17 Burst results for "Fatima Bhutto"

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

05:25 min | Last month

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"Well I I think you know one of the amazing things about radicalism if we look at it through real life. Is that not good squares with what we think about radicalism so there was a a young American woman cooled Woodham was Lasana. I think was He's from Alabama and I believe her family migrated from from Somalia and one of the things she said. was that you know she went to this normal high school when she wanted to be on the football team and go-to sleepovers and all the rest of that. But her parents were really strict and they didn't let her be a normal American teenager, which is what she was. And she ran away to dash to to Isis to be free. To you or me that might sound completely. Off. KILTER. Or. Counter. Intuitive. Monte story is one of those things that. that. I. Felt might be counter intuitive but important Monte. From Karachi to like an Isa Rosa Layla. But he's incredibly priviledged. Monte is not from the periphery of the city, Montes from the heart the gold heart of the city and Monte wants for nothing needs nothing it denied now. Goes to the best school lives in the best neighborhood. But yet. Something appears to be missing. Something appears not to add up entirely from Monte and he does have a certain loneliness but really Monte becomes fixated on a young woman could layla. And what happens with Layla And? A kind of. Heart thickness or heartbreak. Is wants throws Montes World of balance and forces him to make decisions that he would not. Just happens to the best of us when you think about your intended audience for a book like this. Who's your ideal reader? Whenever I write I'm my ideal reader in a strange way because if you start to imagine what incidents I think you become compromised by the imagination because then you start writing in a direction. To appeal to people or to interest people and I think that can be dangerous. So. When I'm writing the thing I'm always following is something I'm distressed about curious about or don't understand and I have to be faithful to wherever it goes is that makes sense I started to write the runaways. What I imagined would be the story didn't end up being the story the story changed form. Would you consider to be connected? Yeah. Yeah. I, it was a story of two boys. It was initially the story of wanting sunny in the desert in Iraq on a March? Thrown together, though they can't stand each other. That was the story there was there was. There was no past. There was no female There was nothing that was just a kind of forward movement and it it didn't work..

Montes Monte Rosa Layla Woodham Lasana Somalia Isis Alabama football Karachi Iraq
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

05:08 min | Last month

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"Taliban other things you know sometimes, if you watch if you watch American Cable News you would think that they were these kinds of magicians who come in captivate the people in lure them into bad choices in unethical choices violence simply because the people are too uncivilized or unsophisticated to understand that there are better options the idea that people get radicalized because oftentimes radical organizations radical. Movements invest in those places they they come with. There is no school where there is no playground where there is no food in jobs and say, Hey, here's an opportunity. Those groups are problematic themselves but they but they come with something and something material that people aren't getting an idea that this relationship between poverty and radicalization is something that we take seriously. But with Anita this character, any two rows like this idea of not wanting to be engaged servitude non wanting to be a consigned to a certain kind of life is key. Yeah I think that there are several ways to approach it an end the one you mentioned. Is Very important. You know we see this time in in cases of disaster in. Has. Floods every year I mean it's happening now in the news as we speak up to the monsoon rains, the city is so inept that they can't do anything and people are drowning in ultimately become sewage water because they've gotten no facilities no support and a lot of organizations will come in and they'll clean away that water. You know they'll come in with food they'll come in with candles when the electric goes. Though absolutely what you mentioned these vital and in the case of a need to rose and I'll be a little. Circumspect only because all. Over spoiler is interesting things that I don't WanNa give away. It's really important. I. Think to know that when people are not given options. By their society. They will either destroy that society or they will offer their loyalty, their space, their voice to a society that engages with them, and I think that's I think that's key and I. Think it's one of the things that have been missed in the conversation on radicalism. Another thing that I I think about when I think about this other catcher sunny is the idea of belonging the idea of wanting to connect in how people can be captivated by Messianic Figures Bhai. Charismatic figures because of these human needs we have because there's the structural stuff that we talked about right I did poverty joblessness will make you do all kinds of stuff leauge down certain roads but there's a human is their own gaps, our own kind of individuals, stories and experiences the holes in our own childhood. The needs we have is people that also make us vulnerable to everything from colts the charismatic leadership to to radical.

Taliban Anita colts
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

03:09 min | Last month

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"Wow in a powerful portraying the book looks at this idea of radicalization and it really forces us to to wrestle with the question of how do people get their. You know in Western media in particular, we hear the stories of radicalization, but they always seem very distant and exotic in dehumanizing in certain kinds of ways yet they are the the Western media narrative. Will tell you like Oh this person in the Muslim though they're radicalized and it's it's as though something inherent to Islam- or the Muslim experience has driven then this life of crime and violence and terror. But of course, any study you WANNA. At he's all over the world for decades of shown that religion is not a spark to radicalism it actually an insulator. It's a protector and most of the young men and women who are radicalized and who joined these terrorist groups on front joining because they're scholars of religion there joining. In fact, they know very little about religion but the joining because they're angry and because they're alienated and because there he need. And because ultimately they don't see that their society has a place for them. And so they will take any place, but he offered to them reading the book I felt like, I was getting a powerful window into these experiences almost the documentary for me. But like a good one, you know whether director is committed to helping us understand who these people are. It's not an overly sympathetic read in my estimation. You know it's not like you're making excuses for folk. You're you're you're not justifying nor you fully dismissing the choices people make as much as you're helping us understand the other three primary characters. Who You us to in the book have a little. Talking about fiction book for some reason in a podcast like I don't WanNa, spoil anything for the person who hasn't read it. There are three. And this I character Anita Roses is an interesting one help me understand her a little bit. Well, one of the things I wanted to do with the runaways is to say we're not GonNa talk about religion as the spark to radicalism than what are the reason and Anita rose is a young girl from Karachi, and she doesn't live in the neighborhood that Monte of the other captive lives in. She lives in a congested and crowded colony, which is a sort of by word for slum. And she's a poor girl she is. The child of a single mother. And Anita Roses is one that rejects wander allows Renault access no space no voice new privilege because she doesn't belong to the center she comes from the periphery of the city. And it needs to rose's story is one about a raging inequality. About the devastations of inequality and the devastations of poverty and what that does to anyone but in particular announce Fokin young girl. So the road to radicalization Harvey's, it should be a key part of the conversation again when we look over the last decade or so groups like the.

Anita Roses Anita rose director Renault Fokin Karachi Harvey
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

05:02 min | Last month

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"Hey everybody I'm Marc Lamont Hill owner of uncle bobbies coffee. In books I am a professor, a scholar and most importantly a Buchner. Book nerd because I don't just love to read books. I'm the guy who loves to read about the Book I love hearing all this talk about how and why they wrote the book and I love talking to other book nerds about their favorite books. That's why I started coffee and books podcast all about books every episode I. Sit down over a cup of coffee with the world's biggest authors to discuss the most interesting controversial fund and important books. Sometimes I just hang out with experts, fans.

Marc Lamont uncle bobbies professor
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

16:14 min | 10 months ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"Years and years in years of evidence that not understanding why these things happen leads to even more dangerous consequences. If you want to change the world we live in if we want to be safer and more secure than I think. We have a duty to understand why people would be vulnerable to radicalism why people would be drawn into violence. And we'll see what happens when people dismiss it and say these barbarians and we don't want to talk about them. It makes it worse and particularly if you come from the Non Western world then you know that. The reasoning is flawed. To begin with the reasoning has been since nine eleven that these are people from a certain place these people of a certain certain religion and this is how they are infected with these impulses and of course that's not true. I don't think radicalism is born out of religion at all. I think it's born out of humiliation and isolation and the fact that many many young people today don't see a future for themselves in their countries and and if you don't see a future in your country you'll be vulnerable to anyone who offers you a future and I think that's what that's what happened with a lot of these young people who have picked up left lives of essential comfort. Let's say and gone off to join dash in Iraq or Syria. It's been interesting seeing the rise. As a far-right extremes of terrorist acts in North America and around Europe because it's massively increased threat right and when you look into the background and again it's mostly young men it's very intraday you go and they suffer the same impulse. which is that? The they're clinging to a past you know and that past is decades ago that passes maybe even something they've never even lived through but they cling to it because they see in their present that they are not respected that their voice is not given a space that people like them are somehow excluded from society on. They feel wounded wounded and humiliated by that. I mean I is born out of that. But so are these Nazis these neo Nazis. You know I hate the word white nationalist because that what does that even mean. It doesn't mean anything if you'll brown they call you a terrorist. You know if you're White Call Your White Knight doesn't it's not even a word that but but they are born exactly the same impulse you move so easily between cultures and continents kings of the world's this fascinating Booker Booker dispatchers. You're looking at changing workings of soft power. Can you tell me briefly this thesis you have about how American power I spread its influence throughout Asia. yeah in the Middle East through military bases Yeah I think I think our understanding is that in a Americana is spread by virtue of cool. that it's just elvis was just intron and that's why everyone in the world wants where Blue Jeans and sing rock and roll. But it's really accompanied by militarism and a lot of senses today for the first time in history you have the lowest number of US bases and troops globally dispatched but that number was incredibly high in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties. You had American army bases. He essentially all over the world And those bases were not only conduits for American in culture they brought with them American movies American music American dress American fashion but in the case of Korea I think is really interesting. Example when and the Americans set up their bases and South Korea around the time of the Korean War in the nineteen fifties if you will these troops there had to be entertained. Somehow they had they had had to have something to do when they weren't doing the work of of of soldiering. And if you were a young Korean and you wanted to play rock and roll and you wanted to dance you. You couldn't do that in clubs in Seoul because they played foxtrot music you know they play the stodgy sort of limp sounding music but you could on the basis you could go to the basis and play electric guitar and and capable was really born out of that out of that beginning. It sounds like a strange beginning. But but it's true you and I think that's that's really how this culture spreads American culture is just innocently accepted by all of us. We watched the movies. We don't even think twice about about who's behind the wheel of what the messaging is. One example I was like is Mission impossible the Tom Cruise Tom Cruise films exactly it was first. TV show in the sixties. Whenever was a now? It's this mega billion dollar series of films and Tom Cruise's character works for an organization called the IMF Mif. You know the impulsive impossible missions force. But you know that's crazy that's that's it's not even subliminal it's so transparent but we don't we don't even think think about it. This is fantastic bizarre in county. How we're CON Bollywood superstar? Who's filling me for some Middle Eastern show in Dubai and it's just the whole sense of Bollywood's impact now being so much bigger and exporting around the world but it's not all positive and you were very frank about your concerns about how Bollywood it has changed and become co opted by Hindu nationalists? Do you think people take that threat. Seriously enough Well you know if I I started writing new kings of the world in two thousand sixteen and that's why I made the choice to include Bollywood. If I was writing the book today in Two Thousand Nineteen I would not have included Bollywood because because I think fit I think the Bollywood has been always very faithful mirror to Indian society. It's reflected the aspirations the struggles on and the fishers of Indian Indian society from the nineteen forties. The nine hundred forty nine hundred fifty S. Bollywood films were really idealistic. Films and my brotherhood and nation building and and moral tales in the nineteen. Seventies films are about injustice and about the poor being dispossessed. Aren't as Roy said what you said as well which is a bunch in that super would play Lease Mun or a porter's yes. They working class shoeshine boys farmers and then you have nine thousand nine hundred liberalism them and then there are no more farmers films and there are no more shoeshine boys and they are all multinational bankers. Who Live in London in summer and Switzerland and have fast cars and and that's finding it reflects the time you know when undergoing neoliberal reforms but today Bollywood films are about war? You know. They're about this muscular. Jingoism Ango ISM that is violent and If -clusive come to look a lot like Hollywood films of the eighties with a big buffed bodies uh-huh yes exactly the aesthetic has got find also the militaristic messaging it's completely minister militaristic and and I think that's alienating and I think it's dangerous I'm I'm one of those people that really does believe that politics is in everything you know when I sit down to watch a movie today. I'm not comfortable. I'm uncomfortable watching it and I think unfortunately culture only moves when it's free of constraints. It moves beautifully. When it's free of constraints it can have politics? It always will have politics but when it constrains itself to a message pushing a message then that culture is going to be wounded. And it's and I think that's what's going to happen with Bollywood moving forward. Just remind US how how you've noticed. Mody the prime minister specifically having an impact on on trying to use Bollywood Stars for his. You see see it You see you see most recently in February of this year Pakistan in just stood again at the brink of war design nuclear armed nations on our our air forces engaged in dogfights for the first time since nineteen seventy one and at that time I was in Islamabad. And Pakistani public figures. Coming out not to say we do not want war. We did not want Indians today. We do not want tonight. We do not have any appetite for this at the same time. Bollywood actors were coming out and cheering hewing war and with cheering strikes Pakistan. and to me that was I mean an unimaginable lead disgusting. Can you imagine I dunno Tom Cruise. WHO's cheering a drone strike minute? It sounds completely. Misplaced does not the role of an artist. So it's it's been impacted like that. I think a lot of recent in Bollywood films have been specific. I mean there have been many films about Moody himself. have been films About these programs you know. His sort of initiatives is sort of soft initiatives. If you want to call them that now have Bollywood films about them. I think what's more interesting coming out of India or TV shows at the moment you know streaming so the the shows that are coming on Netflix Amazon prime. They were a little more interesting than what's coming out of Bollywood. Do you feel a responsibility to represent the voices of of Pakistanis and Islam. That are not heard beneath the headlines. You speak out against the likes of Richard Dawkins as being as damaging into productive discourses Fox News. Yeah yeah well. I don't see myself as a voice for anyone really. I mean I speak out about those things because I I'm personally affronted by them You know I I believe in the idea of discourse I believe in the idea of conversation and dialogue on I. Why don't you get either those from Richard Dawkins or Fox News? It's the same pushing of an agenda on what I'm personally fronted. By as Richard Dawkins can be incredibly Fred ably patriarchal and insulting. When he stands up and says Muslim women need help? You know The so demeaning to Muslim women as though we don't have capacity and capability to help ourselves. We need you know this sort of white savior like Richard Dawkins. So I'm personally offended by. That's why I said it and Fox News is just an insult to everyone is that I've been looking at your twitter feed and this is you on the new Dakota fanning film about a white Ethiopian. Aping refugee once again. Hollywood steps up to tell the urgent unheard time. You stories of white people novelist shriver. There's no volume control on inexhaustible exhaustible white privilege but there should be a you Frank Mississippi refreshing but you have a worry about the effects of a potentially offending important people. No I I mean I I. I tried to go by the hippocratic oath. So I I don't want to cause harm to anybody and I don't want to be insulting anybody or demeaning to anybody but yeah I think if somebody is Exclusionary on if somebody is bigoted or somebody is offensive. But I think you have a right to say Let's stop where you are. I don't accept that I'm you know there's a problem with your conversation. I think we have to say that. I think it's important. I think the idea idea of Hollywood telling that story woke. None of us have seen the film but it sounds ridiculous. Doesn't it you know foxy not your why does is there have to be a white woman in the story for us to have sympathy with refugees. Tail on also you know easy opium has its own stories and narratives. Aren't they allowed those. I think that's that's partially why Western culture is under threat from so many places because it assumes itself is the center and the neutral center. Yes yes of course the enlightened objective center as though such a thing could exist and you know the Hollywood has come so late to the idea of representation. They think that representation means that you put an Asian American President of film. You know one character or you put a Mexican character in a TV show and boom. That's the end of the problem. Everyone fuel seen unheard but what they don't realize. Why would we watch your show with one measly character when there is a whole industry in industries everywhere else in the a world where the stories are Mexican? The producers are Mexican the actors Mexican or Asian American or African. There's a world that we live in a multi-polar world and there's culture blossoming in so many points are not restricted to only one. This is your view that there is a big global culture and it's just certain western institutions still refusing to see the world that way completely. I mean you know everybody in the world who is Not White was essentially as opposed to stand up and give a standing ovation nation to crazy rich Asians. As somehow this is now encompassed what it means to be Asian. Why would we do that when I can go and watch any a number of Korean films which are nuanced sophisticated and an incredibly elegantly told in in their diversity in their multiplicity and why do I have to cheer for one American film when there are libraries film out there I just to me? It seems absurd. Especially when you see the row over the Asian Shen writer. Oh yes. He's refused to work on the second one because they were offering her eighth of the money. Exactly of the white male writer. Although you've made it clear you have no plans. Let's go into politics. I just wonder if knowing that you know you carry the name brutal you you have a life in Pakistan was outside. Do you worry that there are people who see you as a threat just because you do speak out and you speak out on issues like corruption is speak out on issues I I don't know really You know I think that I worked consistently as a writer release since I left college so I don't know if people how will take that as proof that I'd like to stay writer or if they just see that as a placeholder until I I I. I really couldn't couldn't answer that I don't know what do you think it's possible. Something might tempt you into politics. I don't really think so because.

Bollywood Hollywood Pakistan. Tom Cruise Richard Dawkins writer South Korea Iraq North America US Seoul Booker Booker Middle East Syria Europe Dubai Fox News London
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

11:48 min | 10 months ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"And when when he was Reaching the road of our house he was stopped. There were about one hundred policemen on the roads that night some were in trees trees and sniper positions and they had closed all the streetlights and they had moved all the guards of nearby residences and embassies into their house and when my father stepped out of the car to ask what was happening signal was given to shoot to commence firing and my father and six other men were killed that night. They were shot multiple times and then left to bleed on the road. They left there for about an hour and when they were moved there were not move to hospitals they were moved to clinics and know whether could treat a gunshot wound because the aim was was to kill these men and I was at home. I was waiting for my father in his in his bedroom. Actually and so. We heard everything when we tried to leave a house. We were told by the police. There'd been a robbery in the neighborhood that we had standards. I'm so sorry. Thank you One of the last promises you'd you'd make your father was about telling his story wasn't it. Yes my father was was killed two days after his birthday and he had just turned forty forty two years old and we'd come back from a birthday dinner and even very quiet at dinner and my father was never quiet. He was always talkative and he was very quiet and we came home and I started to ask him about his life. And if you had any regrets what did he remember from certain periods things like that and as we were talking to you really have to write a book and he loved loved riding my father and he loved reading and he said No. No no no no you you do it. You write my book for me and very excited that he would think of that. Oh trust me me and I got a pen and a paper and he said no no. No when I'm gone not now. I had no idea that it'd be an endangered. But but my father had encouraged courage my writing from a very young age on encouraged me not only to read but but also to write. I wanted to be a writer really at that point so it remained in the back of my mind and I always felt it was a promise I owed my father but also as a promise I was scared to have to fulfil. I didn't want I want to do it in a sense because it would mean really that he was gone. There was no one else to do it but me and so it was almost almost ten years later that I started. I started slowly the work of research that then became songs of blood and sword on the nights nights that your father died. You ran your aunt Benazir didn't you. I did when we we were not allowed to leave the house. You know. This isn't the days before cell phones and twitter and satellite news and all that so we had no idea what had happened. But my father wasn't coming home and we were waiting and expecting him and expect him. Anew started to get nervous and I called the Prime Minister's House to talk to my aunt. find out what had happened thinking. Maybe he'd been arrested and I remember the ADC. The secretary came on the line and and was already was already saying to me. I'm so sorry I'm so sorry I'm so sorry I didn't know what he was talking about so I just kept reading that I needed to talk to him and he kept telling me he was sorry and the anti connected. Connect me not to my aunt but to my aunt's husband Asif Zardari and It was the guy who told me that I couldn't speak week to my aunt when I insisted and said it was very urgent something had happened. I need to talk to my aunt. He said. Don't you know your father has been shot. That's totally found out. You blame your aunt. Don't you well my aunt. Certainly has a responsibility in the aftermath of the killing all all the witnesses and survivors were arrested. But none of the police were Again in the immediate aftermath tribunal. Oh was put forward by the government that was to investigate the assassination but that had no legal power to pass. Sentence that tribunal was organized by my aunt and even though it had no legal power to pass sentence it concluded that the assassination could not have been carried out except with approval from the highest bench of government. That would would be her and unfortunately the way she continued to conduct yourself didn't lend itself to any any of innocence. Why was the case? Do you think pink. Why why did she? Why does she do that? Why do you think she would have killed your father? I don't know I don't know I think that power is Incredibly corrosive corrosive for us. I think it produces fear That's explainable in some cases. My father was a threat to her. My father was a critic and people had a hope and a promise for him. It hadn't been tested yet. Didn't have the chance to be tested. But unfortunately fortunately my aunt's herself was killed years later on so there's no chance to ask her one of one of the men who was on the road that night she later inducted one of the one of the police people a high ranking police. Intelligence officer was on the road that night. My father was killed and after my father's death my aunt. Welcome that man into the Central Committee of her political party. I mean there's a strange things to do. They defy logic. I so I couldn't possibly gone to why she did them. I wondering how your life changed in that one terrible moment you were so young I noticed you published a book of Poetry Victory Fifteen just a year after the murder. Yes I had been already was very very young and I had studied writing poetry for a school project right and I was show them to my father the poems and he said to me you have to publish these and he was incredibly supportive but I thought no not no not. That's crazy I'm a kid like a kid. Why would I published in? and He'd gone and found publishes addresses and clip them out and written sample letters for me and and so we're actually before he was killed. We were in the process of like talking to the small presses and things like that and because I was underage I had to have a guardian the signature on one of these contracts and I remember as things would change in those days and growing menacing. I I said to my father will if you jail. WHO's is going to sign my contract? and He's put it in my put it in my bag. You know sign in jail. And of course that was packed in his room and so after he was killed. It became even more important for me to publish this poems in his memory and so so I did. Oxford University press by his own publish. Push them at the end of the year after the murder. I guess I kept writing always thinking that I would one. They become like a proper grownup writer but still felt far away that time. Well it's interesting because you're writing is is clear and you see to be both an artist under journalist a-list same time you sort of cut through the truth. Why Guess I? I've done a little bit of everything. In that sense. I started my writing career really as a journalists I wrote for a Pakistan e paper and they send you out. Yeah John John was do paper and the news with the English so they sent me out to do different stories and they sent me to Iran. They sent me to Cuba and they gave me space to write about what I wanted. So I I learnt really how to begin working as a proper writer and she felt safe staying in Pakistan. After your father died. Well I I did and I didn't. I mean I never really feel a hundred percent safe in by San because because of the fact that you really don't have any recourse in a country like where do you go when something bad happens. You know the courts to protect you. The police don't protect too. So you do feel vulnerable. I think that's most people would say that. Not just me but at the same time where is safe. You know. I'm I I don't know what's safe or West. They've there's no place that's going to be one hundred percent safe anywhere. You went on to study at Columbia University which is in New York right Middle Eastern languages yet Middle Eastern legs clearly being in the Nathan Clark and then the School of Oriental and African studies in London. Yeah Salvation government studied now. One might have thoughts with those choices you were thinking about using your voice. Yeah in active politics while I did for a long period very seriously consider that and I've always been fascinated by politics and interested and disturbed by politics and I did studying and at the same time as well. That's true wouldn't really say I'm not in politics. I mean I am not in active politics but I feel what I do is quite political but at the same time much freer than it would be if I was an actual politics I I I write about things that I care about that that are meaningful to me. What's your family expectation at all that you would go into politics being who you were from the family? The U Well I think I think maybe people thought I might. Nobody ever forced me or or made. It seem like I had to. I always wanted to I was I said I wanted to be a writer. I was allowed the freedom to choose. I mean nobody really groomed me in that sense but at the same time you know you you you have a bit of grooming anyways. Don't you because you you learn how to navigate certain things that you wouldn't otherwise so. I traveled across Pakistan with my family with all of them with my aunt with my grandmother with my father on their political tours and trips. But it's those things that made me a writer not a politician Uh what a jump straight into your fiction and how you use it to express what could be seen as kind of political concerns. Activist concerns the runaways. Your most recent novel is a story about extremists. And what draws people into jihadi brides young men going off off apparently happy to join dash these torturing murderous cult. Many people might think I don't want to understand them. We've seen the backlash against people like should be in a bedroom and The others from Britain in particular who've gone off to join dash people think they're monsters. Why did you want to understand them now? I have to say it's incredibly humane and thought provoking book. Thank you. We've now.

writer Pakistan murder twitter Asif Zardari robbery Central Committee Benazir Oxford University Prime Minister secretary officer Iran Cuba Columbia University John John San Nathan Clark others
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

07:26 min | 10 months ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"This is the place to start. Well I knew things that happened in our family and I had seen some things happen in our family so I understood that there was something around us. What did you seen happen? Well I mean I saw that. My father was exile that I was growing up in a country that that wasn't mine. Mine my father's brother. My uncle was killed when I was three years old We were all there when it happened. So how'd that high. I was poisoned. And his wife was then jailed of of not coming to the aid of dying man so sorry he died very slow death breath and his wife had been in the House the whole time and had not alerted the police or call for an ambulance so so yeah. I knew these things were happening getting around us. I didn't quite connect them. What maybe I did but not consciously I suppose? The first time I realized there was something was the first time I went Augustan. which is when I was seven years old and that was the first time I saw this country only heard about and that my father had sort of dreamed and about all these years and they're understood that there were people who knew who this family was and it meant something to people maybe good things maybe bad things but but something nonetheless? I'm wondering what you were like going to school functions on Because you orange confident campaign I see speaking out on saving issues gates hypocrisy in American gun control on the way. Hollywood celebrates white savior stories. We always like like. This is a child's yeah. I'm afraid I want. I'm afraid I was. I was a sensitive todd I think but at the same same time I was always outspoken. And no one told me I shouldn't be No you speak up about God Trying to think now I mean I understood myself to be an adult and people spoke to me like I wasn't adult so it depended I mean I I used to get agitated about. I mean when I was a child growing up in Syria in the first grade we started Language Bridge lessons and all the native Arabic speakers went into the native class and all the foreigners went into the foreigner class You know the colloquial Arabic lessons and I went into the native class and my father said Oh no no no. You shouldn't be eight. Plus you're not Arab. You should go into the forest last so he moved me to the colloquial class and I moved myself back to the native speaker class because I thought I'm not going to go to a lower level of language class. Just because you you want me to stay foreign little things like that but But I but I always wanted to learn and I wanted to know what was wrong with things why they were wrong. Could they be better. Because also can I say someone who shares a Pakistani heritage. I picked up a sense of a kind of racism that exists in in. Some Indians. Pakistanis that are somehow crew to people they are less of value and I wonder if that was something. You were aware of in gray up in Syria. No I mean. I think my father was afraid that I well. I knew things that happened in our family. Father I did it on purpose where he just of other but but so what. I went into the native speaker classes and panicked and thought you know you you. You don't actually live here you. You're actually just visitor. So those were little things. He used to I didn't know why panic about but no it wasn't a racist in that sends. My father was given shelter released so Syria Syria was was a refuge was a haven but no I didn't think so. My father was a head to quite international upbringing in that sense and like me had one those sort of odd accents neither here nor there so he could fit in places and he loved to travel so we didn't have that at home. We didn't have that at home but in fact it was the opposite to be up by his attorney in Syria was an unusual thing because people haven't really encountered South Asian so they thought what they thought. There was only one kind of south Asian and they hides I guess the usual stereotypes people would have about South Asians and I think well I mean you all eat certain food or you know you will sound a certain way everyone does that stupid accent from approved who the simpsons accident you and they wonder why you don't speak like that I remember like I guess the same thing. Anyone who grows up outside their country feels like my grandmother. Mother came to visit at. Oh my body is here. which is you know your father's mother and people were like your Daddy? They make fun of you for Ice Week so actually the opposite. I had that kind of thing. Okay I want to ask about something Difficult when she's you in your home and your father was murdered he. He was assassinated on the road. Outside your house. This is in Karachi Pakistan after you'd move back of fourteen and you heard the gunshots to modify ask what what you remember about that night. Yeah I remember everything really about that. Night It was a very tense time because my father was a very outspoken critic of the government on his book a lot about the corruption of the state and the violence of state forces and at that time in the early to mid nineties. They were a spate of extra-judicial killings in Karachi in particular. I mean some three thousand people were killed by the police. In what they called. Encounter killings an encounter means the police turn up in an area to arrest someone. This was the police version. Of course that person resisted and and they got shot in the back. Bhutto's last activity one of defiance a news conference to condemn police who charged over recent violence. I challenge them to come in a recipe. If they can face the consequences afterwards political consequence but the consequences now will be far greater than he envisaged after a shootout the began when police stopped his vehicle and two others on their way home. Say the government at the time was has been by your aunt. Yes tense writes. My father's eldest older sister Benazir Bhutto was the was the prime minister at the time. And they they didn't have a good relationship. My father is very critical of of of her own own corruption and we started to feel the things were so few something sinister in the in the week before my my father was killed. It had always been very tense city and it was a tense time But I ha- started to be around. They started to put armored cars around the house. You know one day there was one armored vehicle. The next day they were to the day the three so we were expecting something in my father had said that they were going to try and arrest him him and he packed a little bag with books and things he wanted to read. And and that's what we thought might happen or at least that's what it looked like. Sigmund happened but he was coming back from an election. I'm actually election rally but a public meeting on the outskirts of Karachi.

Syria Karachi Benazir Bhutto Pakistan Hollywood todd Sigmund attorney prime minister
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

09:14 min | 10 months ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"Style download. Download the APP today. Now let's go to this week's episode and when my father stepped out of the car to ask what was happening signal was given to shoot to commence firing and my father and six other men were for killed that night. uh power is incredibly corrosive. Corrosive for us with my father was a threat to her. My father was a critic okay. My aunt was killed years later on. So there's no chance to ask her. Hello and welcome to how I found my voice podcast from intelligence squared. I'm Samir Amira. Ahmed and I'm going behind the celebrity persona to find out what influences shaped their success. How politicians artists writers and performers grow? Grow Up to become such great communicators. If you enjoy this podcast please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple podcasts. Fatima Bhutto is a journalist and novelist and a real citizen of the world. Born in Kabul raised in Syria an educated in New York and London and she joins me. Now you've reported from Lebanon from Iran from Cuba and you are an activist. I love reading. Your social media feeds full of an forthright comments about everything from religious extremism to Feminism A to Western anti Muslim hypocrisy. You're lost novel. The runaways was a sensitive an engaging thriller about teenagers drawn into joining Dinesh. And your latest book canoe. Can you kings of the world is dispatches about the global impact of Bollywood of Turkish traumas and South Korean K pop. I have to mention. Of course the FAMILY NAME BHUTTO UTAH. Which carries quite some residents is one of the most well known political dynasties in Pakistan? Your Grandfather Zulfikar Ali Bhutto with the first democratically elected. Prime Prime Minister of the country was overthrown in a military coup and he was executed. And I remember that day. It said that the history of the Bhutto family mirrors the history of Pakistan. Why didn't you feel about such a a claim? But thank you for. Thanks for coming on to talk about how you found your voice. I want to take you back to the start. So you're born in Kabul in in a household where your father was essentially in exile. Wasn't he from Zero Hawks military regime but he was planning. Would it be a revolution with your uncle. Well thank Samir for that welcome and introduction. It's hard to begin seeking after all that. My father was in exile in Afghanistan on. He was resisting getting the military dictatorship. He was a very young man. He was twenty eight years old when I was born. But he was twenty five years old When by his salons upward path was halted and halted quite brutally by a military dictatorship essentially stopped the momentum that Bison in had been building for itself was an incredibly young country at the time and genucel Hukou was a CIA back? Dictator just brutalized the society so there was mass. Censorship mass arrests public floggings journalists were rounded up in whipped stadiums and. My father was one of the political young by Kazan at the time of resisting the dictatorship actively but I would say my birth go to bid him the way it sounds like a very tense time and it certainly it was before I was born. He left Afghanistan soon afterwards. You to Damascus. And we moved to Damascus. And you lived there 'til you were twelve. So what was that the timeline. Yeah we live they said I was twelve and my father becomes a single father on his life is now haircuts for little girls and bedtime stories and and teaching me how to read and write and we had a pretty strange but also a normal fund childhood Syria at the time was quite a closed closed society and I wrote about this a little bit in new kings of the world. It was a time when you couldn't really get very much except the BBC World Service News on the radio. They should've been the one thousand nine hundred eighty eight exactly and so we got our news on the radio from the BBC. But you couldn't really pick up western newspapers or things things like that at the same time of course. Western culture was unavoidable. So you you've got all the Eddie Murphy movies or Episodes of Dallas and cheers and and things like that. It was an unusual time but I do a Happy Childhood in Syria. Will you mentioned you. Father was a single dad so what was happening in your family among why parents divorced divorced When I was quite young about three years old and I was very attached to my father and so I I opted quite easily? He and he he became my father and mother and baby sitter and best friend and and everything rolled into one and I really credit him actually. They would so much because being raised by father who never told you there any limits to what you could do or should do was incredibly liberating and and strangely remains till this this day. There is a fearlessness about that. Comes off so early on meets. You and I'm guessing now this back to just the environment that your father created at home the yes he did this incredible thing which was that. He never lied to me so he never pretended that things were not frightening at times and in fact spoke quite freely around on me so I knew things like dictatorship and martial law and a new these words at a young age and I knew that bad things that happened in my family and I I could see my father's pain and he never hid his feelings either so I I saw him struggle but at the same time he was somebody who loved life and and enjoy life and was curious about the world and and so he didn't teach me to be afraid. He taught me to be unafraid. But at the same time to be vulnerable as well and I. It's amazing that even today I mean I'm thirty seven now. My father was killed when I was fourteen. But it's those lessons that really I have with me today and that's a keep pushing me forward. You obviously have very positive febreeze but I was thinking you know for someone especially for a girl to be growing up without her mom. Your father remarried Lebanese woman fascinated by what that was like because obviously he then straightway have a culturally mixed at you. Well I guess. Our home was always culturally mixed because my father's mother was Iranian and so there was already that we then were living in Syria. I growing up as a child of exile. I thought I was Syrian. Essentially and my father was always reminding me that it wasn't and not only that I wasn't but that that this was temporary so I would you know put a post drop on my wall as a kid and he would say. Oh No don't put that. We're we're leaving soon. Okay what we live here now and he would say no no no. It's not for long. And and so that created strains of being being somewhere and not not being. They're wrong how interesting. It's that being almost a professional exile. Yeah waiting to go back to Pakistan all the time were that. My father lives constantly in in that in that limbo and he would say to me. You know we're going to go home. We're going to go home and I would say when he was a soon really soon but then I realized there was no soon you know and I would mode press a bit more this year. And he's yes this year and the year would pass and we wouldn't leave and so I started to ignore his his Predictions of when we would go home and and then one year he happened to be right and he said it and that was the year we left or year was that that was nineteen ninety-three so I was eleven at the time and he decided to contest elections in Pakistan and return home after sixteen years of of exile. And I thought okay. We'll find if you know if he doesn't win we won't go back and you know he's going to win and he did win and so sort of overnight tonight. We had to start making preparations to leave and at the same time as that was true. Remind us what he won. He won A seat in the assembly from Larkana which had been my my grandfather's seems like an MP exactly like an MP and he was going to go go back and he had always lived with Pakistan even when he was away from it so he was spoke about it in very romantic terms about the C.. You know Caribbean Sea and the smell of salt in the air. All the food so in a way it was like returning home even though it had never been a home for me at least not up until that point and so one thousand nine hundred three. We went back to listen. I want you take back a little bit before that to say. When did you first realize having the PUTO name was significant?.

Pakistan Syria Samir Amira Afghanistan Kabul BHUTTO UTAH Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Damascus Fatima Bhutto BBC Ahmed Apple Caribbean Sea Prime Minister Larkana Lebanon genucel Hukou Hawks Kazan
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"On offer different things in different reasons but all in a slightly hysterical way you're listening to the Latins Aid Fatima Bhutto we took it a new work of nonfiction new kings of the world these patches were Bollywood these cable up and move on to Turkey that we'll talk about deasy yes that's where boating told many times uh what is well they're essentially what we think of a soap operas except that there are two they are two hours and humidity long on average they come with their original scores with as many as fifty characters in a show they'll set across histories there are many Ottoman Sultan epics and at the same time that will be epochs about women prison today in Turkey they cover quite serious issues such as honor abuse one of the most popular dizzy show called Fath- moghul essentially what is fuck moguls and was about the gang rape of a young woman a young woman by several rich man so they're quite hefty this subject a lot of them are based on on works of literature very respected works of literature adapted for the screen and today the talks a second only to the Americans in terms of Oh by television distribution that surprised me actually I I didn't really know very much about it before writing the book Netflix search and they're absolutely is growing and growing Netflix even producing its own original disease the not just buying the shows that are making the rose and they've been going for quite a while not a new project they've obviously existed in Turkey for a very long time but they broke out essentially through the Middle East it happened one go and the early two thousands that few shows massive attention across the Middle East and from daily that is a spread today they're the biggest century everywhere except the English speaking world let's just take a step back and I wanNA talk about the attempted suppression surjit of our some in Pakistan to the point where the Turkish he started to pay yes I mean very interesting case because Bison has a very rich history when it comes to television theater on the periods it's is at its brightest in the nineteen seventies eighties when Pakistan was under its darkest Arab dictatorship under the backed General Zia ul Haq who brutalized society through my censorship arrests executions floggings and what happened at that time is that incredibly nuance television serials started air on state television they're they're not never ending the maybe ten episodes of twenty episodes written in very beautiful poetic were you acted by proper theater professionals and they tackled the issues of the day they tackled feudalism tackled not injustice and they did it in such a way that it was almost impossible to catch them insensitive of course they tried but they really flourished that period and even traveled outside of Kasane very popular in India and have always been popularly do and beyond and under another dictator some decades later Roll Pervez Musharraf there was an opening up of private television channels and media outlets so television licences became quite cheap became four businessmen to to buy them people did and you need something to put on TV so the work of cereals again kicks off and you have a lot of original programming combat back just as it was picking up steam by some gets hit with Turkish dizzy and the reason part of the reason of these excess is that if you are let's say Lithuania it's cheaper for your station to buy existing took a show that to make Lithuania drama buying the rights so that happens in bags on again the wildfire to the point that television channels stopping original programming throwing it off midair midseason and putting Turkish shows on deep fair the baggage that is pretty hard they fought back and and they have made some very popular television dramas and they'll net flicks too by the way now but but the talks really came through in a big way and partly they come through for the reason that these are shows again centered around the family the centered around moral and ethical crises they are a blend of tradition and modernity in a way that is I think done with mobility than buddy because the maternity is not a mimicry of the west necessarily but it's a Turkish version of of that modernity in Bollywood you might hear a lot of English right here what we call mingle ish or English smattering you will hear nothing but Tukish in Turkish shows they're very proud shows they had some trains unfortunately thought they are they are bound by conservative values in the same way that would might be so they don't Donald Trains but you know there's a show called forbidden love giving anything away here to say that you spend at least live episodes trying to figure out who's love is forbidden because everyone's love looks forbidden and the couple of the forbidden love boat still episode I don't know thirty and every visit a two hour long so so they are still bound by a set of conservative values and the other thing that's quite interesting to me is a bollywood film there will always be an in flag there will always be patriotic slogans a man who also now more so now much more so now but always consistently anyone walks into a government office or school or and the speech end with a sort of patriotic kind of ending in the Tokyo shows flags no snow clearing but they're very nationalistic shows it just more nuanced I think but at the same time the the judge in Pakistan just before those coming there was also political changes in Turkey which enabled this to happen what happened well. What's what connects all three of these spaces act? they all undergo neoliberal reforms at the same time on what those neoliberal reforms do is in opening up their markets to essentially American business so foreign business it fractures it fracture something society and all these countries we know from watching near liberal reform was put in place that it disenfranchises populations hugely again who benefits is a small lead all these countries go through this approximately same time and it's approximately at that time that these industries ramp up and go into a different gear Korea might be the more interesting version ah because they really run the same with with Turkey Turkey opens up in a certain way it has now new demands new demands of the market is to produce more has to sell more and it's not enough to just work within your own borders now you must conquer the world and I think it drives a lot of what we're seeing today it drives a lot of what we're seeing today I said earlier I wouldn't have included India if I was reading the book today I would have included China instead because they're going to be the most ferocious I think they're going to be the most aggressive when it comes to push culture out and it's only beginning you mentioned that Turkish television producers diamonds look to the accident uh-huh Asian Switzerland bill and tend to work in studios to have done straight and the hands and you actually win visited sets of a remake of the Godfather River. never know what actually if I can recommend a show I would recommend that show it's called sugar which into the pit and it's essentially adaptation of the Godfather but sets in an Istanbul ghetto and it's the story of a family I mean down to there's a brother like Fredo there's the father like the corleones there's of course the son like Michael doing something accepts he's never got exactly that's one of the rules see but your hero will never fire a gun he will not be violent I think that's quite fascinating industry especially in the ultraviolet world we live in today and what they did is they the producers of this show and they're just one of the two biggest the two huge production houses and token there produced by one of them they took over this neighborhood and double ballot and they renovated some of the interiors they pay the locals to act as extras and they film on the road and I'm what was quite interesting that there's a there's a sign there's a sort of graffiti sign that represents these warring factions in the show and when you walk through this with it it spray painted all over the place and I asked one of the art directors instead of you done this and he said no people just caught only themselves now and the day I was visiting is that there was a a Chinese stringer from news agency reporting that were tourists with their inner selfie sticks taking pictures near the actor Turks just a little about okay pop before we finish more than cinema and stay daisy which obviously take it forms artistic forms from the West.

Latins Aid Fatima Bhutto two hours two hour
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

14:31 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"In between no there's no sort of respect in the took who leaves his country the way Bollywood film has grown to have that and I always to produce Surin Estan Bull I said do you have a film outside he's would be we've got everything here and that idea has been absent in India for thirty years at least also the change in the structure of the things the Bollywood film has has changed you mentioned as become propaganda with the rise of the right in writing this book today I wouldn't have included buddy when I started writing the book in Two Thousand Sixteen and so changes so quickly it's up to the second you're constantly updating yourself culture if I was reading the book in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred sixty I wouldn't have included with that because I think that actually if we look at the Turkish project the Korean project it's got an upward trajectory that's built on a sudden kind confidence and that confidence allows it to move quite freely between the space it occupies whereas India in terms of Bollywood now has that's basically I did I think there are certain things you cannot say I think there are certain things that are now considered incorrect door anti-national or against the grain and I think the moment you do that to culture you lose it you talk about K. pop music one of the Dutch actor is how it's pretty much about the claims a child who may be limited the last day of Saturday the pump capable but bollywood settles. I mean you told issue I wanNA talk to you about with one of the stars by the this week man with a big stars days and g you to buy into Shahrukh Khan and share my difference of any of these three eh looking face as cracks recognized a couple of the web couldn't tell you any films they've been in they're not stars half crossed over into into Western vote my day however Sean New Party is one of the vicious film stars in the world on the Forbes list I mean even the other hands on Forbes lists they consistently in the top five of those kind of lists if not the three and they have enormous enormous fan followings I went to Peru to talk about the this subculture of Peruvian mainly indigenous Peruvians who don't speak English you come from the Highlands and migrate into the cities and they are door Shirakawa or someone on your home and why well the way they explained it to me in Peru is that there's quite a big divide between the indigenous Peruvian who have Inca background and then the White Peruvians who come from that Spanish ancestry or Italian ancestry and I didn't meet a single body found who was white they were all indigenous and what they said to me is that they feel ashamed they feel put down they don't feel they can weather native dress on the streets of Lima they feel that if they eat the if traditional food from their villages their made they've made fun of the language used is always pejorative about indigenous people but Bollywood offer not only people who look like them physically but people who are modern and traditional people who existed in the modern world but wore native dress spoke native languages followed native traditions that was very meaningful to them in a way that it wouldn't have bean to prove into Spanish ancestry retaliate ancestry let's say but go back to the cons I think few places on earth that they would not be recognized weirdly Bollywood films very big in in Africa in Nigeria and Kenya Shahrukh Khan when I interviewed told me there is a small group of elderly German ladies who follow him every single place he goes they don't bother him they just watch him and love him and and the reasoning that they told or at least Germans have told broke that they feel their society so stiff-lipped or tightly wound that Bollywood allows them to express themselves in a way that they feel liberated one of the same name that's just the same character I it's very strange because it follows yeah I mean how much and Raj with great stars of the day played a lot of roles with the same names I asked Shirakawa he played the same character name all the time and he didn't think.

Bollywood Shahrukh Khan India Shirakawa Peru Surin Estan Bull Forbes K. pop Lima Raj Kenya Nigeria Africa thirty years
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

09:51 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This Week Fatima Bhutto returns with dispatches from Bollywood Dizzy and capable in latest book new kings of the world Syria Pakistan she is the author of five previous books of fiction nonfiction debut novel the shadow of the question was long listed for the baileys women's prize for fiction and memoir about life and as as a nation sons of broaden soap was published to acclaim most recent book the runaways which said oh you math not long ago Latins today we're going to be talked about Fatima's ladies work of nonfiction which is the new kings of the world these parties in Bollywood these in Cabo Mac thank you for having me back we'll see how did on this one this is a narrative nonfiction look what's the end of the American Century and the rise of competing cultural industries coming from Asia coming from India from Turkey and Korea so that the original spread of American soft power would you be coach popular show which anyway but he talked about how often that was attached to military power yes it's spread really partially through the the basis through the American indefens- complex today is the is the period with the lowest presence of American military bases around the world but that was obviously not who in the nineteen sixties and nineteen fifties you had enormous numbers of troops of vases and from there you had American culture pushed out so the case of Korea is example when the Americans were in career after the war it was in the basis that young Korean musicians would come and play rock and roll because there was nowhere else in Korea the time that would allow them to the favourite music was quite stodgy and it was you know belong to an older generation if you wanted to play rock and roll if you wanted to play the electric guitar the American basis that would have you there were troops that needed to be entertained so be on the less American military bases of the Lord our world Tom has changed what sort of caused in general around the world the sort of pushback I think there's several factors I would say first of all globalization was a promise that turned out not to be true so the world has promised with globalization with the movement of capital would common credible communities riches movement for everybody and of course that didn't happen if you already had opportunity wealth and movement you had more of it but if you didn't you you basically buried under the system so a lot of people hundreds of millions of people who left their homes and villages and moved to the cities found themselves the drift and on ward those people are not represented in American pop culture they don't see their stories of their struggles brations in Hollywood films you know or American music let's say I think the second factor is that is that migration you know we talk so much today about migration and people moving into other countries but actually the most migrants are moving internally the going from villages to cities than crossing borders that brings with it a lot of turbulence a lot of uncertainty a lot of shock and that has certain implications I think also in culture and then lastly American well any soft power has to be believable in order for it to be affected you've and whatever one thinks of American power and the Brute Force of American power when Obama was the face of that power it had veneer over that was sophisticated and glossy and you need not focus too much on its imperial designs or because you believe the story of America so you could sit down and watch a movie of the story of America to me but when the face of that power is trump for Mike Pence or Richard Spencer will then it's then it's harder but also the way because the American media's image of somewhere like around us and thank you the Great Satan of American popular coach but of course the reality across much of the world is while a more conservative society a solidly Middle Class Society that's not necessarily saying that reflected in the ball he has I mean I think that's to say that it's not that Indian or Turkish Korean and cultural designs are innocent or that they don't come with certain agendas politics behind it of course they do but with any recent to those stories all I think generally we come to culture innocently where we sit down to watch a movie or read a book we're not suspicious of WHO's brought it to us and why we want to be entertained away but we know too much about America I think that allows us to ask certain things that we are not ready to ask about Turkey or India let's say Bollywood first of all our chains described about how people are not necessarily any longer save themselves reflective and American culture also happened over the years with the change in Bollywood considered a minute but let's talk about body would obviously Indian cinema the vastly different threats specifically talking about that idea of Bollywood's people also be familiar with the the secret of the dancing but one of the ways is your average bollywood federal traditionally different from your average Hollywood well in a body would always served as a mirror for India I think it's a pretty faithful mirror so it's reflected the politics and societal changes and movements of its time so if you look at the early Bollywood films of the nineteen forties and fifties they were filled with idealism they were about the birth of her open new nationhood and a certain justice and brotherhood that was the beginning of course of independent India and by the nineteen seventies that dream is voted by not just corruption the knowledge of of a very powerful central state that can decide who gets justice who doesn't Justice who is allowed to live in a highrise who sleeps on the footpath and the movies reflect on the nineties are of course neoliberal and I think this changes in a way that's quite unique I'm not sure you can do the same is true of Hollywood necessarily but NYDIA quickly and today of course Bollywood films are I mean to me on watchable digits Papa Ganda that quite ugly communal again too but how they are different is that there are stories essentially centered around the family they'll stories in which there was certain traditional signs and symbolism that will not change no matter the decades so your hero today may drive a Ferrari and may have a girlfriend but when his mother walks in the room he touches her feet so those things remain but they are not stories that have happy endings necessarily because life is not built on happy endings the hero may die the were usually they don't have that tyranny of positivity that that Hollywood has that's unser quite different of course than the singing and the dancing as you mentioned but I I don't think it comes from Kitsch I think it comes from cultural expressions so if lar- ever going to attempt at say there is singing there is movement there is a lot more noise is not it's not a silent sation between a priest supplicant so then he comes from that it's it's born out of the court in the performances of the court and that remains in the films today in the same way the the people of India or sort of listen to the sirens capitalism from the countryside an area uh you see the same thing in Bollywood so what's changed hugely is that the hero of Louisville today is never a farmer he's never a poor man he's never a homeless man which by the way was true in the seventy s you did have heroes who lived in villages they may wear bellboys they lived in the village and they respected the village and its traditions today the hero what is not a diet he's not a minority he's essentially an upper upper class Indian with access not just to consumer plenty but also international plenty so maybe he lives in London maybe he summers Janie but is bound by a traditional values you mentioned that the international and in the past box of the Anno Domini India somebody here who has migrated Brown we'll see him with some suspicion yes it's changed to sleep because of course to to leave leave your country was to pollute your your spiritual standing you lost a certain part of your your identity by crossing the Blackwater of exile and then as you said the silence of capitalism near Liberal demands now mean that actually crossing the blackwoods of examine you are national corporates Titan so that changes and it's it's reflected in the films it's very interesting because compared to Turkey and there's the divide Turkish dizzy or as they call the TV shows will be set in Turkey they will not be set in Switzerland and London there's as Bollywood films out there is.

Dizzy Pakistan Fatima Bhutto
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"So that to me was a really magical place. It was almost like a canvas for me to do this cope. Cher's that are here for this six position. And I wanted to bring them to because they were part of like from either we're part of the pieces they represent the people that work at the factory. They are dishonest their magnificence, you know, they're like from generation to generation they're like my family nother my friends at the same time. It's not just beautiful. It's almost like a set the core. But it's also dangerous. So there's a different kind of vibrance like something you can trip on something. Or have you carrying a sculpture you can break it. You know, it's at the same time. There's pigeons living inside the factory. And there's is just so full of life that I couldn't I wanted to find a way how to not disconnect one from the other one. Because if you see the main sculpture is completely different to the cast that you see yet. This culture comes from the costs that you see. So I'm very interested in transformation. And I mean, I like metaphors that I'm not a like for people to come to the wrong conclusions. And I don't really describe my we're gonna work. I don't really talk about it. Talking better about the process on the people that participate in it. It's interesting what you were mentioning, you know, obviously, the people that participated in it and the logistics that kind of brought all these pieces hit the geo feel like in the ban Ali wed, everything is headline acts. There's there needs to be a bit most faithful logistics old the people that work behind the scenes for an event such as this. For me. The b starts when you're making it with the people sexually like there is work that I collaborated with other people that were teaching me at the same time on their part of it. But up -solutely for me, everybody's part of the team. And this is why I really like I really liked to work with the processes sexually with respect. And in becomes a history in itself. And I find that the peace of the end represents that for me. But yes, absolutely. The logistics of Venice incredible just to see what people do and to know the city, and you know to work within the different high waters and different climates. I mean, it's kinda crazy to bring all these things to Venice. It's a little bit crazy. But it's it's doable. When people here to add very well. But at the same time as you always learning like, you're never not learning. Something's happening that you're learning. We're not morale is speaking to Monaco's culture editor CARA Ramallah at the Venice. Ben ali. You're listening to the monocle Dany with me MSN. Fatima Bhutto is a niece of the foam of Pakistani prime minister Benazir Bhutto, and she's part of a Pakistani political dynasty..

Ben ali Venice Fatima Bhutto Cher Benazir Bhutto CARA Ramallah MSN Monaco prime minister editor
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Actually, I was just in Lahore does on aside. And I did a reading for the runaways and somebody came up to me afterwards and said, but I did actually work at a refugee camp. Why did you make all and I said, no, no, no, he doesn't. That's the whole point of all is always is a charlatan all the someone who moves wherever the political wind blows. So if it suits him, he's a refugee worker it suits him. He's a radical. You never really quite know with him miles boilers. I. The other aspect of sunny is that he's confused by sexuality as well. And something that's not really talked about it. I think is obviously I can understand this sort of come rodri- of why young men would want to go away. Enjoy their brothers fight somewhere. But also this is how we're autism about as well. I think it's an incredibly difficult time to be anyone. I think it's an incredibly difficult time to be a man, especially in an environment where the rules have always been so rigid and so strict what does it mean to be a man with force in the world. What does it mean to be a man who can confront the environment around him and Sonny deeply struggles? With that. I think he I think the Homer eroticism really comes from his his wanting is wanting in a particular sense, his longing to be loved to be respected and to be a brotherhood of some kind and in as again, not to give to any spoilers away. But all. In a way makes him thinking might have that when he goes away. He makes them think that this is a band of men that know what it means to fight to struggle to be beat down. And yet they're still men the not diminished by it. I think that's really appealing to him at the same time as he grapples with the idea of his sexuality in what it might include. And what it might exclude. I mean right now as we speak in the U K of the country is convo st- with the story of Shamima Begum, the, you know, one of these so-called ISIS brides. You know, who's been to Iraq and seeing terrible things in some respects is pretty unrepentant of reasons why she was she men, but she's a British citizen. And now there is this sort of political argument about what to do with her. And obviously go about it's an entirely the wrong way. But I just wondered if you sort of thought about this idea of how how we deal with young people who have had this sort of level of radicalization. Yeah. I think I think she Meema begums case is really fascinating. And I think done Massana the the American woman who also ran away and now wants to return to macrolide interesting. She was asked in a interview, what would you say to Americans? What would you say to them? And she said I wish I could take it of the internet. I wish I could take it all off the internet and to me that was so fascinating. Because these and they are young women, and they are young men who were born in these countries. They were educated in these countries, they grew up in these countries. And I suspect that part of the reason they left because they felt there wasn't a future for them in their countries another they've made this grievous error in Sonoma begums case at least as far as we know so far she didn't kill anyone. She didn't hurt. Anyone wasn't a part of propaganda was Hooda with a was a part of propaganda. She was a part of inciting people to violence now that they've done this awful thing. All this aspersions are confirmed by the countries who've said well now, we don't want you back to say to Shamima big you go to Bangladesh a country. She's never even visited is really quite astounding. It's quite remarkable because it's Britain Bangladesh that has a responsibility in the trajectory of her life, and her radicalization, and you mentioned earlier in an interview, and these two real-life young women are obviously, you know, their radicalization has been through, you know, YouTube videos, Facebook pages and things and again, all young. People now are dealing with this legacy of how do you live online? You know, how'd you live? How'd you go for a job interview? When something you might have said in ten years ago, still online might KOMO pin..

Sonny Shamima Begum Lahore Hooda KOMO Shamima Meema begums Iraq Bangladesh Sonoma YouTube Facebook Britain ten years
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Obsessed with this TV terrible TV evangelist who always soliciting money from his people. And this is you know, he's a Islamic evangelists. Yes. But exactly like one of these terribles or the southern Baptist guys. We imagine when we think of it. So the TV if Angela so is that is that something happened. Yes. I mean, that's almost a real character. The the TV evangelist who wants his mother becomes enthralled by it does happen. And I think you know, I think there is a there was a divide generation Louis when we talk about people who who full very quickly and very deeply into a religious sway, which is almost cult. Like, I think an elder generation like Monty's mother is lonely and wants answers for a world that they don't have answers to and dealer. These evangelists who come by. And we'll we'll give them advice in return for cash, and you know, events, you know, that they want to be hosted in. I think that's an older generation whereas Monty's generation or Sunny's or any of their generation. It comes with this millennial aspect of fame. You know of being religious for an audience of followers for being followed for your beliefs being liked for your beliefs going viral. And I think they both exists, and it's really interesting. In a place like San at least, how each them gathers followers each of those two different methods, gather, followers, and Monte he's in the same way as any two rows. He's sort of disenchanted with the facile trappings of Madonna too. But obviously coming from the opposite end of the spectrum. Yes, exactly. I think Monty someone who wants for nothing, and who has imported food for dinner if you feels like it who does all his shopping abroad. I think Monty understands that this something profoundly emptying that. What is purpose and all that he doesn't know. And I think I think to Monte's credit he wants to find out. He just takes the wrong path. Ever wondered what it's like to be lost in the African John. The forest is amazed sound to explore untouched. Caves and understand how intensely nature impacts our human experience. Something has changed inside the BBC of podcast, a brand new podcast telling stories of human experiences..

Monty Monte Angela BBC Louis Sunny San
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This week Fatima beaten latest novel, the runaways. Bhutto was born in Kabul, Afghanistan. She owes to grow up in Syria and Pakistan. She's the author four previous books. Most recently the highly acclaimed the shadow of the cresent moon, which was long listed in two thousand fourteen for the Baileys women's prize for fiction and Fatima's latest book, the runaways we're going to talk about today festival on a little atoms. Thank you for having me. Can you tell me how you would describe the runaways first of all it's a book about radicalism, but more specifically it's a book about what the west doesn't understand about radicalism and the radicalized, and I know it's a heavy subject. But it's to me the runaways is not just about the terror of our times. But also, the joys and the exiled as and and the sorrows to young people in what they go through growing up basically with universal. Yeah. I think it's a bit of generation growing up in the shadow of the war on terror a generation that really hasn't known any other way that is constantly surveilled and constantly. -cluded and constantly forced to prove their credentials for belonging. So the book has three main protagonists there's lots of other characters which does also talk about three main protagonists. So before we go through those characters intern. Tell me why you chose to tell it from that multiple character perspective will it it began actually with Monty and sunny it began with the idea of these two young men thrown together in circumstances that they could no longer influence or control. And around them grew the rest of the cost. Guests Leyla who was very ghostly figure Anita rose and her story, including Osama her elderly Marxist neighbor. So they they kind of snuck up on me. Actually, I'm so Anita roses is the first person. I want to talk about tell us something about her. Who is she Anita rose is a young girl who lives in much colony in Karachi, which is one of the largest slums, and she's an incredibly bright. Right girl who wants to do something with her life to wants to be stronger who wants to be seen and who wants to be free and that much economy. Tell us something about the area of Karachi. Once he like, what garage is an interesting place because it's a city that absorbs everyone on that has the capacity for everyone. But that doesn't mean that it treats everyone fairly or humanely so much a colony is kind of informal settlement and a lot of ways because a lot of the homes have grown up haphazardly. There's a lot of fishermen who live in much colony a lot of people working ordinary jobs Potanin Cindy's Mohajer, different ethnicities. And I think that's where you go. If you want to see Karachi, you don't go to the part of Karachi that shopping malls or McDonald's that could look like anywhere else on earth. You go to see people who live in communities that look after them and care for them. As we go into these characters. We'll talk about the. The individual cases of how they become radicalized in the book and Anita rises mothers. And so she works tell us what she does. She works for a a rich family. Well, she's a maliciously, which means it. She's a massage woman and she gets cold round to the houses of these rich women to massage they're tired bodies. And she travels by herself. She carries a little sack of oils, you know, a mustard oil almond oil and to sometimes has to take her to children with her because she has nowhere else to leave them if she's working and Anita sections include not only her mother, but her brother, and how the two of them respond in different ways to having to sit in the courtyards of these grand homes that they're not allowed to enter an brother..

Anita Karachi Fatima Anita rose Bhutto Anita roses Kabul Afghanistan cresent moon intern Pakistan Syria Monty Potanin Cindy Leyla Osama McDonald
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For rebel girls? That's all coming up on this week's cultural frontline. How did the stories we tell help us to understand the world and the people in it that question has been at the heart of the work of our first guest Fatima Bhutto since she was a child Fatima was born into a famous political density. Both had grandfather Zulfikar Ali Bhutto on Benazir Bhutto were former prime ministers of Pakistan, but she didn't pursue a career in politics instead seeking to represent people through her writing I spoke to Fatimah about her latest novel the runaways which takes on the issue of radicalism. And asks what it takes for young men and women to embrace an extremist ideology, the runaways. It really is about what I think the world, but maybe the west in particular doesn't understand about radicalism or the radicalized. I think that there's been a singular narrative there's a kind of industry that has imposed the story on us radicalism. Is about. Religion. And I don't think that's quite true. I think radicalism is about pain. I think it's about 'isolation. It's about anger, and it's about belonging and religion is very small part of it. If any. The main characters in your novel one away to arrive to join an extremist group. How did you go about creating those characters and who are they where they come from very different backgrounds? So there's a character comes from Portsmouth who is the son of an immigrant, then you have characters from Karachi who live on opposite ends of the city. I should say to our international listeners. Portsmouth is in the UK. Yes. Portsmouth, the UK in Karachi, Pakistan. I wanted to explore what it feels like for a generation of young people who have grown up in the shadow of the war on terror and who've never really known a time. When the hasn't been this war, this sort of World War that permeates everywhere, and every group of people and part of it with things that I had watched and learned to new from being Pakistani from traveling and speaking to people, and then I did a lot of research is well, tell me about what kind of research did you do into extremism. Well, I did a lot of when I started writing in two thousand fourteen all this stuff was still up on the internet. You know, they were tumblers, and they were read it threads and blog posts and Twitter. QNA's that's all been scrubbed pretty much of the internet. But at the time, I spent a lotta time reading those accounts. And what was shocking to me was that kind of like millennials everywhere. This new breed of radicals didn't really value secrecy or privacy. They wanted to be famous. You know, they wanted to go viral. They wanted to have likes and ripostes and re tweets and followers, and so like again, like millennials everywhere, they really put themselves out there. And that was fascinating to look at two of the key themes of the novel, our identity and exclusion, how do you think those concepts a changing in the social media age? What it's interesting. I mean, I think in in in the global south or certainly at least in the eastern. On world. We've always had a concept of identity is being fluid because we are so many things, you know, you are you're province your language. You'll state your tribe, your cost or whatever. Tell me about it. Three different continents that I'm born here with a UK, exactly. And so we've never really forced ourselves to be one thing. But the west is so binary about this are you that, you know, do you belong or do you not are you part of us or another, and that's been really frightening to watch. I think for young people, you know, even looking at the case of these young women who ran away to join ISIS who are American who are British and now suddenly to be told unaware sorry. No longer, those things the case that springs to mind. Certain Nate me in the UK. The media's folks don't Shamima Begum Bush girl who ran away who lived in London who ran away to Syria and married, an ISIS fighter. Who is now being refused. Entry back into the UK. Yeah. Exactly. And I think Shamima Begum is an important case because she was born here. She was educated here in England. She was even radicalized here and so far inland then turn around and say go to Bangladesh, which is a country. She's never even been to. Why should it be Bangladesh's responsibility to absorb because they are not part of her trajectory of radicalization, but the United Kingdom is so she's they responsibility as a citizen, I think, and how does that example, relate to the stories of the girls in the runaways? Well, I think it relates quite closely because young women as well as men who are radicalized, I think are drawn to the seduction of radicalization because it offers them a place to belong. It says you're invisible in this place, you don't fit in in this place. They don't accept you in this place. But we do your part of greater community with us. You know, we care about your input here, you'll have not just visibility. But power. And I think that's been what's drawn a lot of people of both genders to join extremist groups in most modern iteration. I think it's really interesting looking at. Some of the girls and women who have left, and when you when you think about agency because aren't today. It's quite sexist thing that they don't have agency. And they haven't they all either they're under the control of somebody else in other controlling mind. A man, and we tend to fetish is underestimating stereotype Muslim women. Absolutely. And we also while we're doing that we then give them agency back when we want to attack them. So in the case of these young women, you know, there's been so much outrage about why aren't they feeling mobility? Why aren't they apologizing more strongly? I think it ultimately robs them not only of their voice and their history and the agency, but it's only also the women. These women are being constantly hounded for more remorse more guilt more apology. It goes against what we how we feel society. Feels women should behave who your female literary heroes as a young girl and even today, and why why we have so many wonderful. Voices in Pakistan, India, Iran, and in our part of the world that maybe don't get read a lot outside. Noel Saadawi is an Egyptian novelist and feminist who's always been a really remarkable voice. And then one of the great characters of literature is shares on who is a woman who survives because of her ability to speak who lives only because of her abilities. Tell stories Sarah's to be put to death. And in order to prolong her life. She starts to tell the king story and the king is so in transpire store, he led to live one more night. So that she can finish the store and she sought to profound storyteller that the next night. She's not finished. And again, he prolonged prolongs and prolongs until she saves herself. That's woman, you know, you've spoken out against increasing conflict between India and Pakistan. What role do you think arts and culture complained increasing understanding between the two nations, I think it's vital. I think any people to people contact you can have not just between injured Pakistan, but by sun and its neighbors or the the world's that we live in that seemed to be colliding all the time. Because art is a place for us to ask questions frost. Respectfully, engage and disagree, and there is a universality to arts. There's no borders in literature. There's no, borders and music and film, it's profoundly important. And I think that's why it faces a lot of obstacles. And in times of trouble, the writer Fatima Bhutto her novel. The runaways is out now. Across the border now from Pakistan to India where our next guest jasmine. But they like so many women across the globe collects clothes to wear oughta, sell, but as a form of protest since two thousand and three the artist and activist has been inviting survivors of sexual violence to donate, the isometric clothing. They happen to be wearing when they were attacked close of all shapes and sizes have been sent from women in India in America, Canada and Germany, then exhibited in public spaces from Bangalore to New York. Jazz main anti fellow activists have marched under the banner of these dresses, trousers and t shirts in Calcutta and New Delhi to challenge. The culture of victim blaming the tool too often raises the question what were you wearing for the cultural frontline jasmine opens up her I never asked for it? Wardrobe in Bangalore, India. That you see here comes in from a survival.

Pakistan India United Kingdom Fatima Bhutto England Portsmouth Karachi Fatima Zulfikar Ali Bhutto us Benazir Bhutto ISIS Shamima Begum Shamima Begum Bush Bangalore Twitter Bangladesh victim blaming QNA
"fatima bhutto" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"fatima bhutto" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Crunch time is approaching when she's going to have to make some really hard decisions and if she pumps customs partnership option which apparently is what she looks i mean it's already been publicly branded crazy here influence secretary he's been burned craziness the leader of european research group of eurosceptic always jacob re smoke and those are very very clear public signals they won't and that they will they will act rosen that to go ahead and you know how how the action happens is is up to up to be sitting nonetheless that's still that's still on the table so she she's taking it right to the brink kit let's talk finally about apology and the hassle comments yesterday extraordinary apology by government minister with the attorney general towards a couple libyan couple a dissident and his wife over the uk government's actions contributing to them being detained or basically kidnapped abroad detained transferred to libya and then he was tortured by colonel gadhafi's forces in two thousand and four the prime minister theresa may's said that abdul hakim belhaj and fatima bhutto had suffered appalling treatment she was pregnant at the time he is accepted only a one pound a payout plus an apology she is accepted a five hundred thousand pound pap the idea is that the the the allegation now it i am i am i six or a tip off help the the americans kidnapped them in thailand and they were taken to tripoli where they were tortured by gadhafi's forces there are lots of implications of this apology yesterday out in terms of what deal was done in the desert between tony blair and colonel gadhafi by a back in those days and also jack's shoulder then foreign secretaries role yeah issued a statement yesterday in which he was essentially saying there's an awful lot of things that i was asked to to back then remember really but having back and he's he says he he he now has established the of given some sort of moral approval for this place he's clearly distancing himself from from being closely involved in what went on but it makes it yes he he let it go ahead tony blair has not said anything there's a lot of pressure on him to to both echo treat them as apology and to explain a bit more.

secretary attorney libya colonel gadhafi theresa fatima bhutto tripoli jack tony blair rosen libyan uk prime minister abdul hakim belhaj thailand five hundred thousand pound one pound