35 Burst results for "Farrow"

Mark Judge on His New Book 'The Devil's Triangle'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:42 min | 6 months ago

Mark Judge on His New Book 'The Devil's Triangle'

"Mark judge, welcome to this program. Eric, great to be here. Can you hear me okay? I can hear you great. People watching via rumble or whatever can see that you're outdoors at some breakfast places. They just hilarious to me what the production values are of things these days. Your book, the devil's triangle before I give you a word in edgewise. As you know, I read it. And I gave you an endorsement for it because I want my audience to understand yours is an absolutely vitally important story that we understand what is happening in our country right now. And so I don't know, we can go in almost any direction. But why don't you sum up for the audience what the book is about in your story? Yes, well, the book is about what happened to me during the Kavanaugh nightmare. And just to put it in general terms, my thesis, the subtitle is Mark judge versus the new American Stassi. And my thesis is that we in America are facing an analog to the German Stasi, which were the secret police under communism. And I think that's a more accurate way to look at things because the Germans thought the unlike the Nazis worked with artists and writers and entertainers, they liked working with celebrities and playwrights in order to propagate their message. Whereas the Nazis tended to be more hostile towards jazz and modern art and those things. So what happened to me in 2018 in regards to the Kavanaugh thing was an attack by the American equivalent of the German Stassi. I don't think that's an exaggeration. I think when I think when Ronan farrow from The New Yorker calls you up and you're sitting at home taking care of your elderly mother and he says, you've been named in a letter charging you with sexual misconduct with a Supreme Court nominee that you went to high school with and being a Catholic with what I think is a pretty decent conscience. I said, that sounds horrible. Who's the accuser? And he said, I can't tell you that. And I said, where did this allegedly happen? He said, I can't tell you that. I said, when did this allegedly happen? He said, sometime in the 1980s. So the church bells are ring. So I've been accused of sexual misconduct with a Supreme Court nominee by a reporter at The New Yorker who can't tell me who the accuser is where it happened or even specifically when it happened. I want

Mark Judge Kavanaugh German Stasi Eric Ronan Farrow The New Yorker Mark America Supreme Court
"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"In the sources and you can see the wheels turning and how they make those decisions and the editing, the score, all of it is so kind of sensitively calibrated around telling those stories. I was so kind of bowled over by what they did with it. Well, I guess you mentioned there are other upcoming projects that you're doing with HBO. And I wonder, are they just before I even asked part B this question? Are they related to similar types of misconduct? Or is it completely unrelated subject matter? Well, you can see in my print reporting up to an including the piece in the last New Yorker about surveillance and espionage culture, some of the themes that I've been looking at and the types of stories over the last few years, you know, you can track that and beyond that I can't talk about investigations that are totally totally. No, the only reason I ask is because I'm curious if you have found that establishing yourself as somebody very well known for on this particular kind of subject matter has that made it, as that made your job in reporting on other subject matter, easier or harder. I will just note I don't know if you were laughing at this when it was said, but this was on the less than a year after your New Yorker piece was published, Colin Jost hosting the Emmys, and he says, quote, Netflix, of course, has the most nominations tonight. That's right. And if you're a network executive, that's the scariest thing you can possibly hear except maybe sir Ronan farrow is on line one close quote. And it was it got a laugh in the room and it's kind of the idea is that everybody's done that joke. Trevor Noah did that to this year at the correspondents dinner. Well, but I guess that Ronan farrow is going to come. Right, this is why I don't get invited to things, Scott. Well done. Well, I guess though, is there an element of truth to that that does it make it harder to do reporting now in some respects? Obviously, on terms of sexual misconduct, everybody probably knows that you are the most trustworthy credible person on that subject matter. But when it comes to other stuff, has it created, has it made it more difficult? I hope it's not that's not the narrow tenor of the reputation that I've built. I mean, most of my work prior to that few stories, I'm proud of that handful of stories, but most of the work that I've done, you know, my first book was about the decimation of the State Department under several administrations, all of that early writing that we talked about was on kind of international human rights stuff. The majority of The New Yorker material that I've put out is about other forms of crime and corruption, so I haven't thought of it in terms of it being like a single beat occupation in the way that you're describing. And maybe that was a seismic moment culturally. So maybe there are people who associate me closely with that. And that's something that I'm only proud of. But I think it's telling that those jokes that all those support shows up to and including this year's award shows are about people being scared of tough investigative reporter calling. They're sometimes in rooms that the joke isn't just about are people leche. I think it's like, sadly, for me, it's a double edged sword. People are scared to get my call because they know but perhaps there will be tough questions. In any genre, on any topic, I also.

Colin Jost sir Ronan farrow Trevor Noah Ronan farrow HBO New Yorker Netflix Scott State Department The New Yorker
"farrow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Surveillance with Tom Keene Jonathan farrow and Lisa Abraham always 5 straight weeks of losses in the equity market hello week 6 from New York City this morning good morning good morning for our audience worldwide live on TV and radio alongside Tom Keane and Lisa branded Sam Jonathan farrow equity futures TK down another 1.9% That's where they're moving a bit is not coming yet Well we can say across three hours here with a pre show preparation and starting surveillance this morning John It's a situation that deteriorates We're going to get out to a 34 vix in a moment And we're looking for a bit in John just as one indication out there Bitcoin under 33,000 joins a party A big move is that big moves in the equity market and in foreign exchange as well as some the dollar index The strongest since 2002 this is big stuff We are very dollar centric here folks And by that I mean foreign exchange centric with Turkish lira blowing through 15 to 1502 John the immovable forces we talked to Michael pervis in a moment is the ten year yield 3.18% Didn't we get through 3% A cup of coffee ago Three 20 Now Tom overnight in this session Big move on a ten year the 5 year the highest since 2008 bramo we're pushing ahead to the big one on the schedule this week is CPI this Wednesday And how much we get that mechanical peak in inflation And then looking forward is that going to be something that we see continuing to decelerate this idea that perhaps the fed will get a reprieve from that We're talking about the idea of risk not stemming from the fed It is stemming from supply chains out of China It is stemming from oil prices that are surging having to do with what's going on in Ukraine And that I think is very hard for the markets to deal with which is the reason that we're getting this tightening kind of ramification of volatility The line from Morgan Stanley Lisa I know this resonates with you too avoiding a recession is our base case but markets will have to confront the rising probability of one regardless And how do you do that after a market has been benumbed by a Federal Reserve for decades basically saying we've got your back Suddenly not having their back and all these traders have to readjust to suddenly whipsaw action does not have to do with what a number of people say at Washington The fed put has been well and truly retired hasn't it given what Lisa just laid out there for us We're going to talk to Michael perverse purpose about this about you know what I guess it's a new regime John And to me there's a repricing going on You put an historical context Is it a bear market Yes certainly as you mentioned John on Friday many stocks just absolutely hammered But you look at the indices and you say well where is the immediate catharsis that we really have we seen catharsis yet John I don't think so Can we make the case that the worst of this is done At least I'd look to credit What's been interested in about credit is yes there's been damage done there But spreads haven't blown out in a massive way like we might have seen maybe a couple of years ago and that's intriguing from my perspective and from others too It's something I focus on every morning when I come in I look at spreads on both investment grade and high yield in the U.S. to gauge exactly that Do we start to price and credit risk How do we get credit risk when you get well capitalized companies that don't have near term maturities The next maturity wall isn't until 2025 So at that point it's credit even reflective of real risk If companies don't have to borrow money and borrowing costs rise does it matter That's the question A lot of people in fixed income are asking right now We're going to return to that a little bit later Futures right now on the S&P and on the NASDAQ into negative territory by 2.3% on the NASDAQ 100 on the S&P down by 1.8 Yields are higher on a ten year three 18 In this session today we had a little look at three 20 yields are higher by 5 basis points Foreign exchange the dollar the strongest going all the way back to 2002 So Euro dollar negative just a ten to 1% at one O 5 So many questions this morning including are we there yet Have we seen catharsis When do we get the full washout We will be talking about that with an incredible roster of surveillance guests Deutsche Bank's George sir velos joining us talking about the Euro a possible strength there which is interesting given the fact that it has been a one way trade in dollar and the Euro has absolutely broken down U.S. Secretary of the Treasury is going to be joining us Ottawa ariyama I am very interested to hear about what the U.S. is next steps are in terms of additional sanctions towards Russia but also with respect to China given the legacy tariffs there And Matt dizak of the Merrill Lynch and Bank of America private bank talking about how much is already priced in with respect to treasury yields Okay let's say that that's the case but is there a non linear move from three and a half percent or three and a quarter percent on the ten year to 4% At 8 a.m. we get Atlanta fed president Rafael bostic joining us on Bloomberg television with our own Michael McKee talking about possibly some of the guidance and frankly I want to know about what they think about the market's reaction to fed chair Powell's press conference last week And at 2 p.m. meta Facebook is opening its first physical store the metastore in burlingame California You can go and live in a universe that's far more certain and less valid than the one that we currently live in The reason why I'm actually interested It's not exactly that It's because the shares are down nearly 40% NASDAQ shares down more than 20% year to date Where does the growth come from John For these growth names given how much has already been priced in and given what we're seeing in China and frankly what a lot of people are saying is going to be a global growth slowdown And the problem is and Lisa thank you is that Tom some of these names are actually still generating decent growth And yet they're being absolutely pummeled in the stock market Well this is important And I think there's a lot of growth out there and you wonder what do you do And we're not going to give investment advice here John But to your point again on Friday there seem to be two markets Those of profit surviving holding on and a lot of others just absolutely powdered John before we get to our wonderful guest Bloomberg dollar index since February 24th the invasion of Iraq up 6.7% the call of the year so far is David fok Landau Michael perverse is going to join us now Some founder and CEO of tour back in capital advisers Michael can you make the case for the end of multiple rewriting in this equity market I think by my math John I think we've given up about three and a half P points this year to date off those lifetime highs back at the end of last year By buying masses we're going to sort of call it a three to 4% maybe three to 5% ten year yield By my math we get to another one to possibly two PE points And at that point I think we're really done I think my bigger question though is that the cross asset volatility conditions right now are extraordinarily robust and dynamic And I think they're so you guys were talking about these shocks from supply chains and some shocks from oil which the fed has limited ability to address And I think one of the things that's going to help is only going to reinforce this very high rate volatility It's not just rates at three volatility And if the cross volatility surface is that high I just wondered if there's so much dust kicked up in the air and there's so much uncertainty about what the risk free rate is going to be over the next period of.

John fed Tom Keene Jonathan farrow Lisa Abraham Lisa Tom Keane Sam Jonathan farrow Michael pervis George sir velos China ariyama Matt dizak Morgan Stanley
AJ Has One More Comment on the Woody-Mia Situation

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:08 min | 1 year ago

AJ Has One More Comment on the Woody-Mia Situation

"But let me comment on the woody verse Mia situation. One more time because I hinted in the last show I did that one of the children Moses was a kid who basically said, no, my sister Dillon's lying. And he took the opposite side. He didn't go with the flow. He did initially, but eventually he came around to being team woody because it was eating him up inside. He knew that his father was being taken down brick by brick and it wasn't fair. Now, Moses is a very private person. He's now a therapist and shit went to get his master's degree. Does great work, apparently, doesn't like public attention. You'll never hear from him or see him. But he came out at one point and talked about how the misleading attacks on his father, he didn't want to stay silent about any longer. And the reason why he won't is because he was present for everything that happened in that house before during and after this alleged event that Mia Farrell and Dylan farrow say took

Moses Dillon Woody Mia Farrell Dylan Farrow
"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Film <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> is a very powerful <Speech_Male> medium <Speech_Music_Male> and it's And <Speech_Music_Male> you know and <Speech_Music_Male> is filmmakers <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> ever <Speech_Music_Male> scripted. <Speech_Music_Male> Unscripted show <Speech_Music_Male> documentary. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You are <Speech_Male> trying <Speech_Male> to have this really <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> intense <Speech_Male> communication <Speech_Male> this rich <Speech_Male> communication <Speech_Male> with your <Speech_Male> audience. And <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> i think that <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> i think <Speech_Male> ed documentary <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> just a whole <Speech_Male> form provides <Speech_Male> an opportunity <Speech_Male> bright. Because you're <Speech_Male> already in this <Speech_Male> reality this uncertainty. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think that's one of the <Speech_Male> rich things. About documentary <Speech_Male> has <SpeakerChange> dogma. <Silence> Instance can't <Speech_Music_Male> can <Speech_Music_Male> see <Speech_Music_Male> the uncertainty <Speech_Music_Male> the experience <Speech_Male> of making a film <Speech_Male> many times in that <Speech_Male> enriches <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> film and <Speech_Music_Male> Viewing experience. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But i also <Silence> think <Speech_Male> part of <Speech_Music_Male> what you have to do <Speech_Male> as a filmmaker <Speech_Music_Male> as an artist is you <Speech_Male> have to go <Speech_Male> into these places <Silence> that are <Speech_Music_Male> rich <Speech_Music_Male> intense <Speech_Music_Male> powerful uncertain <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> complicated <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> that allowing <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> kind of the building blocks <Speech_Male> to have that <Speech_Male> communication with guidance. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you know. I think <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> all good filmmakers. Do <Speech_Male> that all good artist <Speech_Male> do that. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> is is they <Speech_Male> they go <Speech_Male> into an area that's <Speech_Male> intense <Speech_Male> rich and complicated <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> then they come out <Speech_Music_Male> and and <Speech_Music_Male> you know. Have <Speech_Male> communication and <Speech_Male> on his concede <Speech_Male> side. Just <Speech_Male> you're kind of your obligation <Speech_Male> to go <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> you see <SpeakerChange> that to move <Speech_Male> into that. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Well i <Speech_Male> cannot thank you guys <Speech_Male> enough for all <Speech_Male> the fascinating <Speech_Male> work but also taking so <Speech_Male> much time. I know <Speech_Male> it's more than you signed up <Speech_Male> for. And so thank you <Speech_Male> for rolling <Speech_Male> with this and <Speech_Male> it's great <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> speak with <Speech_Male> you guys always thank you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> around. Pleasure <Speech_Male> stop. <Speech_Male> This is amazing <Speech_Music_Male> great <SpeakerChange> questions. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very much for tuning into <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> awards. Chatter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we really appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> taking the time to do that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and would really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> appreciate taking a minute <Speech_Music_Male> more to subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> to our podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on itunes or your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcasts out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and to leave us a rating <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as well <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you have any questions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> comments or concerns <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can reach me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> via twitter at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> twitter dot com slash. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Stop fiber <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and you can follow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all of my coverage between <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episodes <Speech_Music_Male> at t. h. dot <Speech_Music_Male> com slash the race <Speech_Music_Male> until <Speech_Music_Male> next time. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for joining us.

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Were manifold and we felt compelled to drew this on our radar at all. That's what kirby also said earlier about learning each time like holy. Oh my god. Like i thought i knew i had no idea. So she kind of in that interviews kind of schooled me schooled. Us you know was mine wide open and then we said hey you know you're going through this really interesting complicated time. What if we followed you and she was like i'm kind of scared and i thought i know i got it and because of our experience and i said look. Don't sign a release you know and i don't want to interfere with your process. And just if we can we can if we can't we can't but well don't sign a release just for listeners. Means that you can film all you want. But it's not going anywhere unless and until she's comfortable enough to so she said okay as long as that's fine and fair and there's no pressure and i said really there's pressure we'll just follow you through this process and whether you go to the neurons and you don't it's all on you and that's the right decision for you and i support you one hundred percent and whether you go to the and then he say look. Don't use the footage one hundred percent like we're just here. I don't want to add. You've gone through enough like you don't need. I want to sleep at night knowing. I major life more miserable and we really walk that walk and it was very patient nkombe and you can talk to drew and it was a really beautiful experience but also in the course of making it and as she opened up her contacts and she opened up this world we also knew. Of course we are not going to be a pori and blind spots and we are not the right exactly the right team. So we sort of pitch this to oprah winfrey and she was like and to make a really long complicates very super short. She watched a rough cut which he was reluctant to watch because she had a different vision. And i said please watch this. I think this story so amazing so rich. And she watched it and she called me and said you know. Thank you for making me watch this. This is amazing. I am all in. I see it now. Yes let's do it your way let. Let's do a feature film. And i want to be you know a the lead executive producer on it and bring in my team and all that so i just want also make sure we had no again as our films find us. We were just okay. Let's see let's see us having but there was no thought in our mind ever that we'd be releasing this as a white fillet team without collaborating at some level with persons of color quite intimately and also. I want to say the subjects. Of course kiernan. Mayo and hubbard and doctor. Kimberly crenshaw Doctor joe morgan. I mean they were really formative with us. As was drew as was oprah was team on and on and on i mean it was it was all hands on deck will until the just to put a button on that i mean what happened ten days before the premiere and twenty minutes before a press release goes out is that she withdrew her involvement and supposedly. It was because she felt. The film wasn't ready for sundance and wanted to do more changes. Or whatever which i gather was news to you guys And so i guess it just begs the question and this you know she can still be a amazing philanthropist than great personnel of that a great humanitarian. But at the at the in this situation do you think that she just kind of caved to pressure from either russell simmons or others in that community of of hip hop community. Well i can just say that. We were working with very intimately on the film from june to september intimately with her team. They watch multiple cuts that gave notes extensive notes multiple screenings. They were so thrilled with it. That was their suggestion. Go to sundance. They had apple right the sentence application. They put out a press release prior to sundance his announcement to put their stamp on it. They're imprimatur what is it. We were so proud. We have this amazing villa blah blah. The next day sundance announces. They make the mistake. We just wanted to say a film that looks into the world of hip hop. I mean we've been down this road. We know you have to be super careful until you until you break news. You're quiet sundance. did the press. We wanted which was a hip but they included a picture of drew which an everyone immediately could do the math. She'd been in the new york times. And you know within seconds. I do know oprah's phone was ringing and i do know them. You know everything everything. Everything changed and all i can say about it is. It was a phenomenal film. Would not be what it was. It would not have been made without oprah have made without her wisdom and insight and vision and input throughout and her blessings throughout so so grateful to all of that and the irony of it is the film is very much about how black women continually come up against minefields that impede them from speaking in ways that white women and men don't and that are just racially coded and You know and it's just instructive that even with this film. We saw an meta way that kind of getting played out in its release and just a quick side note. I mean we. She years a few years ago. Was on this podcast and you see today. We go into somebody's personal history before we get into the work and i mean. She was very candid about the fact that she herself has been terribly subjected to sexual abuse from within and outside of her family. So i mean it's obviously a subject that she cares about but this was a bizarre twist in any way thankfully it ended well where she and apple or hbo. Max comes in. It's sad a very nice life. From what i can see but all right this brings us finally to the latest of your great collaborations and one that you've you guys are co directors on and that is ellen v farrow and. I believe. It's your first docu series. Ever right for either of you right correct. Yes it was. It was interesting. I mean in many ways Yeah actually a one long. So i mean we. We can help but Treating everything we do with just a great deal of care we so it was really. We were even. It's more it's more like a four and a half hour film. We did structure and of course so that it would have cliffhangers. It would take the audience because it was on. Hbo and not feel mass. Nowadays on hbo max so it was dropping once a week so we had to keep the audience with us but.

drew Kimberly crenshaw oprah kirby oprah winfrey joe morgan kiernan russell simmons hubbard Mayo apple new york times ellen v farrow hbo Max Hbo
"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"The other guy was had money but was changed which was part of his problem and so But of course what happened in that situation is that all the personal and emotional things come out so you happens in you know many most ongoing sexual interactions and And so it caught all that and then the other thing about this is interesting. Is that the same time this is happening. This is all been prescribed by therapist and the therapist is meeting with the client and meeting with the surrogate after each session to find out what what happened and you know and then give instructions on what should be done that so you had this triangle relates to you. Know i mean so much. Literature and film is based on the triangle. You have really writes. Got up there so it worked out. Well it was successful premiered phil matt's pro regional. La and it. Was you know in the film that's used to i. I don't think i like film festivals. Are batch shown. Some expert mirrors thousands of people would just be so explosive so you had his documentary which the light of day you know in two thousand people And then it went on to you know vision in home video so did well and so that that brings me to the last question for you before we merged these story lines and that is is there any rhyme or reason to the fact that all right so that deals in in one sense with sexuality the film that you were working on when amy met you Which i guess was at that point in late. Stages was sick. The life and death of bob flanagan supermasochist about a b. dsm celebrity in the last years of his life. Obviously there's a sexual element to that. And then of course in recent years together you guys have dealt with quite a bit of you know sexual abuse related stuff just is it purely coincidental or was there something. That explains why that would have been a area that you're drawn to it. Why wednesday. It's going to i think the number reasons one The most simple level. I was interested in getting something seen so if i was going to pick something that was you know. Psychologically even philosophically complex. I didn't want something that would be really interesting but nobody of watch. So that was that was somewhat of a business decision if you will But i also think a lot of people who are working in this arena are coming from the outside right our end And i noticed that all my work and in all of amy's in my work. I think has been about outsiders. You know. I mean homeless person running for office in santa monica dairy. I mean and and that's something. I've always been drawn to because you can you. It allows you position of critique. Right i mean some money. Usually outsiders have really thought this through. And then you can take this film and sort of enhanced and smash it against the culture in a way and you know. I think we've gotten better and better as smashing pretty hard in the culture has to react and to and i was always interested into power film in that way more in the beginning with them. You films Sick in private practice which was some about sex or therapy. It was more psychological. And the about the you know the the sexual politics that go on in a personal relationship of concerns but But yeah no. I mean it's i think it's i think a lot of people i mean. I think a lot of writers have have used a Sexuality as a way of critiquing mainstream society share or not just critiquing but sort of understand. You know packing right bearing witness or you know that. So rich. But i wanted to make a bad joke. Well dick pics burn fire. It was right that would have been the production company. So i of course you guys do meet at this at this i guess work-in-progress screening of of sick and i guess the film ends. And maybe you wanna take the story from their amy. Why did you guys man. And i'm blown away blown away and it was so smart. It was so much so different. From what i expected. You know documentary can really run a gamut would be very just information thank you and it could also be sort of you know an exquisite piece of art transport of and it also can be like transported but not that deep and it was transported than deep and it was also oddly. Enough very iranian. I mean it was about as you said a sadomasochist. But kirby didn't you know what the film does is. It really upsets your ability to hire guys in any facile way those relationships which is what you know. Conventional society typically does but actually went. Dairy does work is all about is about. Let's look at these top bottoms and see how they sort of are mutually constituent of as opposed to you know and let's look at what we consider aberrant behavior. It's actually normative or kahn. Co constituents who are the norm. And if you don't know what normal is if you don't have an understanding babar. Normal so come out of the screening mind blown gupta. Kirby say this was great. Gave him my notes. Of course that. Something's narrow change. And i said i said i'm working on this film on dairy and also up until this time you have to understand that you could pretty much clear room like if you sent that to anyone in la like it was like humor. Martian no one had heard of him or could care less like they were just turned in like. Look for some interesting to talk to. And kirby said oh my god. I love his work. I've read him like and so then i he said i'm happy to help you. And he actually did offer his help for quite some time. And i don't know if we'll have the same right memory but i think he then said why don't we go direct and i was like that and then after like a year i was like help. Come back you know please god. Let's go direct because you've been you've been at this for a few years already. You were running up against the wall. Yeah actually so that same time. I call debbie's in that editor on dead poet's society. I also called my girlfriend margaret waller. Who had been a professor of mine at amherst and she had gone to film school posts. Teaching amherst i. I did the same thing i was like. How and she said you. Gotta talk to richard cohen. He's the only filmmaker i know. He does a really cool stuff. So that's so at the same time. So i got connected to kirby. And i got connected to richard. Richard was making wasn't making so met richard esau his films actually deadly force was really good less sophisticated and complicated intellectually but really smart verite film and and so then i said what's your what are you doing..

phil matt bob flanagan amy santa monica La kirby babar kahn gupta Kirby poet's society margaret waller la debbie amherst richard cohen richard esau richard Richard
"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Four's twist of faith which explored sexual abuse in the catholic church. They have experienced their greatest successes on projects they made together. Which also tackled subjects related to sexual misconduct. Two thousand twelve the invisible war for which they were oscar-nominated in one peabody award. Shine a light on sexual assault in the military. Two thousand fifteen. The hunting ground for which they received the producers guild stanley kramer award exposed the epidemic of rape on college campuses. Two thousand twenty's on the record looked at numerous allegations of sexual misconduct on the part of hip hop mogul russell simmons and alan v pharaoh a four-party. Hbo docu series which dropped last. Spring examines allegations of sexual abuse. Made by dylan farrow against her father woody allen and has brought this team primetime emmy nominations for writing directing and producing. I'm talking about kirby. Dick and amy's eric over the course of our conversation. The sixty eight year old and fifty eight year old reflected on their very different journeys to filmmaking. How i crossed paths and began working together. How sexual misconduct became a running theme of their work. What they would have asked woody allen if he had agreed to be interviewed for allen. V pharaoh plus much more and so without further ado. Let's go to that conversation. Aiming kirby thank you so much for joining us on the podcast great to have you and to see you guys again and on this one. We really do begin at the beginning. We're gonna work our way to the current project but just to start with. I wonder if you can each share where you were born in raised. Amy can you kick us off on my gosh born framingham massachusetts than i was raised in newton gerrad socks until i was six years old and then we moved to la unsound then. I should add before we go to curvy. He also tell us. Just what your folks did for living always interesting to see how you know what people come from to get into this business. That's that's interesting. i'm my dad. May he rest in. Peace was a holocaust survivor and when he was liberated from the camps. He couldn't speak any english so he went into the sciences and he ended up getting a phd in physics and actually did the heat. Shields for the apollo's only which is quite extraordinary. I like it's interesting to share right because like what we lose from these genocides traumatic events that total flipped on others. He managed to do that. But then in the seventies whitaker corporation would ham and they said we wanna do we want to compete with nasa and we want to start a space program on the west coast. This was kind of when the boom appre now. Space exploration had sort of a very optimistic about it ended he moved. That's why we all moved from boston to To la and then of course the all of that fantasma exploded imploded and it vanished and so that actually for my child owned car wash so it was like there wasn't a lot of freelance for for nuclear physicists. Where else do you go to what. He did inaccuracies. Each and so i mean base us was was a baby. Ten a twinkle at his mother's is so so that was that and actually so i grew up. I i did cashier on weekends and my brother did what we call. Kiss off you know. Clean the cars off and so he he Ran a car. Wash for about ten years was continually because he was as entrepreneurs continue looking for something else to do and then by the time he was forty and i got into college. He had started a diagnostic company. That tests blood. And that's what he ended up doing and actually became a very successful businessman so it was kind of a very interesting career and my mom was a speech therapist when she thought she was marrying a physicist did that when he was doing that they apologize and then everything else as she kind of just when he did buy a car wash. She worked the car wash and then when he did his sled testing business. She ended up doing marketing so she was an adjunct to his his work career. Okay kirby although you not quite as sensational But i do want to say about it is that it's quite it's sort of very instructive story about what immigrants bring to this country. Brian i mean he was able to. His father was able to making credible contributions in two completed fields. My parents were teachers My dad was a high school teacher. My mom's a junior high teacher. I grow up. i was born in phoenix. Arizona and grew up in tucson arizona. Left when i was eighteen to go to college. You know is kind of a bourbon live. It was a good time. You bring in tucson other than the fact that it was It was at that time that was during the cold war and the cuban missile crisis. And so what the. Us government decided to put a ring of found a missile icbm missiles around the say right so it was like everybody just sitting. It'd be completing ring. But i will say but my parents they were always a sort of. They were always activists in their own way. I mean there were very involved in the methodist church. They were involved in the original great boycott. I remember going out and picketing and and things like that you know when i was. I don't know early teens. I think my mother was the first person. Introduce the concept of reconciling church to her. You know of. I think it was arizona. California division of the matha church and she was the first person to say you know we should embrace gays and lesbians and And to the first person to kind of do that. At a at a nash regional conferences. So they're always they're always some you know activists arson social justice. And if i say one more thing about your point kirby about The emigrants is that my dad actually made it a point once. He was in a position When he had that blood testing business the diagnostic business that he started his forties of hiring immigrants. Pretty much exclusively. Because he wanted to do for them. What this country had done for him. So i remember growing up. We had the boat the boat people. He had russian immigrants. We had an iranian child. Live with us. You know one. When the shah fell he got out his parents. And that was really. I learned to that up-close. And i do remember at the dinner table. My mom said that at one point. Someone ran from the backward. The russians are fighting the russians brennan. She turned on the radio thinking. Oh my god and now it was just the russians were fighting back with a department.

kirby alan v pharaoh woody allen dylan farrow stanley kramer peabody award whitaker corporation fantasma russell simmons catholic church emmy Hbo la oscar framingham amy eric newton Dick allen
"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"It's an incredible in any body of investigative reporting on an do think that combination of him confessing Essentially to serial groping at very minimum 'cause he says know I'm used to that. She's the senate chilling phrase in this context And then also the the quality of just being able to experience what some of these women went through. I do think that change the the dialogue around the case. I think it made it harder for the first time for a prosecutors not to go after him more aggressively in so many instances of the legal system dropping the ball and harvey weinstein evading accountability I think has been so many things. It's a critical mass of factors. You know the the new york times did incredible reporting on the harassment side of things not just need a whole team at the new yorker brought together this reporting about the rape allegations There is a cultural moment. Unscrew ling That was related to all that reporting but also separate in some ways where i think a lot of women were standing up and saying enough And i think all of that came together in a moment where there had to be more accountability in this case sadly than than there is in so many cases to this day But i do think what. We can only speculate what the universe would be like without that tape. We all owe a debt of gratitude to amber gutierrez Because there's that whole caper of tape. And then there is a whole other saga of her life falling apart and yet her fighting to preserve the evidence. So i was happy. We were able to to do an episode jerry really dive deep on that. The taped conversation does reach you. It is chilling as you said and it is a visceral reaction. You have to it. One of the things. I mean it's there many in it The the aggression the the insistence and the word. He kept used the friendship when they're not actually friends. It felt so manipulative to save friendship. When the undercurrent on that is you wanna maintain your friendship with me. It's how you get the things that you want from the power. They weren't friends in any way. And there's just no way to listen to that and not feel uncomfortable all of it. Yeah it's very very dark And it feels very practiced and his side of that. Conversation is very sinister. I think that end the for the series in particular where you're seeing and hearing things it's much more visceral in some ways you know. I did a lot of thinking about What is the right. Balance of including frank accounts of details because there's power In that kind of honesty And not putting people through the ringer more than they have to be or bludgeoning people with the darkness of this You know the the show actually While it has some dark. And i think for some potentially triggering moments or is on the side of focusing on sources and their bravery rather than on weinstein to even that tape in the way we frame it and i think one of the things that i personally emerged from listening to that tape with is just with an emphasis on the incredible ingenuity of amber gutierez. Because you go into that tape. I think expecting to some extent when you just see on paper. What's happening this very very young model of who. He's just groped she. Unbeknownst damn collaborating with the police agrees to a follow up drink She doesn't speak english well at all. She speaks english much better now. But this was some years ago And so she's speaking haltingly. And you go into this conversation as a listener thinking oh well. He's playing her. He has this routine and he thinks he can just steamroller with But what emerges as you listen and understand the full context and and you're my conversation with her along the way is she really is playing him. And it's this very strangely empowering moment to of someone who took risks it was scary but was interested. Insanely brave at did prevail. Yoshi does corner him into a confession and she is in those early moments where he thinks he's kind of doing his usual. I guess he would call it a seduction routine She's actually running circles around him. You know she's kind of she's playing apart She's leaning into those things that he hunts and She's doing it all very knowingly. So i think things for the series in particular were included Not just ever. Further darkness order shock value. But because they have that element of let's spend some time with a person who we can we can learn a little from frankly Because they are that brave and their story is that empowering and inspiring despite the darkness. I was heartbroken for his assistant. Rana chiel. I think i'm pronouncing her name correctly. I hope i am She was talking about harvey weinstein. Not being the only monster in the room when she was discussing with her lawyers and the other lawyers the nondisclosure agreement. How do we arrive in a place where the lawyers on both sides are trying to get towards settlement. I assumed that's just because it's so hard to prosecute these cases and what you run up against. Which is this story is never going to get published ronin. This is never going to happen. That basically the lawyers are saying. This is the best you're gonna do. I just couldn't believe that the lawyers on her side were arguing on behalf of. Yeah the money will just make this go away. And it made and made me feel like they were just interested in getting their cut as opposed to actually helping her yeah and you know part of investigative reporting his talking to every person on every side of the situation and understanding all the nuances night. I did have contact with that legal team when i first reported Her and zelda perkins's stories You know these. The two assistance in england who took action against weinstein. And it's it's a fascinating episode of the show where you start to see again in keeping with the theme i just mentioned people have rising up and starting to fracture the system. He had built An zelda marina deserve a lot of credit for doing that You know The lawyers on the other side of that equation the people representing them. I would argue as you might expect that day am briefed them all available options and it wasn't that they were railroading them in any way I think the truth is very much in line for between is saying and it's not necessarily down to an individual case of bad lawyering or any kind of technical breach of duties of care here has to their client I think it's a wider problem. Nice as as an attorney myself. It's an unimaginative profession. at times. When it comes to this kind of contract law and the safest easiest path is to get your client payout take a cut at pal and then put the thing to bed and you actually get in in the industry Beyond this individual legal team that we're talking about a whole lot of who are repeat players with that business model young. Gloria allred someone who I've talked to on record. Who has been sort of quoted in pieces. I've done about nondisclosure agreements of who really defends that practice. And that's our business model. Read like she has to present to her client the option of signing a nondisclosure agreement and getting a payout and she makes no bones about the fact that she not only presents that option but embraces it as the right outcome and a lot of situations..

harvey weinstein amber gutierrez amber gutierez weinstein Rana chiel new york times senate jerry Yoshi frank zelda perkins zelda marina england Gloria allred
"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"It is riveting catching kill the podcast tapes and it is a slice of the work. That ronin does. How important was the taped conversation of weinstein. Can any of this happen if you do not have that tape conversation. Does it all die all of your reporting for a year. All of the reporting killed by nbc. None of it would see the light of day without that taped conversation. It's really hard to say and it. Some it's hugely important. There's no doubt about that Hearing him in trap someone is chilling. Any of a lot of people. Very triggering It's hard tape to here. We owe that to amber gutierrez. A this incredible woman who Went to extraordinary lengths and had to show such ingenuity. I to participate in a frankly terrifying. Police sting operation Where she had to go back to a guy who had behaved in a way that really traumatized her and try to entrap them The the very next day and there were plainclothes officers. Sort of hidden around seemed then at as we lay out on the show. And you get to actually. Here's in real time. Through the state she gets separated from them and she's alone with him and it's very very scary and you can hear how scare she is And you can hear how out of line and increasingly unhinged he's getting but she did extract a confession and a. That's an incredible thing in any criminal case..

amber gutierrez weinstein nbc
"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"One of the final episodes of the hbo show is a very strange thing which is sitting down for a conversation and a drink with a guy who staked me out and follow me around ostrovsky And i talk about in in the book and in the show Just how audit was to have someone come out of the woodwork and broker a secret meeting and say hey you know here all the pictures from when i was when i was following you around. That's crazy. And i wanna get into the specifics of that in a bit. And i do want to touch on all of these stories because i do have a lot of questions about what the women here. That seems remarkably unfair. But when you started this entire process and you're trying to do a casting couch story on just the understood. Hollywood thing of the way you get parts for sexual favors. You imagined the highest point of that story was what well as initially conceived. It was part of my usual beat at the today show and this again gets more into to my story which is a little separate from the show. These two things are designed to be complementary can read the book and you can watch the show and and there's some overlap they connect but It's almost like you know you get to spend more time with characters that lived only more briefly in in the plot of the book where there's lots of different things going on in the show you get to spend an hour with people who showed incredible bravery and understand a little more how that emerged from their back stories But in the in the book do a little bit. Were into my own backstory. Which is i was. Add something of low point. When i started reporting on this on. You got a little bit of this in the rich mchugh profile on the show to rich being the producer i mentioned because when he first was paired with me i had had a daily cable news show. That was Canceled I was doing. Investigative reporting tape segments for different embassy shows And you know. I was guest hosting the today. Show and Figuring out what. I wanted to do in a career where i add. You know both been given incredible opportunities then also know i think it was viewed a little bit as a laughing stock and a failure Just because i had a low rated cable show Although it was critically well received in the very end when frankly we started doing more of this investigative reporting and breaking news reporting that was substantive And less about headline reading which is not what people want in the middle of the day. But was what i came to care about and so i kind of you know i was. I was tackling both an existential challenge at that point. Of what do i do And knock feeling particularly Empowered in where. I was careerwise Though again i acknowledge how fortunate i was in so many ways And i was also coming on the other hand to believe sincerely in that deeper investigative reporting But the the upper limit your question of of what that amounted to was in no well regarded. Occasionally a awards recognized shorter taped segments for for network news and i would You know in addition to sort of doing hosting duties and stuff. Here and there. I would come on today. Dacia say hey matt lauer has a five minute segment but sproule tape couple questions at it. And that was what this was supposed to be a series on. Hollywood pitched and i. It was an ongoing negotiation. Right up to the end. How dark could get with that And never of news particularly morning. Television is understandably not the most natural fit for the very very dark topics To their credit they ran pieces in that series on. You know gender diversity in hollywood Were talked to women. Directors about the problems with the lack of women directors in hollywood There were a handful of pieces that y'all got substantive issues but this piece about the casting couch became something of an albatross because it was darker Because increasingly it became a piece about harvey weinstein And because we each piece of evidence that we gathered the the network became more and more uncomfortable with it which is all now sort of old history although it's been striking Having rich this producer lay all allowed in such a kind of frank way on the show. That there's been this resurgence of reaction to it But but all. I thought at the outset was you know will will earn this on the today. Show around oscar season And it'll be one of several role in this series and that's it but but i do. I do think the moment the harvey evidence starting to come into play. It became apparent that it was going to be bigger than that. This episode.

ostrovsky hbo Hollywood mchugh sproule matt lauer Dacia hollywood harvey weinstein frank oscar harvey
"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Check out his documentary series. Catch and kill the podcast tapes. It's currently streaming on hbo max. It's very strong work. His work has been strong for a long time even though he's only thirty three years old which is amazing to me he essentially and i don't know if he wants to be taking credit for this but his reporting on harvey weinstein helped ignite the me too movement so i am thrilled to ask a bunch of questions of ronan farrow. Because the journalism he's been doing is exceptional and exceptionally hard for a while. Now so ronin. Let me begin with. When did you doubt the most that this story would ever see. The light of day on harvey weinstein. May i remember. There was a period that i describe in the book catch and kill Which is more semi story reporting the story the the podcast tapes just wrapped on hbo and is now streaming as of today on hbo. Max is more sort of stories. it's deep dives into the sometimes really quite epic saga. That are totally separate for the sources lips through an and in that respect i was grateful to build a shift. The focus but to your question about my own doubts that lives in the story that separately told him the book and Although it's touched on a little bit here and there in the tv series on an aching him both wanting that comes across as you know when you get fired for your job Yo when you hear from a bunch of executives at a news network and just executives but friends who've worked with for some time You when you hear them that this is never going to be a story and that people fundamentally will not care about this And not just that. You don't have enough evidence to room story But that you know it's just not that big a deal Which was no oppenheim. The the president of nbc news is contention e you can get to a point where you question. What you fundamentally no would every fiber of your being. Which is you've got a recording of a guy admitting to a sexual assault that the police had suppressed. You've and. I should clarify that. The digital and legal system had suppressed. Because actually the cops want very much for that tape to get out You know we had multiple women on the record All of this is detailed in the in the hbo documentary and understandably. in retrospect. It looks pretty bad that people were racing to to get that out publicly. But when you're inside that and your career is on the line and it's all a cost benefit analysis and Again you have all of these voices in your the executives. I mentioned but also people like you know my agent You know people in the industry A lot of the sources understandably from a place of trauma also saying you know this is just not a story that's ever gonna see the light of day. The odds are too great Absolutely there there. Were times where i had no idea what the outcome was going to be an and found myself thinking what what do i do. I remember My partner john lovett. Who's also shows up in this book. saying to me recently. Do you remember when we were talking about. Like do put it up as a medium post like what is gonna happen to this reporting Because he was actually one of the rare people to his immense credit who never wavered even once you know said from the very very first piece of evidence i got. You know you've got everything online and incredibly important story. How many people like that were there very very few you know. I think there were people within the group of sources who kept me going Because they were holding strong and never wavered in their understanding of how important it was You know there were other sources. As i mentioned who i think were dealing with so much personal trauma That it was much more a process pacek document and in both the book and the podcast and and this show Of trying desperately to convince them to stick with him but there were other sources People like emily nestor. Who's one of the first to go on the record in this particular body of reporting Who really were ten of unwavering. They never withdrew and then there was. There was john on my partner. I mentioned that i'm actually. I'm thinking for the first time. Because i haven't been posed this question before. I honestly don't think there's anyone else who leads to mind. There's my producer. There's an episode of the hbo show which i am really proud of. And i'm glad is out there in the public about my producer at nbc. Rich mchugh And he is someone who actually also never wavered. We were going through the same cost benefit analysis together and He talks about in the show having kids to support and family on the line and nevertheless really feeling this was worth putting his job on the line for and i drew a lot of strength for that and i think the outcome might have been quite different if he hadn't stopped by me because i was very much being to use a slightly overused term right now gasoline. But i think it's the truest definition of that you know to have a group of people. Descend on you and say no. You're judge menaced totally not correct. This is not news This will never be news And he was having none of that you know. He was a more experienced professional in network news than i was and from the very beginning. Said you know this suspicious or shutting down. The story had been at other networks. This is not how it's supposed to work And encouraged me to keep going even when he couldn't because he was you know they're under contract at that network and they killed day. I've heard you interviewed enough to know that you know the journalist is supposed to be the story and the victims here the brave ones. Maybe you don't look at yourself as the same kind of brave and maybe you say. I'm not a victim here. But while i'm watching catch and kill what i felt on your. I can't believe how scared this dude had to be. Just scared when nbc comes down on you career on the line and now the money and the lawyers are pelting you with all manner of threats like of course. Your confidence is gonna get shaken. How could it not. Yeah it did get and it was a hard period mental health wise and You know your way to clock a challenge here which is Really have a worked very hard to keep the focus on the sources Not from any nobility so much as just you know my posture for a very long time in this story was banging my head against the wall trying to get people to pay attention to their stories And i didn't want to distract from that And that was the case for several years. But i did come to realize over time that what you're saying is true And that connects to a separate wider issue of importance which is journalists. Do get threatened all the time in the united states. It's beyond united states sometimes with much higher stakes outside of countries where there legal protections of for the free press and eight felt important to me over time as i lived with the fact that you're alluding to of how scary this was To tell that story and sober way that wasn't overly dramatic or overblown or anything but That god at just what. Investigative journalists confront when they go up against powerful interests. And i as i am alluding to with that reference to countries around the world where journalists face a lot more direct violence Had it much much more fortunate than many but It is a problem. And it's definitely not fun. getting chased around smear efforts and having move out of your place because it's no longer safe place and i'm really grateful for the sources who allowed me to tell that story and being able to document that And prove mentally proved with documents you know held up in court and stuff is all figured in the criminal prosecution of weinstein To be able to prove that your being a chaste and surveilled in that way makes a big difference. And that's only possible because there were Conscientious whistle blowers within that operation and.

hbo harvey weinstein ronan farrow john lovett emily nestor oppenheim Rich mchugh nbc news Max nbc john united states weinstein
"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"It's one of the parts of this. That i am most grateful to have been able to get out it. It's an incredible thing to witness. The new yorkers backtracking process. And it's the only way. I was able to withstand all threats coming at me and i wish that That regret fact checking were more commonplace in journalism. Because i think it is the best antidote to the kind of skepticism about the media. That's out there and the accusations of fake news Which are infuriating. Because of course journalism is a constitutionally protected profession for reason cornerstone of democracy you have to access to facts tavern informed of body politic. And there's a reason why it's suchitra routine historical currents that fascists and You leaders who are against the rule of law want to consolidate power go hard on journalists And try to weaponize rhetoric that conveys the public that journalists are enemies so it feels like an important moment actually to talk about and demystify what journalists actually do and particularly the corner of journalism that These stories exist in which is one. That's attended with a whole lot of care and caution and you were not perfect. But i i can tell you that. There is a sincere and at times backbreaking effort to really get the facts right and convey them in all of their complication And that's a that's another tribute to the sources in these stories because particularly for this kind of very traumatizing Set of facts. I'm requiring sources to not just disclose those facts but really relive them in the context of a very intense and sometimes adversarial grilling and i'm grateful for all the sources who've come forward and said that that was a healing process for them that that was a good thing for them but Make no mistake about it. You know. I'm i'm in some ways in an adversarial posture in that process. I i share. I think sources Commitment to getting the truth out and believe that that's important and that they're doing something brave But the best way for me to serve them is actually to pick apart their story and identify inconsistencies. And make sure to read or knows about that. you're you're subjecting yourself to scrutiny of your credibility when you come forward with these kinds of serious criminal allegations and that some that's a scary hard thing and you know again. It underscores for me. Just how brave. The characters in the series. The women who helped to out the truth in this case And some end to have people like that. That spy who Had a change of heart Who helps to expose and dismantle a system But it really reminds me of their bravery and all of that works hand in hand with the system that you're talking about where there is a team of editors in fact checkers that are scrubbing and re scrubbing and standing up to legal threats. Partly Because they can really say. We did our due diligence. We really really left nose tone unturned. And we really faring of all of the different sides of this. It really is remarkable. Work documentary series catching. Kill the podcast tapes. You should watch it on. Hbo last question. And we'll get you out of here among you mentioned a spy among the places where you personally felt threatened. Nbc not supporting you letting you go We've chronicled some of the things buried in lawyers threatening you. God knows what kind of ruined and they were threatening you with. And then you know black ops following you around surprised at Detectives where did you feel most threatend. I mean i think it's that it's that sort of interesting where the story just didn't have a home And my career have a home and a there was a you know i try to make the story. Not about me Bud in the context told about before finally understanding that there was some utility. I think for others and telling my story. I i have now knowledged. Those two things came together You know the personal interests And fears about my own future and safety. And then you know the concerns and sincere caring about the fate of the story and what was going to happen to potentially other women who might get hurt. If i didn't get those facts out so all of that kind of converged very complicated way for me And i think i just hit a point honestly where there was no way out but through at a lot of journalist center had that feeling on top stories where you're getting a lot of incoming on it At a certain point you know when you've sort of we've given up the the job and the career path you thought you were going to have and i. You can't really be in your home at that point in time And you don't know whether the work is going to see the day. Yes if i say that. That's hard moment. That was probably the top spot for me. But you know you you in this point earlier. Dan and it's when. I make a lot. But i make it a lot relief. I have a. I was bullied by the fact that i was dealing with. Incredibly brave sources aside from anything else embarrassed to let them down very embarrassing to you know get on the record have that long process. Put them on camera and then say hey so. I'm working on getting out. I promise. I can't tell you where to hell but i'm working on it. Stay with me. Stay with me And you know more seriously than an embarrassment. The contrast was always apparent to me where they were reliving. Something really tough. Some of them it became increasingly apparent. Were also dealing with espionage and intimidation than legal threats. And i couldn't wallow too much in my own situation which was I think you know a smaller spike on the richter scale of pain and trauma relatively speaking grateful for your time. Grateful for your work. Grateful for your empathy grateful in general for what it is that you're doing on behalf of journalism. Thank you for spending this time with us ronin and i so appreciate it as always such a respectful and interesting and thoughtful conversation and a lot of the press. I do around a project like this is very very bite size so It's nice to have a conversation With such evident carrying and with some breathing room. I have a thousand more questions. But i don't want to take up more of your time with free sometimes been pressed. You put up with me twice in a row in as many weeks Thank you sir. Grateful for all you do thank you..

Hbo Nbc Bud Dan trauma
"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"When it comes to this kind of contract law and the safest easiest path is to get your client payout take a cut at pal and then put the thing to bed and you actually get in in the industry Beyond this individual legal team that we're talking about a whole lot of who are repeat players with that business model young. Gloria allred someone who I've talked to on record. Who has been sort of quoted in pieces. I've done about nondisclosure agreements of who really defends that practice. And that's our business model. Read like she has to present to her client the option of signing a nondisclosure agreement and getting a payout and she makes no bones about the fact that she not only presents that option but embraces it as the right outcome and a lot of situations. I adopt a slightly different view. United i think a system in which the default option is silence And which that option has tremendous center of gravity right because there is a payout associated with that you wind up with a on public policy level A real health problem essentially for lack of a better phrase because you get repeat offenders You know this. This is literally public safety issue And these kinds of legal structures allow for repeat offense in a chilling number of cases many of which have never made public nachos through me but through the whole bunch of reporters. And then the second thing that i've seen happen with these nondisclosure agreements lawyers pushing clients towards them. Is you wind up with clients who are really unhappy. You know a lot of the sources in these stories who signed nondisclosure agreements Found that it took a tremendous psychological toll. It's part of the amber gutierrez episode in this. Show that you know she takes a million dollar payout and really grapples with the emotional way of that and she only did it after the cops had had dropped the case and she had really tried for all of the non payout options and was kind of quarter you know. She makes a persuasive case of that. I entirely understand why someone might take that money But it is telling that if she struggled with how to live with that and worried about other women getting her and ultimately breached that nonsense karimun And gotha the tapu which is an incredibly brave thing to do You know that is really really gutsy and terrifying for anyone to stare down And i am very very happy to say that you know. She's thrived in the wake of that. But what zelda ruina experienced was you know sadly a chilling reflection of how these legal structures protect abusers. Because that happened. In the ninety s and ambrose case happens in only twenty four fifteen And it all those years between zeldin rowena both talked about you know worrying about the fact that they tried their best to change things but ultimately did take a payout in exchange for silence Worrying about how that might have You know allowed others to to get hurt. And i don't think that responsibility is at all on them But i respect immensely the the degree of moral reflection. They both showed an and the fact that they both ultimately agreed to talk about this. Zelda helped put the initial reporting an Ruin is incredibly eloquent and powerful talking about the burdens of silence. And the reasons why. She didn't finish julie speak. She talks about hiding in her bathroom when i was initially calling and Not knowing what to do and it's very gratifying. All this time later to to see her telling her story in different firms am really grateful for it. You're basically exposing the business of being a rapist. The way that harvey weinstein was doing it which is just do what you want and then have the lawyers come in and throw money on it and you can get the nondisclosure agreement and then you get the silence and you can keep doing it. So what are the consequences of these women breaking or violating those nondisclosure agreement. Well it depends on the specifics of the contract. You know i never cavalierly tell my sources. They're not gonna face any legal risks if they breach nondisclosure agreement of course they can theoretically be enforced. That said i think one of the lessons of this moment where there's been a lot of good reporting a lot of people on nondisclosure agreements. That were technically supposed to be confidential. i think one of the lessons that moment is there are limits to the enforceability of these agreements. And you know it depends on some specific. Is there a private arbitration clause in this agreement where they can kind of paul you into mediation Or does it require a you know an actual courtroom process where there's going to be a discovery phase and people are going to open themselves up to all sorts of exposure more things if they enforce these contracts But by and large. I do think you know once. The cat is out of the bag with these kinds of disclosures. The utility of enforcement declines steeply And with most configurations of contracts There are serious downsides to enforcement Not for all nda's in generating plague your run of the mill. Work non disclosure agreement. All of us have lately signed. Some version of this can be fine. You know if you sign a legitimate contract to protect trade secrets of the company are working on you know that's fine and enforcing that can look fine But you know what. I've found this reporting across dozens and dozens of sources breaking non-disclosure agreements is. If you have been using a nondisclosure agreement to cover up a crime Or attempts to cover up a crime enforcing it can look really really bad and lead to the exposure of a whole lot more details And you know arbitration or not There's always the potential for the enforcement process leaking on. So that's kind of a a nerdy and technical slightly meandering answer to your question but i think that As much as those sources are taking risks they are calculated risks and it is telling that You know across these stories sources breaking again as including ember gutierrez have not been hauled into court agreements have not been enforced And i think that they're doing so has been celebrated correctly because there are exposing wrongdoing. An it's really in the public interest at so thankfully after a lot of tough conversations with a lot of sources You know my experience by large has been that. They're they feel good about the fact that they took that risk. I was grateful ronin that you covered the journalism as someone who cares about journalism that you showed the audience and catch. And kill the podcast tapes. Just how meticulous and how thorough. The vetting has to be for every word of what it is. You're writing and how careful it has to be at a time. When journalism is diluted in a number of different ways. I was grateful that you guys were showing just how meticulous this has to be in order to get published..

amber gutierrez zelda ruina Gloria allred zeldin rowena ambrose harvey weinstein Zelda United julie nda ember gutierrez paul
"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Also the the quality of just being able to experience what some of these women went through. I do think that change the the dialogue around the case. I think it made it harder for the first time for a prosecutors not to go after him more aggressively in so many instances of the legal system dropping the ball and harvey weinstein evading accountability I think has been so many things. It's a critical mass of factors. You know the the new york times did incredible reporting on the harassment side of things not just need a whole team at the new yorker him brought together this reporting about the rape allegations. is a cultural moment. Unscrew ling That was related to all that reporting but also separate in some ways where i think a lot of women were standing up and saying enough And i think all of that came together in a moment where there had to be more accountability in this case sadly than than there is in so many cases to this day But i do think what. We can only speculate what the universe would be like without that tape. We all owe a debt of gratitude to amber gutierrez Because there's that whole caper of tape. And then there is a whole other saga of her life falling apart and yet her fighting to preserve the evidence. So i was happy. We were able to to do an episode jerry really dive deep on that. The taped conversation does reach you. It is chilling as you said and it is a visceral reaction. You have to it. One of the things. I mean it's there many in it The the aggression the the insistence and the word. He kept used the friendship when they're not actually friends. It felt so manipulative to save friendship. When the undercurrent on that is you wanna maintain your friendship with me. It's how you get the things that you want from the power. They weren't friends in any way. And there's just no way to listen to that and not feel uncomfortable all of it. Yeah it's very very dark And it feels very practiced and his side of that. Conversation is very sinister. I think that end the for the series in particular where you're seeing and hearing things it's much more visceral in some ways you know. I did a lot of thinking about What is the right. Balance of including frank accounts of details because there's power In that kind of honesty And not putting people through the ringer more than they have to be or bludgeoning people with the darkness of this You know the the show actually While it has some dark. And i think for some potentially triggering moments errs on the side of focusing on sources and their bravery rather than on weinstein to even that tape in the way we frame it and i think one of the things that i personally emerged from listening to that tape with is just with an emphasis on the incredible ingenuity of amber gutierez. Because you go into that tape. I think expecting to some extent when you just see on paper what's happening this very very young model of who. He's just groped she. Unbeknownst damn collaborating with the police agrees to a follow up drink She doesn't speak english well at all. She speaks english much better now. But this was some years ago And so she's speaking haltingly. And you go into this conversation as a listener thinking oh well. He's playing her. He has this routine and he thinks he can just steamroller with But what emerges as you listen and understand the full context and and you're my conversation with her along the way is she really is playing him. And it's this very strangely empowering moment to of someone who took risks it was scary but was interested. Insanely brave at did prevail. Yoshi does corner him into a confession And she is in those early moments where he thinks. He's kind of doing his usual. I guess he would call it a seduction routine She's actually running circles around him. You know she's kind of she's playing apart She's leaning into those things that he hunts and She's doing it all very knowingly. So i think things for the series in particular were included Not just ever. Further darkness order shock value. But because they have that element of let's spend some time with a person who we can we can learn a little from frankly Because they are that brave and their story is that empowering and inspiring despite the darkness. I was heartbroken for his assistant. Rana chiel. I think i'm pronouncing her name correctly. I hope i am She was talking about harvey weinstein. Not being the only monster in the room when she was discussing with her lawyers and the other lawyers the nondisclosure agreement. How do we arrive in a place where the lawyers on both sides are trying to get towards settlement. I assumed that's just because it's so hard to prosecute these cases and what you run up against. Which is this story is never going to get published ronin. This is never going to happen. That basically the lawyers are saying. This is the best you're gonna do. I just couldn't believe that the lawyers on her side were arguing on behalf of. Yeah the money will just make this go away. And it made and made me feel like they were just interested in getting their cut as opposed to actually helping her yeah and you know part of investigative reporting his talking to every person on every side of the situation and understanding all the nuances night. I did have contact with that legal team when i first reported Her and zelda perkins's stories You know these. The two assistance in england who took action against weinstein. And it's it's a fascinating episode of the show where you start to see again in keeping with the theme i just mentioned people have rising up and starting to fracture the system. He had built An zelda marina deserve a lot of credit for doing that You know The lawyers on the other side of that equation the people representing them. I would argue as you might expect that day am briefed them all available options and it wasn't that they were railroading them in any way I think the truth is very much in line for between is saying and it's not necessarily down to an individual case of bad lawyering or any kind of technical breach of duties of care here has to their client I think it's a wider problem. Nice as an attorney myself. It's an unimaginative profession..

amber gutierrez harvey weinstein amber gutierez weinstein new york times Rana chiel jerry Yoshi frank zelda perkins zelda marina england
"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"The book and in the show Just how audit was to have someone come out of the woodwork and broker a secret meeting and say hey you know here all the pictures from when i was when i was following you around. That's crazy. And i wanna get into the specifics of that in a bit. And i do want to touch on all of these stories because i do have a lot of questions about what the women here. That seems remarkably unfair. But when you started this entire process and you're trying to do a casting couch story on just the understood. Hollywood thing of the way you get parts for sexual favors. You imagined the highest point of that story was what well as initially conceived. It was part of my usual beat at the today. Show and this again gets more into to my story which is a little separate from the scho- these two things are designed to be complementary can read the book and you can watch the show and and there's some overlap they connect but It's almost like you know you get to spend more time with characters that lived only more briefly in in the plot of the book where there's lots of different things going on in the show you get to spend an hour with people who showed incredible bravery and understand a little more how that emerged from their back stories But in the in the book do a little bit. Were into my own backstory. Which is was. Add something of low point. When i started reporting on this on. You got a little bit of this in the rich mchugh profile on the show to rich being the producer i mentioned because when he first was paired with me i had had a daily cable news show. That was Canceled I was doing. Investigative reporting tape segments for different embassy shows And you know. I was guest hosting the today. Show and Figuring out what. I wanted to do in a career where i add. You know both been given incredible opportunities. Then also i think it was viewed a little bit as a laughing stock and a failure Just because i had a low rated cable show Although it was critically well received in the very end when frankly we started doing more of this investigative reporting and breaking news reporting that was substantive and less about headline reading Which is not what people want in the middle of the day. But was what i came to care about and so i kind of you know i was. I was tackling both an existential challenge at that point. Of what do i do And knock feeling particularly Empowered in where. I was careerwise Though again i acknowledge how fortunate i was in so many ways And i was also coming on the other hand to believe sincerely in that deeper investigative reporting But the the upper limit your question of what that amounted to was in no well regarded occasionally. A awards recognized shorter taped segments for for network news and i would You know in addition to sort of doing hosting duties and stuff here and there. I would come on into dacia say. Hey matt lauer. Who's a five minute segment but sproule tape couple questions at it. And that was what this was supposed to be a series on. Hollywood pitched and i. It was an ongoing negotiation. Right up to the end. How dark could get with that And never of news particularly morning. Television is understandably not the most natural fit for the very very dark topics To their credit they ran pieces in that series on. You know gender diversity in hollywood Were talked to women. Directors about the problems with the lack of women directors in hollywood There were a handful of pieces that y'all got substantive issues but this piece about the casting couch became something of an albatross because it was darker Because increasingly it became a piece about harvey weinstein And because we each piece of evidence that we gathered the the network became more and more uncomfortable with it which is all now sort of old history although it's been striking Having rich this producer lay allowed in such a kind of frank way on the show. That there's been this resurgence of reaction to it But but all. I thought at the outset was you know will will earn this on the today. Show around oscar season And it'll be one of several role in this series and that's it but but i do. I do think the moment the harvey evidence starting to come into play. It became apparent that it was going to be bigger that this episode is brought to you by dr king sportsbook. 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Indiana pennsylvania only new customers only restrictions apply see draftkings dot com slash sports for details gambling problem. Call one hundred gambler. Earn indiana one. Eight hundred nine with the documentary. Hbo max now is where it's streaming. It is riveting catching kill the podcast tapes and it is a slice of the work. That ronin does. How important was the taped conversation of weinstein. Can any of this happen if you do not have that tape conversation. Does it all die all of your reporting for a year. All of the reporting killed by nbc. None of it would see the light of day without that taped conversation. It's really hard to say and it. Some it's hugely important. There's no doubt about that Hearing him in trap someone is chilling. Any of a lot of people. Very triggering It's hard tape to here. We owe that to amber gutierrez. A this incredible woman who Went to extraordinary lengths and had to show such ingenuity. I to participate in a frankly terrifying. Police sting operation Where she had to go back to a guy who had behaved in a way that really traumatized her and try to entrap them Then the very next day and there were plainclothes officers. Sort of hidden around seemed then at as we lay out on the show. And you get to actually. Here's serve in real time through the state. She gets separated from them and she's alone with him and it's very very scary and you can hear how scare she is And you can hear how out of line and increasingly unhinged he's getting but she did extract a confession and a. That's an incredible thing in any criminal case. It's an incredible in any body of investigative reporting on an do think that combination of him confessing Essentially to serial groping at very minimum 'cause he says know I'm used to that. She's the senate chilling phrase in this context.

sproule Hollywood mchugh dr king sportsbook america hollywood matt lauer harvey weinstein oscar harvey frank tokyo amber gutierrez weinstein Hbo dan Indiana new jersey
"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"farrow" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"When did you doubt the most that this story would ever see. The light of day on harvey weinstein. May i remember. There was a period that i describe in the book catch and kill Which is more semi story reporting the story the the podcast tapes which just wrapped on hbo and is now streaming as of today on hbo. Max is more sort of stories. it's deep dives into the sometimes really quite epic saga. That are totally separate for the sources lips through an and in that respect i was grateful to build a shift the focus but to your question about my own doubts that lives in the story that separately told in the book and although it's touched on a little bit here and there in the tv series on an aching him both wanting that comes across as you know when you get fired for your job. y- when you hear from a bunch of executives at a news network and just executives but friends who've worked with for some time You when you hear them that this is never going to be a story and that people fundamentally will not care about this And not just that. You don't have enough evidence to room story But that you know it's just not that big a deal Which was no oppenheim. The the president of nbc news is contention e you can get to a point where you question. What you fundamentally no would every fiber of your being. Which is you've got a recording of a guy admitting to a sexual assault that the police had suppressed. you've and i should clarify that. The judicial and legal system had suppressed. Because actually the cops want very much for that tape to get out You know we had multiple women on the record All of this is detailed in the in the hbo documentary and understandably. in retrospect. It looks pretty bad that people were racing to to get that out publicly. But when you're inside that and your career is on the line and it's all a cost benefit analysis and Again you have all of these voices in your the executives. I mentioned but also people like you know my agent You know people in the industry A lot of the sources understandably from a place of trauma also saying you know this is just not a story that's ever gonna see the light of day. The odds are too great Absolutely there there. Were times where i had no idea what the outcome was going to be an and found myself thinking what what do i do. I remember My partner john lovett. Who's also shows up in this book. saying to me recently. Do you remember when we were talking about. Like do put it up as a medium post leading what is gonna happen to this reporting Because he was actually one of the rare people to his immense credit. Who never wavered. Even once you know said from the very very first piece of evidence i got. You know you've got everything online and incredibly important story. How many people like that were there very very few you know. I think there were people within the group of sources who kept me going Because they were holding strong and never wavered in their understanding of how important it was You know there were other sources. As i mentioned who i think were dealing with so much personal trauma That it was much more a process pacek document and in both the book and the podcast and and this show Of trying desperately to convince them to stick with him but there were other sources People like emily nestor. Who's one of the first to go on the record in this particular body of reporting Who really were ten of unwavering. They never withdrew and then there was. There was john on my partner. I mentioned that i'm actually. I'm thinking for the first time. Because i haven't been posed this question before. I honestly don't think there's anyone else who leads to mind. There's my producer. There's an episode of the hbo show which i am really proud of. And i'm glad is out there in the public about my producer at nbc. Rich mchugh And he is someone who actually also never wavered. We were going through the same cost benefit analysis together and He talks about in the show having kids to support and family on the line and nevertheless really feeling this was worth putting his job on the line for and i drew a lot of strength for that and i think the outcome might have been quite different if he hadn't stopped by me because i was very much being to use a slightly overused term right now gasoline. But i think it's the truest definition of that you know to have a group of people. Descend on you and say no. You're judge menaced totally not correct. This is not news This will never be news And he was having none of that you know. He was a more experienced professional in network news than i was and from the very beginning. Said you know this suspicious or shutting down. The story had been at other networks. This is not how it's supposed to work And encouraged me to keep going even when he couldn't because he was you know they're under contract at that network and they killed day. I've heard you interviewed enough to know that you know the journalist is supposed to be the story and the victims here the brave ones. Maybe you don't look at yourself as the same kind of brave and maybe you say. I'm not a victim here. But while i'm watching catch and kill what i felt on your. I can't believe how scared this dude had to be. Just scared when nbc comes down on you career on the line and now the money and the lawyers are pelting you with all manner of threats like of course. Your confidence is gonna get shaken. How could it not. Yeah it did get and it was a hard period mental health wise and You know your way to clock a challenge here which is Really have a worked very hard to keep the focus on the sources Not from any nobility so much as just you know my posture for a very long time in this story was banging my head against the wall trying to get people to pay attention to their stories And i didn't want to distract from that And that was the case for several years. But i did come to realize over time that what you're saying is true And that connects to a separate wider issue of importance which is journalists. Do get threatened all the time in the united states. It's beyond united states sometimes with much higher stakes outside of countries where are legal protections of for the free press and eight felt important to me over time as i lived with the fact that you're alluding to of how scary this was To tell that story and sober way that wasn't overly dramatic or overblown or anything but That god at just what. Investigative journalists confront when they go up against powerful interests. And i as i am alluding to with that reference to countries around the world where journalists face a lot more direct violence Had it much much more fortunate than many but It is a problem and it's definitely not fun You know getting chased around Smear efforts and having move out of your place because it's no longer safe place and i'm really grateful for the sources who allowed me to tell that story and being able to document that And prove mentally proved with documents you know held up in court and stuff is all figured in the criminal prosecution of weinstein To be able to prove that. Beg your being a chaste and surveilled in that way. makes a big difference. And that's only possible because there were Conscientious whistle blowers within that operation and one of the final episodes of the hbo show is a very strange thing which is sitting down for a conversation and a drink with a guy who staked me out and follow me around ostrovsky And i talk about in in.

hbo john lovett harvey weinstein emily nestor oppenheim Rich mchugh nbc news Max nbc john united states weinstein ostrovsky
"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Ships and guardian ships was fascinating. I grew up in a family with Significantly disabled people You know. I have friends who are significantly disabled. Probably a lot of people in this group on this call listening out there Either know someone who has been in a guardianship of one type or another or has had a loved one that they've had to place in in guardianship and you know it's it's an interesting legal system to explore rape because in many cases it's important and welcome If you have someone who is in a genuine state of incapacity It's important to have a system in which we can allow loved ones to help them either through a hard time temporarily or long-term but then you have a population of people who test the outer limits of this question of to whom that restrictive structure should be applied and britney spears. Is you know. In addition to being a subject of fascination on a personal level which we can get into For for the american public for years and years also a test case for conservatives ships and guardian ships and the ways in which today can be abused so for me this was never you know just a a sizzling entertainment story about pop star or even something i i also think is true of the story. Namely it's a heartbreaking chronicle of a human being in a state of struggle. I think it's also something that's even more significant. Which is it. Reveals a corner of the court system that can be underregulated and yes can lead to useful and helpful outcomes but also can really get badly abused the limits on her freedom. Can you go through some of the details. Because when i'm hearing things like she can't have an iud removed. I can't even begin to understand what world we're living in here. Yeah she is a nearly four year old woman She has over the course of this. Thirteen year conservatorship For at least the early years of it performed and made tens of millions of dollars The administrators of this conservatorship have in many cases profited richly off of this arrangement We talk about how her court appointed lawyer Was making a in the neighborhood of half a million dollars a year off of this situation You know her father and other members of her family who were involved either in maintaining or creating this ship Have also at various points been financially dependent on her And then you have britney spears at the heart of all of this and despite all of that on a very very limited weekly allowance that at times has been just you know a couple of thousand dollars when she was making tens of millions of dollars She has a as you pointed out. Alleged sort of handmaid's tale style limitations on her basic bodily automation and reproductive rights. You know she has said that her lawyer her court appointed lawyer saying emma ingham did not inform her of her ability to file to get out of this situation An through all of this. There's a through line that emerges of her wanting to be a mom and see her and even a lot of the early cases of evident public distress that led to her being placed in this situation were directly after she tried to see her kids in the midst of a custody dispute and was denied access to them so far from the picture that emerged in the tabloids of you know a wacky popstar spinning out Yeah whether you could say that's also true or not. I think there is another dimension to this which is a mother Possibly by the accounts of many people near her In retrospect seem to be struggling with postpartum depression was struggling with the difficult custody. Fight You know may have been depressed. There may have been many other mental health. Diagnoses a play here But you know not Someone who was just over indulging in the way. The tablets made out and who as a result has paid really dear price in terms of her basic freedoms. You do such a great job a deaf job of slaloming through reported facts and also offering the nuance and perspective. That's needed around these things. That has some opinion in it. As well reported a opinion exhaustively back the pinion but in your view. What are the worst ways. She has been wronged well. I think it's telling.

britney spears emma ingham handmaid postpartum depression
"farrow" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"farrow" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Nick cardigan. I listened to the diane ream show for many decades and now my son is listening with me to diane ream on my mind makes me think of when i listened to the diane ream show with my mom. It takes a lot of work to produce a podcast on mind. It gets made because of the members of wmu so if you love it then you can support it. You can make sure it keeps getting made and you keep hearing diane on the air make a donation at wmu dot org. Here's the rest of my country's agent with ronan farrow. He's a contributing writer to the new yorker and author of war on peace the end diplomacy and the decline at the american influence. The question becomes now. President biden is in office. Has he taken steps. Small ones even to correct what happened to the state department. So the answer is undoubtedly yes. If the threshold is has he taken steps even small ones and the diplomats i spoke to in there were hundreds of sources in this book. Many of them career state department officials they were in a state of deep disillusionment coming out of the trump administration and they were immensely heartened by the fact that on the campaign trail. Joe biden talked about reprioritising civilian diplomacy. That said i include some of this the edition of the book. It's in a new yorker piece. From last week that i published there are misgivings already six months into administration about whether enough is being done to attend to this problem. But that in fact the case that perhaps you're making the judgment a little early six months in two biden's administration. That is the argument that you obviously get from tony. Blinken camp Tony being the the new sector state and it's the argument you get more widely than the biden administration. I don't think it's unfair. Defense to say wait and see That said i think it is instructive to hear the people on the inside. Saying exactly what they think is still stalling The most interesting argument that emerges in those conversations is that in a zeal to distance themselves from the kind of careening unilateral leadership of trump and his secretaries of state figures who disregarded the input of the building and the wider government You know situations where donald trump would be forging ahead into brokering alliances with some pretty shady figures without ever talking to a single expert in an effort to create distance from that kind of posture. A number of career officials who served across multiple parties told me that they feel the biden administration is being deliberately Slow and consultation on and that while there are advantages to that it has reached a point of excess in several policy areas including for instance in iraq which was raised as an example by several of these individuals. Because it's a little less than spotlight right now but nevertheless has serious life or death consequences depending on what we decided in terms of our our ongoing presence and our strategy and you know the the peace lays out clearly unfairly the responses of the biden administration which includes the argument that you made of. You know it's just too soon. But the fact is six months of policymaking is is a meaningful start and if there are pivotal people on the inside who say these new folks are very nice and their intentions are right But not enough is being done to jump. Start this kind of Diplomatically lead policymaking and not enough is being done to staunch the bleeding in of staffing and resources at the state department. That's another complaint that we actually have not yet seen the headcount of foreign service officers at the state department increase Fair enough to say it's gonna take time to see change. But also i think appropriate for those people on the inside to turn whistleblower and say. Hey let's keep the heat on because these are deep wounds gonna take a long time to fix fully and the work in their view has to start now. It does strike me that he tony blinken has been given such a large portfolio especially in light the cobra virus. You know i. I still come back to the idea. He said dedicated professional. He will do what's necessary. He does need more money he does need more time and in a state department that has been so disheartened and sewed is functional. And so deteriorated. It's going to take quite a while. It would seem to me without a doubt you know. I talked to ten secretaries of state on the record for this book and it was fascinating to get their perspectives But one way in which. Those perspectives tended to align was. It's going to take a long time to heal. You know john carey says in this book a generation before we restore expertise at the state department where it should be because it's not as simple as rehiring. The kind of expertise that you need is a is a decades line pipeline. You need people like tom. Countrymen who starred in that system young and learn and learn and learn about their field within that system. And you know the argument carrying nixes. You're not gonna have the trained career ambassadors that you need in thirty years in forty years after the trump era where there were all these firings So so yes. It is a long term problem and yes tony. Blinken has inherited an incredible challenge That would be daunting. I think for any public servant however dedicated and i think that the you know the scuttle but within the building on on lincoln is positive. People feel Relieved to have someone who is consultative and cares about the building and has been in it before and had a reputation when he was a deputy in prior administrations. I for being a kind good boss. You know. I think all of that is is welcome acknowledged and nevertheless i think the The unenviable position of being in that position and carrying that challenge is there's gonna be effort to to keep the heat on on him and officials around him to throw themselves into this challenge and do the almost impossible in setting the state department. One wonders how much you as dip see is actually trust it abroad. We have made so many enemies. During the trump administration. And now there's a period repair and reclaim the moscow on and it's got to.

Joe biden john carey ronan farrow donald trump Nick cardigan Blinken six months iraq Tony wmu last week tony thirty years new yorker diane trump biden hundreds of sources tom forty years
Dr. Martyn Farrows: Analyzing Voice Technology as an Educational Tool for Children

VOICE Global 2021

02:03 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Martyn Farrows: Analyzing Voice Technology as an Educational Tool for Children

"I think we're we're way beyond the stage now where we're having to talk about the utility of voice technology right. Everybody's convinced that it has utility. Now it's now just about. What are the really effective. Use tastes right. So what are the radio. Effective use cases. The kids Job is job is really to provide kids with the experiences of a dessert why they deserve to have experiences that a tailor made for them on that requires speaks technology which has been built with them in mind. But you're absolutely right. You know we we get inspiration from our clients right. And they're the ones that are now. I think it's we take change the last twelve to eighteen months where we are getting bumped with new ideas of how you could potentially use voice with kids And you know. Education is an obvious one. Another people don't realize just how dependent the education industry is on data points ruins inform how you track performance in many different ways whether it's in beaumont of formal assessment reading practice or instruction right but voice is actually a new category data for education. Because you mean about you know the only real way of capturing boy seat previously is for a human to sit alongside educated. Sit alongside a child on down no tate. What they're saying what we can do. Is we start to automate that process but we can also provide richness of features based around the voice. State is not just wanted to child. Say how well did they said well. We can also vote. What didn't they say is what what he didn't say is in many cases just as important as what they did. Say you know. Where did they make the substitution magic. An in session. And then you can start looking at things like reading property. And how how how indicative is reading prostate of of confidence when a child is reading. So there's so many features that you can extract from voice which a critical to improving educational experience and then having that along chewed the data set that can illustrate improvements in performance over time

Beaumont Tate
Interview With Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, Ronan Farrow

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver?

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, Ronan Farrow

"I go backwards and forwards on the first question of wearing and when will you happiest. Because we're so encouraged to be happy all the time rather than the place that we're headed. I don't think that's a well not to be terribly pedantic right out of the gate but you know what is happiness is what you come very quickly and answering this question rided any way and i also found it. Surprisingly hard to answer by any metric that there are a lot of professional moments of fulfillment that came to mind as the answers. Getting a tape of harvey weinstein trying to entrap a woman. After months and months of trying. To get that those are obviously moments of fulfillment of kind. But then i think was a happy then because those high points were also marked by a lot of stress and can also be frankly kind of scary. I mean i think both on a level that any writer would relate to where. You're in the zone crafting a scene but also you're on a terrifying deadline and stressful. And you're afraid you're going to fail. And there's a lot riding on anything particularly when it's investigative reporting and in ways that are unique to my kind of work which is very combative in some ways and you know there are sometimes private. Investigators hired to follow me around and smear me in various ways so those moments of the film and are often entwined with ryan easy. And i don't know of happiness quite captures what those moments our exclusive. No i agree. It is part of the satisfaction of doing an incredibly hard job. That is dangerous and frightening at times but also incredibly necessary and then that paying off. I think there are ways in which that's a healthy happiness. If you were doing something whatever your profession is that you feel is contributing in positive way to other people's lives. That's a great thing to nurturing yourself. On the other hand that can take a lot of unhealthy forms. Yeah i i know and really respect a lot of great war reporters who famously do get high off of being in conflict zones and during time spent in in some of those types of places you encounter a lot of those people who are in it maybe for all the right reasons but also i think you know if they were to search themselves on a personal level. It's probably not the healthiest thing that they need to be in those high octane places all the time so is that happiness or is that kind of getting a certain kind of high again regardless of how noble the intentions

Harvey Weinstein Ryan
Woody Allen Denies Daughter Dylan Farrow’s Abuse Allegations

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Woody Allen Denies Daughter Dylan Farrow’s Abuse Allegations

"Woody Allen says actors who have distanced themselves from his films are well meaning but foolish. In a rare interview that aired Sunday is the CBS Exclusive on Paramount Plus, the 85 year old director said. They're persecuting a perfectly innocent person and they're enabling this lie. Allen's first US interviewed nearly 30 years recorded last July in his Manhattan home. It aired alongside a 2018 interview with his adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow, who is accused of mull of molesting her in 1992 when she was seven.

Paramount Plus Woody Allen CBS Allen Dylan Farrow Manhattan United States
In The Room with Sean Clancy: Ramon Dominguez

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

In The Room with Sean Clancy: Ramon Dominguez

"Year old multiple clips award winning jockey one nearly five thousand racists including the travers. The breeders cup turf twice the arlington million. The woodward the jockey club gold cup and road stars have her to grace gio. Ponti better talk now and so many others. Welcome to the show. Ramon thank you. Just turn for now. I said jockey. Ramon dominguez introduction. Because you will always be jackie in my book you retired after suffering a head injury in two thousand and thirteen. How how's retired. Life is good. continue Working on different things Llosa new chapter in my life and certainly will start smiling when you say jockey exactly exactly what keeps you busy these days. I know it's been almost eight years. I guess Since you retired what what keeps you so yes busy with different things. I mean personally. Your skill involved with things Family why Enjoying family and use. I enjoin also saratoga which is home for me now over springs in And i have been working a couple of projects. One of them A riding crop that i invented and a lot of people know about in the horse racing role Doing a show going to the other question disciplines in And most recently start working with a friend on a platform that we name a box which we threw up from. Look into bring a content to the spanish speaking Horse racing fan and the has been something that we have enjoyed and just went interview and pre imposed race analysis among other things. So yeah that keeps me pretty busy. You were always playing the long game saving your money thinking about your next step right. I'm and you were always one of those guys that you kind of watch. That were was planning the rest of your life. yes i Certainly i'm happy with a josiah leaving Today in in my career. I didn't have to have The most expensive thing so That certainly has helped through these retirement as where. I am no making the money that i was making was writing a however there's no Huge needs in terms of having to fulfill something that Warsaw too big for my financial capability other time so now they usa enjoying a life's simple pleasures in some ways. Yeah you've always been good at that. How how tough was it to be forced to retire him. And you didn't really get your choice. You had a fall and and had a dramatic Traumatic brain injury. How tough was that for you. So it was the one that i Came to realize that that's what's going to happen Four awhile. After my accident. When i had a i was Gog capable of thinking about what was happening and so on I was planning on coming back in the was pretty exciting for me to come back to to riding in a day when i realized that that was no longer choice You do go through What i call it a grieving where these by Being jewish job. Or what you the is career. You can't help to feel in some ways attached to that or sec studies farrow who you are even if that's the case so It was a little bit difficult walking away. Or separating myself from defy that. I was no longer gonna racist But i kinda would support my family. Friends and so on and Shortly afterwards i ended up going to the track against my will really because my wife Pushed me to go to the track. And that was the best thing that i could have because it really helped me to turn the page in. In all time. I was able to enjoy the racist and just looking at it from a different perspective without feeling a sense of love like oh my gosh i wish i was there. So You as i said in the beginning of our conversation. It's just another chapter in my life. And i'm fully embracing it in and enjoying it as well. Yeah

Breeders Cup Ramon Dominguez Llosa Ponti Ramon Arlington Jackie Saratoga Josiah Warsaw Traumatic Brain Injury USA Farrow SEC
Alexander Mikaberidze takes us through the history of the Napoleonic era

Based On a True Story

03:18 min | 2 years ago

Alexander Mikaberidze takes us through the history of the Napoleonic era

"Let's start by setting up the hoof the two main characters that we see throughout the movie are gabrielle. Farrow and our montebourg who are both lieutenants in napoleon's army. Were they real people. Kind of the story of you're a ridley scott chose direct a screenplay drafted from ninety seven availa from the famous author joseph conrad but away the noble a was published as dual in britain. But it was kind of the point. Honorary night it stays and you can still find the first edition of in used. Bookstores and condo story was supposedly inspired by this real duels olga. He clearly to liberties facts and the story was about the duel between two officers of napoleonic army. The historical individuals of peer won't The town and francois leotard lavazza. Who became ill baer and finkel in the movie and both of them are very collar for the interesting individuals. Do point was born in chaban as in shock and in western france in seventeen sixty five like many of his generation. He first saw action I military action. During the french revolutionary. Wars in fact he fought that battle. Volney really important. Battled all of the then. He served in the rhineland and by seventeen ninety seven. He's already a general so he would have been all league thirty two years old and a general widely respected for his Martial abilities He supported napoleon in seventeen ninety nine when that general sees power to our and then he couponing pollyanna campaigns. All is distinguishing himself. I mean he. This guy was quite successful in quite capable. Man fought at morongo for that Allback where he he did. Do really remarkable defense with barely five thousand man. He was able to stop and australia. That was five times larger and then he earned accolades for he's exported. Ooh macron's rheinland in the sauna zone and with such a stellar record. He had much to expect from the future of maybe even marshal's baton right as new polian savings says every soldier right in. My army carries marshals. Donen in these anyone could carry. It probably will Dupont was one of them but it all changing in eighteen eight. Napoleon sent dupont you. Spain with motley crue of a of the provisional battalions new new recruits swiss troops. That wayne pressed into service. No one over. Dick league cited fighting and he's tasked was to secure the southern region of of spain and initial successes. He found himself surrounded by the largest army and in the remarkable decision affected. He's entire life. Dupont decided to surrender with some eighteen thousand men at violin in the news of this french. Defeat him in the worse than they surrender right but shock europe. Napoleon is range. Dupont is sent to court martial deprived of his rank and his title kashir and then sent to a military installation into to be imprisoned there for the rest of the only any wars

Montebourg Napoleon's Army Napoleonic Army Francois Leotard Lavazza Chaban Volney Joseph Conrad Farrow Ridley Scott Allback Finkel Gabrielle Olga Baer Rhineland Britain Donen Morongo Dupont Napoleon
Woody Allen slams 'Allen v. Farrow' docuseries revisiting sexual abuse claim

News, Traffic and Weather

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Woody Allen slams 'Allen v. Farrow' docuseries revisiting sexual abuse claim

"Woody Allen responds to a damning new docuseries the early nineties. Allegations that Woody Allen molested is then seven year old daughter, Dylan Farrow are the main focus of the HBO docuseries Alan V. Pharaoh, which includes extensive interviews with Dylan, her mother, Mia Farrow, and a bunch of others that lead viewers to believe Dylan was abused by Alan. The filmmakers say they reach down Talyn to tell his side, but he never responded. Now he's out with a statement, saying the documentarians had no interest in the truth, calling the allegations categorically false and the Syriza's a

Woody Allen Dylan Farrow Alan V. Pharaoh Dylan Mia Farrow Talyn HBO Alan
Allen v Farrow Showcases America's 'Guilty When Proven Innocent''

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Allen v Farrow Showcases America's 'Guilty When Proven Innocent''

"I'm going to focus on the Woody Allen versus Mia Farrow four part documentary that's premiering Sunday Night in HBO. This is a story that just had to be conceived and born in today's America. I know I got listeners who are pro Mia Farrow because we've gone round and round this ugly carousel a few years ago. And it's a story that never really ever leaves. Even though Woody Allen was investigated many different times and nothing turned up that proved them guilty. As a matter of fact, the United Nations proved that top to daughter Dylan was just not being too honest. And maybe she was accused of confusing reality with fantasy. No one likes that angle though. But in today's America, like I said, especially if you're a liberal. It's become very Vogue to have someone be proven innocent, like, say, I don't know, president Trump, not once but twice. Then only to be convicted in the court of public opinion, a court that Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer, Kamala Harris, Eric swalwell, who loves himself some Chinese now and then. And Mitch to Mitch McConnell, among others, sit on. And it's just bullshit. It isn't right. There's a legal system in America. There's a wave you've been doing things for hundreds of years. And that should be enough. You know, lady justice doesn't have a third hand in which she puts a thumb on one of the scales that she holds. But here we are today. You can be innocent and still be found guilty. It makes no sense. And Woody Allen knows that almost as well as

Mia Farrow Woody Allen America President Trump Sunday Night HBO Eric Swalwell Dylan United Nations Kamala Harris Court Of Public Opinion Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi Mitch Mcconnell Mitch
Explosive Woody Allen Documentary Series Coming To HBO

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Explosive Woody Allen Documentary Series Coming To HBO

"Jason the controversies of Woody Allen's Life Getting the miniseries Treatment from HBO. Careful saying is being done to kid Kallen v. Pharaoh will do a deep dive into the marriage of Woody Allen and Mia Farrow and the allegations of sexual abuse by their daughter. Dylan says he molested her when she was seven. Couldn't believe it little feature interviews with Mia Dillon and more, but it appears Alan is not involved, and he's denied the allegations. For decades. Allenby Pharaoh was shot in secret, and it debuts two weeks

Woody Allen Kallen Mia Farrow HBO Jason Pharaoh Mia Dillon Dylan Allenby Pharaoh Alan
Dow futures cut losses after better-than-expected GDP, jobs data

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:53 min | 2 years ago

Dow futures cut losses after better-than-expected GDP, jobs data

"Farrow, your market action futures unchanged in the S and P 500 waiting for claims waiting for JD Pay. Some might argue that GDP data For the market. The economic historians and the data coming from initial jobless claims will be for the investors, the traders as we await that data, let's bring in my coma cares. We always do and start with claims Mike Claims coming out for 751,000 during the week last week. That's down from 787,000 the initial print for jobless claims last week so it does show some progress. But we're still at a very elevated level, continuing claims now down to 7 77,756,000 from 8,373,000, but a lot of those people are going to be moving over to the lengthy continuing claims process. Because they used up their 26 weeks. We're still waiting for the B E a to put out its numbers on GDP. At this point, I guess there's a no there we go 33.1% a little bit above the thie consensus of 32.0% on an annualized basis, however. The thing to keep in mind here with GDP is that the economy is not an annualized economy. It's a quarterly economy. It shrank by 10.1% in the 1st and 2nd quarters together, so at 33% 33.1%. We're looking at a 7.4% gain. So we're still in the hole by about 3%. The economy's still 3% smaller than it was at the beginning of the year. We're looking for the breakdowns, but they haven't crossed yet. We're just waiting to see what kind of numbers we get out of that. But as As has been pointed out many times. This is the largest quarterly increase in GDP ever. But it followed the biggest quarterly contraction

Mike Claims Jd Pay Farrow Coma
Proposals for new podcast tags in RSS unveiled

podnews

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Proposals for new podcast tags in RSS unveiled

"Could be the most exciting news independent podcasters for some time proposal of a set of new tax for RSS. From the podcast index pickup me and better discover ability and accessibility more revenue and protection against piracy. You'll hear more later in the podcast. Amazon has caught to two main names, podcast, dot com, and podcasting dot com play, both forward audible, which doesn't have third party podcasts in it. Amazon music does though in four countries. US Radio, personality Howard Stern was apparently approached by spotify claims Bloomberg his contract with Sirius Xm seems close to renewal. However, black women in podcasting can now apply for a micro grants from the black and Brown podcast. Collective grounds can be between two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The Edward R Murrow awards were awarded whereas include all kinds of podcasts including the catch and kill podcast with Ronan Farrow, the dropout from ABC News and the daytimes and wonder reproduction detective trap. Friend has added a tinder for podcasts feature allowing you to listen to random new episodes. Swipe left for Nope and swipe right to add that podcast to list of shows you like to be a bit more. Acquainted with. spotify onto allowing use of API to transfer playlists to other platforms. It transpires today for podcasts would notice that podcast indexes new podcast says, namespace allows you to link to your show on other platforms without use of spotify is. API. And is it time to kill reviews in Apple podcasts? Tanna. Campbell. Thinks it might be replacing it with a simple love button. It's a Monday. So here's some more tech stuff starting with that new namespace for podcasting. The new specification allows additional tags like location. A locking mechanism to protect feeds against privacy links to the show and other podcast APPs transcripts, multiple enclosures, and funding. The namespace is to be done in phases allowing full industry contribution, and it's fully backwards compatible with existing feeds. There's more on the podcast indexes podcast, which is called podcasting two point. Oh Jason Feed version one point one has been released. It's a simpler easier to pass alternative to RSS, which has support for multiple attachments are in closures as we know them and for extensions or namespace is as we know them, we've updated our Jason Feet? Apple podcasts rejects new podcasts with show images bigger than five hundred K. or bigger than three thousand pixels, but you can't change that image after you initially published. So congratulations to Canadian podcast on torpoint. All Songkhla for managing to have a podcast in apple podcast, which has an image measuring five, thousand, eight, hundred pixels wide and is an astonishing one, hundred and two megabytes large. Wow. It's broken our page congratulations for that podcast paying an upcoming monitoring system just for podcasters as work to integrate podcast index into its service podcast addict now offers multiple podcasts, search engines including the podcast index at Lipson appears to have started. Forwarding insecure are fades to their secure https versions. And in Pokhara News, a murder case has many layers, the victim, the crime, and the investigation get to the heart of it on anatomy of murder, a new weekly, true crime series launching on Wednesday ad sales by Cabana, an at large company, and we thank them for their support today. Stuff of legends is. New From Airlines Iheart podcast network Australia is hosted by radio presents a Christian Connell and features interviews with people, Russell brand and Ricky Chavez sharing at three most treasured items. Ron. COM HOGS returns for second season today. The scripted romantic comedy features a full cast of voice actors and immersive sound design. Vote for love is the title of the new season

Spotify Apple United States Amazon Edward R Murrow Murder Ronan Farrow Abc News Howard Stern Jason Feed Jason Feet Sirius Xm Australia Campbell RON Pokhara News Lipson Ricky Chavez Russell
Pit of Serpents

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:23 min | 3 years ago

Pit of Serpents

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land and dime Joe McCormack and I'm so excited because today we're diving the snake bit. That's right. not slashes snake pit. We're discussing before we started recording the show but this idea of a pit of snakes, the sort of a place you might want to drop a a doomed hero or a Damsel in distress that sort of thing right and I think the great place to start here is by discussing. A. Sort. Of Snake pit. Very much a snake pit that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark, film that we've, we spent a lot of time talking about on the show we did we did a couple of episodes on the Ark of the Covenant that I encourage everyone to everyone to go back and listen to where we spin off. We also frequently refer back to raiders for examples of things that raiders does that refers to. Various qualities of the arc in ancient traditions. I've just thinking back on those Ark of the covenant episodes because I remember we talked about this one professor from the. Nineteen twenties or thirties who had this crank theory that the Ark of the Covenant was a real historical artifact and it was a giant electrical capacitor yes. Yeah. That was pretty good. Yeah. But what I was laughing at when you were talking, I'm sorry if I sort of interrupted but I was laughing the fact that you called the pit in Raiders, a sword of snake pit. I mean, it's definitely a snake pit don't beat around the Bush here. It's very much a snake bit it. It is an amazing and really game changing one of the many amazing engaging sequences in the film. It is the well of souls sequence now to refresh everybody. First of all the well of souls is an actual place. It's a partially manmade cave located inside the foundation stone. Under the Dome of the Rock Shrine in Jerusalem. The name itself pit of souls well of souls stems from medieval Islamic legend in this where the the spirits of the dead or supposedly awaiting judgment. Day. But that it has nothing or very little to do with the well of souls that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark. In raiders, the well of souls, and this is straight from the Indiana Jones Wicky is quote part of a temple built within the ancient city of tennis where the Ark of the covenant was placed after Farrow she sacked stole it from Jerusalem again, that is entirely within the context of the Indiana Jones world don't confuse that with actual history right now there is no indication that there's an actual pit of snakes in any archaeological site in ancient Egypt. Right but it makes for a great scene because of course, we remember what happens is that. Indiana Jones and his cohorts discovered that Oh. This is the actual resting place of the Ark of the Nazis are off their digging in the wrong spot. So they open it up, and of course, they immediately see it full of snakes. He hates snakes, they lower him down. Anyway they go. His friend who is it Sala. Sala. Yeah. Solid goes down with them. They they crank the the arc up in. That's win Belloc and the Nazi show up they steal the Ark and just for sheer meanness, they throw Marian down there into the pit with him in an a seal inside with a bazillion snakes

ARK Raiders Jerusalem Indiana Jones Robert Land Indiana Jones Wicky Joe Mccormack Rock Shrine Bush Professor Marian Belloc Farrow Egypt Tennis
Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

The Tennis Podcast

04:23 min | 3 years ago

Actual tennis tournaments; 'Federer should avoid my retirement mistake - Edberg

"Thanks very much to June and son Peter for that. Lovely, and for the length that we're going to in order to record said in true because I understand that social distancing. Guidelines were observed throughout that recording So I seem some sort of throwing recording device happened in that split second inbetween hearing jeans. Peter's Voice so Bravo Gop, sir, and thank you very much. Feel supports. Lovely, intro. Pleased to have had your intro used on a very significant week for tennis and the tennis podcast because. Is Back. We've bounced back. We're not rely reliving anything this episode David. We're just living in the sweet sweet moment of Palermo and Fiona Ferro up against an contemplates Tennessee is bouncing. It does feel properly like real tennis. Now, because this is the first time we've reviewed tennis tournament and previewed another one with. pre-tournament press conferences going on everywhere that we've been listening across to and chats amongst about people and look at draws actually looking it draws is. Suddenly such a thrill. It feels so so exotic do one of my lockdown. Tasks was to organize my phone apps into the hopeful folders. I. Completely Forgot which fold Roy put my eighty WPA schools happen to me quite a long time to hunt around to find that. Mind seem to shut itself down given that it hadn't been used five months after reloaded onto my phone. Just, a bit of a rough. It was glorious to see tournaments pop up in it. They wasn't. Oh Yeah. Yeah, such a defining feature of tennis happening the ATP. WGN APP being. Full. Kind of forgotten. How to preview tennis. The. Great. Stay tuned. Because the WTO always send. You know prior to every tournament, they send out match notes, really helpful staff and stat and. Kind of feels quite relevant at the moment because. The kind of it doesn't really matter who's won the most titles this year already, there's no such thing as form at the moment and it's all. It's all really unknown like what? What are the factors going to be with how players perform? Yeah. I mean, Fiona. Farrow is going to be like the new sort of defacto world number-one. Suddenly, she feels like the greatest player of all time to me because she's six to three all against the conservation I did find myself looking up Fiona Farrow before this podcast to work out what she'd done before it systems any sign of this having. Coming about six months ago. Matt Matt. Thanks. So I mean I've gone through her exhibition results she's unbeaten. Unbeaten an exhibition tennis during the lockdown ten Matt. We'll check submission Tennessee been playing matches arranged by the. F. F., T., and. Yes, she paid him one the mole and she's kind of this fall into. Palermo. I mean I'm getting I'm getting carried away with. These being perform because that's the only thing given the well, exactly. So maybe we should be looking at the players who have played a lot of exhibition. Tennis in this period, if people that are you're going to be having to make predictions. Maybe that's something to a life off to cling to. We have already made predictions and they've gone incredibly. They became irrelevant. They became relevant very quickly. nobody was picking Fina ferry now whether it is going to be interesting, though isn't it to chart the few players that have played a lot of matches over the last. Actually, there are quite a few players because if you think of all the exhibitions that have gone around on all around the world and some of them have been publicized, some of them have been televised some of them. We've talked about others have kind of gone by without really. Being. Noticed, but a lot of players that played a lot of tennis and then some party played any at all and it will be interesting to see whether that has any impassable.

Tennis Fiona Farrow Matt Matt Tennessee Peter WGN WTO Fiona Bravo Gop Fiona Ferro Palermo ROY Fina F. F.
In New York City hot, steamy four day - Ga Test 2

Bloomberg Surveillance

02:18 min | 3 years ago

In New York City hot, steamy four day - Ga Test 2

"There's gonna be a lot more unemployment coming on a ship from what was temporary unemployment into permanent. To some degree. These companies are now starting to hunker down for a longer, more protracted recovery on so they have to right size. Their business is not gonna turn on right away, and we'll find out some things that were turned on, and we turned back off for a little while. It's gonna be bumpy. Mrs Bloomberg Surveillance with Tom Keen, Jonathan Farrow and Lisa Abramowitz. Good morning, everyone. Jonathan Farrow, Lisa Branson, Tom Keen on Bloomberg Radio, Bloomberg television Worldwide hot and steaming in New York City hot, steamy four day conversations in Europe to some level of success. We'll talk about that in a moment. And then, of course, the stimulus discussion and Washington and all this wrapped around A market that will never, ever ever go down Futures up 25 down futures up 1 86 We have a 23 print and the vic's now John just to go to the equity markets for one teensy weensy second. I know you want to talk Europe. I mean, come on, John, 32 to 23 on the vics is really something. It's an equity markets got away from so many people, Tom, particularly big tech side to see the nasty 125% higher through 2020. Amazon, up 70%. Microsoft Apple Up 35% We have had Monster moves and the South side has struggled to keep up through all of it. John your thoughts on Europe use did a tour of duty in Frankfurt, Germany, Viscerally felt that tension on the continent. How historic is this? A story? Important moment, Europe has demonstrated or demonstrating that they can borrow what the commission level and distribute grants the places like Italy that was unthinkable in the last crisis. What it's what many people wanted to see. I don't think it's that golden bullet, though, Tom, this is not the end of fiscal integration. This is part of the journey. And that's how you should view it. It would take a while for this story to build the keyword here, though, is crisis. It took a crisis to take this step forward. I imagine it might take another crisis down the road to take the next important step forward for the continents are Maria today. Oh, in Brussels. And of course, it's been an exhausting for days. Lisa Bram. Once I look at all that's going on. And really the fixed income market is the litmus paper off this system. What of the spread Barca do off this agreement? Oh, well, you can see that there's definitely risk on and it

Tom Keen Europe Jonathan Farrow John Mrs Bloomberg Lisa Bram Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Lisa Abramowitz Vics Lisa Branson Amazon New York City Frankfurt Microsoft Washington Italy Germany Brussels
The alpha generating opportunity for the second half of 2020

Bloomberg Surveillance

05:58 min | 3 years ago

The alpha generating opportunity for the second half of 2020

"Of K P W as we enter the second half over this year, I think we have very little clarity, Visibility whatsoever. Government e Year and well this economy and the pandemic situation will look like from New York City this morning. Good morning to world alongside Tom Kay. Together with Lisa, Grab it some Jonathan Farrow, one hour, 12 minutes away from your opening about We roll over just a little bit. A mild move lover, down six points. The S and P 500 off by 2/10 of 1%. That's the equity market is the bond market for your Treasury yields have been lower. The curve has been flattered through much to the morning so far, your 10 year yield comes down to basics points. You're 30 year down almost three and a foreign exchange muted price. Actually, G 10 through much of this morning euro dollar Going absolutely nowhere. Poundsterling just a little bit weak. It's on the pound. Just a little bit lower. Well, interesting in the pound. Maybe Francine Lacqua, driving the pound weaker with her conversation with the chancellor of the exchequer earlier today, right now to have you reset for the second half of 2020 a guy who writes an incredibly interesting short research note. Michael Purvis is great because it six or seven or eight pages instead of the 30 pages a boilerplate that your eyes glaze over on. And in that he always tries to get out front of the trend. He did that to a tea with the Asia currency dynamics about 23 years ago. He is tall back and we're thrilled. Michael could join us this morning. Michael Purvis real simply. Where's the opportunity? Right now? What do you writing about is the truth. Alfa generating opportunity for the second half. You know, it's it's a tough question. Tough. I think for any of us, we were shifting. I would start by answering that question. If we were the first half was very fine area, you know, almost sort of wrist on wrist Call Allah 2010. The second half is going to be a much more nuanced sort of less binary set of analyses. And there's a lot of things that are just to come into the foreground. Just after we clear the Fourth of July holiday, which is all of that right around the corner. They're so I think the framework shift there, you know, in terms of how one position For the second half. I am looking, you know, opportunistically to sell volatility. I did that a couple of weeks ago when we had that big spike after the FOMC. There. You know, I'm looking at, you know, on my long equity portfolio toe have sort of a core ballast of what other people have. Which is you know the big cap tax, which is sort of an all weather type of Equity investment. It's almost a separate after classes to itself. There. I think the areas that are very interesting into the second half is looking at this potential sort of pivot where Europe, the European condition. Maybe moving into a into a more interesting place with stimulus slowly coming together and at the same time writing political risk in the United States. With a whole bunch of uncertainties. But what kind of policies were going to get out of D? C in 2021? There's no like I expect. I expect for the f B X, you know, to be most likely rangebound. I think it's gonna be hard to be a committed bear in the second half, but the same time it's gonna be hard to be That they committed bowl and then I think not too much that answer, But I would also suggest that look, you know it's it's arguably a consensus trade right now, but I've been Very constructive and precious metals for some time, and I continued to be so I think we're going to see a lot of pick up their particularly in the minors and silver. Well, Michael, that's basically a whole book. So let's pick out part of the story gets a Europe Do you think we could see re allowed performance on the continent? Well, I you know, Look, European equities have been the mother of all value traps for some time. We've all been there revolved and you know, sort of excited. You had a glimmer of hope in 2017 that lasts about 6 to 9 months. There. But I do think that there's something that investors have to keep their eye on here. Which is that there is, um you know, perhaps a bit as the catalyst has brought together. The new sense of European cohesion, and you're saying that with this with this very large 750 billion grow stimulus plan France, Germany over Anchoring there, and it seems like there's slowly getting old 26 countries on on board with it, but it's very important because it underscores declining. If it happens, it'll level harmonized. Interest rates across the eurozone. Um you know the spread of TB. The bones will come down and arguably, O'Neil should come higher as well. But at the same time, the political risk premium that's always exist in the euro should come down. I think I look, there's a lot Can happen between now and that you know whenever that might become a reality, but it represents a very, very important chefs in terms of training it, you know, it may be The long euro trait is the easier crazy and say my along the equities right now or or or the widow maker of sorting fun, but I think it's very, very important because over the long term mechanic tracked Very substantial capital flows that have been very US focus. Back into the eurozone, and that has implications that will ripple across. I think the whole the whole investment landscape. Again with the caveat gifted when it comes to happen, But there is a moment of building there that We had not seen before. Michael purpose

Michael Purvis United States Europe Tom Kay New York City Jonathan Farrow Treasury Eurozone Lisa Francine Lacqua Fomc Poundsterling Chancellor Asia France Germany
COVID-19 data sharing with law enforcement sparks concern

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

COVID-19 data sharing with law enforcement sparks concern

"A personal celebrity information caught up in the me about too tens scandalous of thousands lashing of coronavirus out at a journalist patients who is has being done a shared lot of with work first on that responders subject even though that former information today show should host Matt be kept Lauer's confidential accusing author Roman Farrell a review by the of Associated inaccurate Press and biased buys at journalist least two thirds as presented of U. S. in states Farrow's book a releasing catch and addresses kill among of people the things that who Lauer tested says positive that Farrow for Kobe got nineteen wrong is an with accusation police firefighters that the fired host and EMTs ripped a co worker nearly Farrell says a dozen it is Lauer states who is also wrong provide on this court their patients cara one names a Pulitzer Prize more for his than eleven work on accusations million Americans against Hollywood have been tested producer for Harvey covert Weinstein nineteen but and the new York we're short times has their suggested private medical an information investigation would not and it be disclosed did show that Farrell first was less responders than thorough are you the in information vetting his is work needed meanwhile for them Farrow's to take publisher safety precautions says the book was fully but civil vetted liberties groups and that worry it supports some minority the author patients I'm could Oscar be profiled wells Gabriel or information could be sent to immigration authorities the U. S. department of health and Human Services says this is not a violation of Baruchel privacy laws Jackie Quinn Washington

Weinstein Jackie Quinn Washington U. S. Department Of Health And Oscar Publisher Harvey Associated Inaccurate Press Gabriel New York Matt Producer Hollywood Pulitzer Prize Kobe Farrow Roman Farrell Lauer
Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Lauer says Ronan Farrow's work on him was shoddy and biased

"A celebrity caught up in the me too scandalous lashing out at a journalist who has done a lot of work on that subject former today show host Matt Lauer's accusing author Roman Farrell of inaccurate and biased journalist as presented in Farrow's book catch and kill among the things that Lauer says that Farrow got wrong is an accusation that the fired host ripped a co worker Farrell says it is Lauer who is wrong on this court cara one a Pulitzer Prize for his work on accusations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein but the new York times has suggested an investigation and it did show that Farrell was less than thorough in vetting his work meanwhile Farrow's publisher says the book was fully vetted and that it supports the author I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Matt Lauer Roman Farrell Farrow Pulitzer Prize Harvey Weinstein New York Times Publisher Hollywood Producer Oscar Wells Gabriel