33 Burst results for "Fatima"

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

02:27 min | Last week

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"Yeah i don't mind if it's choppy or it's cold. It's the time of kline By the sea. And it's not like super darken super cold than that. It's already a good a good place to be close to cool. I agree and i'm missing it so much. Yeah fatima thank you so much for coming back and Was really nice to finally into these training. Talk questions a lot. Lotta people are looking forward to them. I wish you all the best in cypress's awesome. You have a couple of months to build up the competition there. And i hope you really do well in the competition and looking forward to maybe seeing some of your dives and thank you very much for having me again and And i'm looking forward for a whole season and thank you for listening for everyone. Who was here and i hope to check with you very soon. All right take it easy and other. Seo day thank you.

kline fatima Seo
"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

07:48 min | Last week

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"No for now. This is what this is. What i like in the in in the nf. It's a little bit different Dives my dives how i planted however Draining it it's it's a different thing then for immersion or by fins for me at like cnn is more Back nicole obviously there. I go also that. You're feeling. But i like knowing the strokes and then i usually add one or two cakes without doing distracts when i already got into that. The free so cnn for i would say it's around like thirty five meter By fans and framework. I don't count anything. I just that okay and on when you're Ascending do you have your like if you a by fins dive you have your hands up or down. I definitely have them up. And i'm hyper flexible. So i don't have any problem with the ability more. Have big arms too flexible and so So i'm always continuing my my hands up and Without a without any you know like really getting into the details. I would recommend this for everyone to work towards the way to put armed up because it saves energy if you do the right way because there is less. Accurate more hydrodynamic. Like i do different dives with arms down and arms up on the way up and it a huge difference like leg more than keeping seconds. Answer definitely arms up and Do you exhale before you surface or removed the nose clip before you surface It it's the same reason why the way of my diving. I packs so. I don't really have that huge amount of access air. That would cause any any problem. The last part of the of the decent said. That's why i i don't remove my nose closed in. I don't exhale okay. Let's give a massive shout out to our wonderful sponsor today of course from talking about to be free equipment to be free make leading free diving safety equipment and accessories. They have everything like boys. Landlords police dems even inflatable counterbalance system. Everything this company produces is made to the highest standards of production quality. It's durable practical and looks great. I use a bunch of to be free stuff around my school. And i love it to bits. I doubt anything better will be coming along anytime soon. to be. free are very generous to free. Caffey you can get a whopping ten percent discount on any order you make from their online store. All you have to do is use discount code free cafe. That's all one word even better. If you're in australia you get free shipping out there down under for that. You use the code. Ause free a u. s. f. r. e. by the way if you're a free diving school instructor equipment dealer and you or someone you know is looking for some high end gear to distribute to free divers in your area should be free and email and have a chat with them about that and maybe you guys will hit it off. The website is to be. That's the letter b. The number two to be free equipment dot com. Check it out. You won't be disappointed. Okay let's get back to fatima. Okay so this has come up a couple of times That we're just casually talking about about this but for the listeners. I do forget that. Not every listener is a top level. Free diver so why would you Exhale before you surface and maybe rather than me explaining that you can. You can explain why i diver would. Xl before the surface and how that's related to packing packing is basically you force more air into your lungs. So it's when you're uncertain base Your your lungs are super inflated but then on your dive abuse league because of the pressure. Your lungs are getting children spoiler deck. But when you turn and you go back to the surveys are getting closer to reach their original size. And during the dive you see you're using the oxygen and so when you're using the oxygen and you're going up the partial pressure update of the oxygen will change in the last hand. Meter is like the biggest change when you go up to the surface so when there is this huge change the pressure and the your lungs are inflated and they get from the help size to the original size and it sucks the oxygen from from your from your core basically back to your extremities when you reach surveys that can cause you like a quick change because of the pressure pressure also decrease change at the distribution of the oxygen. And that's why it's leg up the shallow water bac zone is lost meters died. I think that unanswered question nuts. It's interesting a different explanation from what i've heard before like before i've heard about this exhibition before surfacing packing related to Fluid in the lungs The possibility that if there is fluid in the lungs than the you have the risk of the overexpansion injury are that want to. Yes so now we have to and making it not to explore both of those because what you said is actually quite interesting. I never thought about it like that. Do you do when you surfaced to you. Do recovery breathing likes recovery breathing or hoop breathing. Yes i do. I don't know anyone who doesn't do breeding okay so you sat there. Yeah there are people out there who don't recovery breathing they usually live on the internet Funnily enough but Yeah because there are some people who are still still questioned. The the benefits of recovery breathing so Talking about that and the listeners. Not going to hear what we were just talking about. So we can enjoy that for ourselves fatima what is your experience with. Narko sis Like have you experienced it. And how do you deal with it. I did experience narc hoses although a not diving that super deep but i i had a few times i think i headed wartime My first cruises was pretty funny and Maybe not talia will not be very happy about that but it happened with her with.

cnn Caffey nicole fatima australia talia
"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

03:54 min | Last week

"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Make sure they're in space where they're able to speak freely without being overheard by don't want to speak to so it's nothing specific. Say these words because if you said thought it would just be scripted at. It wouldn't feel comfortable or natural whereas just gives tips on how to make space safe and what not to say interesting very interesting. Is there anything that you would like. Listeners of the guilty feminists to know about this. Fatima either said that they can start to do some of this stuff themselves. Or maybe they're in scotland and they can access. This can people outside. Scotland access or only in scotland yet. An anyone could options shit from the ywca website. I would ecm mates going and checking out. I think it's really important. And because it can often be really scary to like open up and start. These conversations is definitely something that needs to happen because everyone deserves to feel safe in relationship and then we will serve fuel constable yup. That is certainly true. Is there anything else you'd like us to know about it eleanor. Is there anything you came to say that you didn't get to say no because i've been on a train all day and i don't even know what year is much more chang than it used to be isn't it. Yeah we'll let it that. I'm sure my boss will be like. Why didn't you say this now mentioned on these came. So check and scotland thatch. They've done that. We'll let that up. Show love short to do ashley. Who is there anything. You came to say that you didn't get to say just that like we understand. The conversations are might not just be completely young girl. It could be uncomfortable for the adult too. Because i know from experience a wall older people are not the most emotionally available.

scotland Fatima ywca Scotland eleanor ashley
"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

05:44 min | Last week

"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"And then a number of things happens. Maternity leaves pandemic You know the usual. And we kicked off this program and linked up with dundee. He came to kind of develop it and did this with no funding for it. We just decided to fit in the middle of a pandemic and so it sits separately from kind of pse in terms of what's being done at a governmental level. Scotland did a pse review a few years ago around the same time that these reports were coming out. And so what we're doing now is we're got what we've gotten. Dundee and schools are no back. So we're going to be kind of rolling out to every school in dundee getting feedback on. Who is working and then hopefully am look to go nationwide and start bringing more young people into the project as well lynn. at this. it's amazing. But how do you get secondary school students. Like ashley and fatima to kind of get involved in it to then create the content. I come up with a name. Like how does that happen. Because i when i was a teenager. If anything like this happened it would have been done all by adults. And i certainly wouldn't have a say in it. It would have been imposed upon us. We've discussed this deborah. They're a lot more serious now. I would say we rightly weren't allowed anything anywhere near anything so important but now they'll they look very not very wrinkly but they're basically more wise than us there. owed difficult but much wise yoda's small but wise I mean not. If you look in any way to me. I i i mean you look fatima you look very stylish your earrings and ashley. I am a feminist. But the main question i've got for you is what saying yet. And the lighting. You look like you're on a professional furniture sheet. It's like a green hazy. Live like a golden light makes it look like it's magic hour there with ringleted as kitchen. He's got really nice light. And i got lipstick can christmas stocking..

fatima Dundee dundee ashley Scotland lynn deborah yoda
"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

04:09 min | Last week

"fatima" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Adult blowing in the guard about muscle. Yup that that no. Actually i went till that. Start fatima. And ashley you both at school and you have founded the fierce goals project. Could you please tell us what it is. Fatima you came up with a name at necessite. How did you come up with his name. Yeah well i actually took inspiration from. Have you heard of the book. Integral kerr scotland So i thought all of us young women in the campaign are all fierce praising slot. Combine the two girls. So what was that. can you talk about the. What is the original one. The here willie openly eric leica. You'll have to explain but it was like the comic book character. Yeah so you like our. Yeah yeah i see i see. So the office. Goals ashley what fierce gallstones full and we can send her solidarity with females in girls and ten of standing up for sexual harassment and abuse young girls and building education That's really exciting. What is it that you do. And so we're trying to bring more that into education into schools to make teachers more aware of what could be happening with relationships and to try to bring more education for the teachers so they can have health conversations with young girls to make sure that they are. They know what's going on. What could happen to the threat doesn't so how does that play out. Fatima are you creating content or methods for people. Talk about these things. Yes so we've developed a range of kids. We'd go one in the young people in schools other sensings record one for professionals on Wonderful gesture for question today whether this was paul off or is in any way running alongside the sort of brilliant new changes that have come into primary school relationships education or stop different in england than in scotland but like as of september primary school kids getting taught a much broader curriculum about relationships. And it's not I think there was a backlash on the press because it sounded like it was sex education etc etc and its relationship education and i think especially what very young primary school kids have. Being told is exactly like it. Sounds like your briefest. An an terms of like teaching the different things relationship can look like a more healthy relationship. Is it start. A primary school is anything to do with that on top of that. And in addition to that so i think yeah it'd be helpful to talk about how it started so am in two thousand eighteen. Why do we scotland's one of the called young women leads on which i was participant and i run. That program released a report looking at sexual harassment and scottish schools. And so what was happening. How is it being handled. What could be done better and then in that same year. The fcc in the uk ever released a report looking at peer to peer sexual abuse. Based on 'em calls that were coming into childline and so back then. Dr patrice kubiak. Ceo ywca scotland kharlamov. Who's the scottish campaigns manager and. sbc scotland decided that this could be a really good opportunity to do some joint working looking at healthy relationships and schools in scotland and ways that we.

eric leica Fatima ashley scotland fatima willie paul england Dr patrice kubiak Ceo ywca scotland kharlamov fcc uk sbc
"fatima" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

LeVar Burton Reads

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on LeVar Burton Reads

"Wow what a story. I love this story for a couple of reasons and deceptively complex at least to me because the situation for one is is rare in the stories that i read here because the protagonist isn't telling the story herself her story is being told to her by a narrator which is juxtaposed against fatima trying to draw her stories from her and i love how the world building itself is complex and unfolds throughout the story. I mean i. We've got a world here where no men exist and that alone is interesting to me and how the world of women have adapted to this world absent men and mine information from those who lived through the common era that it is untenable to them to not have the whole story right. Not just the whole story of what happened but the whole story of those. Who were there thinking that that information will give them insight into the truth of what went down and now the thing about secrets. Is that number one. We have them And number two. There are good reasons for why we tell our secrets or some of our secrets and there are usually at least we convince ourselves very good reasons for holding those secrets close to our chest in my experience. One of those reasons to keep secrets is our shame. At whatever it is that we've done To cause us to want to not have anybody now that vulnerability inside of us that is desperately afraid of the judgement that can sometimes come along with our actions Now our protagonist creates in herself a dilemma. Because she knows that there was something she might have been able to do and didn't literally took the path of least resistance and the guilt that she carries it's heavy and she carries with her every day. I think we can all relate to that that there are. There are secrets that we will carry. Two are gray but our capacity to hold on to some secrets can be crippling. And i think that even if you don't come clean with the person or persons that you feel you have offended the person or persons that you feel you have done wrong by. I do believe that it is helpful to tell someone. I part of our mental health is that we have a safe space to go and tell our secrets in therapy. I belong to a men's group and every thursday. We meet in support of one another. And that is a sacred space for us whether his no judgment where you can share the the darkest most vile parts of yourself and know that you will still be accepted in that circle. It's it's a rare feeling to have in this world. And i think it's really incumbent upon us to seek out those safe spaces where no matter what we can unburden ourselves chartreuse. Let go of our secrets. So they simply do not cripple us. The least that's.

fatima
The Miracle of the Sun

Unexplained Mysteries

01:20 min | 4 months ago

The Miracle of the Sun

"The sun was low on the horizon when physics professor gustafsson stepped outside his office in november. Two thousand two. He smiled as he felt. That chile belgian air brush past him. The sky was clear. The afternoon was perfect. He strolled through the university of leuven campus. Until he found a vantage point it was an ideal spot to watch the sunset. But that wasn't exactly what the professor had in mind for months. Meese in had been obsessed with the miracle of the sun. A spectacular event witnessed by nearly seventy thousand people on october thirteenth nineteen. Seventeen a massive crowd in the village of fatima. Portugal had watched the sun dance across the sky today. Mason wanted to see it too. He took a deep breath in steeled himself for what was coming next. After a moment of hesitation he opened his eyes wide and looked directly into the sun. He knew he was risking damage but he had to be sure of what happened that day. Five years earlier as he stared into the sun he was astonished. The crowd was right. it was some miracle.

University Of Leuven Gustafsson Meese Chile Fatima Portugal Mason
The Miracle of the Sun

Unexplained Mysteries

02:01 min | 4 months ago

The Miracle of the Sun

"On a spring day in nineteen sixteen. A trio of children from the village of fatima headed out to the countryside with a flock of sheep. Nine year old lucia let her two cousins eight year old francisco and six. Jesse enter into the rich pasture. Land outside of their town deuce was daily routine for the three kids. Their families were shepherds and the children's spent most of their days with the sheep. They played games and cheese each other around the fields. It was a peaceful mostly uneventful life. Children and their families were devout catholics every morning before breakfast francisco and just jessica would say their prayers. Lucia carried a rosary with her into the passenger on this particular morning. It started to drizzle while the children watched the flock so they decided to hike up to a nearby cave and wait for the rain to pass in the cave. The kids took lunch break which included saying their prayers before breaking bread not long afterward gusts of wind began to shake the olive trees outside of the cave startled by the severity of the breeze. That children peaked outside to witness the storm but there was no storm as the kids stood in the mouth of the cave. The sky cleared in a blinding lights suddenly appeared above the nearby trees. The children were confused. The like wasn't coming from the sun and it didn't look like anything they'd ever seen but one thing was certain delight was coming toward them as it got closer. The kids saw take on a familiar shape until they could distinctly make out a human face then. The lights spoke. The children were terrified by its deep masculine voice. Little just seemed to start to cry. But the eldest lucia bravely stepped forward to protect her cousins.

Francisco Fatima Lucia Jesse Jessica Lucia Bravely
"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"But I like it. And i was there last year. People liked it. They were there with me and I would really wanna you know introduce more kids into this sport. I had two kids last year. That i was doing like introduction And i really wanna have like more kids getting involved this so. That's one of my also long term plan and we're going to organize the crews For the first week of oguz to be the victims. So we're gonna do like Workshop training camp in cratia we think seven different islands in the north of gray shot. So that's going to be like an epic boat trip free diving draped and then I'm going to participate in the competition. That victim Organized at the beginning of september the adroatic trophy wet. I was participating also last year. The my face my favorite competition ever park. And then i should go to cash and For the first time the there is a friend of mine shaikha who was also in impre shown the competition and she wants to open the center there in cash so i go and train with her there for the world championship for the semester championship. It's going to be the beginning of folk tober at the. Yeah that's the plan for now. so let's let's get into the desert island questions and so what would be your perfect morning routine. This section of the show is recorded especially for the wonderful tribe of patriot supporters. You can find out more about that access. This extended episode at patriot. Dot com slash. Free cafe or go to freedom cafe dot com slash patriotic okay. Fatima thank you so much for for joining me here The free dot cafe said before that you're excited to To the interview. I hope that it was Lived up to your expectations. Yeah definitely thank you very much. For having me donny. Replanted for like a year and now actually happens. So i'm super happy. it was. It was like a therapy for me. You know talking about my life so it was. It was great. Thank you for listening. Thank you for everyone. Listen anytime you need someone to to talk to. I'm here to listen That doesn't mean you listeners. Everyone out there who listened to the podcast. All ten thousand but Fatima you're welcome back on anytime and enjoy the rest of the day. They're in dab say hi to the diabetes or the habits that i may know and dive safe. I.

last year Fatima two kids shaikha first week seven different islands first time beginning of september cratia dot cafe ten thousand one freedom cafe dot com Dot com championship
"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

05:45 min | 4 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"Belongs to.

"fatima" Discussed on Unfuck Nation with Gary John Bishop

Unfuck Nation with Gary John Bishop

04:23 min | 7 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on Unfuck Nation with Gary John Bishop

"Future a future would you can get to look back and be disappointed and there i say victim like oh yeah could have been awesome bought i. I could've been fucking great. But i could done great. Thanks bye so your explanation of where you are in life. It's all too readily available. I can't wake you up from this slumber fatima. i can't it's is on you. You have to come to terms with what you're doing do you. That's can indulgence the reason i'm not jealous. Antibodies i'm too focused on. What's next in my own life. Good luck. the loads folks fucking gulf rate rang the bell it. I mean you'd even resent your current partner rather than just fucking unequivocally loving person. You'll i you got the immigration and yet we young and i never gone You know what tough and so that rolls and whatever you're wrassling weapon your twenties. It's okay that was a good time you rasa with. That can't look upon that it's time wasted. That's only time wasted. If you're not bouncing out of there and doing something fucking great now. Yeah then as time wasted not only did you can shelter yourself from whatever life was practicing at you and that was a very real experience for you by the way don't diminish that. Don't they just anxious and depressed. You were fucking dealing with something but let's show me something. Show yourself something that made all of that worthwhile but yeah there were certain sacrifices. I look at my own. Fuck i never went to fucking college. Is that a great experience to be had in college. There can be yes but then are many many many people who many college and university who say they hated fucking thing. It was terrible for their. So you've got this idealized notionally. Oh yeah and then over the map. My i love and miss. We aren't and my. Did the dan.

fatima
'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

WGN Programming

03:18 min | 8 months ago

'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

"State leaders make their own decisions on wind groups or eligible, but many people are not happy about obesity being considered a risk factor that should get early dibs at the vaccine joins us now to talk about this Dr Fatima Cody Stanford, She's an assistant professor of medicine in Massachusetts General Hospital. She's also in obesity, medicine, physician and adults, Adolescence and Children and MGH Wait center. Thanks for joining us tonight, Doctor. Thank you for having me. I guess the first question becomes one of the risk factors for those who are overweight when we're talking about Cove it so it's important for us to recognize that obesity is an actual disease, and I think one of the things that people don't realize is that it's the disease is not just how you look. It's actual, a disease process characterized by a high degree of inflammation. And so when we have that high degree of chronic inflammation associated with obesity, the disease it doesn't play well with the acute inflammation of covert 19. As such patients that have the disease of obesity do have a risk of dying. That's much higher, sometimes 3 to 4 times the likelihood of those that are leaner and wait. So it's important for us to recognize that this is important. We need persons with obesity to be vaccinated. We want them to live. We want them not to need ICU care and be on the ventilator. And that's why I think that this really is a prudent and a really important step for those that have the disease of obesity. Doctor. I want to read a quote from the chairwoman of the Obesity Action Co Elite coalition, who was featured in the USA Today article, she said, Wait isn't always within your control. With that in mind, and what we know about the risk of obesity and Kobe complications is the right move to get obese Americans in this next phase of the vaccine. One thing I'm gonna change I don't want to call people will be so this is a label. Obesity is a disease. And so that language can be highly stigmatizing for my patients that actually have this disease of obesity, but hands down. It's the right move to get patients with obesity vaccinated when we're looking at the vaccines, the fires of modern of particularly we saw that patients with obesity had a similar level of immunity with regards to the vaccines as persons that were leaner and wait status. So if we know that they're dying quicker. We know they're getting sicker and having much more Colton disease processes associated with covert. We need to make sure that they're getting vaccinated. Have you had a chance to talk to any of your patients? What was their response when the news broke that the possibility of them being moved to the next group? They're up to get the vaccine. What was that thought process. What was their feelings about that? There were some that felt you know a little bit guilty that their weight status would cause them a higher likelihood of getting the vaccine sooner than others. But many of my patients were actually very pleased, actually finally be able to get this vaccine so that we can return to some sense of normalcy here in the United States and around the world as we try to navigate these issues with social distancing physical, do, insisting and getting back to work, So I think that it's important to see that there's different camps in terms of what people think. But overall for my patients that have a B C that Aaron care they were very relieved to see that they were moving up in the ranks of the consideration for the vaccine. Alright,

Obesity Dr Fatima Cody Stanford Obesity Action Co Elite Coalit Massachusetts General Hospital Chronic Inflammation Usa Today Colton United States Aaron
Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

Morning Edition

04:33 min | 9 months ago

Nearly 3 million U.S. women have dropped out the labor force

"Not long after Donald Trump arrived at the White House, he disbanded and office that focused on challenges affecting women. President Biden is now resurrecting it. Women's rights groups hope this will help them make progress on things like paid family leave and affordable child care. Here's NPR's Melissa Block. The wish list on Biden's agenda for women is long restoring an expanding reproductive rights, combating gender based violence, reducing maternal mortality, and he's pitched a slew of economic proposals. Major structural disruption requires major structural change. And I feel like thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So now is the time That's the co chair of the Biden administration's new gender Policy Council. Jennifer Klein. You know we're seeing because of the health pandemic because of the economic crisis, and, in fact, take care giving crisis that's been layered on top of it. These are core issues core issues, Klein points out that air hitting women hard and especially women of color. Just look at the most recent jobs numbers. In December, women accounted for all 140,000 of the country's net lost jobs. One factor behind that, with so many schools and day care centers closed because of the coronavirus. Many women have had to drop out of the labor force. That's been disastrous, says Joan Williams, director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California, Hastings. Mother's already We're at the breaking point in the United States. I mean, we already had a choc your system that was basically a Rube Goldberg machine and the coronavirus brought that machine crashing down. Williams says. What she wants the Biden administration to do is to recognize that Just as we don't expect workers to get to work without physical infrastructure like bridges and roads. We can't expect workers to get to work without a care infrastructure. What would that care Infrastructure look like for Williams? That would mean subsidized neighborhood based child care, paid family leave Universal, pre K and $15 an hour minimum wage, especially during the pandemic. Single moms have had to choose between putting food on the table and leaving young Children home alone. Now. Part of the reason is because the minimum wages so low that there is no way on God's green Earth that those moms can pay for childcare. The paid caregivers are also reeling from the crunch. President Biden highlighted this when he announced his covert 19 relief plan last month. Let's make sure caregivers mostly women, women of color immigrants. Have the same pay indignity that they deserve. Advocates like I Jen poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, are heartened by what they're hearing from Biden. Her group represents workers, including nannies, home care workers and housekeepers, actually focusing on how we're going to make Thies jobs, good jobs for the 21st century. That you can take pride in and earn a living wage with benefits. That is a really big breakthrough. Conservatives, though, are leery of an agenda that carries a hefty price tag and they warn, will lead to crushing government regulations. Charmaine Yost is vice president of the Institute for Family Community and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation. My biggest concern is that all of the proposals that I'm hearing coming from their side of things inevitably seem to come back to big government intervention in government programs. As for raising the minimum wage in the midst of a pandemic, when many businesses are suffering so badly if there were a time that you could create, that would be the perfect time to not Raise the minimum wage. This would be it with such a slim Democratic majority in Congress. Biden's agenda could have a tough time gaining traction. But Fatima Goss Graves, who heads the National Women's Law Center, is undaunted. Her group has issued an ambitious list of 100 demands for Biden's 1st 100 days. Basically, what we're asking this administration and Congress to do is effectively walk into gum. We need them to both undo things that have been harmful and have been Holding this country back and launch us forward in a way that we're stronger for it, Graves adds. This president doesn't have the luxury of coasting in Melissa Block NPR news

Biden Administration President Biden Melissa Block New Gender Policy Council Jennifer Klein Biden Joan Williams Center For Work Life Law Donald Trump NPR Williams Jen Poo Rube Goldberg White House National Domestic Workers Alli Klein Hastings University Of California Charmaine Yost
"fatima" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"fatima" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"Sport at forty four on the home a mom and for the first time in thirty four years. You're having a conversation that we had thirty four years about why this thing. That happened to me why he was. He allowed to come back and live with those twice. While i was. I put into that situation and the damage that it caused me about lights. The uncertainty insecurity all of the broken as far as like feeling inadequate around man and filling civil uncomfortable around men. And all these things that can happen When you're in those types of situations and she gained her reasons. I don't think there's ever a reason to be able to ballot that decision for me. So best something that she has to deal with aloma with. That's her that's not my issue When i walked away from the conversation to your point i fell a sense of freedom. I felt for the first time in my life that i had stood up for the first time. In thirty four years. I had stood up for myself and maybe the abuse yeah okay. I stood up but it was more retreating. First time in my life. I stood my ground and i said this was wrong. They should not have happened. I remember after. I had that moment with her. I went into my bathroom. And i just started crying crying whereas obviously you know all that smoke coming out and i remembered drinking all i could think of was was saying. I'm sorry and i was speaking into that. Eleven year old child. That was inside the asking so far that nobody. I'm sorry. nobody protected from far. Nobody stood up for you this moment on protect out for you and that was the moment where it like broke and so. I'm so grateful that i had that moment. I did not give out wanted. And when you're trying to heal certain things and you're confronting matters that happened in your life. You may not get the response that you want it. Because maybe you're in a place where you're ready to heal. That person is an nfl place for. They want to acknowledge right. It's brought out. You have to understand that is now at about beer response. It's about your freedom and so for me. When i made that decision. I felt free and ninety incident. Matter was the response was. I felt free and i know i know i know. Now that doesn't carry. That weight isn't of me. you know. i don't carry that on my back like this happened to me. But i also know that. I'm so victorious. So strong and i am so awesome. So what did you know you. You still doing singing in the music business or adding that so less than from the baggage of i'll say well what else say tobago grace. Thank opposite that is when i divorced him. I divorce thing which is a horrible thing. But when i divorced him i divorce thing is up for about fourteen years. I did not saying it was like when i thought about saying. I've thought about him and it just gave put on what god the gift guide. Gay right yeah and so the last last year as saying for the first time and som- getting back to god has been doing with me. You know he's been dealing with me that and helping to help me to I am a place. Where i i love that god gave me the gift but it took a very long time to understand t gave f. I meant for which was whistled ex husband he was he was awesome. Saying i mean nobody can patching he. I looked up to him but that goes a completely different thing at that. I you know. I can remove him for without is giving me an acknowledged. God gave it again So yeah i feel a little bit of something here and there for church and But i'm happy. Where with god has brought me and a lot of that had to repeat the hardware and when i say that i mean i needed. Medical help took to humble myself. Even if i was a little embarrassed about going to the doctor up with any way and they helped me we've met us and then taking another step. It took me ten years to make the staff taking another step to go and sit and talk with someone who didn't know me from adam for a pain and sitting and explaining to them what i was dealing with and then take an additional step in and joining on some type of ministry at my at my church and this case it will celebrate recovery but basically skip around around like minded. Women wanted to yield their stuff. Like i wanted to hear myself. Yeah well that's That is some journey. And obviously you found a way to overcome. And now you're at the place. It's a bit about the book. So you published in november I'm not look at look at a chances. But you know what what. What's so chat so what people can take. What can people take away from that and it take feeds riot but okay so there are religious tale. It's so in our. I have to say it this way. So and celebrate recovery at the end of the recovery journey. Pay to write a test. Basically right you song. Say they want you to be able to say out. When i before i came to these doors through all this and then i starting dealing with all this stuff and now i met this like. I'm not perfect but i'm site and so really i sit down and i did that because i i do. Yeah they told me to do. And i wrote it all down. When i said this book i mean let people make books from from a lot of things now even from some if someone's gonna solo pocos and it's something that people can learn from it and make it have or logs in so close. Yeah that's yeah. So what i did was i took that and i just expanded on it and i got into detail about some things not everything. A lot of things that have happened in my life and then inbetween those things. I put some reflections between each chapter dip in again off. Because my spirit's brewery at it like a a bible verse from the from the bible and then what that means to me and kind of challenging you to think about what that will mean to you so as an example. I grew up My name is fatima. I haven't islamic name. I name means daughter daughter of a prophet idea. But that's and so a growing up. I learned my name. Mit- daughter for profit and a lot of islamic name We've had muslim frantically. Taught me a buddhist on. you have. Yeah.

aloma tobago grace nfl adam fatima
How COVID has worsened modern slavery

Between The Lines

05:46 min | 1 year ago

How COVID has worsened modern slavery

"My guests are Sierra and Stephen. Moore. So a husband and wife team the CO founders and directors of the Anti Slavery Organization. On China now, sadly, even with all the framework implies to tackle slavery along comes twenty twenty, the covid virus complicated further by the recession of the world economy. Sarah keeping with you how has the pandemic affected the workers at the bottom of the supply chain? mean the depend makers having catastrophic effects on supply chains and the people within them. We know that right at the beginning of covid thousands of people lost their jobs overnight. For example, Bangladeshi workers in factories would just told simply not come back to work the next day I read a story of a Lady Fatima. Twenty six with one child and she said one minute I was working the Knicks I was told to go home and not come back. What will I do and we're doing this story I ever either again, just yesterday I read about full thousand Filipino workers have been laid off because they contracts have been canceled from big name brands on this side of the world. This is a reminder that lives of the poorest of the poor said they must affected. You know when factories closed down no water more krant leaving no access to medical care very disturbing stephen a terrible Arnie has come from the pen Jimmy can one of these stories can you tell us about the manufacturers of people? In Malaysia Southeast Asia. Yes so Malaysia is a major producer of rubber and therefore rubber products made from rubber, and so we know that prior to Kevin. tain they were upset in bands on on manufacturers in the US are guiding the manufacturing of a products because of the conditions of workers and the standards that were in place. What's interesting is that as the pandemic breakout at the Dimond four PPA products through those Restrictions were lifted so that those products could be made and so this is concerning regarding the explosia increasing the risk of on slavery in those areas, and that brings us to Australia I can just imagine those of you cheating gene. You'd like to think of yourself as an ethical consumer. You wouldn't buy anything from a supply that explored its employees off certainly thought that Sarah is it really true. Look here in Australia, the Global Slavery Index estimates that there around fifteen thousand people living in slavery. So they miceli in the agriculture construction domestic service hospitality and sex industries says as well as services provided often by subcontractors such as cleaning security. And even car washing. Stephen. I'm sure he made a lot of Astrid. Slavery. Happens in this country till us more. Conversations on a daily basis with lots of companies and receptionists and executive assistants who sort of take a second look in the modern modern what slavery does this sexually occur? So there is a growing understanding of this issue in certain sectors of society, which is great to say a growing desire among consumers, a young consumers to be careful in how they purchase and what they buying to know what's behind the brand and the backyard. But there is still a great need for consumers and businesses to understand what are the implications of the choices they make and to make sure that. Is for ethically my products is actually real. And you think of different types of slavery forced marriage debt bondage six slavery child labor in the strain context who are the most vulnerable groups to fall victim to exploitation soon. Well Australia we have a number of women and at times there underage who are forced into marriage. So married against the will. That is an issue. 'CAUSE estimates around four and a half thousand up to eight thousand in Australia in the new. Year. So. These these people are at risk. We also know that there a risk among temporary workers, migrant workers in Australia there's up to one million. Timber Workers in Australia and they have been badly affected by covid nineteen, and so they are now at risk of having to receive low pay and also to do jobs for no pay. As you say covers made it harder but Sarah how do you identify person or group WHO's being exploited? That's right. I mean I, guess, it depends on the industry. But for example, I read a story about a man quote Abdul who was a Bangladeshi man who was working on a construction site just outside of camera. He came here thinking that he was going to be able to earn a lot of money to send I am to his family to send his children to school. But in the end, he ended up working six days a week for around two hundred, fifty dollars and was forced to give one hundred dollars backup that to his employer for accommodation costs and so I guess it's if you're on a construction site, it's looking at WHO's there. Do they speak English do they have appropriate? Even having a conversation with them to find out. Are they. Okay. Because a lot of these people feel like they don't have a voice, they often don't speak English and. Attend to. So you know in the case of healthcare workers keeping your eye out for people who come through the emergency department who maybe controlled by an older man, for example, looking out for signs of physical sexual emotional abuse.

Australia Anti Slavery Organization Stephen Sarah Global Slavery Index Malaysia Knicks Moore China Southeast Asia Sierra United States Executive Kevin. Tain Jimmy Abdul Producer
Fatima Goss Graves on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Legacy on the Supreme Court

The Electorette Podcast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Fatima Goss Graves on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Legacy on the Supreme Court

"Look Grapes welcome to the podcast. Thank you. I'm glad to be with here. First of all, I want to congratulate you on winning this year is John W Gardner leadership? Award that's that's huge. Thank. You it came as. To tell you that came as a huge surprise to me, and it was kind of beautiful boost at a time where we could use it. So thank you I, appreciate that yeah. We don't get a lot of opportunities to celebrate a good thing so I wanted to mention that. Are you just feeling generally we feel like we've been going from you know one kind of bruising experience to the next every day there's something new and you know most recently we lost I'm justice GINSBURG. So I have to tell you that at some point in time and I don't know when that is I will process how I'm really really doing. But at days I am just geared up to fight. We I. Feel really disappointed that we didn't really get the time and space to truly honor Justice Ginsburg legacy to spend the time and space doing that over a period. But we are also facing a pretty existential threat around our democracy right now, and that's where my attention has to focus. Yeah, I. Remember you know that Friday when she passed in kind of thinking the same thing we were there were these two conversations going on right one about her legacy what that meant for. Women and this country generally and democracy, and what we're going to do about the crisis that you alluded to right I mean the truth is, is that we have to do something in relation to this nomination and this process which isn't really legitimate right so we're kind of morning and finding at the same time, which is really hard. It is hard. You know I like to think of it as in some ways we're fighting for her legacy and in her name you know she. Stood for Justice and equality she dreamed up a legal framework when the law had not yet recognized one and brilliantly advocated and led the Supreme Court to recognize the same. And even as recently as last terms, she really did the work of reminding the court what was important and so when when I think about how we have to galvanize over the next few weeks and how women in particular have to show up. Partly. I think will be doing it in her honor and we'll be doing it as a tribute to her legacy right and I think some of the energy that I felt I felt over the past week is a lot of energy from women kind of similarly to after the two thousand sixteen election and again in the two thousand eighteen during the two thousand eighteen midterms and we had the historic. In Congress, you feel the same thing like women are kind of energized to do something this election cycle you feel that again I do. I do and I almost wonder if people aren't syncing it in the way that I'm sensing an I am constantly getting calls in tax from women I know well and women I don't know very well asking what can I do on that to me is a sign that people are you know they have that they're not in their stomach and a feeling like they? Need to come out, come out around this election come out around the Supreme Court and so I I, wonder if everyone is considering bad in understanding and predictions about what's going to happen this fall one of the things I wanted to talk about was what her legacy means to you. Personally what it means to a lot of lot of women especially in the legal field and some of her most pivotal cases I was thinking through those do you have any that stick out to you as being I guess More pivotal or he'll be more impactful for women generally. Yeah. I mean she is obviously just a giant giant in women's rights giant in the legal field generally and. Did. That work at a time when it was unusual for women to even be lawyers at all

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg John W Gardner Congress
Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life and legacy as she lies in repose

The Takeaway

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life and legacy as she lies in repose

"And tomorrow at the U. S. Supreme Court building. On Friday she will lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. She's the first woman ever to be given this honor all this week. We've been looking back at the life and legacy of Justice Ginsburg and we'll continue that today in 1993. When President Bill Clinton nominated Justice Ginsburg to the Supreme Court, he referred to her as quote the Thurgood Marshall of Gender Equality Law. Begins work herself sometimes pushed back on the comparison to Marshall and his trail blazing civil rights work. I'll take this opportunity to say I don't like the comparison of me. Deserving Marshall because my life was never in danger. His wass he went to his southern town in the morning. I couldn't be sure he'd be alive at the end of the day. I never had that. Kind of threat. That was Justice Ginsburg, speaking in 2018. While much of Ginsberg's legal work indicated clear understandings of racial discrimination, some critics have called out some of her more personal shortcomings when it came to race, for example, Like most of her male colleagues on the bench, she hired few law clerks who were black or people of color. Joining me now is Fatima Goss Graves, president of the National Women's Law, Center. Fatima, Thanks for being with me. Glad to be with you. So how did racial equality factor into some of justice Ginsburg's early legal work? One of the things that I think few people know is when she was at the two women's rights project. She out actually filed a really important Grief in the court in a case involving whether or not there should be the death penalty for rape. And she really used that case and that breathe Toa High light. Both the race tropes around sexual violence for black men. And also the way in which notions of purity that have been attached to white women that they actually are harmful to white women into everyone. And so you know, one of the things that I think may seem more quiet and subtle about her work is that she got really clearly the idea that we were all harmed by discrimination. We were all harm by Whatever form it took, whether is racism, sexism, disability discrimination that that is a through line throughout her work. In yesterday on this show. We've been

Justice Ginsburg Fatima Goss Graves Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Ginsberg President Trump U. S. Capitol Bill Clinton National Women's Law Toa High Rape Center
Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:06 min | 1 year ago

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

"Dr Stanford is an obesity medicine, physician, scientists, educator and policymaker at Massachusetts General. Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She also lectures at Brown and Teaches Med students at Harvard. Hello, and welcome well. Thanks for having me. It's an absolute delight to be here today with both of you. We're just we're the most accomplished person ever had this podcast like I cannot even begins. Batum were all you have. You guys are the best and this is. This is what I need to me through the rest of the day as I conquer the world. Yeah! We're honored that you made have the time the time to come talk to us just a little, so thank you so much. Did I get all of that right? You did I I. Guess What I can do is explain it to people because people are kind of like is all of that absolutely so? I'm obviously a mathematician, so the MD is the easiest part I think to understand on my completed my masters in public health nineteen years ago, so it shows you that I'm older than I appear. And that was in health policy management. My masters impose ministration was from the Harvard. Kennedy School, government and government. Currently working on my MBA executive MBA, so that hasn't quite made it to the end of my name, but I may lead US next year. Let me tell you guys. We'll have more to talk about. The the all the that you see after not team for fifteen, but it is nice that it goes with that, so those are all fellowships, so my fellow of the ANC, which is the American Academy pediatrics I'm a fellow of American College of Positions. American college positions represents all Physicians for adult so internal medicine, a fellow of the American Heart Association so basically. I'm looking at cardio metabolic health and being the fellow in the American Heart Association what represents that and then a fellow in the obesity society. Society which is the F. Toss? So you know these fellowships come you know after having accomplished in those different on areas domain, so I see children I see adults I work in this kind of Cardio Metabolic, health space obviously as obesity medicine physician I work in that space, so it really is a combination of kind of who I am, and just looking at Vegas, the letters that come after my name really talks to the work that I really care about and working with my patients patients across the wall. That's amazing. Wow -gratulations. What inspired you study obesity. One of the things that I was always very concerned about as a black one in a black woman who was born and raised in Atlanta Julie obviously in Boston is that's where mastermind Harvard are? I'm I was really. Perplexed I think is the word I WANNA. Use about the disproportionate impact obesity on communities of color particularly I'm the black community. That was what really brought me to this work, so if you go back twenty years ago, I think you've as you're in your twenties for twenty years ago. When I was doing my m H, you're not okay. Across. Our loved anyways Oh! That's Cute I. Love it still have you guys by? Decades! but one of the things I was really interested in seeing was like. I felt like there was a lot that we weren't doing to understand why. Obesity obesity disproportionately impacted certain groups and the groups that are more likely to kind of tackle these issues or the people that are representative, so those scripts so as a black woman and the group that is most disproportionately impacted by obesity I felt compelled to really approach and tackle this headline, so the projects that I was doing back at emory school of Public Health, back in ninety nine two thousand etc, We're looking at specifically obesity in the black community one project I was doing was. Was Looking at obesity in the Black Church community was looking at obesity among African, American, adolescent girls and one was looking at obesity within those that are law resources within the wick programs. It'll women's and children's for Ram, and how could we fix their Their plight in terms of recognizing that we can in some ways with the limited resources that they may have available to enhance their role house. So this was something that was kind of lingering. I didn't anticipate that I would choose obese medicine. 'cause that was not a field when I was twenty years ago. It really was not a field. There was no board certification in obesity medicine. The first Brit sort of patients directly. No Be Madison didn't start until two thousand well, which was well after I finished medical school, but I can tell you I was on. Call in the pediatric ICU when I was in residency and I as internal medicine pediatrics and I literally just googled obesity in medicine at about two thirty in the morning after I just intimated three kids in the ICU in a new. I was going to sleep at nights. I figured I'd just need to keep myself busy. And, the fellowship here at Mass General at Harvard popped up and I was like. What is this? You know I I really interested in obesity. I had no idea there was a fellowship, indeed the first ship and so I came and I spent three years. Doing a fellowship dedicated to understanding the disease of obesity.

Obesity Harvard Harvard Medical School American Heart Association Black Community Dr Stanford American College Of Positions Brown Massachusetts General Black Church Kennedy School United States Batum Emory School Of Public Health American Academy ANC MD
Resonate Recordings launches a podcast host

podnews

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Resonate Recordings launches a podcast host

"We start with an exclusive resonate recordings has launched its own hosting platform resonate being the editing mixing and mastering platforms. Hosting Service Means Simpler workflows. The company says with analytics, a podcast, micro sites and to imbedded players. Costing is proving to be recession proof. According to the CEO of. Fatima's add who's writing for pod news today. Looking at how podcasts fared during the pandemic, a why she believes that podcasting is resilient and offers great opportunities to come twenty five percent of Latinos in the US a monthly podcast listeners according to the Latino podcast listener report from Edison Research Tinos also spend more time listening to audio Katina USA. NPR REX have announced a new partnership. The Latino USA podcast will join pr ex from October the first. NPR has announced this late for the second half of two thousand and twenty, including three new shows and a change for invisibility. Fair. APP has had an update the popular podcast APP now includes Apple Watch support a relax and sleep collection of shows and full support for ipad cast box is now correctly sending a user agent with its RSS feed scraper. After we reported bargain, the user agent is in our show notes and our newsletter today reporting user agents that pass, RSS Feeds. Helped to gain more accurate analytics. Motorcycles launched an updated version of their podcast tools, director, including articles and resources. The pivot podcast is hosting a series of virtual events called schooled in August. The shows will include live interviews and the opportunity for you to ask questions in real time nominees third annual audio theatre central Seneca awards have been announced. The winners will be announced on July. The twenty fourth and audio description has come to Australian public service television, allowing people with visual impairments to join TV programs and movies like this from frozen reindeer jams the. Place and penstock like a proud puppy. One him with his stick. Then goes to sneeze. He grabs his nose with both hands. His head shoots frozen coming this winter and our focus on those when those audio described shows be great as podcasts. Polk News Pablo. Torre will be the new host of the ESPN daily podcast from Aug launched today. Missing all murdered looks at Katie O'Shea who vanished in a small country town in Queensland in Australia in two thousand five adult lily wants to know the answer to that one question and the Vesey's view has former British Minister Vesey's looking at tech disruption. His guest is unlisted. Benedict Evans

Fatima NPR Torre Director Edison Research Tinos Vesey Katie O'shea CEO Benedict Evans Apple United States Espn Queensland Australia
Authentic Resilience

The LEADx Show

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Authentic Resilience

"Hi. My, name's Tina dominy I'm the CEO Authentic strengths advantage, and it's a pleasure to be with you today and today we're going to talk about my new book. Authentic resilience and I'm going to share some tools with you that I think can help during these very challenging times. This is a very unique time in history that we're all facing right now. And everyone's been stretched to the limit and people are experiencing high stressors in anxiety and. You know they're. They're questioning their abilities, and there's just so much going on with people right now. Having relationship challenges because the stress, so I've written this book to help people to build their resilience, and we define resilience as the ability to bounce back from challenges, so with that said I wanNA take you to. One of the key concepts in the book, and that is moving from what's wrong to what strong so all of us in the past have been kind of wired really. Because of our survival instinct to focus on what's wrong, you know we're always looking to detect errors in to fix errors, and that's a great survival mechanism, but it's even more powerful with learning to focus on with strong dead. Our performance goes up. Archie goes up. There are a lot of benefits so today. We're going to talk about that. Really essential shift from focusing on what's wrong to focusing on our strengths with strong and we're GONNA do this with a three step process the first thing. Thing we're going to do. We're going to explore our strengths. And the many aspects of our strengths in our own uniqueness were also going to empower goals with our strengths, so we're gonNA look at ways that we can use our strengths to achieve more, and in most importantly to achieve life, satisfaction fulfillment, and finally we're going to consider how we can engage tur- strengths more consistently in all aspects of our lives, and this benefits are relationships as well so this is the three step process. And as we learn to use our strengths in those three ways, our resiliency goes up in energy and engagement achievement as I mentioned earlier, our relationships become more positive and healthier, and we achieve sense of wealthy, so we know from global peer reviewed. Research Studies that when we use our strings that we can achieve all of these. All of these benefits and more depending on how dedicated we are to really focusing on our strengths in using them consistently on a daily basis. So now we're GONNA take a look at this concept called the inner critic versus the inner coach and I'm going to share some tools with you to listen more consistently to your inner coach. Dr Daniel Ayman who wrote the forward to my new book. Authentic resilience talks about this concept called automatic negative thoughts, and he describes automatic negative thoughts is deceased in a were wired to survive right, and so we look like I said earlier at. At everything that's wrong. We tend to focus on what's wrong. and these automatic negative thoughts just pop into our minds is just part of the human experience. So what can we do to mitigate those I like to encourage my clients to turn up the volume on their inner coach in turn down the volume on their inner critic. How do we do that? It's what you choose to say to yourself and it's also learning to refute. When it enters your mind. And to do that very quickly, the research actually shows that before you have that cascade of all those stress hormones from negative by it only takes about a second of thinking it, so we really need to learn to refute it quickly and all share with you some ways to do that as well such as You know it. Let's say you have an automatic automatic negative thoughts, and we think I'll never be able to take this project. Something negative like that or I. Don't have what it takes for that. K You stop your saw mid-sentence insane. We'll wait a minute I can use these particular strengths I. I've done similar projects in the past. You can start to refute it very quickly within about a second, and that's the best. Sometimes. We don't respond that Quigley in. We really internalize that emotion, but they're still many ways that we can deal with that type of negative

Dr Daniel Ayman Tina Dominy CEO Archie Quigley
Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Fatima. Goss graves the president and CEO of the national. Women's law center. She joins to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, and how the pandemic will uniquely affect women women who are of course on the frontlines as essential workers. We also discuss the childcare crisis, and we talk about a recent report published by the National Women's Law Center I'm the investment needed to adequately fund the country's childcare knees? So here's my conversation with Pajama. Gos- graves. Screens welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you. So we are about. Three months. I think into pandemic now. That sounds surreal to say. But you know. The economic fallout has been really swift. It's been head-spinning. There have been millions of people out of work. You know overnight. But we're just starting to parse through which groups specifically will be the hardest economically when I was specifically talk about women. Can you give me a quick summary of what the picture looks like for women right now economically. Crisis like the line we are in is gonNA always reveal inequalities that exist before one of the things that we know is bad about one in three women who are working are considered essential worker is in. That's in part because women are disproportionately in the healthcare system, both as nurses doctors in also in nursing homes sped. It is also because women work in retail and in manufacturing jobs like at Amazon, so they are disproportionately. Cashier is in big stores that have stayed open in on the front lines. You'll see them on the street doing things like delivering nail, and and so as a result, it's about one in three of women who are working right now are are right now front line. In working without hazard, pay working without protective equipment to ensure that they can work with safety and at the same time when we look at who lost their jobs quickly that women disproportionately have lost their jobs over the last two months in. That's especially to black and Brown women. And part of the reason that is again is job segregation. It's where women worked. So women make up a disproportionate number of people who work in restaurants that had to close in close quickly proportionate number of people who work as. Housekeepers in hotels who who work in small retail who work as domestic workers in and we're talking about jobs where people aren't working in sitting on a huge safety net to begin with these are all jobs that were already in the lowest paid fields. and. Were women were working in many many states just for seven twenty five an hour, trying to scrape by enough. So wait, you have. Is that about forty percent of the people who were working in those jobs about forty percent women who were working in those fields were already basically working fulltime making poverty wages. For the ten domecq incident you if you're picturing frontline workers. If you're lucky, enough and I'm probably have lucky in quotes. You can't see me on a podcast to work. And deep in sharp unemployment at the same time, women are more likely to be caregivers, and Co or sole breadwinners, and we're in a time where that care crisis that we have right now around people who have either been forced to work in this period outside the home or who have been working from home, but also parenting in home. Schooling is largely being ignored. As states race to reopen without a plan, a big part of the problem with having no plan as you haven't figured out. What are people going to do about having to go back to work without schools without summer camps without child-care? Exactly, that's a huge piece because when you look at the stories about people who are rushing to get out in these states that have open or starting to open early. Early you know what are the pictures of their of people who are sitting in restaurants and bars, and who are the people were on the front lines serving them primarily women and those women have children at home in their responsible for child care, and they don't. They don't have the childcare safety net there to help them. I was GONNA. Say I can tell you we're going to say on the. Interstate period, but Came in I, don't care and safety net. Yeah but one of the numbers you mentioned. It's one third of the essential workers are women right now? The positions that have been deemed to be essential one those are women well. It's one in three women who work are essential workers who it's in the in in some ways, it's an even larger percentage, so it's not that women are spread in so many many different occupations, one third of them are actually frontline workers right now. I think we have this image in her head that there's some tiny percentage of people who are out there on the front lines and. Everyone else is not for women. That's very much. Not The case may are on the frontlines right now in really large proportions, and those are just the ones that were talking about who are working frontline out there right now. We're not even talking about the many people who are also working from home. Everyone struggling with care crisis

National Women's Law Center President And Ceo Jim Taylor Skinner Fatima Goss Amazon Brown
"fatima" Discussed on The Bellarmine Forum Podcast

The Bellarmine Forum Podcast

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"fatima" Discussed on The Bellarmine Forum Podcast

"Benji profile felonious as Chris Novak Yvonne. This is John. Man was president of the bellarmine forum with a quick update for you. Couple announcements assist say hail. Mary Together L. Mary full of grace. The Lord is with the blessed art dial amongst women and blessed is proof that I wound Jesus Holy Mary Mother of God pray for us sinners now at the death on our lady of Fatima pray for US Saint Robert Bateman. Pray for us. I'm a day late bringing this update to you. Yesterday was the feast of Our Lady of Fatima and the Feast of Saint Robert Ballymun. You'll notice that Cindy Pavlovsky. Our secretary had posted in. She's coming to a conclusion that I have as well that were definitely through this corona virus pandemic dealing with something about faddem. There's a small thing we posted yesterday on twitter and facebook. And I think it's worth mentioning here. Did of the three Visionaries Mirror you call these young children happening in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. Remember the angel. I came to the children. One thousand nine hundred sixteen visions of our lady occurred through one thousand nine hundred seventeen and then in one thousand eighteen. What are we have? We had the Spanish flu. Won't little dissent the Marto and Francesco. You may not have paid attention or maybe you've never heard this or maybe you did in. It's just worth recalling now. They died of the flu. Pandemic that year. You know the Spanish the Spanish flu.

Our Lady of Fatima Cindy Pavlovsky Feast of Saint Robert Ballymun Saint Robert Bateman Chris Novak Yvonne Fatima president Mary Benji US bellarmine John twitter secretary facebook
"fatima" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"fatima" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What people deserve if they're actually out of work all of these things could have a long term effect in there we restructure our labor market structure our wages to structure public policy pretty much I have been thinking about you all weekend it's been nine days since I spent a morning after team is grocery store and we took precautions try to keep our distance from each other from other people at the grocery store but it wasn't always possible to stay one hundred percent safe I've just been like very scared that I got corona virus from being at the grocery store like I have been worrying about grocery store workers since the beginning of all of this after spending that morning with Fatima it's like this whole like other level of worry and and also gratitude because I put myself in a fraction of the risk factor team of faces every single day and I have been truly like honestly freaking out about my health so when I called to check in with the team up by the way says she's feeling fine I wanted to ask how she felt about people who are staying home safe and if she had been thinking about whether she'd prefer unemployment honestly no I wouldn't feel right just you know I've been leaving you know I want to be here to help you know because I know they need to help that's that's amazing you you do know that like you might get more money yeah yeah I know and as for the rays have you like walked in like okay today's the day I'm going.

Fatima
"fatima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"fatima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"People deserve if they're actually out of work all of these things could have a long term effect in there we restructure our labor market to structure our wages to structure public policy pretty much I have been thinking about you all weekend it's been nine days since I spent a morning after team as grocery store and we took precautions try to keep our distance from each other from other people at the grocery store but it wasn't always possible to stay one hundred percent safe I've just been like very scared that I got coronavirus from being at the grocery store like I have been worrying about grocery store workers since the beginning of all of this after spending that morning with Fatima it's like this whole like other level of worry and and also gratitude because I put myself in a fraction of the risk that Fatima faces every single day and I have been truly like honestly freaking out about my health so when I called to check in with the team up by the way says she's feeling fine I wanted to ask how she felt about people for staying home safe and if she had been thinking about whether she'd prefer unemployment honestly no I wouldn't feel right just you know open leading you know I want to be here to help you know because I know they need to help that's that's amazing you you do know that like you might get more money yeah yeah I know and as for the race have you like walked in but I think today's the day I'm going to do it and that you know I'm not gonna do it yesterday I actually wanted to just kind of talk to him and be like you know why are we getting you know raises what I did and what you did so you got close to almost acting like you know just kind like start a conversation like you know well you know other places are getting you know more money like how do you feel about it what stops you from doing I'm scared because it is so hard to ask for a raise extending from your boss saying you know I want more money even.

Fatima
Mexican women plan historic strike against femicides

Democracy Now! Audio

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Mexican women plan historic strike against femicides

"And in Mexico. Feminists are calling for a national strike. March ninth one day. After International Women's Day to protest skyrocketing gender-based violence in Mexico calls for national striker being led by the Mexican feminist group which is of the C- The strike has been referred to as day without US calling on women not to go to work or to school to stay out of the streets and to avoid participating in the economy in any way for twenty four hours. This is a member of which is of the C. C. Under he is must believe that women in Mexico are tired of the different types of violence that are committed against us in all spaces. It is not only femicide crisis but also the day to day in homes in schools on the street on the job. It seems that there's no place that is safe for us. Plans for the national strike game momentum after the brutal murders in February of Twenty five year old Ingrid Skamania who was killed and mutilated by her partner and seven year old. Fatima who was kidnapped and later found dead wrapped in plastic bag in Mexico. At least ten women are killed every day

Mexico United States Ingrid Skamania Fatima Partner
How Data Science, Machine Learning, and AI Can Support Executive Strategy and Business Goals

Data Crunch

14:21 min | 2 years ago

How Data Science, Machine Learning, and AI Can Support Executive Strategy and Business Goals

"Out our training and consulting offerings for our executive panel. Today we'll be talking to Simon Lee chief analytics officer from waiter Fatima Kosher who is the vice president of data science engineering at all tear and role in Roberson who has the president at Tryon's so welcome everyone to the executive panel. We are super excited to have you guys here. You're all executives in companies that are doing amazing things with data science so the audience knows again. We're talking about today. The topic is how data science machine learning and A._I.. Can Best Support executive strategy can business goals. How how does that function really work? Let's start maybe with Simon and then fatman enrolling if you give us a little introduction. We'll get going from their banks. I'm silently. I'm actually kind of a mixed bag. When it comes to data science Heinsohn analytics <unk> about twenty years of experience using analytics than advanced algorithms in in a whole bunch of different industries like transportation for example airline rail trucking Ocean Carriers Printing Publishing Shing Manufacturing Finance and delivery delivery is where I'm currently at waiter is a restaurant food delivery company in small and mid size market so probably a lot of people haven't heard of us because we're in <music> smaller communities but where are trying to make a big splash so yeah? That's that's awesome. Thanks for being here <hes> Hi. This is Michael from alter engineering. I am a civil engineer by training. Although I know we get a chance chance to practice it's my background is <hes> multidisciplinary design exploration and optimization and I was in the auto industry before I joined al-Tair <hes> I've done several things throughout the fourteen years that I've I being here but always keeping <hes> design expiration opposition as the core of <hes> my responsibilities and I'll tear is a global technology company we provide software and solutions for product development data intelligence origins and high performance computing on the are McCain and its headquarters in Michigan in Troy Michigan where I'm speaking and <hes> we have offices in twenty five countries now <hes> so that would be great thanks to read Padma and rolling right. Thank you good morning or Roland Roberson with Tryon's you know for my own background. I've <hes> similar to Simon. I'm kind of a mixed bag. Then in industry for twenty plus ears <hes> solely in digital transformation space the working from startups mid level companies through global service integrators working with Tryon's currently to really expand the growth in use within within a I an Iot within the organization and our customer base <hes> tries as a company of fifteen hundred plus employees a global offices and a breath mainly serving the upper mid tier and enterprise his level customer base solely focused on digital transformation in the use of those high technologies greater return on value. That's often so lots of experience here really rape panel. Were excited to hear what you guys know no and can offer to the audience so we're going to jump in right here and the first thing that I really wanted to dig into is as an executive in your specific industries. How do you approach leveraging data science machine learning and A._I.? To have an impact on your business what's your focus and how do you make that work in your companies and maybe we can start with my here and then after she's done she's talking. If other people have comments please join it. Thanks coach is <hes> I think the biggest biggest impact the data science machine learning <hes> have on our business and on our customers business is to enable and speed up ovation. Do I think about data science data signs allows us to think in the multidimensional probably dimensional way the problems works applications wrote and we no longer have to think linearly because it simplified seeing the multidimensional aspect of a problem you know this gives us relations between changes in the system and the corresponding change in system performance whether the system is in engineering system always a financial system allows us to build predictive models using machine learning and of course you know we all know that once you have predictive models all those you can do prescriptive analytics explore many alternatives to trade off you know expose new ideas and new products and that paves the way to innovation. We have many customers twelve years that has <hes> world fit to to deploy this <hes> has been mostly in engineering domain but recently with Iraq positional intelligence company. We are also leveraging these technologies for business cases for example. We have a customer in <hes> a large consumer products brands way we use data science to find optimal package designed to reduce material which is an engineering problem and at the same time indeed do optimal trait spent to increase the sales and maximize revenues which is a business problem got it. I think there's a lot more we could dig into their but let's give the other panelists that opportunity to respond as well yeah I I love Fatma's answer kind of mirrors my own experience here at waiter. What I really love about? Waiter is just the multi dimensional multi the different aspects of data science and analytics general world forecasting what the order volume will be what happens on holidays unusual events super bowl parades etc what happens to the order volume because we need to schedule that and then in terms of just optimization it just how do we how do we get an efficient schedule out because we have thousands of drivers that we need to schedule. How do we match the supply demand once we get the forecast? How do we when we're actually doing operations? Tally matched the drivers to the orders again another optimization problem and then and then in in terms of machine learning. What can we learn about the three pillars of our business <hes> the customers the drivers in the restaurants <unk>? How do we classify them what we know about churn in their lifetime value when their preferences and all that sort of stuff has tremendous business now? It's just an exciting time an exciting business where we can apply all these different aspects of analytics addicts to to make a meaningful impact. Yeah I would agree with that. You know as we look across our customer base you know data science data engineering artificial intelligence machine learning earning all the technologies dealing with today helps us take and make the difficult easy for our customers we find many of our customers now are quite frankly struggling just to keep up with the amount of data the different types Oh to changes in the environment that they're dealing with on a day to day business and what we do is actually make those type of challenges easier to overcome we look at the Sonam e of data that they're now getting presented with in we take that in presented to to them in a way that is not only easier to use but consumable and thus they can actually make better business decisions with the type of data now the right information is presented to them so they can make a better day to day choices. That's a great overview. I'm curious now. We've talked about these various use cases across all of your industries. Actually what are some maybe specific concrete examples that you guys have seen where you can help help our audience really get a grasp on here's a specific use case that we saw and the result from it and in kind of how we built that out so they can see this process sure we happy too so as an example we recently been working with a large global logistics company and part of their transformation internally is to actually migrate from Human Driven Vehicles Do automated vehicles vehicles for types of shipping logistics now part one of transformation is just getting their arms around the telemetry and the telematics. That's happening within vehicles on how a human driver interacts day a two day now part of that transformation. It's actually not only the sensors that have been upgraded around the vehicles to collect the information but actually the collection then and distribution of that data to understand what's happening so real time use case is that while we might understand on how to move accussed driver from aid be what you're really seeing though is and the intent was maybe I can move them to location see if a storm is in a way to maintain he might logistics schedule but with some of that censor data we're now collecting weather information across all the different vehicles nationally and so with that we understood that now we have a better weather collection database of the National Weather Service at the time that is even more real time in just having that data is valuable into itself in his actually can be considered revenue stream so we identified new revenue streams for business at really had denied even have that in mind when I first went down this journey and now we started opened up new ideas and new ways to collect revenue that they never knew that they had before so it's not just attacking the problems at that. They're interacting with today and trying to move forward forward but it's it's identifying new sources of revenue that they never knew that it was even capable of having got. I love that yeah because revenue and profit are what what keeps us in business right. That's really interesting other examples that people have I didn't more generic <hes> response to it as you know. What makes success? Is You know I didn't find the right case in one that has business value but technologically we didn't reach and has data and I think the example that role engage it is a perfect example of how all those pieces are aligned and and I find one of the most rewarding things in terms of the work that we do is is as as human beings we tend to be fairly proud of our ability to make good decisions and I think that as people working in online or manufacturing evening executives we tend to be very proud and then when somebody comes along and says you know there may be an algorithm or an approach or a data driven method that can help make a better decision. The immediate response is usually skepticism <hes> <hes> you know you. You can't figure out all the all the different factors I've been doing this for a long long time good luck and when you do deliver something that actually far exceeds needs what human can do. Sometimes you get. This incredible change of attitude and perception is yeah that is actually better than what I can actually very rewarding to see that transformation to say you know we can help make better decisions with this massive information that we're collecting and we've seen it in the airline industry you seen him printing and publishing where in printing publishing week there's a schedule of how to how to construct the British could material which is a fairly complicated thing but we represented graphically for for one of the experts in the field when I showed what he did at what what the Algorithm did he's he actually stopped. Oh my goodness that's absolutely beautiful and to to get that success which translates the dollars is quite rewarding from a personal level because it's you can you can actually see yes. We were making a difference here even the experts in the area see that at acknowledged and I think that's really really awards lots of use cases here and lots of transformation as we're talking about this Simon. You brought this up just now that there's sort of a hesitancy for people to accept maybe that an algorithm can do better than I can do right when once you show them that there's a change of mind. What other areas are you guys? Seeing that are big. Hurdles are big challenges that an executive needs to be aware of when they're trying to take advantage of of what the capabilities are nowadays when they need to be thinking about what are the pitfalls. I'll give you an example you know in many cases what we find with our customers is that they already have a significant amount of data over the last decade. They've been struggling quite a bit with how to leverage that data effectively for day to day use and you can acquainted more with actually the customers really and firefighting mode because they are actually taking bits and pieces and trying to stitch relevant story together. Gather as to what that data really means and ultimately find that they don't have a complete view of what that data is so they have to go find out more so time and time again they're fighting struggling trying to make use coherency z. of the data and bring meaning to it now with allow the more recent advances. I mean you're getting more and more data now. That's being moved not only from customer data. That's being brought in thew larger scale the European systems but you're also getting IOT enabled devices so this wave of data is now going to completely swap you know the customers enter their

Executive Simon Lee Tryon Roland Roberson Iraq Shing Manufacturing Finance Vice President Fatima Kosher Rape President Trump Officer Engineer Michael Fatma
"fatima" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"fatima" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reciting from Koran. But that is of that. I mean. And that's actually didn't to his grave. Dan, she called mom told me you have cut. You know, the US I shouldn't affect co-manufactures in your on. Because they can't import the car parts. And he had to sell his dealership. And know you've us to join his family members who lives overseas in Canada. So does that mean because of the sanctions that he's not actually getting the cars to be able to sell them? It's a supply issue. Yeah. I asked to my she had a sense of how he felt about selling grave, we talk about this. He said his wife doesn't want him to sell, but I don't believe in anything anymore. Visible shelving. Any running? It's just a great Haji on shocking historian may be the gentlemen, Fatima spoke to is an alone. He told her about a guy who is trying to sell a whole family plot twenty four graves in all he said, I haven't been able to single grave. Twenty four graves because after so many years of economic pain, some run or just done, I think if you sell your house that's munti saying goodbye. But if you sell your grave basically saying goodbye for eternity..

Dan US Fatima Haji Canada
"fatima" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"fatima" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"I'm hearing so many great things about it the pros and coal, it's kiss. Fatima's. Thing. Cool. Knows. Young. Just. Lag new. Knows. Wannabes. In seven kiss. I really need to work, not looking to excited when I find out somebody has a pool or a.

Fatima
Is Doug Ford cutting Ontario to the bone? Or is this what voters signed up for?

The Big Story

06:44 min | 2 years ago

Is Doug Ford cutting Ontario to the bone? Or is this what voters signed up for?

"City or a province or a federal government is big and dance packed with numbers. There are always little details buried in. It's fine print that only come too late later on mostly these details are people especially people who voted for the guys who didn't get to make the budget all of that is business as usual, but over the past couple of weeks since the Progressive Conservative government delivered a budget and on -tario. There are an awful lot of those little details last week the government cut funding to the north and south on -tario library services for government wants to go from thirty five public health agencies to just ten flashing one billion dollars in provincial tree. Planting organization was told by the Ford government that four point seven million in funding is being cut the provincial government is planning to acts more than thirty four hundred teaching positions over the next four years to save some. Money and the people of Antero well basing bit beyond ERC. There has been news of cuts to services and funding and programs nearly every single day since the budget dropped in Ontario, and the list is kind of staggering to contemplate. So, of course, for some this is the end of the world and to be fair, the sorts of services that are at risk here. Do seem fairly critical on the other hand Doug Ford government won a mandate to find savings and balance the budget of a province in debt. So are they not just doing what they promised or have they gone beyond their mandate. How hard is it to keep track of these various measures? When there's a hailstorm of them. And are we I mean us in the media doing a good job at focusing on what's important here. Or are. We just chasing each shiny new object as it's revealed. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Fatima Siad is an investigative reporter with the national observer, she spent much of the past week exhaustively tracking a list of all these cuts Fatima. Hi, jordan. Can you? Tell me first of all in broad strokes and for people who might live outside of Ontario. What's been going on in this province for the last few months? Very big question to answer. I'm going to approach it in a slightly different way. The new phrased it I'm going to tell you everything that happened just last week. All right. So what we learned last week is the Ford government is getting rid of Ohio medical emergency coverage for on Tehran's travel outside of the country. What this means is that if you're traveling to what's your favorite country, Jordan. Of the top of my head Spade. Okay. Say you're traveling to sane and you twister leg, and you need to go to the hospital. Oh, hip, which is the -tario health insurance program would cover you for up to two hundred dollars per day for a hospital stay and up to four hundred dollars a day for a higher level level of care. Should you need it? And that program is being cut to save a couple million dollars last week. We also learned that the government has stopped funding a program that was aiming to plant fifty million trees in Ontario. This is important because we were trying to build forest cover, which we need in this province to prevent flooding to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change and so forth. I got trees are great. Last week. We also learned that the government is axing all the funding to the Mars discovery district. This is something the logic reported. The Mars discovery district is an innovation hub where a lot of new ideas and new inventions and new tech start in that district. So what does loss of funding mean, not quite sure yet? But it's happening. And last week. We also learned that the -tario music fund is being cut by half from fifteen million dollars to seven million dollars. According to billboard. What does that mean? Jordan. I don't know. Neither do I. But we know that the funding is getting cut, and that is going to have some sort of fact on -tario music industry that's pretty comprehensive for just a week. But that's why we wanted to talk to you. Because for myself, even who who covers the news everyday and lives in on -tario, and for people who don't pay close attention to the news over people who live in another province. I feel like we've heard a lot about one cut another cut another, and it seems really difficult to keep track of it. Absolutely. Is it's a lot. And I think part of the reason that we're hearing more and more about new cuts every day is because a we have a new government, right? They're barely a year into their tenure, and they have plans, and we're learning about those plans slowly, but surely and they're coming out step by step. So that's one part of it. The second part is that the budget just came out on April eleventh, and it was very complicated. Difficult to understand document that we are just still navigating. And looking between the lines of and understanding what you know, some of the proposals mean if you're someone who's just casually paying attention to the news at concede like these cuts are being announced one day after the other. But explain the process a little bit to me because this result of sort of two weeks of digging down into one document. No, I think this is the result of a government still laying out how it's going to execute its plan and its vision for governance, if you can imagine the budget that was put out April eleventh was three hundred eighty page document that laid out a vision for four years that aim to reduce red tape that aim to find a fishing sees to reduce thirteen point five billion dollar deficit. According to the government and that aimed to restore accountability. And those are the government's words not mine that they want to restore accountability and trust and they want to bring more modernization and transparent. Rency to sort of the work that the government does the budget lease out a series of ideas about this and not entirely clear from I read what those ideas meant on practical terms. So when you're going through the budget, and you're looking at numbers, so the funding of the ministry of natural resources, for example, was cut. What does that mean? And then as you start digging into it, you realize, oh that means that we have less money for firefighters who tackle forest fires or we have less

Ford Government Ontario Jordan Jordan Heath Rawlings Doug Ford Fatima Siad Antero Investigative Reporter Fatima Ohio Tehran Four Years Fifteen Million Dollars Seven Million Dollars Four Hundred Dollars
America's Forever War In Afghanistan Has Engulfed A New Generation

Perspective

02:37 min | 3 years ago

America's Forever War In Afghanistan Has Engulfed A New Generation

"The Pentagon stopped releasing the official number of troops in combat. It's estimated that the American military force on the ground in Afghanistan is still about fourteen to fifteen thousand strong. Star General John Nicholson commands all u s and foreign chiefs. We join Jim high above the capital, Kabul. Down. Really? It's become clear to most the military alone. Come witnessed war ended. It might be time to try to make a deal with a very people. We'd been fighting all the time. The Taliban since our trip. ABC news has learned of secret one on one talks between America and the Taliban. Although the Afghan people are now desperate for a pass to piece the also fears the deal would risk a return to the brutal rule of the Taliban. So many would lose out, especially women and girls. Sixteen year old Fatima has nothing but war her whole life. Every day. She puts her life on the line just might going to school by being the girl who dares to dream is one of six thousand students that this elite all girls school partly funded by the US remain stereotypical images. What life is like for women and young girls in Afghanistan. No access to education, haven't stay home. Not able to work more than a third of Afghanistan's girls are in education, but the dangers are still real professional and these girls have overcome countless obstacles, they were catapulted onto the world stage. Teammate in historic trip. To the United States bringing back a medal for courage. President Afghanistan few can escape the reality of war just days later, an ISIS suicide bomber attacked a loophole. Most killing her dad. Ishbel as nine. Furthermore, owner to father during a recent speech at the Oslo Freedom Forum. She says her dad used to tell she should always stay strong. Now, the girls who dream of peace and the US soldiers who dream of home must hold onto some hope this America 's longest war can really come to an end

Afghanistan Taliban America Kabul United States John Nicholson ABC Pentagon Oslo Jim High Fatima Ishbel Official President Trump Sixteen Year
Cape Town water crisis: adapting to a water-scarce future

02:21 min | 3 years ago

Cape Town water crisis: adapting to a water-scarce future

"You're listening to all things considered from npr news we've been hearing that capetown south africa could be left without any water as soon as this year well the historic drought has an eased but city officials report that residents have complied with tight water restrictions so they may have bought some time until the taps run completely dry meanwhile as daniele czeslaw reports some wealthy south africans are sinking their own money into finding extra water water fills a square pit cut into the corner of a little front yard today we expect you to about sixty meters sixty meters or about one hundred eighty feet trevor hemmings watches over this process he specializes in drilling boreholes to tap into underground aquifers it's a very similar method that will reach us off shore oil wealth and this towering blue drill looks like an offshore rake except for where it is wedged between a wrought iron fence painted white and the side of a house we had a crane eighteen over the wall to put it in position and weighs about seven tons since capetown's water crisis began business has exploded trebled in size i've got six drilling rigs no matter how many it doesn't seem to stem the flow the ted fills with water and drilling starts a nine foot long steel drill twists in the mud the worst drought in a century has dried up the dams that supplied the city of about four million people the city warned that it might reach days zero when there's no more water to pump two houses people would have to line up for hours at public taps to avoid that residents have to stick to thirteen gallons of water a day or face steep fees this crisis has highlighted the vast divide between the rich and poor coming from work maybe sometimes this late on today's little time i don't think i'll have enough time to go to the to the water that's andrew maher willa driller here he says the driller can make a hundred to two hundred dollars a week this fourhole costs fifteen thousand dollars it's being drilled for fatima is up and her husband sally salaam he's an investment manager she's a phd candidate in law a plastic pipe runs from their laundry machine to a.

South Africa Daniele Czeslaw Trevor Hemmings Capetown Andrew Maher Fatima Investment Manager NPR Willa Driller Sixty Meters Fifteen Thousand Dollars One Hundred Eighty Feet Two Hundred Dollars Thirteen Gallons Seven Tons
"fatima" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"fatima" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"We don't play banerjee pop chef fan is added a little crazy so good you know have fatima's she had cancer no she had cancer shaved the hair gone the whole thing the chefs for like visiting her at the hospital and now she's cancer free just has to finish up i know i left fatima post no asthma she which he's from pakistan now you can to others their indian and pakistani generally they're fan you must malek's me is like a famous preattack course but i set your mental you you also was sacked sima as from pakistan now that's back i got my mandate potemkin so that's really what i'm focusing on route without spoilers because i stopped watching it years ago what homeland we are what is what is going on now it you know what it's nothing about the original you know what i mean that it all guy one has nothing to do with one in one's birdie was gone i was like i don't think i care can i felt all remain and i'm told by everybody were wrong you are wrong it's amazing they made a good show for three or four years so i don't doubt that it's so good i just was like his interests but yeah no it's this this season is really interesting as they have a female president so i think initially thought oh hillary ago did and there were there but she's turned into this kind of trump character but yet is like the wing guy who's like targetpractice on her face and i it's well those to make that show or republicans i remember hearing about it i mean a feels right republican isn't trump.

fatima cancer asthma pakistan sima president malek hillary four years