study by the university of Michigan and Utah found federal aid to Puerto Rico with slower and less generous after hurricane Maria than federal aid received by Texas and Florida. After hurricanes Harvey and Irma. President Trump has still not knowledged that more than three thousand people died in Puerto Rico after the hurricane in Florida thirties have identified a second survivor of the February two thousand eighteen parkland mass shooting who died by suicide this month sixteen year old Calvin to sear took his own life Saturday just days after nineteen year old Sydney, a yellow also died by suicide seventeen students staff and teachers were killed in parkland on Valentine's Day last year in one of the deadliest school shootings in US history. If you or someone you love is in crisis, you can reach the national suicide prevention lifeline at one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five that's one eight hundred two seven three talk uncapped hill, some democratic lawmakers or calling on the Trump administration to rescind new rules that make it easier for US weapons manufacturers to so grenades. Flame thrower. Hours and semi automatic rifles overseas under the new rules gun makers, no longer need to be licensed by the State Department to so weapons like the air fifteen to foreign buyers and will instead need only a far easier to obtain license from the Commerce Department on Tuesday, Minnesota democrat freshman, congressman Ilhan, Omar took up the issue at a house foreign affairs committee hearing she was questioning Jeff Abramson the Arms Control Association on March fifteenth of this year, there was a shooting at a mosque in Christchurch New Zealand that left fifty people dead. The shooter was armed with five guns two of which were some atomatic rifles. Is it your understanding that this policy would make it easier for American manufacturers export that weapon? Indeed. That's exactly what we're talking about. This comes as an undercover investigation by aljazeera English found officials with the National Rifle Association gave advice to members of Australia's far, right? One nation. Party on their campaign to overturn Australia's strict gun control laws enacted after a mass shooting in one thousand nine hundred ninety six this is an NRA media, liaison, speaking in Washington DC to members of the one nation party in secretly recorded video though, somebody flees to your side that worked at a newspaper. Maybe it was covering city hall or Cryer order stories about people who were robbed Heather invasion, and being whatever might be that could help. Can be the angle restores. And that's what he's got. He's got to put out to five a week. Meanwhile, half post is reporting and official with the National Rifle Association corresponded with prominent sandy hook conspiracy theorist to call into question the school shooting in parkland Florida last year in an Email obtained by the Huffington Post and RA program coordinator, Mark Richardson, wrote to the conspiracy theorists Wolfgang how big just one day after the massacre, quote, just like sandy hook. There's so much more to the story. The parkland shooter was not alone. He wrote the Email was made public as part of the discovery process in a lawsuit by parents victims of the sandy hook massacre against Alex Jones and his website info wars Jones, a far right conspiracy theorists. Who's denied that twenty school? Children and six adults were killed in the twenty twelve mass shooting at sandy hook calling survivors of the massacre crisis actors in Virginia self. Described Neo Nazi James, Alex fields pleaded guilty Wednesday to twenty nine counts of hate crimes in federal court for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racist protestors in Charlottesville in August, two thousand seventeen as part of the deal. Prosecutors agreed not to seek the death penalty. Last. December of Virginia jury sentenced fields to life in prison for murdering anti-fascist protester Heather higher and injuring twenty eight others at the counter protests of the white supremacist unite the right rally Facebook said Wednesday, it is banned white nationalism and white separatism from its social media network. Facebook says it will redirect users trying to engage in such content to a page for the nonprofit life after hate which seeks to help people. Leave hate groups in Texas. A Houston area county official is under fire after he criticized the judge for speaking Spanish on television, a March twenty fifth Harris County, judge Lena Hidalgo was giving updates in both English and Spanish about a chemical fire that was burning at a petrochemical plant in the Houston suburb of deer park the press conference. Was carried live on Facebook page of Houston CBS affiliate K chew where Mark tastes chambers county. Commissioner posted the comment quote. She's a joke English. This is not Mexico. He said following a public uproar Thais later apologized census. Data shows Harris County forty-three percent Latino in nearly half its residents speak language other than English at home back in the United States in New York City. Suburb has been children who are not vaccinated against measles from schools markets and other public spaces emits one of the worst US outbreaks in decades, the sometimes fatal disease Rockland county, executive Ed as said the ban will target parents who refused to give their children the MR vaccine against measles. Mumps rubella effective at this joke at midnight tonight, much twenty-seven anyone who is under eight ten years of age and his vaccinated against measles. We bought from public places until the declaration expires in thirty days or and so they receive at least the first shot of 'em are the order will affect an estimated six thousand unvaccinated children and their families. The outbreak which has seen at least one hundred fifty people infected with measles since last October has mostly been confined to Rockland county source that Jewish community which is particularly low vaccination rates in California. A federal jury ordered Monsanto to pay over eighty million dollars. To a cancer survivor whose illness was found to have been partly caused by the urbicide roundup seventy year old Edwin Hardiman says he sprayed the widely used herbicides on his property for almost three decades. Once got the product directly skin he's been diagnosed with non Hodgkin's lymphoma. The jury's award could have implications for hundreds of others accusing the company of making them sick. And the Trump administration struggling to justify its plans to cut federal funding to the Special Olympics and other programs benefiting students with disabilities. Well spending tens of millions more to fund charter schools and higher salaries at the department of education under President Trump's twenty twenty budget plan education secretary Betsy DeVos proposed. Zeroing out funding for the Special Olympics. The third year in a row she's made sexual request. This is Betsy DeVos being questioned Tuesday by Wisconsin, Democratic Congress member Mark PO can Judah home the kids are going to be affected by that cut. Madam secretary mis- mister procon, let me just say again, we had may we had to make some cult decisions with this budget. And this is a question of how many kids not but the budget hits I one hundred seventy thousand kids that's allience or for you. That's okay. No problem. It's two thousand kids special litter affected. Awesome organization one that is well supported by the philanthropic sector as. As of Thursday morning move on petition asking DeVos to reverse plans to cut programs for Special Olympics had gathered nearly one hundred thousand signatures last year. Congress allocated about seventeen point six million dollars to the Special Olympics. The Washington Post reports that figure is roughly equivalent to the amount tax payers allocated to President Trump's lasts five trips to his gopher sort and mar-a-lago Florida, and there's just some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The warrant piece report, I'm Amy Goodman, and I'm going to mean faith. Welcome to listen view around the country and around the world. The Senate on Tuesday of addicted the green new deal after forty three Democrats voted present on the measure introduced by Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell for other Democrats joined all fifty three Republican senators in voting against the green new deal Democrats, including the bills champion New York. Congressman Alexandria, Cossio Cortez blasted McConnell's moved to push the procedural vote calling. It quote bluff vote the green new deal seeks to transform the US economy through funding renewable energy while ending US carbon dioxide emissions by twenty thirty democratic leaders have resisted backing the deal, which has the support of all twenty twenty democratic presidential hopefuls in congress on Tuesday. Republican Senator Mike Lee of Utah ridiculed the green new deal during a fourteen minutes speech on the Senate floor. He should a series of fantastic images that included former president Ronald Reagan writing a dinosaur. Man on the giant purple seahorse Lee. Also Vokes Luke Skywalker from Star Wars writing a Tonton mythical snow lizard to belittle the green new deal. This is parts of Li's speech. I rise today to consider the green new deal with the seriousness. It deserves. This is of course, a picture of former president Ronald Reagan naturally firing a machine gun while riding on the back of a dinosaur. This image has as much to do with overcoming communism in the twentieth century as the green new deal has to do with overcoming climate change in the twenty-first Tontons, Mr President while perhaps not as fishing in some ways. As airplanes or a snowmobiles these hairy bipedal species of space lizards offer their own unique benefits. All residents of Hawaii would be left with is this. This is a picture of aqua, man. I draw your attention Mr President to the twenty foot. Impressive seahorse. He's writing. Under the green new deal. This is probably Hawaii's best bet on Twitter. Congressman Alexandria, Cossio Cortez accused Senator Leahy of not taking his job seriously. She wrote to her followers, quote, if this guy can be Senator you can do anything. This is congress member custody. Cortes, speaking on the Senate floor, and a clip that has been watched more than ten million times. We talk about the concern of the environment as in elitist concern one year ago, I was waitressing in a taco shop in downtown Manhattan. I just got health insurance for the first time a month ago. This is not in elitist issue. This is a quality of life issue. You want to tell people that their concern and their desire for clean air and clean water is elitist tell that to the kids in the South Bronx, which are suffering from the highest rates of childhood. Asthma in the country. Tell that to the families and Flint whose kids have their blood is ascending in lead levels, their brains are damaged for the rest of their lives called them elitist. Tell you're telling them that those kids are trying to get on a plane to DAV those people are dying that Alexsandr Cossio Cortes will for more. We're joined right now by riana gun. Right. When of the lead policy writers for the green new deal. She's the policy director for the nonprofit new consensus riana gun, right? Welcome to democracy. Now. It's great to have you with us wonderful to be here before you explain exactly what the green new deal is. And what you are working on leading to twenty twenty. Can you explain what happened in the Senate this week? What was this procedural vote that congress member Alexandra custody Cortez called a bluff vote you called it a sham? What happened and why did the Democrats abstain? Right. So mitch. Mcconnell, or she's a majority leader McConnell. Decided that he wanted to do this a while back when the green new deal started to pick up steam, and this was the fruition and actually got pushed back once or twice and from my estimation, I focus on policy. So I'm not an expert on the political side was that it was really an effort to embarrass. Embarrassed Democrats to show cracks in support for the green new deal and essentially to try to stop the momentum. And my understanding of the democratic response was that there is deep interest in the Senate and keeping the momentum of the green new deal going, but some members don't want to vote on it until there's more policy. So this was the middle path that they chose in order to still allow the green new deal to to develop policy to grow legs and to continue moving forward to the what do know about what Democrats at the moment what their opposition to the green new deal is largely. It's that the resolution is a non-binding resolution that sets out goals and doesn't have policies specifics right now. And so that is a main opposition in my understanding, I think there some fears also about cost and feasability from particular senators, but I think it's also important to recognize that all of the. Editors who are currently running for president have back the green new deal. And of course, Senator marquee has been a champion and is a veteran climate hawk. So there's definitely pronounced support in the Senate. But there's also some reservation so this what happened with the voting down of it. And all the Democrats abstention set doesn't mean that they do not support the green new deal. So explain what it is. What's the resolution that congress member costs you Cortes and Senator Markey put forward, and what is still in process? What is evolving? So the resolution that came out set out high level goals for the green new deal and a lot of ways it was meant to be a marker in the sand to say these are the goals of the green new deal. These are the projects that are part of the green new deal. And the this is the approach that the green new deal has to take particularly around issues of equity and Justice. So that's what the resolution sets out, and it was always meant to be a floor to be a marker until. What's happening? Now. A lot of the work that we're doing it new consensus is the policy development. We now have the goals we have the project. So we're trying to figure out along with a cadre of experts involved in movement policy. And academia, what is a smart path forward on all of these goals, and how do we actually achieve the things set out in the resolution? Well, I wanna talk about one of the issues that you raised about people's concerns about the green new deal, namely expense, including Democrats last month, California, Senator Dianne Feinstein came onto fire after video showing her interaction with a group of youth climate activists some as young as seven years old went viral in the video Feinstein dismisses the students demands to take action on climate change including supporting the green new deal. Let's go to part of that exchange. Remove it on green new deal them, while they're reasons why can't because there's no way to pay for it. Is there a lot about our going? Well, I I understand that the United States government does a lot of things with the money and they're important things. And you just can't go in and say, okay, we're going to take hundreds of millions from here and hundreds of millions from there. It doesn't it just doesn't work that way. So that's a Senator Dianne Feinstein speaking last month. Can you talk about what exactly is the expense of the green new deal and even more what's the expense of not acting on the green new deal? So the expenses agree. New deal is largely unknown because there are no policy specifics. But there is plenty of research and evidence about the cost of deep decarbonisation, which is exactly what the green new deal sets out and also the benefits from green jobs, so one smaller green jobs report that professor Robert pollen put out recognizes and. It's far smaller in scope than agree. Then the GED and for that, it was two point seven million net jobs created so and most analyses of green jobs, especially if you're going to go complete net zero you see millions of jobs similarly on the cost side, deep decarbonisation grows our economy. Rocky Mountain institute wreck they say that it will grow the economy, deep decarbonisation two and a half times the American economy and save five trillion dollars. So there are studies not from us out there about what these things cost to implement and also the benefits and the savings that come on the cost of not implementing it those are more known, but there's a lot of questions because a lot of those estimates. Actually, we don't know all of the second order effects of the cost will likely be greater but last year NASA found that the US economy lost ninety one billion to climate change alone. And there's other estimates that five hundred billion two percent of GDP was lost from from climate change. And what about the fact that Republicans have been saying such bizarre things about the green new deal? I mean, we just saw. You know? Dinosaur taunton. And so on so, you know, what is that about? And how can you possibly combat that? Right. Well, the reality is they're not taking this seriously. They're not taking this threat, seriously and the ways that we combat that at least at new consensus, and in the context of the green new deal is being willing to work with everyone. But also not pegging our hopes our vision to Republican talking points or Republican solutions on climate, which clearly if you're showing dinosaurs there are nine on President Trump told Fox News Wednesday that he wants to campaign against the green new deal. So he doesn't wanna killed off right away. I don't want to speak badly about the new green deal, Sean because frankly, I'm afraid that they'll stop using it because I really do want to campaign against it. It's ridiculous. Right. It's crazy. And it'll cost one hundred trillion dollars. Nobody knows what that means. That means it's more money than you have in the world, and it will be give catastrophic. It's not going to happen. It's just talk. It's not going to happen. It's just talk riana gun. Right. So tell us the substance of it and not only the science of the green new deal. But also the issues of for example, how you're going to address the racial wealth disparity. And why you see that connected to a green new deal. Well, there's a couple reasons that we see that as connected to the green new deal. One is of course, a moral argument alive. The people who are dying from fossil-fuel pollution of work carrying the heaviest burden are people of color in their poor people of color and likely when climate change picks up, and we see more disasters more deaths. Those are the first people who are on on the line people like to say climate change will kill us all but the truth is climate change will kill some people. I and so there's a more. Imperative to make sure that in the green transition the same people who bear the brunt of our reliance on fossil fuels are not the same people who the green transition is being built on their backs. So that's one and then the second is that income inequality in climate change are linked not only because we have an extractive economy. But because there's a growing body of evidence that especially in rich countries, the higher, you have incoming quality the more emissions that you have the mechanisms are not clear, and there's lots of theories about it. But the evidence is clear, and so if you're going to tackle climate, change and tackle it in a way that sustainable you have to be talking about inequity you have to be talking about racial equity as well. Because those are drivers right? And the ways that we think about addressing that is making sure that the policies are cross cutting. Right. And so say one of the examples in the Bill is is upgrading all homes and buildings. You can structure that program. I'm through federal jobs guarantees through local programs through incubators and just through the structure of how you split up the work between different types of buildings to make sure that people of color are benefiting and another way that we're constantly thinking about the racial wealth gap is how do you make sure that this transition brings not only income, but that income can be translated to wealth, particularly for people that are more likely to be on banked. So those are the things that we're thinking about and those are the reasons we think that it's incredibly important right to make sure that racial equity is involved and also from pass mobilizations like wrote war two and the new deal. The other thing that we see is when certain people aren't involved or included you see those affects for generations. And we don't want another set of problems that we're dealing with just kicking the can down the road. We just have fifteen seconds, but frontline communities why this is so important why your climate legislation is so different from others. Right. Well, there's a couple reasons like I said, those people are are the people who are most on the line. But then the second there's a political reason people of color and folks in front line communities are much more inclined to care about climate change. The issue is that they don't have the resources face a ton of existential threats that are not just climate. So if you can link the two and do it successfully while continuing to focus on deep decarbonisation, you could open up a whole new bucket of climate voters in in a situation where power, particularly when the GOP is so intransigent is going to be crucial to passing any climate legislation large or small well on Tuesday, Republican representatives. Sean Duffy of Wisconsin suggested the green you deal only served the wealthy. Focus on the rich wealthy elites who will look at this and go I love it. Because I've I've got big money in the Bank. Everyone should do this. We should all sign onto it. But if you're a poor family just trying to make ends meet. It's a horrible idea. Democratic Representative Alexandria Cossio Cortez of New York shot back with a passionate defense of the green new deal. We talk about the concern of the environment as an elitist concern one year ago, I was waitressing in taco shop in downtown Manhattan. I just got health insurance for the first time a month ago. This is not an elitist issue. This is a quality of life issue. You want to tell people that their concern and their desire for clean air and clean water is elitist tell that to the kids in the South Bronx, which are suffering from the highest rates of childhood asthma in the country tell that to the. Families in Flint whose kids have their blood is a sending in lead levels, their brains are damaged for the rest of their lives called them elitist. Tell you're telling them that those kids are trying to get on a plane to DAV owes people are dying the are dying and the response across the other side of the aisle is to introduce an amendment five minutes before a hearing a markup, this is serious. This should not be a partisan issue. This is about our constituents and all of our lives. I o Nebraska broad swath swats. The midwest are drowning right now underwater farms towns that will never be recovered and never come back. And we're here and people are more concerned about helping oil companies than helping their own families. I don't think so I don't think so this is about our lives. This is about American lives, and it should not be partisan. Science should not be partisan. The we are facing a national crisis. And if we do not ascend to that crisis. If we do not ascend to the to the levels in which we were threatened at the great depression when we were threatened in World War Two if we do not send to those levels. If we tell the American public that we are more willing to invest and bail out big banks than we are willing to invest in our farmers and our urban families than I don't know what we're here doing. I don't know what we're here doing. We talk about cost. We're gonna pay for this weather. We passed a green new deal or not because as towns and cities go underwater as wildfires ravage our communities, we are going to pay and we're either we're either gonna decide if we're going to pay to react over a pay to be proactive, and what we know is that prevention. When you spend less money on prevention. You would you can prevent a lot of that damage from happening in the first place. So it's not a question of whether we're going to spend the money because I'm very sad to say that the government knew that climate change was real starting as far back as one thousand nine hundred eighty nine when NASA was reporting this and the private sector new way back in the nineteen seventies. So we had until around the time. I was born to address this issue. I wish it didn't have to cost so much, but I'm gonna turn thirty this year. And for the entire thirty years of my lifetime. We did not make substantial investments to prepare our entire country for what we knew was coming. So now is coming all up at the end. It's like we live our whole lives, and we don't eat healthily, and we don't move and and we pursue unhealthy activities. And then at the end of our lives, our healthcare costs are very high. We have the choice to. To lower the cost now because I can tell you the cost of pursuing a green new deal will be far less than the cost of not passing it and with respect to to our our brothers and sisters and neighbors that are in agriculture bring them to the table. Let's hold hearings. Let's add provisions. Let's amend the the legislation to accommodate for the just transition and for the encouragement of those industries to grow. And I would also encourage to my colleague on the other side of the aisle that thinks we're trying to ban cows to actually read the resolution and understand that there's nothing to that effect in the legislation and not only that, but we're trying to invest in these communities and our agricultural workers that they can enjoy prosperity into the next century that was Democratic Congress member Alexandra customer Cortez of New York for speech in a house committee hearing has been watched at least thirteen million times. We also want to thank ran a gun. Right. One of the lead policy writers for the green. New deal policy director for the nonprofit new consensus. This is democracy now one week comeback. We look at the hearings that are taking place on Boeing on the interior secretary as well as what happened with Monsanto massive settlement massive care case against it. Stay with us. Let it go slack ones ping four. Stones Roebling backing to ocean, shake it all it was on to cause money money money, Nate canidae ocean. Stones rolling back into the ocean handmade moments. This is democracy. Now. I mean, he could men with Nermin shea we turn now to look at how regulatory agencies under the Trump administration have been captured by corporations on Wednesday the Senate aviation subcommittee held a hearing on the two deadly crashes of Boeing's new seven three seven max jets where the Federal Aviation Administration defended the agencies reliance on aircraft makers to help certified their own planes for flight the delegation processes known as the ODA program. This is FA acting head Daniel L will we have very strict oversight on every participant in an OD program. And we may make sure that they are experts in the field that they have the appropriate understanding of FA rags and manuals they have professional integrity is check everything. But to your point if we had no ODA at all. It would estimated it would require roughly ten thousand more employees. And. Do that role in about one point eight billion dollars for our certification office in the Boeing has spent more than seventy million dollars on lobbying since two thousand fifteen it also contributed to the campaigns of members of the committees that regulated including more than sixty thousand dollars to the two thousand eighteen reelection campaign Republican Senator Ted Cruz who is chairman of the subcommittee. This comes as the Senate committee on energy and natural resources holding confirmation hearings today on Trump's nominee head the interior department. David Bernhardt, former oil lobbyist, meanwhile, a federal jury California's just ordered Monsanto to pay over eighty million dollars to a cancer survivor whose illness was found to have been partly caused by the urbicide roundup for more on these corporate issues. Joined by rob Weisman, president of Public Citizen on Wednesday. The group delivered a poster size version of burn hearts conflict of interest chichi. Two lawmakers will vote on his confirmation and receive nearly one million dollars in donations from Bernhardt and his former lobbying firm, but we're gonna get to that in a minute. We wanna start with Boeing talk about the significance of this hearing the deaths of three hundred forty six people in two airline crashes in the last months from Indonesia to COPA Boeing's plane found seriously full at the US was the last to ground the max seven eight planes. What did you learn yesterday? We're seeing more and more evidence of how the FAA the agency that's supposed to regulate. Boeing is in fact, working for Boeing it staff actually by Boeing and its outsources regulatory duties to Boeing in the clip you played at the top of the show, you have the acting administrators saying, I don't understand he calls him safety companies airlines because them safe airplane manufacturer safety companies. I don't understand how they might cut back on safety. It's a pretty big problem when the guy was in charge of regulating safe. Can't understand how the manufacturer might cut back on safety. And of course, he comes from the industry. The person who runs the safety division at the FAA did a stint for the lobbyists station for their space companies. The new guy coming in to replace the acting administrator comes from the airlines delta. So you have this total revolving door problem in a total capture of the agency, maybe as bad as anywhere in government talk about who Stephen Dixon, s Steve Dixon, the former delta executive Trump has picked to head the exactly part of the same story. So you have different parts of the industry running the FAA. So results are predictable. They're not going to do their job. In fact, it's not even clear they understand their job to really do safety. And regulate the companies that they're overseeing they seem to think that their job is to work in collaboration with a companies to to do the best they can and actually to promote the industry so was Boeing responsible for the. Deaths of three hundred forty six people how and what exactly didn't the US regulatory agencies do to prevent this from happening. What was their role, but we're still going to have to learn more. But what seems to be unfolding is that they redesigned the seven thirty seven the design required. Some new kind of software autopilots off where the auto pilot software made errors the pilot. The human pilots weren't able to overcome in many cases, the errors inflicted by the computer software and the planes crashed Blumenthal sad for Senator Blumenthal's yesterday at the hearing he's read reports for many pilots in the United States who had exactly the same problem. But we're able to overcome on like, the the pilots THEO P, and Indonesia, so we're we're pretty lucky. Maybe he's only been too long had this been in use the seven three seven months. This is Rosalie new they've rushed it to the market. So there's still new technology and. Is exactly the case of why you went independent regular. They rushed they had competition from Airbus they were under pressure to get to market quickly. And so they did and it appears they did. So I'm cutting corners on safety. You are the president CEO of Public Citizen, which was founded by Ralph Nader Ralph's grand niece. Sammy Stu mo- died in the crash. She was one of three hundred forty six people in those two crashes right now. What do you feel has to happen with the FAA and Dixon is not a done deal? Right. He has to be approved by the Senate that's up to be confirmed. I'm going to say, I I knew Samya Ralph's grannies and delightful when we see these regulatory issues, they're often abstract and people maybe don't pay attention to them. But they fail to realize that actually failed. Regulation means people are going to die. And when you know, the person who died, it changes the whole story for you. Personalize it makes it real. And so it's totally heartbreaking at the FAA. They have outsourced. So much of their regulatory oversight to Boeing there's a real problem about how they can actually do their public duty. Again, you heard L would say gosh, we would need ten thousand new inspectors. I don't know if they would need ten thousand new inspectors, but they will be more. They don't have the capacity and the agency so we can take some time to rebuild his agency. Let's move onto Bernhardt. Let's move onto the hearing that's taking place today the interior secretary. And why you've written open letter will out of all the Trump appointees. This guy may be the most conflicted one coming. It's hard to say, but he's running for the most conflicted cabinet appointee. He carries around a card listing off his conflicts of interest and all the companies he's not supposed to work for because you can't keep track of it's more than two dozen hand is not really clear. Why carries the card around because he doesn't seem to use it. He is in fact, working on behalf of the companies that he used to represent intervening. And a lot of decisions of the department at terrier so far is the number to to help companies that he used to work for why do you think Trump chose him to place Zinke, while, you know, the the Trump administration seems to got an ethics crisis because someone's forced out why don't we place them inside of corporate lobbyists. That's our solution to the ethics problem. This guy was there. Number two. He does know the agency he's very effective. He's very effective working for the companies that used to represent and so he was a natural choice for the Trump administration. As actually looking at a proposal expanding offshore oil drilling which has happened while he's been that. Right. So he is involved. Efforts on offer oil drill used to work for the oil and gas industry. He's involved in changes to the endangered species. Act on behalf of clients used to work for his now intervened and pesticide decisions that would affect the former Dow company who made a million dollar contribution to the Trump administration as close with the with the administration's true Bernhardt ordered some furloughed workers back to work during the government shutdown to push through oil and natural gas drilling permits offshore drilling permits in the Alaska refuge. I don't know. If burner was when order, but that's definitely occurred. Yes. So what are you demanding right now? Well, our position this is not a guy who's qualified to rough department of interior. He shouldn't be approved what about pesticides. Well, he's intervened. And recently, the New York Times reported in two instances of pesticides highly toxic pesticides. Biggest study inside the department of interior found that the use of these pesticides jeopardize more than a thousand endangered species. So the conclusion is okay, we got we got to deal with this problem is not a guy who knows pesticides. But intervened he came swooped in to this process and said, okay, never mind. We're not doing that. We're not gonna take any regulatory action business as usual. His move benefited major pesticide makers, including FM FMC corporation, endow. Agro-science Dow a major donor to President Trump, I think they gave a million dollars to his inaugural committee. Finally, the latest court decision that just came down around Monsanto and roundup, it's pesticide. So a huge decision in a case. Brought by a man who has cancer still living with cancer alleging that it was caused by roundup, and the jury came in and said yes and caused it and gave huge damage not just for the disease that he's been flooded with. But as a punitive damage to punish Monsanto owned by bear for what the jury believe was covering up the evidence of carcinogen city of random for many many years. Will this award happen? Wait, bears going to certainly bear Monsanto will certainly appeal this decision. But in this case, it was it was designated by the judges bellwether case because there's so many cases in line. And the judge is saying look we want to see how the first few trials go, and they were gonna make a decision about how we should look at the rest of these cases, it's going to really strengthen the hand of other people have claims to negotiate a fair settlement from bear. Monsanto? Rabbi. Thank you very much for being with us. Robert Weisman is president of Public Citizen. This is democracy. Now when we come back biased uncovering the hidden prejudice that shapes what we see think and do stay with us. Turkey. Burder? Probably berry. Sleaze. Sesame? She does. Many go this is democracy. Now. I mean, we with their main shave we end the show with the news out of Jinya where valid Neo Nazi James. Alex fields pleaded guilty Wednesday to twenty nine counts of hate crimes in federal court for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racist protestors in Charlottesville in August, two thousand seventeen as part of the deal. Prosecutors agreed not to seek the death penalty. Last December Virginia jury sentence. Feels to life in prison for his violent act which killed anti-fascist protester Heather higher and injured twenty eight others at a counter protest of the white supremacist. Unite the right rally, we turn now to a new book that addresses the tragic events insurance villas well as the rising number of race base. Mass shootings hate crimes police shootings of unarmed. Men in the past several years, it also looks at cases of discrimination against African Americans for simply sitting in coffee shops or. Trying to -cation Airbnb hosted homes biased uncovering hidden prejudice that shapes. What we see think and do examines how implicit bias impacts everything from hate crimes to microaggressions in the workplace school and community and what we can do about. It the book's author. Professor, Jennifer, everhart writes, quote in Charlottesville bias rip through the packed. We've made to pretend that latent bigotry is a relic of the past in truth bias has been biding its time and implicit world in a place where we need not acknowledge it to ourselves to others. Even touches our soul, and drives our behavior where joined right now by Jennifer Eberhardt, professor of psychology at Stanford University recipient of the two thousand fourteen McCarthy's MacArthur, genius grant, welcome to democracy now. Professor, it's great to have you with us. Congratulations on the release of your book this week. Bryan. Stevenson, who was the who spearheaded the legacy. Museum where we just went in Montgomery, Alabama, a calls, your book groundbreaking, the subtitle of biased uncovering, the hidden prejudice that shapes what we see thinking do is Hordley relates to Charlottesville in the sense that hidden prejudice was not the issue there. But connect the to talk about what you thought as you watched what unfolded at the university of Virginia. Well, I mean, so this unite the right rally was the largest public gathering white supremacist in a generation. I think it took a lot of people by surprise. They were there to protest the removal of a statue of Robert Lee from the core of the city. And it's it's you know, so they they were there to start a race war. According to them, and there were a count counter protesters there who showed up. To try to protect the city and protect their values. And let's of clashes during that that rally and a lot of. Just I think concern about the role of the police with that. And just not standing back and not intervening as people were being beaten and taunted, and so forth and it come out. I didn't know led to a lot of people in the city of Charlottesville and on the UVA campus to think about how this happened and why it happened in. Why was this the sort of ground zero for that movement as how does that in such explicit manifest of racism with your idea of unconscious? Implicit bias? Why think ties in if we I think a couple things I think people think a lot about sort of bigotry rising up when we have economic, insecurity or instability. But there's. Research showing that it's not just that. It's also the changing ratio demographics in this country. And that makes people fearful that makes them nervous. There's research by Jennifer Richardson, and Maureen Craig showing that just reminding white Americans of that changing ratio dynamic or the changing racial landscape can lead them to express more prejudice against people of color to feel like a discrimination against whites is on the rise. And that's the big problem and to also endorse more, politically, conservative views and policies. So so it's not just the economic issue. Why we get this move towards more explicit bias or old fashioned racism. It's it's also this concern about losing your presence and your status in society. President Trump did not tweet about fields yesterday pleading guilty to a hate crime. But this morning he did tweet. He tweeted F B I and DOJ to review the outrageous jussie smollet case in Chicago. It is an embarrassment to our nation. This is captured the media over the last few days, the Chicago. Prosecutors dropping the sixteen felony charges against Jesse small at for arranging a hate crime against him. That's what they charged him with. He did some community service of forefeited his ten thousand dollar bond, and they've dropped all the charges. So Trump tweeted about this. But on this issue of the white supremacist killer. He didn't say a word can you make a segue from one to the other. And what your thoughts are on smollet? Right. So. As a social scientists. I'm not, you know, looking at it isolated cases sort of trying to make claims about that one way or the other. I think that case is still unfolding to. And so I'm not sure how all of that will end up. But what I could say is that we know that our leadership matters in terms of people's willingness to express a bias. I think also the social norms matters a lot of research on that actually. So when social norms shift so that we are becoming sort of less Agana -tarian that the sort of individuals that gives them license to express express more bias in. So it's not just about a choice that we're making this individuals to to be biased or not. It's also about the social climate. We're social beings in so. We're sensitive to what the social climate is. And to the extent that the social climate is moving away from being a gala -tarian that can feed our bias that can and that can lead implicit bias is actually to become explicit because there is a context for that. There's a way in which that's welcomed in. So that those social norms can lead us to actually become more prejudice into act on those prejudices. Can you explain what goes into constituting an implicit bias? So implicit bias can be defined as the beliefs, and the feelings that we have about social groups that can influence our decision making Egner actions, even when we're unaware of it. And so the. It's sort of bias that exists. Despite of how we see ourselves as a gala -tarian say or bias that can exist despite our intentions in our motivations to act. Otherwise, you begin your book biased with the story of your five year old son. Yeah. Less about what happened. So so yes. So we were unapplied together. And you know, he's five so he's looking around and just really excited about being on an airplane with mom, and so he's checking everybody out, and he sees this guy. And he says, hey that guy looks like daddy. And you know, when I look at the guy first of all he doesn't look anything at all that he and it turns out that he was the only black guy on the plane. And so if they could okay, you know, my son, obviously thinks that all black people look alike rate. So I'm gonna try to have a conversation with him about that. But before I could have that conversation. He looks at me, he says, I hope. He doesn't Bob the plane. And I said what what did you say? And he said it again, I hope he doesn't rob the plane and I set ever it. Why would you say that? And you know, daddy, wouldn't rob a plane and he said, yeah. Yeah. I know and I sip. What why would you say that? And he looked at me with this really sad face. And he said, I don't know why I said that I don't know why I was thinking that. You later talk about your son being a target of racial bias. Yeah. I do let me so that's the five year old is now seventeen and so he's growing into a man a young man and. So, you know, people sort of experience, you know, him with the same kind of sort of his presence triggers, those same kinds of thoughts, and he's becoming aware of that overtime and aware that he could be seen as threat in in the eyes of others. Well, is there any way to overcome implicit bias? Well, you know, it's not something that we can just overcome and get rid of completely. And that's something that I write about in the book bias that. I think we keep thinking we'll get to the day where we'll be done with this. We don't have to worry about it in. The fact is that we have to be constantly vigilant around it. So even when we can we can push it down with our laws. We can push it down with their social norms, and we could be motivated right to to work on it. It's not something that we have to be vigilant about all the time because it could spray. Up again, social conditions. Can you know? Allow it to to surface again. So there's some situations that really sort of promote bias more than others in as social scientists. We know about those situations. So the to the extent that we can manage those situations. You know, we can the better basically, I don't need you to tell me who you're gonna vote for in twenty twenty again. And you want to ask you to comment on the Bibo us. That's Bernie Biden mayor Pete Buddha. Judge and Beto. Okay. They're called the Bibo. Okay. You're old white men. There are a number of people of color and women who are running for president. But they are getting much more. Attention these four white men your thoughts. What is the media need to learn? We have thirty seconds. Well. Think maybe. We can have a discussion about who people. Think of as as leaders, right? Sort of who do we associate with leaders and leadership tends to be associated with men and leadership tends to be associated with people who are white and powerful. And so to the extent that you have inconsistency there between what a person looks like and what social group they belong to. And what they're trying to do that that's hard for our forever to wrap our minds around. Well, we're gonna leave it there. But we're gonna do part two and put online at democracy now dot org. Jennifer everhart professor of psychology at Stanford University, author of the new book biased uncovering, the hidden prejudice that shapes that we see thinkin do.

President Trump Senate US New York City Charlottesville Federal Aviation Administratio president Boeing Trump Senator South Bronx Mitch McConnell Monsanto Alexandra Cossio Cortes New York Times Florida
The Syria Conflict, 8 years later

PRI's The World

45:23 min | 1 year ago

The Syria Conflict, 8 years later

"Support for the world's podcast comes from legalzoom with over seventeen years and more than two million customers. Legalzoom provides helpful support legal advice entrance. Parents you for business owners. More information at legalzoom dot com slash world grounded today on the world. I'm Marco werman. President Trump orders the immediate grounding of all Boeing seven thirty-seven max, eight aircraft this after two crashes involving max aids and Indonesia and vio Pia raising serious safety questions. Trump is following the lead of other countries, which had already said once might have been a one off twice. In a way, grounding IRA plant. We'll have the latest also today. Young women trying to escape Saudi Arabia's strict gender. Roles must first escape their families. This woman did it during a family trip by handing a note to airport staff at says, I want asylum. My family doesn't know case. Protect me from them. Now, she's living in the UK stories and much more today on the world. I'm Marco werman. And you're with the world the Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight the airplane that crashed on Sunday, Nathan opium killing everyone on board. It's officially grounded in the US. President Trump made that decision this afternoon international pressure had been building with a long list of countries barring the plane from their airspace in the last few days the roles Jason Margolis joins me now in the studio with an update. So what exactly did Trump order today? Well, just this afternoon. President Trump issued an emergency order, and he said that all of these Boeing airplanes were grounded in the United States and the ones that were currently in the air they could finish their flight, obviously. And then they had to come back down, and they were grounded. And here's what the president said. And we acted also very fact based and very much working with other countries. And with the airlines, okay? So Jason when there is a grounding protocol like this, that's ordered. There's typically set of guidelines on how to get out of the grounding do we know at this point what's going to happen next. We don't know exactly what is going to happen next. Because this has happened. Very few times that happened in nineteen seventy nine the FAA grounded all McDonald Douglas, DC ten's, I after a crash kogo killed almost three hundred people. The investigation found that the problem was actually maintenance issues not aircraft designed and the FAA lifted the prohibition after a month in early two thousand and thirteen Boeing seven eighty seven Dreamliner grounded after it was a problem. With lithium ion batteries that have been early in the year and about a little under four months later the air their planes were allowed to fly again. So that's all we know. This has happened. Very few times FA has a very very very good safety record because they don't allow planes to fly until they're proven to be safe. So this is very rare. So we should also. Note that is not just the seven thirty seven max eight it's also the max nine model as well. This recent crash of the max eight that happened in Ethiopia. There was also another seven thirty seven max eight involved in a similar crash in Indonesia last year. How will synchronize synchronize is the US Federal Aviation Administration with the rest of the world. Well, every country gets to decide its own pota- calls, but if one of these airplanes is flying into Canadian airspace or European airspace. That can say no, you can't fly that airplane into our space. So they are synchronized in that account. But if something is going from Boston to Atlanta or Seattle to Milwaukee that is up to the FAA as it would be up to the country. If it's an inter-country flight, so let me just play a segment for all of us. Have an interview I did earlier today with David Lee mount he's a navy Asian journalist in the UK and a former pilot, and he was talking about these different philosophies dealing with problems like these technical problems when they crop up a tink helps to contrast. The way the rest of the world sees this America says hate we briefed up pilots. Extremely well. If a problem does arise we can trust them to deal with it. Now, the rest of the was not taking that approach is taking approach something like this. It's bit mold. Traditionally says, look, we are not going to give all pilots an aeroplane, the might have a software fold that. We don't fully understand yet. And then Oscar pilots to save us for mitts Foltz. It's a completely different approach America's very American. It's very much. Can we briefed up politics? They can handle it. So that's a British aviation journalist and former pilot David Learmont there Jason Margolis before the Trump announcement this afternoon Canada had joined the list of countries, a grounding, the seven thirty seven max aid. Was this a case, do you think of the US just really didn't have a choice in the interest of passenger safety to be one of the last holdout? It's not grounding the plan and how important to this decision to Trump's decision. Do you think as a fact that Boeing is an American company, right? So several US senators were putting pressure on the president and the FAA to ground the planes. So there was mounting pressure. Was it was the FAA resistant or the president resistant because it's an American company that is speculation. But what I can't tell you this right after the president made his announcement, the Boeing stock tanked. So there is a direct correlation between a US company, and what the president says here the wells Jason Margolis. Thanks very much for updating us on the story. You're welcome fast. Moving story. Secretary state Mike Pompeo once referred to his State Department as the department of swagger, but take a look at the federal budget proposal. Trump submitted this week, and there's a lot less money to fuel the swagger. The Trump administration says it wants to slash spending at the State Department by nearly a quarter. The fight is still to come in congress over the spending levels, but here's a larger question. What do Trump's budget priorities say about American diplo? Mri the world's Matthew bell has that one. Whatever you think of Trump's foreign policy. He's been personally engaged in ways that previous presidents were not very importantly, the relationship is very strong. And when you have a lot of things happen. Trump met face to face with North Korea's leader Kim Jong UN last month for the second time. So we have made a lot of efforts so far. And we thought that now is time for us to come to Hanoi sit together, and then have this wonderful dialogue. Joel. On the president's supporters. Give him high marks for doing things differently rolling up his sleeves and taking the helm on big diplomatic challenges. Not Madeleine Albright though, teach a course on decision making Georgetown University he would fail. It speaking to Newsday. The former secretary of state said Trump, confuses American allies, and emboldens enemies, which is not how US diplomacy is supposed to work when I asked Daniel Dresner professor at the Fletcher school of law and diplomacy how he would grade. Trump's record on diplomacy. Here was his response. Sorry about aside. That's supposed to laugh at that. Question. I really don't think there's an objective way, you can describe this as anything other than an unmitigated disaster. Dresner says the Trump administration doesn't have much to show for its highest profile diplomatic efforts North Korea's nuclear program the renegotiation of NAFTA trade with China. None of those have been big successes, but there's a larger problem Dresner says that's not making headlines under this administration. You've seen a mass exodus of the most skilled and trained diplomats from the State Department that will take years perhaps decades to sort of rebuild that kind of human capital reserve, it's not easy to replace automatically. And this administration's rather cavalier approach to the State Department is not gonna make that any easier. Dresden's says it's hard to talk about restoring the swagger to American diplomacy when there's a proposal to slash spending at the State Department by twenty three percent, even if congress decides to restore that funding. It's still sends a st-. Strong signal that diplomacy is not a top priority. And no president Dresner says can do it all himself. Yeah. There's no denying that the president should obviously have the loudest voice in foreign policy and should be able to veto or put a stop to foreign policy initiatives that he doesn't like, but the idea that the president alone can fix America's foreign policy problems or dress all of America's foreign policy challenges is absurd. Most of the proposed funding cuts at the State Department are in specific areas, international development and foreign aid. That's important stuff says Matthew chronic of the Atlantic Council, but there's something more important if you have to choose I think the military aspect of the competition is really heating up now with the return of great power competition from Russia and China there is a bipartisan consensus that we need to spend more on defense have a more serious defense strategy of for Russia and China, including developing new technologies artificial intelligence next generation. Missile defenses. And these are things that are going to receive adequate funding in the new budget on diplomacy. Overall, chronic says, he gives Trump a mixed review. Trump's really reset relations with Israel with the Gulf states taken a tougher line on Iran in Asia, making North Korea priority, something the South Koreans and Japanese are pleased with Europe has been aware the relations have been more complicated. So not perfect. But I'd say probably better than than they're getting credit for chronic also teaches at Georgetown's school of foreign service for his students who look at the Trump administration and worry about starting a career as an American diplomat. He tells them it's the country. They will be serving not the president. And that they shouldn't let the politics of the moment dissuade them from the job for the world. I'm Matthew bell when Saudi women won the right to drive. It was the first time many of them actually got behind the wheel of a car. Shocked the excitement up largely to the activists who fought to get rid of the driving ban. But shortly before it was lifted the same activists were arrested Lou Jean. I'll hath Lula's is one of them today. She faced trial in Saudi Arabia alma Hassoun is with the BBC's Arabic service. What is the latest on hustles trial? Like, what does she actually being charged with the last think, and maybe the only confirmed in us about the Triune, which is so far seemed to be ambiguous was that it started and ended before midday and head brother did confirm this. Unfortunately, as we understood the media diplomats, we are not allowed to enter. So that are not reports yet, we don't know what the tappan and heb river that say yesterday on Twitter that there were no official or like public list of charges again his sister. So the brother Levin l hath Lule that's while he the one who lives in Canada is that right? Correct. And by the way, illusion she's very prominent activist. However, the rest of women are also very prominent, However, I understood from a conversation with an eagle expert. I mean, his Saudi opposition is that the families of the rest of the detainees are scared. They cannot speak because they are most of them are inside the kingdom. He said that Luzon's sister and brother who are living abroad have been playing a vital a very important role in her advocacy. That's why we see Jane more. Help us understand this paradox on one hand Saudi Arabia lifts the driving ban on women on the other it arrests activists like possible champion the driving ban and made it happen. Can you explain that? So the Saudi authorities detain many women, and of course, a number of male supporters around one month before the ban was lifted. The authorities were trying to claim how achievement the whole victory, and they were trying to under-. Mine the rule of the activists despite of the long struggle and also state media was trying to frame them as traitors, and they were saying that the activists were undermining the state security, and why you think the Saudi monarchy would would do this. Because I mean, isn't it good publicity to show that they are making changes at women? Now have the right to drive Marco as many NGOs say they want to silence opposition to silence different voices. Otherwise inside the kingdom more and more people, including women will be demanding more rights. And now what many Saudi women want is not only driving? They were saying that there are many issues like domestic violence that are other issues gets about the day today. So of course, it was symbolic the lift of the driving ban. However, they said that there are more deep-rooted social issues in the society. And again, domestic violence is only one of them that's alma Hassoun of the BBC's. Rubik service telling us about the trial of a Saudi activist who fought to get the women's driving ban lifted in Saudi Arabia in the past few months. There've been several high profile stories of Saudi women trying to escape from their abusive families. But the personal toll on them is high our story on that. Just ahead. You're with the world. I'm Marco werman. You're with the world we've been recently witnessing several high profile attempts by women to flee from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries. And they're not alone. More and more women from this region are taking dangerous measures to escape abusive families, but failed attempts can be extremely costly as the world's Sharon Jafari reports. She said she wanted to go to the bathroom his sister and mom said they would go to it was last October an eighteen year old Donna knew this was her only chance when I told them goes tied. I just go out they've been at Heathrow airport in London and their way back to Saudi Arabia after a trip to the US Donna who didn't want me to use her last name says her life in Saudi Arabia in have father's house was extremely restricted my dad, his my garden. Hey controlled everything. Just everything. Chance Luke's house. I can't go today. Supermarkets without permission from him in even if I took permission I never go out long the breath things she liked about life like, hey, grey cat to to Donna says she had secretly renounced Islam, and if have father found out who would have killed her. So when she was on the plane to Heathrow, she wrote a note that says, I want asylum. My family doesn't know case. Protect me from them do not walk out of the restroom went up to an airport stuff and handed over the note at that's moments. I forget everything I forgot how have speak, and then when she saw me crying and solar that mccamley will come now, she talked to another airport staff, and this occur to are a smaller Donna's mother and sister kept calling and sending frantic messages. She didn't respond. She was already gone women from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries are increasingly. Finding ways to run away from abusive families island to asylum have been hiding from system to an eighteen we have location. There's their stories are getting out loud because of the videos, they post online and everyone actually thinks that it's so easy to leave you country to leave your family if people on flesh and blood external, it's actually the hardest thing I have to do. So this video could segma- life. And if you are watching this video, it's not such a good thing either. I'm dead or I'm gonna die at situation. These are some of the voices over Mahathir Muhammad sisters, ream and a- currently stuck in Hong Kong, Lena and Princess Latifa the daughter of the prime minister of the United Arab Emirates, according to the United Nations in two thousand five hundred fifty one Saudi citizens applied for asylum in another country by two thousand seventeen that number jumped to two thousand Adam kogo of Human Rights, Watch says Saudi women have to resort to escape plans because of what's known as guardianship loss. Guardian who has to make critical decisions on their behalf. Don't have the right to get a passport travel outside the country. Get married to get an approval for a male, relative, a father, brother, uncle, our son to be allowed to leave the country. And if they happen to have a strict guardian will their stock but a good scape. Plant can take years to map out on all started plotting hers when she was sixteen years old. I started saving money as that's point up until the night ice caked. I saved nearly three thousand five hundred dollars until years on these older brother abused her physically and mentally her stepbrother abused her sexually she says. And so for two years, she became obsessed with leaving do by where she lived with her family are used to stay up late at night to know when everyone sleeps when does everyone wakes up I felt like three is the best thing. I could do even though on the need a travel permit like women in Saudi Arabia. Do she still have to get a hold of her passport? Her mother kept it in a drawer in her bedroom. I stole it. I just found it in my mom's were van I took it. Then no one noticed. So I went to my roommate mealy if you days later, she booked a flight stayed up until three AM and called an Uber. I had my sister sleeping with me. So I had to slowly take up my things where my clothes and just out of the house, and it was dark the right to the airport was short about ten minutes. She said on the bay she thought about what would happen if her brother found out he would kill her. She says, but surprisingly, she wasn't scared and terrifying, I love adventure. I'm very adventurous. All I had in mind is either Radim or death on it is in France. Now, she's applied for asylum and he's waiting to hear back. She says she wants to study engineering, something her brother wouldn't approve but other women have been so lucky. This is D not oddly enough an English teacher from Riyadh two years ago. She ran away from Saudi Arabia, but was stopped at many airports in the Philippines. Muslim baked airport. Officials let her stay, but they handed her back to her family. Witnesses told Human Rights Watch. She was forced on a plane back to Saudi Arabia hem mouth hands and feet reduc taped. And there's been no more from her since Adam Koogle of human rights. Watch says that shows how dangerous these scape attempts can be. The women who have been returned that we know about some have faced. I mean, usually they face confiscation mobile phones force confinement. Limiting contact in worse circumstances. They can face central violence or even honor related violence or honor killings, so called I spoke to for this story said they did reach out for help whenever abused. But they've either ignored all returned to their abusive fathers and brothers Kubo says wild there are shelters on hotlines in Saudi Arabia to report the mystic violence women generally can be reticent to go to the police with these accusations because they generally will intervene, but they'll sort of attempt to reconcile oftentimes what they'll do is get now guardians to our or abusers. I should say who have clearly committed the abuse to just sign in a statement saying they won't do it again. But the potentially grave consequences of running away haven't stopped these women, Donna the woman who made her scape at Heathrow airport is now. Living in the UK. I'm living normal life. Now, we're like any other person in Dirac. So of course, I'm so happy with that. She wants to go to school maybe study law, and as for what she misses from head life in Saudi Arabia her mom, she says and had cat to to for the world change affari. I don't know how to pronounce the song's title in Turkish. But an English at means sons song, it's from the duo minor empire. They call Toronto home now. But their thoughts are never far from their homeland Turkey is this from their new album up rooted. Music from minor empire. You're with the world. I'm Marco werman. This teacher took part in some of the first anti-government protests in Aleppo, Syria. He remembers the optimism felt that because feeding let so close ally was so close things look very different now after eight years of war in Syria that story still ahead here on the world. I'm Marco werman. And you're with the world where co production of the BBC World Service PRI and WG be h here in Boston. The Arab spring held so much promise for so many people some dreams and some countries where realized but in Syria, it's been nightmare since two thousand eleven eight years ago this week a peaceful uprising began in Syria, the first protests in the capital, Damascus was caught on film. Host. The revolution was a protest against the tyranny and corruption President Bush our law said his regime's response has been brutal. Syria has seen six days of unprecedented, unrest in which total of ten civilians. Now died at the hands. It's countries men this morning. President Obama palled on a sod to step is more than a thousand dollars dead tonight in Syria and Syrian rebels say they are victims of a poison gas attack from that terrible might the world saw in gruesome detail, the terrible nature of chemical weapons. And why the overwhelming majority of humanity has declared them off limits. A crime against humanity and a violation of the laws of war violation or not the international community. Did nothing back in two thousand eleven when all of the started alu coffee alarmed, oh was an English teacher in Aleppo, he was one of those protesters in the beginning of the uprising against us odd today. He's a marked man when asides forces conquered Aleppo, the end of twenty sixteen other coffee was forced to flee to the province of inlet. That's now the last rebel stronghold in Syria. He and his family, and at least two million other Syrians are trapped in that province with nowhere else to go. My colleague Carol hills spoke with him while it was at home with his young family haffey take us back to twenty eleven. Do you? Remember, how you felt when you first heard about the protests? In fact, at the beginning antenna, by the way, you know, I supported it quickly, and I joined it from the first day and impact everyone every human being who died democracy who like freedom who like to leave as a free man in was very the happy at the beginning of these protests. Although it was dangerous own them many of us were being arrested. So it sounds like basically you stood up for what you thought was right. Almost eight years later. What has it cost you? The cost was more than which we didn't think that the cost would be so high because freedom was so close to delight was so close. So I thought that we really Baid, you know, very high price. But nevertheless, we don't grant at all. I mean, if you asked me if you went eight years ago with you got to sedate these rations, I would say, yes. And yes, and yes for you personally. What has it cost what sort of losses? Have you suffered? Yeah. Look, I lost a lot of friends lots of teachers of Khalid's. I mean, some some some of them are old friends on some of them are new every I lose many whenever I make new friends. I lose some of them. Coffee. I'll Hamdan is an English teacher and Syria. You you you're from Aleppo, but you now live in it lib. Why were you forced to leave Aleppo? Look. Before twenty sixteen we wanna living. That's it. You I considered about an ice on. As don't it into hell, and we were besieged. We were destroyed. We were killed. We were you know, we were forced to eat things that you cannot imagine that we should eat during the siege. We we have to to be displaced. I didn't move from that city because I wanted to of course, if I toast to say, this means that worse than hill worse than displacement. Because some of my friends, in fact, who stayed there all of them. Now, they are either dead or imprison you have to children tell us about them. How old are they? Yeah. The the oldest is not mar he's now three years, we celebrated her birthday just in twelve out for brewery and other. He's mad six months old. Of course, Lamar was born in Lippo, and I hope that she would be brought up there if you can hear I'm going to ask her where are you from is gonna take other? If it's a K. Sure Nomar where are you from? Did you hear her? Yeah. I mean, I remind her that he's from there. The war has been going on for eight years. Your oldest child is only three they've known nothing, but war what future. Do you see for them? You look I mean, it's difficult. And of course, having having kids make me, you know, love life more, and, you know, trying to speak up more to speak to want to help more. Although I know that it's useless in fact, because we know that none. When hunt boss, but. But I hope that one day we could live in ensued without the same regime because living in the same regime is impossible something impossible. I want to live here. And Nevertheless, I won't freedom here. Yeah. I might bay prize. I know that all those who passed to bathe prize, and we pay this price for the next generation not for ourselves. I'm coffee of what lessons have you learned from standing up and trying to fight for freedom. I mean, was it worth it? Yeah. HR's I still remember when my father was always sending me B's, my mind son, and keep sident don't say in word walls have eaters these safety is for God, willing we under. We are alive. That's the most important. No, no, no. It's not the most important for me to live as a free man is the most important to leave with us toys to leave. You can speak. Yeah. This is the life living without having any, you know, edited to speak without having any ability to decide what you want or whom should rule the country is not live. This is another kind of savory in you kind of savory. This is what I believe of the coffee. What what hope do you have laughed at this point? Okay. I hope that you know, we might not be held. We might be left alone again. And again, and we might safari remind die. I know that. But at least now if we wouldn't be held by you. I speak about as well. Speak about us that at least next generations know that we really want to just freedom. I want for the next generations. I want for all people. I mean inside outside cedar to speak about us proudly. I'm the comfy. I wanna thank you for speaking with us up to a coffee. I'll Hamdan is an English teacher. He now lives with his family, and it lib the last major pocket in Syria that's in rebel hands. Thank you so much of the coffee. Thank you. Well, extraordinary eight years in the life of one man in Syria, by the way today of the Covey's neighborhood in it live is under bombar -ment. Again, Amara allows is also from Syria. He was and is part of the opposition to Charlot Saad. Now armor is a professor of Middle East history at shawnee state university in Ohio. I asked him how he thinks the conflict in Syria might end militarily speaking asset has won against the opposition in general, but the country is still. Dread is divided into you know, obviously areas that are under normal position control. So is long as asset is in charge. And he has new incentive to. Find some sort of resolution that includes all the different parties. Then I don't think this was going to end anytime soon. But I'm Elisa, I mean for someone who counts themselves among the opposition to Assad and this regime. I mean, have you been struggling to accept a reality that maybe the Assads are here to stay? Oh, it's it's very difficult than in very painful as well. I mean from many not just myself, but for many others. You know, we've lost more than just. The fact that you know, the conflict is didn't go away. Let's say we we failed to remove asset. But it goes to the fact that there's also have very strong likelihood that Thailand would be able to return to Syria. I'll never be able to to see my friends back there eleven able to to visit that part of the world again. And you know that that is a picture to to hold onto. And now in a way, I kind of look at it and think while for me, it's done. Maybe my grandchildren will have that opportunity on who knows? As you know as many as one of four series of fled the country and hundreds of thousands of people have been killed. What about the human cost was two thousand eleven worth that? I mean, the human cost is catastrophic. But but you can look at it in terms of just simple, you know, cost benefit wasn't with it was it. Because there is no positive outcome from it yet. But I think I think the question should be more should the lesson. Be then that we would never try to do something like that. Again. That's what the regime would want us to think. That's that's exactly what the regime once that that you've been taught a lesson that, you know, you would never consider challenging this regime again in in in in any way. And I think if that's what the regime if that's what the regime one wanted then. Yes, it is what the cost because regimes should never be allowed to think that they could to continue to act the way to do with that with complete impunity without any form of repercussions. And at the end of the day that he might have won the might win even the war because war is not over yet. But winning the pieces something completely different. And I don't think the Syria that they have one will look ever look anything like Syria. That they lost. I'm morale as professor of Middle East history at shawnee state university. Thank you very much as always thank you tomorrow. We'll look at how the conflict in Syria has impacted the rest of the world one writer, thanks. It was a test of our commitment to human rights and of our ability to tell truth from lies and do Syria provided test for all of these things. And I say it was sort of resoundly, you know, poor marks from everybody be with us tomorrow for that story right now in Murmansk Russia. Hundreds of swimmers from all over the world are gathering for the ice swimming championships. Yep. Organizers have cut through the frozen lake to make an Olympic sized pool in the icy water the rules, are you swim thousand meters you're only allowed to wear a bathing suit swim cap and goggles, and you're not allowed to die of hypothermia. I reach British ice Kate steals earlier today in Murmansk where incidentally, it's five degrees Fahrenheit outside and the water is a brisk thirty two degrees. And we went had a little swim. In what they call the world with how which is a small ten Maton ice hall at ten o'clock this morning, and I had to break the frozen overnight that we can have a dip in. So if you know in the bowl to it starts to rephrase striped, why is it doesn't like freezing? When you get in water like that. What does that feel like I mean, what is your first physical reaction the coast, we climatize we don't get that really coach, but you fail. It. You get in is important concentrate on breathing out. You don't guy in you tumble? Ten. So we got in legislating won't sell. Rhonda Redway will set us on why? And we rice to the forty lines Kate much respect. But w t f what the hell are you thinking doing the sport? I mean, what do you actually get out of it? Well, this Terrell challen sn extreme talent. When you finished it covered, you formed up you get real boss, the dole prince line, and you feel really good. I'm not failing last for several days. So let's talk about being warm. What is your routine? Once you get out of the water is there like kind of a hot drink that you go to or just a something that you do once you're done with this. I swing said. Slightly different hindered amounts. Absolutely first class facilities. Hey will as you'll get check type adultress and she got apps Volta. You have a swim buddy was second. He's being more senior swimming all the time. I will stay with you. I will help keep up to the main building area where inside the coverage area and the Russians. Detente Fibi fine out you hands on fate will be placed in buckets of by Kumo. But it went fail cowed. When he added to fail quite quite halt. And you have hot wet towels patrol Ranji pet's neck hidden is growing indicate China's really rapidly on then she thought to cover you start to become more able to have you want to move on just concentrating Konichi-wa Abby stopped fo- by when you start to get Wilmot. They will say oh well enough to get into the Sona an-an-and you might ship awhile. But once you come out about Sonal in dolphins running club. I swimmer Kate steals at the ice women championships in Murmansk Russia. Stay warm somehow doesn't seem right. So I'll just say good luck. Thanks very much and keep. Time to check in again with the world. Caroline bieler. She's been sailing for the last six weeks on a research ship, traveling to Antarctic as massive Thwaites glacier as part of a five-year international effort to figure out how climate change might be affecting glacier. And what that might mean for global sea level rise over the next hundred years or so Caroline where you know. We are off of some ice shelves to the north of tweets. Go share. But until recently we were looking at pine island, glacier, which is the sister to weights part of this giant west and Arctic ice sheet, and for the past several days, there's been a lot of sediment core and going on so dropping a big metal tube down into the sea floor to pull up sediment that is sort of a store. Call record of what's happened here in the past. So that's what we've been doing on the science side of things. But on the Aren our side of things the great twenty nineteen th annual b Palmer ping pong tournament. Finally, just wrapped up. All right a ping pong tournament. I remember a couple of weeks ago, you mentioned that the ship had to turn around for medical emergency. You lost a week of sailing and people on board were going stir crazy as this ping pong tournament. A result of the stir-crazy Innis. Yeah. So it started when we were doing that transit. And it's the final kept getting postponed because we got into the period where scientists rectory really busy working. So there actually was a lot of antique. Patient building for this final one day last week after dinner, we all Trump down to the cargo hold the ping pong table is and the finalists came out in national dress. So one of the marine technicians had the letters USA taped onto the back of his jacket and then a Swedish student had a Swedish flag clipped to the back of his head band. Reader student ended up winning the best two out of three and he got the goodie bag that we all contributed to which had chocolates with labels in a variety of languages a carbonated lemonade. There's nothing fizzy on the ship. So that was in high demand a ziplock baggie with about ten dollars of Norwegian currency, which is a bit strange because there are no Norwegians on the ship and then a pocket knife. So it might also on silly. But you know, there's not a lot to do by way of entertainment. So it's fun to see what people come up with. So we go to champion in the ping pong tournament. Aboard the Nathaniel b Palmer, I want to talk about something else though. Caroline today. And that's the ice. There's a slow return of see us at melted over the southern summer down there, which is coming to an end now. Yeah, it's funny because we have this occasional entertainment like ping pong tournament. But really what people do most of all when they have any free time is go up to the bridge of the ship and just watch what's going on out, the windows, and I've. Become totally obsessed with the formation of C ice down here as it turns toward winter washing. It start as these darker streaks on the top of the water, and then form into this cloudy film, and then eventually a brutal thin sheet of ice that sounds like this when it scrapes against the whole ship. So I asked marine technician on the Palmer named Joey Patterson to give me a sort of lesson and the different kinds of ice here. How they form she's on her ninth Antarctic voyage. So she's seen this all before. From the bridge, we climb up three ladders to ships lookout point, which is something like eighty feet above the water. Okay. Sixty. Us we're in a tiny enclosed tower about twice the span of Joey's arms. The sea is choppy and gray with dark streaks running toward us. They're made up of tiny ice crystals with a delightful name of frazzle, and when enough of them formed create these streaks Joey says, they're called grease ice. It looks like grease or oil has been spilled across the top of the water like the chop is down. And there's no Whitecaps, and you can just barely see the swell of the ocean underneath. Okay. So the next stages. I think my favorite word. Shoulda shoulda. So. Yeah, I think Suga forms from Greece ice, and there are patches of it growing to our left. And right. It's grayish whitish like sugar that got thrown into water and didn't dissolve it flattens out the waves even more than Greece ice. So the C gently undulating underneath it inside. Those hazy grape patches of Shogo we can see tiny round disks of solid ice starting to form. Joey says that's the next step pancake ice as it gets colder, and colder the water is trying to freeze into a sheet. But there's movement so is breaking the sheet apart, and you get these little chunks of ice that as they get sort of tossed and blown by the wind and current it round off the edge is a little bit. And love the names. Yeah, I do too. Like who came up with? They're either like really cool words like frazzle more. They're perfectly descriptive grease ice and pancake ice like I can picture that in my head. So good. Okay. So according to bout it. That's what's known as the mayor knows bible by Nathaniel Bowden, which and he single piece of relatively flat sea ice that is less than twenty meters across is called an ice cake. Joey says ISIS cakes grow into ice flows and ice fields which are still a little flexible. You can actually see the cease well moving under the icefield. It's very disorienting because the ground is just like gently rippling underneath you eventually the ice gets thicker, it starts to be named by how long it's been around first year second year multi-year freezing up can happen. Fast down here. I can grow from nothing to five inches thick and just two days and up to six feet over its first winter, it's kinda crazy to think eventually some of those little pancakes are going to. To become that like massive multi year ice that we were like working so hard to break through on our way down. Marie technician, Joey Patterson. They're speaking with the world Caroline Baylor both on the research ship. The Nathaniel b Palmer in the waters, just off Antarctica. Caroline, stick around for another minute. If you would with that is starting to reform is it getting tougher for the ship to maneuver down there. Well, it's the captain's job to make sure it's not too tough. He is keeping a very close eye on ice imagery sent down specifically for our path where we're going by the national Ice Center. So he's keeping a close eye on that always looking for what he calls a runway out of the ice or path. And he also is keeping an eye on whether as far away as stralia because that can give him a pretty good sense of the kinds of weather pattern today. We'll be seeing here in about ten days time. So he'll be making the ultimate call about when we have to turn around and head home before the ice starts to form up too much. That's the world Caroline Bieler afloat on the Amazon CEO of west Antarctica. Caroline, thanks as always stay warm. Stay safe. Thanks marco. We've got more about the research team and photos of the freezing amensty that's all in Caroline's latest dispatch at the world dot ORG. And before we go today, a quick Brexit update from the UK parliament today voted down a proposal for a so-called, no deal Brexit, this after British lawmakers overwhelmingly rejected the deal Prime Minister Theresa may had negotiated with the EU that was yesterday. So members of parliament didn't like maize deal, but they don't want to leave the EU without a deal either. Which leads us to a third vote expected tomorrow on whether to request an extension to the entire Brexit process. Big week for Brexit votes in London. We'll keep you posted and unconv- used that is our show today from the Nannville hair studios at WG VH here in Boston. I'm Marco werman. We'll see you tomorrow. Our public radio international.

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AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 05:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. I'm Rita Foley with an AP news minute. At least three people have died in the flooding in the mid west Michael sessions, home in Fremont, Missouri flooded, I'm happy to be home. And I'm on blessed that we didn't lose more than we thought we were gonna lose. He talked a K E T V today. Vice president Pence travels to Nebraska to survey the flood damage for himself. New Zealand's Prime minister wants people to say the names of the fifty people killed in the mosque shootings rather than the name of the man who is accused of killing them, prime minister, Jinda ardor earn. He sought many things from his act of Thira, but one was notoriety. And that is why you will never hear me mention his name. The Justice department reportedly will begin an investigation into the way the Federal Aviation Administration. Regulated Boeing we're hearing the prosecutors will look into the development of Boeing's max jets after two crashes overseas. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience to prepare me for the future. I that will make me feel supported a courage and connected quickness, Ed or go to online dot dot EDU today. This February history will be made millions will watch as eighty years of unjust stigma is left in the past a product the drove good people to the black market will be revealed as one that's creating a new global market, this February what inspired the symbol of counterculture will at long last be seen as just culture. The new normal is coming. Will you be one of the first to see it? Visit madman dot com to watch an exclusive preview.

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