35 Burst results for "Farm"

What's happening at the virtual 2021 PA Farm Show?

KYW 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 11 hrs ago

What's happening at the virtual 2021 PA Farm Show?

"Pennsylvania Farm show wraps up a week of virtual programming Tomorrow. KY delegates John McDavid reports, food security and its environmental impacts were topics covered by the Panelists at one session from the food chain in a pandemic to feeding the hungry instead of landfills, where topics covered by the participating state agencies, businesses and nonprofits. The secretary of Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection Patrick McDonald, discussed how food waste is an environmental concern. Every bit of food that could have been eating that goes to a landfill instead, is Increasing the volume of waste at our landfills across the Commonwealth. It's also a climate change issue, which many people may not realize food waste in a landfill produces methane. That's a greenhouse gas programs were perfectly good food that was being thrown away now going to places like food banks in the state were also highlighted, according to the advocacy group Feeding Pennsylvania. More than two million people are food insecure in the Commonwealth.

John Mcdavid Department Of Environmental Pr Pennsylvania Patrick Mcdonald KY Feeding Pennsylvania
Arizonans 65 and older will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine starting next week

Dave Ramsey

14:28 min | 17 hrs ago

Arizonans 65 and older will be eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine starting next week

"This hour we took you live to the Arizona Department of Health Services Update on the covert 19 vaccine distribution. We had some technical difficulties, but we have those resolved and we want to bring you now. The rest of that briefing with all the details. Here's Dr Carol Chris, director of our State Health department. So now provide some updates on covert 19 vaccine and implementation of our program here in Arizona. One of the exciting updates that we made today. It is not this week that is not reflected on our chart. It will not be reflected until Tuesday, but Arizona made the decision that Arizonans 65 8 years of age and older are now prioritized. To be vaccinated against covert 19 in our prioritized phase one be along with our education and child care services and our protective services occupations, which includes law enforcement, corrections and fire. This recommendation was approved by the Arizona Vaccine and Antiviral Prioritization Advisory Committee, which is intended to protect those who are most at risk for severe outcomes due to Cove in 19. So we know that those there are over the age of 65 have all higher likelihood of hospitalization and death, and by be getting people vaccinated in several weeks from now we hope to reduce the strain on Arizona's hospitals. And you can find additional information on our website at easy Health. Doc Dub slash find vaccine. And on Tuesday, we will be updating that to provide clarity about which counties are going to be vaccinated the 65 to 74 year old age group at their vaccination sites. We also have counties that have moved into our prioritized. Phase one B and we have some that are fully in phase one B. So if you look at the map of Arizona, the counties that Aaron Black are still in phase one A. So does our healthcare providers and our long term care facility, residents and staff. When you look at our darker gray, that's the prioritized phase one be, so that's going to be the face that we just talked about. Currently. We are vaccinating age 75 older. Along with educators and child care and their support staff and our protective services occupations. When we increase to one be that also includes our Sent can keep our society functioning. That will be people who work in the transportation industry, including gas stations, shipping those types of things. The food industry, including agriculture. S so there's a large number of there's a large list of employees that are eligible for the one B category that is located on our website. Um But you can find out what what phase Each county is in, and we update this infographic daily, and you can link to it off of easy health. Doc Club slash find a vaccine. As of today, over 232,000 doses of vaccine have been administered statewide. So now we'll move into Arizona's vaccine allocation and administration. Over the next few weeks, A DHS will be working to increase access to vaccine increase the rate of vaccination into streamline communications. So as you look at the vaccine, I'm distribution overview. Arizona currently follows a local Allocator model for vaccine distribution. Our local part partners are the backbone of the vaccine program implementation and know their counties that are no they're partners and their counties the best so our federal partners every week provide our Arizona's allocation to the state. We divide that allocation of based on priorities to our local partners, who then will determine which providers in their local jurisdiction will receive that scene for that week. We collect all of those orders on Ben. We place Arizona's full order for that week, and then the federal government will ship those orders directly to the providers that we have ordered on behalf of as vaccine becomes more and more available. We will no longer need to use this local Allocator model and providers such as pharmacies, community health centers and physician's offices will be able just to directly order vaccine from the manufacturers. So this week we received additional first dose allocations of Fizer, which were distributed again. Toe America and Pima County's All 15 counties received Madonna doses, and so we continued to reserve given the unique storage requirements for our Fizer vaccine. We continue to reserve our Majority vaccine for our local or rural health departments. Um In addition to receiving that first those first doses of visor and Madonna vaccine we have received our second doses so that we can continue vaccinating those that I've already received their first US. And have had that either 21 or 28 Day waiting period. This is Dr Cara Chris State Health director, speaking at the Health Department's covert 19 vaccination rollout. Press briefing on Katie Our news 92 3 FM. So during the week of January, 18th Arizona will have been allocated 803,150 doses total. You can see how that's been allocated across the state. You can see at the bottom where we have prioritized our CDC Long term care facility partnership by providing them with the vaccine that they need to vaccinate our Our staff and residents that are long term care facilities. And then you can also see the number of doses that have gone to the state of Arizona. Um Not all of these doses of the 803 have arrived in Arizona. A number of these doses have been allocated to, um Have been ordered for our county partners and will arrive next week. They We anticipate that with the federal holiday. Usually they arrive Monday through Wednesday. We anticipate that they will arrive Tuesday through Friday of next week. So we continue to add additional sites for vaccine administration, So we have initial phase one and phase one B vaccination sites throughout the state. We have over 200 vaccination sites on our website. We also have activated the second phase of the CDC pharmacy partnership, which began the week of December. 27th. So we initially prioritized in phase one of that partnership are skilled nursing facilities, which are highest security, long term care facilities. Um As of the end of this week, all of those facilities will have had at least their first visit from CVS or Walgreen's, and they are scheduling appointments to start assisted living facilities throughout the state next week. So as additional state. Um uh, that scene becomes available, We will be adding additional providers we've had over 730 providers on bordered with a DHS and over 800 pharmacies statewide have enrolled in the CDC pharmacy program to provide in store vaccinations. We have talked on each week about the long term care partnership that CDC put together with our pharmacy partners. So our pharmacy partners code into the facility's and vaccinate the staff and residents of that facility. Um as of this week over 140 skilled nursing facilities scheduled to receive vaccinations, and they will begin vaccinating are assisted living and our group homes starting next week. We've got over 2000 facilities enrolled in the federal program where one of the states with the highest number of facilities enrolled, and our goal is to cover approximately 450,000 residents and staff over the next couple of months. So this is part of the infographic that we post each day on our website. If you look you can see by county what phase That county is currently vaccinating. The total vaccines and ministered along with the vaccination rate per 100,000. And so you can see statewide 232,000 vaccines have been administered. Um, This may not include some of the doses that are provided by our tribal Our federal partners is this is pulled out of the States Immunization registry. So to talk about updates and announcements of this week. On Monday, we had a soft launch of the State Farm Stadium Probate 19 vaccination site. So far we've administered over 20,000 vaccinations at that site, and we are averaging apart between 203 100 vaccinations per hour. We have booked tens of thousands of appointments through January 31st and anticipate opening up additional appointments. That will be between February 1st and February 28th. Those appointments will open up on January 19th at 9 A.m.. We're very excited. Because our partners have really made this endeavor possible. It's a whole community partnership. And again, we just want to thank the Department of Emergency and Military Affairs, the Arizona Cardinals and state from Stadium Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, The Catherine and Ben I. V Foundation. Arizona State University and Walgreens. All of these, these groups are playing a large role at the site on D have made this possible. Way also are very excited about the launch of our second state run of vaccinations site. This will be located at Phoenix Municipal Stadium. We are still looking to see how many doses we will have available for that. For that site, so the number of appointments will depend on the available vaccine again. We're partnering with the Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs and Arizona State University to run this site. Arizona State University currently runs a testing a saliva based testing site at this location and so they will scale up to provide vaccination administration. Again. Registrations for appointments are going to open up Tuesday, January 19th at 9 A.m. for this site. We updated our easy health. Dr. Hobbes Flash find vaccine website with an interactive map. You can go onto the map. It has all of the current locations with vaccine, you can select a sight and a box will pop up that has information about that site and a link to their registration. So not all of them. Not all vaccine providers are utilizing the state's vaccine management system. Some providers air using their own appointments software, but we will link to them whenever we have that information so that it's one stop shopping when you go to our our map. We will continue to update this map with additional vaccination sites as they come. In a couple of other exciting announcements, we have been expanding access. So a DHS activated the CDC retail pharmacy program. This is going to add up to 100 pharmacy stores over the next few weeks. The first pharmacies to come on board in Arizona are gonna be fries, Safeway and Albertsons. And so those will be included on our sites as we get notified, which pharmacies which specific pharmacy locations will have that scene? But they will be on our website and will be another source for those that are eligible to receive vaccine to go get vaccinated when this program becomes fully activated, more than 800 pharmacies will have covert 19 vaccine available in Arizona. We currently have more than 200 vaccination sites on our website that have received vaccine and this includes 45 community health centers as well. So if you are eligible and you receive care at one of our community health centers You could check on our website to see if they have received vaccine. And again just another update on helping our Arizona hospitals. We have been recruiting nurses with a nursing staffing contract here in the state. That's been one of our most successful endeavors. We are very excited. The majority of the nurses are here. When they arrive. They will stay on site for eight weeks with an opportunity to extend that On gesso. As of last week. 348 nurses have started work. We anticipated almost 200 more arriving this week again that We don't necessarily count them until we've heard that they have Arrived in the state and are attending on boarding at their assigned hospital. But we continue to work with our staffing contract to get all of the nurses that we can here in. Arizona State health director Dr Cara Crist went with her press briefing on covert 19 vaccine rollout that coming from the state Health Department. Go

Arizona Dr Carol Chris CDC Arizona Vaccine And Antiviral Aaron Black Doc Club Arizona Department Of Health S DHS Fizer Dr Cara Chris State Health Department Madonna Arizona State University Walgreens Pima County States Immunization Registry State Farm Stadium Department Of Emergency And Mi Health Department Stadium Blue Cross Blue Shield
Indigo Agriculture: Google Maps for Agriculture

Software Engineering Daily

01:09 min | 1 d ago

Indigo Agriculture: Google Maps for Agriculture

"David. Welcome to the show. It's great to be here jeff. We're talking today about indigo agriculture. He described what indigo egg does for people who were hearing about this for the first time for sure. Our mission at indigo ag is to harness nature to sustainably feed the planet and to break that down a little bit. we're helping farmers become carbon farmers. Jeff and along the way we're helping them bring their green to market in new ways. And what does that have to do. Software engineering well whole lot if we're doing it right You know the challenge that we face in the team that i lead gio innovation is. We're essentially trying to build a google maps for agriculture. We're trying to build a living map of the food system. Amer doing that. Because essentially the industry that we're trying to innovate and is the biggest oldest factory in the world and there isn't a particularly good map of all the different rooms in the factory and so to kind of scale almost anything that we're up against indigo. We need to build digital systems for recording. Where farming happens and making it really efficient to sort of watch the harvest playout

Indigo Ag Jeff David Amer Google
NASA Let Astronauts Feast on Space-Grown Vegetables

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 1 d ago

NASA Let Astronauts Feast on Space-Grown Vegetables

"Eating fresh produce is an important part of a healthy diet. But if you are in space. Where's the closest farmers market. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future astronauts and space if the same benefits from eating fresh fruits and vegetables as anyone on earth but growing those highly. Nutritious foods can be a challenge. As part of nasa's flight opportunities program space labs technologies recently sent their hydroponic chamber pond two sub orbital space on one of blue origins reusable launch vehicles during the flight of the commercial rocket lily pond experienced several minutes of microgravity before returning to earth researchers will use the data from the flight to prove that they're closely stacked shallow growth. Trays will keep the water. Needed for hydroponic farming securely in place when choosing a crop for the hydroponic experiment the company zeroed in on duck weed with its high protein content. A rich supply of antioxidants amino acids and omega threes. The crunchy vegetable is a superfood that grows fast and extreme environments and just as important tastes good

Nasa
Using LinkedIn to build your business and brand with Scott Aaron

Industry Thought Leader Podcast

10:14 min | 1 d ago

Using LinkedIn to build your business and brand with Scott Aaron

"I'd love to do. We're going to deeper into linked jan and how you've been leveraging in using it because what we're saying to people is look leave untapped opportunity on link jin to really take the time now to build those connections because the seeds that you start to so now i going to come as you develop a nurture that just like farming going to seed and sprout and what you do now is going to impact many months down the track which is cost. Scott is what happened she you but before we move on sometimes we do need to plow that field a little bit talk about some of the ways that you overcame some of those obstacles new sites. Actually you'll superpower because sometimes when we are sitting in that situation off want now. Everything feels and seems hopeless. We're not able to take on any new learnings. That really could be the solution to moving forward because what happened to you. of course. it's taken that trajectory in a whole other area. Which now you'll specializing in. So what are a few words of advice some insights maybe around becoming obstacles that that becomes a superpower being resilient and that that can sort of late to successes and then i think jive deeper into to the link. Jim but what are some Insights you wanna share here. Well it actually. It all came about two different things so just four and a half years ago. I filed for personal bankruptcy. And i am i i. I don't believe you can go any lower. The net point now to preface. That i had a successful coaching practice. I had a successful online wellness practice but the gym was failing. It was losing about three thousand dollars a month. I was the personal guarantor of the lease and for business owners. That don't know what that means. When you're the personal guarantor of the lease your financially responsible for every dollar. It's owed on that least whether it succeeds or fails and that was about four hundred and fifty thousand dollars of liability debt. That was in my name. And i met with my business attorney and he said listen. You got two choices. You can continue having your two successful businesses fund. You're failing one or you can file for personal. Bankruptcy have cleaned sate slate and start your life now and when he painted that picture for me. There was no hesitation. A lot of people. That may be here that they're like all my guide. I might be faced with filing for bankruptcy. I didn't hear your life is going to be over. I heard your life is about to begin. Because this emory this was my opportunity over an eighteen year period that i was finally able to start doing things on my own my own way painting the picture that i wanted to paint carving the path that i wanted to carve people think that life is a straight line. Life is not a straight line there. Are you know again. We're in a very unprecedented time rate now in globally a lot of people have. There's been a lot loss. There's been lives lost. There's been Relationships lost there's been memories and precious time with loved ones that are lost but again we've all been through our own form of personal pandemics whether it's divorce whether it's bankruptcy whether it's cutting ties with family member whatever it is but the one thing that always kept me going was knowing that i couldn't control anything that has happened. Can't control it. It's early in the past. And i can't worry too much about the future because it hasn't happened yet and remember reading. A book called the power of now by eckhart totally and he talks about just and and this is m read. This is my the foundation. That i always come back to whenever there's a wall kicking moment whenever there's a hiccup with something that's going on. He says in this book. There's three types of people there's people that live in anxiety there's people that live in fear and there's people that live in peace. The people that live in anxiety are the ones that are constantly replaying the tapes of their past that are keeping them where they don't want to be the people that in fear are the ones that are so fearful of. What has it happened yet. They are paralyzed with what's going on right now. And then there's the people that live in peace and the people that live in peace are the ones that are living in the time period. That is the only time in our life that we can actually control which is the now the present moment which we are in rate at this time so when i started to think about that i knew no matter what was going to be thrown at me. There is a solution for every problem. And you hear it. All the time live in the solution. Don't live in the problem if it's already happened. Okay i'm going to work through this. There's a there's a way to figure this whole thing out and i had to remain grounded. And that is what's really enabled me to continue to thrive whether there's a pandemic or not it's allowed me to overcome those obstacles. I'm not saying that there is no emotional scars. We all have. We always carry around emotional scars. But it's how we process and handle them and grow from them and it's also allowed me to become resilient it's allowed me to understand and take conceptually know that no matter what the universe is throwing at me it's going to propel me to something greater and i look forward to those challenges because we are challenged when something is thrown our way and we are growing. We become better definitely and you being in the background. The jim knight building muscle. When you're lifting you tearing muscle a posh to make wine. You'll crushing those grades. And so to build resilience. You have resilience muscle. Guess what in asia guy challenges and obstacles to be able to learn and grow and because of that you'll now able to share how you you'll leveraging linking because that was something that the kind of apparent to you. Hey i can connect with all of these people. So what i've got. I've got gone in john beforehand. Is i have actually let me. Just see if i can bring this on. Looked you up on lincoln and they guy we've got. Your leak did profile so i'll go. That might be nice to have been. But you know you talk about the best use of linked into build your business and brand. What would you say have been some of the key insights. You've learned through leveraging region. Some of the how. To's that really have made a significant difference in how you have leverage in the outcomes that you and your clients are now getting through using this platform. So i called the layer cake of lincoln and the four best practices or best things that you can understand the way that i call it. A layer cake is because there's a big layer medium layer small layer and then a tiny layer and the big layer is your profile. This is this is where people get to know who you are and what you do and actually if you scroll down a little bit and maria on my profile you'll see under the highlighted the featured information rate. They're on the right hand side. There's an optimize linked in. It's it's a free download That i have where it helps. People start to optimize a pdf. That goes over the specific sections. And i always talk about making sure that you have a clear and present headshot you have a background photo that is branded to you. the about me section which is very very important and the two best tips that i can give you for the about me. Section number one Actually three making sure. It's in first person you don't want it in third person. Make sure it's in first person number to make sure it's two to three hundred words in length that is leading the reader of your profile. No here's what i do. Here's how i do it. And here's what i do for clients and finally a call to action. So is there a website you can direct them to. Is there an email. They can contact you out so if you go to the bottom of that you will see that. I put a call to action. Connect with me here. Reach out to me here. Give people somewhere to go. The experience action is also very important because the experience section. It really allows you to pudding key words and what people don't understand is there's something called seo embedded all over our profile which means search engine optimization so are linked in profile so emory if you open up another window and you just go on google and i i always do this with people and you open up another window and you just type in my name and you type in scott aaron One of the first things. That's going to come up with a google result on the first page is my latent profile. And are you talking. Yes and why. That's so powerful. So that means that you're profiles because microsoft obviously works in conjunction with yahoo with being with google so now when people are searching on google the redirected back to your page. So you can see rate there. My linked in profile is the third result on there.

Eckhart Scott JAN JIM Jim Knight Lincoln Asia Maria John Scott Aaron Google Microsoft Yahoo
Use Lighting to Make a Dramatic Statement in Your Yard

Your Gardening Questions

05:03 min | 2 d ago

Use Lighting to Make a Dramatic Statement in Your Yard

"One of the things you wanted to remind everybody about his not to forget about lighting features when it comes to planning your landscape tremendously so mark. I have lighted my gardens over a very long period of time and then done same for others. there was the day when there were not any solar lights or very very very few that you did have to wire the whole thing and certainly that is still an acceptable way of doing things. It's it's far more permanent. And so on. However i have gone After the old electrical system Got to say well boondoggle the couple of times. I went to the soldiers. And i'm having good luck. The its it's less light but it's also significant amount of light on the ground or to be seen from a distance There are all kinds of solar fixtures I have found several of well many of mine to be in their fourth year at this point so even though they are not particularly expensive. There are twenty two in my backyard from Walk pathway lights to the edge of the patio lights then some that are simply outlining the edge the bids. I have several that. Are you put in the ground. And then turn the head upright so under light. Three different small trees It it is not something that you look at all night long however some of them can last that long but in the evening when there's snow on like we have here a while back now. The interesting part of that was the day of the snow. There was plenty of late and charged them all up so the next morning and that evening there was a good bit of light under the snow and the following day. The snow is deep enough. They didn't get much light at all so there was not much deceive however One particular. Plant that i looked at Whenever we had that last snow it was under. The light was under lighting so it was sending late minimal light but it was sending it down the snow and then up under the branches of a little kind of a a low spreading plant and each of those little limbs twigs and all had about an inch of snow on them. That would handle that then. It stayed cold enough for. I think two days. If i remember right that they stayed that way and then to be to be night lighted to be dutiful in the daytime And you don't need to shovel a path of that thing. You can see it while you're sitting by the fire in the evening if you're looking out right but lightning is a significant advantage in terms of the visual and then on certain walkways and i was at home the other day where. The walkway is sharply angled relatively to narrow and so on and to have some pathway lights there to help conduct people's walk into the house would be very welcoming and then sometimes had a turning point like that you can add a few low shrubs under the lights that when people are leaving your driveway walking toward the house there they step into the entry situation when they come to that point in the sidewalk there directed by the lights and the low shrubs day and night up to the front door so adds to the size and nature of the entry way and is a total complement so Aiding patios lighting up under trees way back in time. I made some hanging lights that i put in a giving tree now. This was with with hooking up to the versity but being a non electricians. I decided to quit doing that when we changed homes so that i wouldn't murder myself but You can do all kinds of things. That are very very interesting. Well think about it this time of year and even to the extent. If you have a display in the store that you can work from The solar lights can be pushed into the ground on little harpoon. Like point most anytime that. It isn't frozen so you can do that now. And you'll find great enjoyment and evening even if you only look out three times in a whole evening and don't spend more than thirty forty seconds doing it. It's very worthwhile to light the yard. I even i. I have a real farm situation here right in the middle of town but i even can see the raccoons walked by between me and the lamp when they go across my backyard. That's good or bad but to to To know that you have country situation in town isn't all bad except for the destruction of the roses.

Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

Kottke Ride Home

05:33 min | 2 d ago

Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

"A couple of years ago. I read a novella called river of teeth by sarah gaily. The concept of the story is based on a real world event. That almost happened smack. In the early twentieth century a bill was proposed in the us house of representatives and informally supported by theodore roosevelt. The us should import hippopotamuses from africa to the swamp lands of the gulf coast and breed them as an alternative meat source for americans basically starting a new industry in the us of hill. Ranching as you know this proposal never came to be but gala novella now collected into a volume with a sequel and some other stories under the title american hippo imagines magic in alternative history where this did happen only set fifty years earlier. You get kind of gulf coast cowboys on hippos tape story. It's great loved it. I highly recommend it. Or if you just wanna dig more into the facts. I put link in the show notes to a long read on the history of the hippo proposal by john. Mouallem will the reason i bring. This up is because americans in the early twentieth century. Were not the only ones with dreams of becoming hbo ranchers decades later pablo escobar would also get into the hippo game importing four of them to live on his estate in columbia and now forty some years later they have bread and multiplied and are spreading all over the wetlands of north bogo. Talk causing mayhem. Consternation and some real concerns for the region. Scientists say this now invasive species is competing with native wildlife polluting local waterways attacking humans and they project will grow in number two fifteen hundred hippos by twenty forty at that point the scientists say they will be nearly impossible to control their environmental impacts will be irreversible but never mind controlling fifteen hundred hippos. How do you control a dozen or even just one. That's not like you can just google it you know. In colombian officials are not hippopotamus experts and there are unique challenges levied upon this specific situation. I quoting the washington post in their natural habitat. Hippos spend the long dry season crowded into waterways shrunk to puddles. They're vulnerable to disease and predation not to mention one. Another as bad tempers but tropical columbia is hippo paradise. Environmental agency researcher david vary lopez said rain is abundant food is plentiful and they're no carnivores large enough to pose a threat. The animals spend five hours a day grazing on grasses and the rest of their time basking in the cool waters of the magdalena and surrounding lakes and quotes report from columbia not being the hippos natural habitat having in effect on the hippos behavior it also affects the surrounding communities impression of the hippos. The officials tasked with dismantling escobar's estate back in the ninety s. Weren't sure what to do with the one male and three female hippos so they just let them roam instead of sending them to a zoo with his other animals and mostly they did that because the hippos were massive and aggressive no one really wanted to approach them so we'll get the harm be and letting them go well. Kenyans and other african communities with native hippo populations could tell you a whole heck of a lot. You've got hippos from each sex so they can breathe for one and they're also hugely destructive to the environment into other animals. Hippos killed more humans each year than other large mammal. But when you don't grow up around hippos you don't necessarily know that so the hippos have become something of a mascot and columbia. According again gift shops in nearby puerto trail info sell hippo keychains and t shirts at the amusement park that was built on the site of escobar's former pleasure palace. Visitors can tour the lake where several dozen hippos now live occasionally one will plot into a nearby community looking as blase as a shopper on his way to the grocery store the hippopotamuses. The town pets resident claudia. Patricia camacho told the local news in two thousand eighteen. You could say that he now takes to the streets as if it were his own and quote but the hippos aren't as friendly as they may look on t shirts. They terrorize farms and hurt residents at times. The government has ordered the hippos to be shot on sight but there's been pushback from animal rights organizations and local residents so then they tried putting the hippos in a pin but and this is one of the mini quotes from this article. That honestly sounds straight hundred jurassic park. Etcheverry said i didn't know they could jump hikes so then they tried big pens with high enough walls that the hippos can't jump onto them. They've also been focused on trying to prevent them from breeding by cuisine. And then castrating the males. They've been through a steep hippo anatomy learning curve on that front though. Not even being sure where to look. For the animals external reproductive organs turns out. It's a bit complicated. They finally got a system of castration down. But it's costly and complicated so they can only do about one year but the estimates are that the population grows ten percent a year and apart from the bodily harm humans and the destruction of farms the hippos as they multiply host of other problems quoting again. A twenty twenty study of hippo inhabited lakes found that nutrients from the animal's feces were fuelling huge. Plumes of area an algae. These intern reduced the oxygen content of the water. Making it toxic to fish.

Sarah Gaily Gala Novella Gulf Coast Mouallem Columbia North Bogo David Vary Lopez Us House Of Representatives Pablo Escobar Theodore Roosevelt Escobar HBO United States Africa The Washington Post Patricia Camacho John Google Etcheverry Amusement Park
The Birthplace of Saint Augustine

5 Minutes in Church History

03:52 min | 3 d ago

The Birthplace of Saint Augustine

"World of augustine encircled the mediterranean sea spain and portugal. To the west france switzerland and the british isles to the north greece turkey israel to the north and to the east. Of course italy extending right into the sea the boot poised to kick a soccer ball also known as sicily and stretching all along the south egypt in the coast of africa. Agusan is from africa. Now that's the modern designation as are all of those country names. I just listed for you and the three hundred and four hundred. This was all rome. All of these peoples were roman or were to be considered roman and all of these places were part of the far flung roman empire augusta was born specifically in what was called new media the roman province of namibia. It is modern day algeria. His hometown was aghast. It was originally a village of nomadic. Berbers and back in the two hundred and one hundred species does the punic. Wars rome took control of this vast area as guston was born. Rome reached its zenith as augusta and lived roman declined and as guston died. Rome fell well. The gas was two thousand feet above sea level. It was surrounded by mountains that were another thousand feet or so and it was a very fertile plain. In fact the most fertile land in north africa it was a great place to settle and farm. Corn olives were mostly harvested and had a great economy one. A story noted how it became a retirement destination spot for roman soldiers. Did you ever wonder where the lions and bears and tigers in the roman amphitheatres came from. Will they were caught in the mountains and in the plains around agustin's hometown of the gas one hundred and seventy miles away to the east was the massive city of carthage. It was bustling with people and trade. It was second city only to rome and sixty miles or so to the northwest hippo regis. That city would come to play a significant role in the life of augustine. Near the end. Agustin's father was patricia. S a roman pagan. His mother was monica and devout and sometimes mystical christian much much more on her later as our book unfolds. Augustine had siblings. But we know very little about them he had at least one brother navigate. Send at least one sister and he likely had more brothers and sisters. But we just don't know that much about them at all. He was born on november thirteen. Three fifty four. This was a full generation of post. Constantine rome one. After constantine's conversion did you see the air quotes there. i put around network. that's important. This was the christian era at the end of the roman empire of course alongside of christianity. Plato's philosophy and the schools that followed him ruled the roost. That's important. It was a time of doctrinal advance. Augusta lived right in between the nineteen creed three twenty five and the cow sedonia creed of 451 that's important. He also lived during the time of heresies. They were springing up all over the place. Will that too is important if you were to ask a young augusta playing in the streets of the gassed. What do you want to do when you grow up. He would answer with one word. I wanna be

Guston North Greece South Egypt Coast Of Africa Agusan Rome Augusta West France Mediterranean Sea Sicily Portugal Switzerland Namibia Algeria Spain Soccer Italy
Rain, Potential Flooding, Landslide Threat: Washington Forecast

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

01:52 min | 3 d ago

Rain, Potential Flooding, Landslide Threat: Washington Forecast

"Is going to stay rainy for the next two day or so, But by the time we get to Thursday, it looks like we might have some sunshine breaking through Friday. It appears we're reigning once again and all through the week with the exception of today about 50 is what we can expect to see on the temperature gauge. Right now, though, in Seattle 54 degrees with still very cloudy skies and potentially some more rain on the way All this rain means the possibility for flooding to flood watch in effect until 10 o'clock Wednesday. Communities bracing for potentially landslides as well. Come on meteorologist after you Cockney reports from along the Snoqualmie River, David Hawkins said, is the owner and operator of Jubilee Farms incarnation. He's seen his share of floods over the years, and this week he's getting ready for rising water levels. I've got Pigs in my greenhouse, I'd probably have to move. So I start thinking about where everything is where the water levels will be and what needs to be brought to high ground And the next thing you know, this area's an island. Larry back, remembers major floods of previous years and hopes people never drive into flooded roads. After all, it only takes about a foot of water to float most vehicles. The main thing is just You know if you can't see the road in front of you don't drive into it. Doug Williams with the King County Flood Warning Center, advises people to sign up for King County flood alerts and to consider getting flood insurance. Very mind. It takes 30 days for the policy to take effect. What insurance If you live in a flood from area there quicker, you'll be protected from potentially large losses from a flood to say all along Washington waters. Minor flooding is possible due to a combination of low pressure and king tides. Excessive rain is also leading to a sky high threat for landslides over the mountains Wanted 2 Ft of snow could pile up over the northern Cascades expected to make travel over Steven's Pass near Impossible. At times,

Snoqualmie River Jubilee Farms David Hawkins King County Flood Warning Cent Seattle Doug Williams Larry King County Washington Northern Cascades Steven
Experts warn about slow pace of COVID-19 vaccinations, calling on states to expand efforts

Glenn Beck

00:37 sec | 3 d ago

Experts warn about slow pace of COVID-19 vaccinations, calling on states to expand efforts

"And states try to expand the number of covert vaccinations, health officials complained. The role is rollout is still too slow boxes. Alex Hogan reports the nationwide rollout of the cove in 19 vaccine, transforming beloved spaces on lockdown into vaccination hubs, the fairgrounds in Oregon and Texas, turning into mega sites, Miami's hard Rock stadium, the State Farm Stadium in Phoenix. San Diego Padres Petco Park. Now all vaccine drive throughs or centers still coast to coast, medical experts say the effort is falling behind, according to the CDC. Nationally, 65% of vaccines remain

Alex Hogan Hard Rock Stadium State Farm Stadium San Diego Padres Petco Park Oregon Miami Texas Phoenix CDC
Experts warn about slow pace of COVID-19 vaccinations, calling on states to expand efforts

Fox News Rundown

00:38 sec | 4 d ago

Experts warn about slow pace of COVID-19 vaccinations, calling on states to expand efforts

"And states try to expand the number of covert vaccinations, health officials complained. The role is rollout is still too slow boxes. Alex Hogan reports the nationwide rollout of the cove in 19 vaccine, transforming beloved spaces on lockdown into vaccination hubs, the fairgrounds in Oregon and Texas, turning into mega sites, Miami's hard Rock stadium, the State Farm Stadium in Phoenix. San Diego Padres Petco Park. Now all vaccine drive throughs or centers still coast to coast, medical experts say the effort is falling behind, according to the CDC. Nationally, 65% of vaccines remain on used

Alex Hogan Hard Rock Stadium State Farm Stadium San Diego Padres Petco Park Oregon Miami Texas Phoenix CDC
Uganda's Museveni Faces Tough Challenge In Presidential Election

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 4 d ago

Uganda's Museveni Faces Tough Challenge In Presidential Election

"New seven E, who has been in power for 35 years. Is facing a strong challenge from Bobby Wine. Ah young singer turned politician who's half his age. MPR's Africa correspondent later Peralta is in Uganda's capital of Kampala. And he interviewed the president and he joins us Now with this exclusive and ater. Where did you meet the president? So we met at his ranch in she. SOC, which is about a five hour drive from Kampala and his cows were grazing in the distance. And you know, he came in making jokes. He was carrying a travel mug and wearing his signature broad brimmed hat, and we sat under this big tree to talk. Guess before we dive in. Can you tell us a little bit more about him? Yes. So he helped topple to dictators in the seventies and eighties. But now he has been in power. Since 1986. Uganda has changed the Constitution twice to allow him to stay in power, and he is now running for a six term in office. The election is on Thursday. So I started with a pretty simple question. What is it that you haven't accomplished in 35 years? You plan to accomplish this time around and as most 70 is bound to do, he gave me a history lesson and colonialism. And he said that he wants to work to bend the arc of history on the continent, including to change what he said was a culture of not working hard. Not with this huge continent. With a small population. Has a good Mentality for its people. They don't have to work hard. No, this would be the struggle week. These know it all. Promotes. I don't know. Because in other parts of the world People are pressure to work either by the environment. Which is horse died. Oh, by competition between man and man, But here Fool's gonna survive. Don't tell that really harsh thing to say about you just recorded to record that is really harsh, so he didn't talk about a five point plan about issues like building roads or improving schools. No. I think he was insulted by the question because he said that it implied that he should leave office after 35 years. He says that he's trying to accomplish historical things, and he looked to George Washington as a model. The Americans are the most powerful country in the history of man. I want to do. What Washington did work for the economic and, in some cases, even political integration of Africa. So using the United States is an example. You and here I told President Museveni, the George Washington gave up power after eight years to make a point that the American presidency was not a lifetime appointment, and 70 argued that Washington could leave because the American electorate and its economic system was more sophisticated when the social direction Over society. Is already set. It would have been run it. Probably with you know, kids, the dentition is not set. So it's very risky, very risky age, actually, from the lack of seriousness off those who talk the way you were talking That you you just go. Just go. People don't know whether the world North or South And you see you just go. Yes, if before already clear that the direction is the North. David. The body's no longer There's no more argument about that. Then anybody thunder candidate. I can see it now. You know the way that you go. But your people are smart and they're entrepreneur Ng and I mean to to be totally honest here. I think what you're saying sounds really condescending toward your It's not under city. It is a struggle to J. A society which we know where Which, of course you don't know very well. Hmm. So transition is risky, he's saying but later what does his record after 35 years actually show Hey, look, there's no denying that most 70 has brought peace to Uganda. There's a saying in the rural parts that suffered tremendously under the terror of the L. A raise Joseph Kony. But at least they can sleep. But look, Uganda is still deeply poor and corruption is endemic. And I asked him specifically about his foreign minister. A few years ago, the FBI found that he took a $500,000 bribe from a Chinese businessman. You know, after they looked through some emails of hiss yet Sam Kutesa is still one of president was seventies. Most trusted men. What do you tell Ugandans who see this pass by and you don't fire your foreign minister? That one is is terrible. I have not read it. But what I read it on. I really I despised And Condemning or policy. It's I'm happy to send you the indictment, which has the email in it, you can reuse do But look, The truth is he has had years to read this, so he must have known about this. Okay Elections, as we've mentioned are on Thursday. Is he campaigning? He is He's everywhere in Uganda, but he did still take the time to drag me around his farm to show me his cows. Yeah. These and these cows or his prized possessions, and you know they're beautiful, and he has 10,000 of these cows. But as he was walking away, he wanted to explain what made him different from his young opponent, he says. Bobby Wine is too focused on the lumpen proletariat or the thoughtless masses because what you do with the money the income generated by the By us the farmers. The industry's That would happen Who would head up in the ghetto people? Hmm? So he's saying if you can't hear it, that it is the rich like him, who will help the ghetto people. And this is coming from a man who has 10,000 cows in a country where many people eat meat for special occasions. Maybe for Christmas or for ead. This is so fascinating. Aitor will have more of your interview later today. What will be here? So we will ask him about elections will talk about his opponent and why security forces have reacted so violently to protests. And maybe it won't surprise you. But President was seven E is unrepentant. That's NPR's ater Peralta. Thank you later. Thank you, Tanya.

Uganda Bobby Wine Kampala President Museveni George Washington MPR Peralta Social Direction Over Society Africa Washington Sam Kutesa Joseph Kony NG United States David FBI Aitor Ater Peralta NPR
India's top court suspends implementation of new farm laws

BBC World Service

00:24 sec | 4 d ago

India's top court suspends implementation of new farm laws

"Court has delayed the implementation of new agricultural laws, which have caused widespread protests by farmers. It's at the laws will be put on hold until a compromise is reached between the government and the farmers. It also said that would be a four member committee to hear the protesters grievances. In its verdict. The court expressed disappointment with the government's handling of the dispute on the state of the negotiations.

Government
28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

A Psych For Sore Minds

01:00 min | 4 d ago

28: JEREMY BAMBER Murdered His OWN FAMILY - burst 2

"Tie like go from a different angle because my area of expertise is forensic psychiatry. Which is the crossover of mental defending offending. So i picked a specific angle related. This this is without question. The most gruesome at cold-blooded bernstein said jeremy bamber third fine members and family called blood. Then try to frame it on his sister who has schizophrenia. I should say has. She's vixen sheets mud at the age of twenty eight and a two twin boys secure. So this will happen in essex the uk so foreign friends essex as a county northeast of loaded when women have a reputation of being very friendly. So i'm going to answer questions in these episodes including how realistic was it for jeremy. Bamba try to frame his sister and what john

Jeremy Bamber Bernstein Essex Schizophrenia UK Bamba Jeremy John
What Was The Westward Expansion?

Can We Health You?

07:49 min | 5 d ago

What Was The Westward Expansion?

"Today we're talking about westward expansion. Yes earnings comforting. Yes in the united states yes so in eighteen zero three president. Thomas jefferson bought the territory of louisiana from the french government. For fifteen million dollars. This was known as the louisiana purchase. That was a lot of money back then. It was a ton of money. I wonder what it translates to today. Do that just curious know sure. It's like billions of dollars. Yeah so that. Land stretched from the mississippi river to the rocky mountains and from canada to new orleans so that like mid section it doubled the previous size of the then young united states and as as soon as jefferson signed the treaty. He sent the explorers lewis and clark to find a route to the pacific ocean. Many other explorers made the journey as well and so began the expansion of the country to jefferson. Westward expansion was the key to the nation's health. Jefferson believed that a republic depended on an independent virtuous citizenry for survival and that independence. Virtue went hand in hand with landownership especially up small farms. He wrote quote those who labor. The earth are the chosen people have gone. Wow yeah it doesn't correlate to me but okay yeah right so you're virtuous visuals and land or work. Yeah ok you work. Land make something from it. Honest work i suppose. Yeah if you're thinking kind of thing you take away like what we know about him. I'm think stop thinking of him as a person and the right he wanted the country to expand. And i think he planted the seed for the pioneers. Till i look you know you can go right. Make something something for yourself. Yeah so in. But in order for jefferson's dream for the country to come to fruition expansion had to happen so he maybe the country the dream of the country came first. And then thought okay. I need to have more land People to do So while the westward expansion is one of the defining themes of the nineteenth century american history. This growth was certainly fraught with struggle and won't get into that way by almost about forty years later. Nearly seven million americans forty percent of the nation's population now lived in this area. Well they know that way from eight eighteen three from eighteen hundred eight forty k. So pretty quick. Wake seven million. That's pretty big. Most people left their homes in the east and followed lewis and clark across the country as promised they were searching for economic opportunity like jefferson. Many of these painters believed that they would find land to farm trusting that ownership would lead to freedom in nineteen eighty five. Sorry wow a lot in eighteen forty five. A journalist named john o'sullivan put a name to this idea. That helped pull the pioneers to the west. He said that it was americans. Manifest destiny to carry quote the great experiment of liberty to the edge of the continent. O'sullivan wrote that. The survival of american freedom dependent on it and it was their duty to quote again Overspread and to possess the whole of the land which the providence has given us an quote the providence of meaning. I think the providence of light. What they were given like the land that was before them. It's here so is ours to take. Even though it wasn't i mean. Is that kinda what they get this kind of the way. I remember from Es three class and talking about manifest destiny asked yeah so this became a widely held cultural beliefs which carried the following themes the special virtues of the american people in their institutions the mission of the us to redeem in remake the west in the image of the east and an ear irresistible destiny to accomplish this essential duty so was disappointed was so arranged of area. Right ideas are planted in their head. Like if you go out there you will make your money. you'll survive you'll be happy. Happiness is just. Yep exactly yeah you'll have your own lambs have all the freedom that you'll have yeah So that term became controversial. You know throughout time. Meanwhile meanwhile while this kind of happening the question of whether slavery would carry onto to the west was at hand around this time. The missouri compromise was made which attempted to resolve the question of whether or not slavery would be allowed in the new western states That the louisiana purchase sort of like you know was responsible for create Them so this whether slavery would be in. These new states shadowed almost every conversation about the frontier. The compromise admitted missouri to the union as a slave state and may had to change main to a free state had they needed to have. They had to preserve the fragile balance in congress between us owning states in nonstop hunting state. Yes i say. I'm surprised that main was asleep. At i mean because she just think of the south. But i know. I'm know an i don't really know actually slave-owning or they like the changes such. Yeah just to keep that the same number okay. Half-and-half just have to say i know going. Forward as policy was made progressing through that it was always taken into account those southern states or the slave owning states. How making sure that they get what they want. It always had to be part of the conversation. Yeah it's crazy for another strong decade. A yeah i think even on that of course of an attorney but while they're formation was been the biggest conversation sure. Oh yes right. See that the okay. So the missouri compromise also stipulated that slavery would be prohibited north of the southern boundary of missouri. So the the thirty six degree latitude line okay It couldn't be north. Slavery couldn't be north of that but missouri was north of that so i think like after missouri said that they were going to be a slave. Nobody else could that was it. Yeah grandfathered in so many. Many thought of sullivan's manifest destiny was a secret term for spreading slavery. Really yes who thought that the people that wanted slavery or did not want to read. You know the people in the north okay. They thought it was. They thought it was like a secret term for light taking it over there. Really conspiracy theory Despite the many conflicts Far more complicated detailed for wondering really what. Everybody's wondering about the food. Because that's what i talk about sure. That's what we're here for

Jefferson French Government Louisiana Clark Lewis United States Thomas Jefferson Rocky Mountains Mississippi River Pacific Ocean Missouri John O'sullivan New Orleans Canada Sullivan
A Deep Dive into Aquatic Plants

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:16 min | 5 d ago

A Deep Dive into Aquatic Plants

"That's a really exciting trajectory. And that's really cool that you really early on saw that connection between water and aquatic plants and to me. It's really interesting. Round because aquatic plants both are influenced by water quality and can wander quality so the two are hand in hand and unfortunately even professionals in You know. I have told the story before. I came from a a nonprofit background that was into water quality and they just scoffed at the idea that native plant communities more important. So it's it's not a connection that people easily make but it's so important for both species and water right ensure as one of the things i've encountered is that i would be on a pond working with a student people walking by and you would hear comments about all. That pond is just all of nasty. Algae at i'd be like actually there's no algae here and it would usually be covered in something like duck queens or full of coon tail and a lot of time. People look look at a water nature. See the plans. But they think they think it's algae under call it Weeds or hans. Come so there's definitely this you know. Some negative not towards aquatic plants and a my goal really is to share with people. You know how cool these plants are and as you said. There's this connection with water quality. Such a great goal to have and yeah i. I was waiting to hear how long it would take for pond skunk to mentioned at some point. Because that's the thing. I hear repeated time and time again and until you really get a chance to throw on a pair goggles or canoe or kayak an area that has a really healthy aquatic plant community. I can kind of understand that because if you're just used to like sort of overflow ponds or farm agricultural ponds sometimes they can look a little bit like pea soup but when you see those communities when you see a really healthy thriving underwater plant community stunning and amazing But it's also this evolutionary marvel because even though everything came from the water if you're an aquatic flowering plant at least you didn't start out in the water. They're kind of the whales of the plant world. they they moved onto land adapted to that and then kind of moved back right. Well actually. I was doing some reading today his i. I'm really interested in in this question. And so i. I was reading to really sort of heavy paper about the evolutionary history of aquatic angiosperms and one paper this one i think he mountain twenty six t in and they they present these two hypotheses. One that there's these plants that are in aquatic orders where they don't have any surviving terrestrial relatives and still. They're thinking that these plants that are in these truly aquatic orders. Their possible origins are aquatic and possibly from early cretaceous period. And then the other part of this is that there's plants that are in aquatic families and aquatic genera- but there are from terrestrial orders and and these plants. They think evolved from terrestrial ancestors that adapted to aquatic environment. So there yet. So these two groups so plant. Some aquatic orders that have aquatic origins. Eventually an implants that are in aquatic fees or quasi general. But they're from russia or news and severe ones that would evolved from terrestrial ancestors how to read another paper. This one was published in two thousand and three but it was a little bit over my head. I feel for the general sense that there's these these two sort of thinking of this quiet orders in plants that came from terrestrial orders so this is all

Russia
Unsung Heroes Presented by Claiborne Farm

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

05:47 min | 6 d ago

Unsung Heroes Presented by Claiborne Farm

"Have the privilege of welcoming in wesley per cell who is the claiborne. Farm brood mare manager. He is our very first person to be recognized on this new unsung heroes segment wesley. First of all good morning my friend and thank you for everything that you do. Thank you for having me on the show to obviously a privilege to do this. And i'm glad to be here talking with you so excited you know walker bernie other great people at claiborne. They they stepped up with the sponsorship of this segment. And i thought it would be appropriate that we start with a claiborne farm representative and there's when you think about the personnel name. You'd be difficult. It'd be difficult to find somebody that's more ingrained in the culture of claiborne than you. My friend you were raised at the in a farmhouse on the property and that name per cell is pretty much synonymous week labor. That's correct My brother and i we still currently work out here My father worked here for over close to forty years started. Here nineteen seventy. I've had numerous calls Actually on both sides of the family work here so you know clybourn and and the per sales of go back several several years probably starting in the mid sixties of one of my first articles Making his debut out here you know. I read an article that had a piece about your uncle. Don am i correct on that he was your uncle. Right don yes. He was a yearling manager for several years. Yup yup and Passed away in september. Unfortunately you will be missed. But he worked with secretariat riva ridge roundtable and even got to meet his favorite actor. John wayne at clayborn kinda interesting. When we we had visitation we We saw those pictures. And it's just it's amazing because you hear people talk about opposite. John wayne in these horses like secretary and river ridge and so forth but for family members to be associated with them and and have memorabilia pictures taken with them on both sides of the spectrum with horses and People it's it's it's just awesome. What was it like growing up in a house on the property there at clamored kind of second to none. Go out and you do your childhood thing. You know you're playing basketball or whatever may be in the yard but you've got these these thoroughbreds this you know front door back tour left and right Beside you ever day knowing that they're going to make an impact on a lot of people's lives As they you know these babies grow mature and it to the race track in the mayor's or the the stallion he'll come back for their secondary career. So you know growing up as a young child. You didn't really know the importance of that. But you you know your dad worked here in your uncles and you know there was a major significant taking place you know. Every kid likes to have a big backyard to go out and play in. You had acres and acres and acres to go play in if you wanted to. What did your friends and maybe some of the other students that you were in school with growing up. Think about you living on a horse farm like that. I remember my. I believe it was my first grade year. Our field trip was to claiborne farm. So i'm six seven years old and i'm so ecstatic. When they announced it we're going to claiborne farm. You know this is where i live and i can recall telling my classmates house. We rode the bus out here. You know i was. I was like the tour guide at six years of age. And we pass by my house. You know something special say. Hey i live there And all the kids stuff that it was very interesting but To do that as a young child. And you know that's one thing that's all people remember where you took your field trip bad you know in kindergarten first second third grade and so forth but to be able to say that i took a field trip to a place that i grew up i lived on still holds a special pricing heart. There as you were growing up and you're starting to get a little bit. Did you always think that you would find yourself working at kleber. You know from day one. You know the passion of horses and and that it's in your it's in your you know your father's coming home and he's talking about horses like swell in rough and i mean i can just sit here name. A list of horses easy. Go where we can go down the line but you know i wanted to pursue a career in education and that's what i ended up doing And i got a degree at the university of kentucky. But that was doing that. You know the back of my mind. I'm like you know. I've got this opportunity. Clyburn that there. And so. When i while i was away from it. You know that that's what you're supposed to be doing in this life. So what was your first job on the farm. When i was about fifteen years of age Had a weed eater. My hand wasn't the greatest experience with that something. He knows a young kid. You pay your dues. And i would go around. You know the pastures and the a lanes of the farm and we'd we'd and as a group of High school. You know kids that would do that. Every year and My second season out here. I did started working with the marriage. The baby's my father was the form and at that time So he gave me a lotta great guidance and how to handle yourself around a thoroughbred the presence needed And the relationships that you build with each individual horse and that's that's where it really started with my second season out here

Walker Bernie Wesley Claiborne Farm John Wayne Riva Ridge Claiborne River Ridge DON Kleber Basketball University Of Kentucky Clyburn High School
Seed Shopping With Nate Kleinman

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:50 min | 6 d ago

Seed Shopping With Nate Kleinman

"So to give people the history of experimental farm network. I'll share the link to our chat last year so they can dig a little deeper The transcript of that show so we don't repeat ourselves but very briefly. It's more than a seed catalog. I mean really. it's much more than a seed catalogs. So what's the quick elevator pitch on what you do so we started in twenty thirteen and our purpose is to facilitate collaboration on sustainable ag research and especially plant breeding we are really focused on developing perennial staple crops. To help with fighting climate change things like perennial grains perennial oilseeds Perennial vegetables and The seed company side is what funds are work. We don't really reach out. Seek grants and much in the way of donations. Were really focused on being a sustainable nonprofit cooperative through seed sales so we really rely on Exclusively on on selling seeds and We do a number of other projects as well. We we work on remain creation projects returning seeds to the people from whom they came originally We do we do quite a bit of Food justice work and we At the beginning of the pandemic we started an organization called the cooperative gardens commission which worked all of last year to provide free seeds to folks and to help facilitate resource sharing to get people the resources they need to grow food themselves and that continues the collective that that is running cooperative gardens commission is still still going we just released twenty twenty report a forty four page document on our website coop gardens dot com and Yeah pfm just really started our seed catalog the other day not that you're busy or anything. So they'll give the links to all of that all of those different things as i said so. I know i shouldn't have any interaction. Probably even if mentioned that green fleshed winter squash. Because i think it's already sold out. But when i saw you post a photo of it on instagram awhile. Back split into in there. It wasn't kind of looked like a butternut but it was green inside. And i thought what in the world and i think it helps from like guatemala or something but it just spoke to me about and that's why i got back in touch with you. It has spoken about like all these oddities and wonders of genetics. And that you have these growers breeders selectors curator sort of care people caring for all his genetics and So tell us about some of the other wonders of the world that are in the catalog this year. Thank you yeah. We're very excited about that. When we really just wanted to get it out there. And i can't say i expected it to sell out in the first day i be popular but that that exceeded all my expectations and is truly beautiful. Beautiful squash This year we are. We are released. I think one hundred and forty six things that we have never had in the catalog before Some of them. Nobody had in any catalog before. So we're really excited about that We have we have quite a few in the in the grains category this year including number of upland rices or lowland rice that will grow in dry areas and in northern areas. We have a rice from poland and other couple from japan. One from russia and We're just thrilled to be offering these because rice's Rice's really great crap and it's actually something that homesteaders can grow on a on a relatively small scale. It's still produce of calories themselves

Cooperative Gardens Commission Squash Guatemala Poland Russia Japan Rice
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"A farmer of color where you know, I can do all these episodes, I can put a lot of information out there. And people can learn from that, but they're not. May Begin identifying the same way as seeing you or Justin Gay or Ron Finlay or will allen doing that I mean. You guys are really the pioneers. For a community where it hasn't caught on as much, does that feel like a lot of responsibility? No I don't think so I would say I think we're may be tying nears and. I would say maybe the Curtis Stone Model. If you will okay, that's kind of where I would maybe put me in negative I drew. My far model right, but like I said here and DENVER beverly. Beverly granted Mobutu grains. You've been doing this for years, so she's the true pioneer might is right. And she operated farms out there for a while, but just with a different model she's feeding people and those sorts of things and. For Very Long Time and that's what I drew. Michael Ration- form, so I'm just piggy backing on people like with the four need to be honest with you now as far as the responsibility goes I think I have the responsibility to pay homage to them into continue to work that they started. I think that's what my responsibility lies And the community again it goes back to your children right it's. People dirty. You're doing a certain thing that here convince anybody or to sway. Anybody says hey, do you like what I'm freezing? She liked it a cement I'm going in. If you do then cool this on board with trying to change some things, if not coal to national choice, he's GonNa. Go this way so. You see instagram you see it on the social media. There's a lot of choices you can make you just only that you can. Do you control Brunettes what you want to see a world change? And that's pretty much all I. Really Try Diego in if you think ahead for your farm and what you're doing. Where would you like to see in five years ten years down the road? I would like to see that basically A. Self sufficient farm I would like to make money off of not get twisted here But I don't want it to grow at two charts where I'm needing tax with name, purposes saw someone be rooted in the community. I still wanted to be an anchor for the community so once they make the building network for for my people right. I'm we have food, but I don't WanNa get too far gone through our lose touch, so that is my main goal. She way to find the happy medium between. Hey, off! You know that day, Chapelle, right? You know as instigating million dollars to Carl. You know do some stuff that you don't agree with, but single time. Be True to yourself. so that's kind of where I wanted to kind of maintain that that day. chapelle kind of Zen. That makes. You think that that part of this is. Like like I'm listening I'm realizing you? We, we really need people not just to have farms that. Cash flow their own lives. We need farms to fill voids in America right now we need farms to. Give. People opportunity to to distract them to help them rehabilitate from some of the hard things they've seen in life in the hard things they have to deal with on their life. Because you know soils kind of that calming tool that we all have access to. We need people to teach other people. We need people to inspire other people and. I'll admit I mean maybe I'm guilty of just too much of. Your farm has to be profitable and support yourself but. You're in the military. You're doing other things if I think it's all good well. If you want to do that, and then you have this farm this just. Making a huge cultural vocal community impact and We need people to step up and fill those roles. Yeah I would agree with you. I mean when this whole thing. Let me two thousand twenty. Then credit I you know I came crashing in mind mental right? To be in farming, and again the SAUERKRAUT again by receptively grant, and she was working on farm, one day and I just kind of got on my comfort zone and say hey. Come work and cheer farm for a little bit, and she's like yeah, come on in, and then I just put my head in the ground, and just start shoveling and I just worked, and just got all that anger out up and just helped you out at the same time and. I think it is a very like as something in the soil Diego I mean there's something there so where? If you angry if you have certain team that you want to deal with I, mean you don't WanNa. Talk to nobody I mean just adding that I see where you know, there's a neighborhood fondness allowing communities people come in and actually worked at soil. Delaying. I mean many sealing off. I. Don't know about you, but I really see my legs. I really met a lot acid the commander, the American farm do doing work in the lanes. You know what I'm saying, so many kids. Needed, because we just shooting hearing that because you know how many farms stories I've heard. that. Really got kick started by somebody reaching out to a local farmer and say hey, COB, come volunteer on your farm today and they do, and they catch on, and they go on to do their own thing and I think a lot of farmers are hesitant about having people on their farms or coming on for the because it's kind of a hassle and.

Chapelle Curtis Stone Model American farm DENVER Justin Gay Michael Ration WanNa Beverly commander Diego Ron Finlay America Carl allen Mobutu
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

02:10 min | 7 months ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Let me. See what I can put in the ground real quick just in case of unity, my Samuel, such things. You end chip in that I can. and then so that kind of went through and. Obviously we a military, so we kind of were drawn down a little bit. I think going to work for a couple of weeks. That really gave me the benefits. You religious. Go all in on my. Farm and I made huge progress on it, so that's been a blessing on my end, and then obviously when dorks floyd thing. As a black man with black kids in that kind of switched my mindset yet again to say are. Now. Let me grow food for my community me. Build my community and then let me solidify kind of my family's legacy if you will with a means of income. Means it likes substance of you know right so. In a way twenty, twenty, four to five, my beliefs in the things that I've been studying release these years, allowed to have a platform kind of one of the first things. I Really WanNa touch on his the military side things. I I've gotten a lot of email or the years from people in the military trying to do the farming thing on the livestock side on the Veg side. What's it been like for you being military and trying to do the farm thing who is? so Mayan I, actually. You know. We're not turning into personal, but you know I actually tried to. Necessarily it's splits. Draw down my time in the service right so I tempted to do that in February. Because I said I was. Trying to focus more attention on farming siding, and obviously the Cobra things happen, so I'm still locked in. But now I am balancing that side of the House is very difficult and I'm a single father with Greek Kate so let I've learned to manage my time and understanding that you know. With different things going on, you just have to do on the back end, so there's long days. My weekends only exists the war when I come home like Senate right there in the backyard. So it's tiring, but it's.

Veg side Farm Senate Kate
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

01:45 min | 7 months ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Just talking about the business and the economics of things we're talking about legacy inspiring. In bringing together people around food. Think about your farm and how it fits into the community at large. Would trickle down effects. Does your farm leave on the community besides just producing food? When you have a farm, it's a magnetic place. It's visually stunning place, and it can be a place that kick-starts a lot of change. Let's hear how James's farm is making impact in Colorado. So James I mean I I think it's been crazy. Twenty twenty so far starting out kind of quiet as a farmer, you then have covid nineteen to deal with, and then we have the whole George Floyd situation, which just culturally his really disrupted things in our country for you know unfortunate death. What's it been like for you? Twenty twenty I mean you're. You're getting hit on all sides here. Yes twenty twenty is. Interesting to Italy's. But, honestly it's it's a blessing also. Entering this year consciously made an effort to. Put effort and time into my backyard farming. Go during direction right so. Basically I had the the set up the mindset. buildings route and coby it Kinda switched my mentality, a little bit like hey. We might need food. You know people might community my knee for so I kind of. With activated in that way like purpose to say all right cool will..

Twenty twenty James George Floyd Italy Colorado
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

10:09 min | 11 months ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Both about the same amount of work in kind of showing up in in very similar areas as well noah farming gum. No so we. Yeah we each have a kind of side Gig. I've been I've been lucky enough to have a relationship with With actually two two people in Portland that also have a small business that have been around for about seven or eight years so so as the years have gone on with them. I've been able to be someone that they can look to to manage their yard or come in and work at their shop or you know simple things like how sit in do things that they can get away in travel us that that's been a that's been a helpful way for me to to balance scheduling to of making income outside in also being able to work on the farm. Yeah Yeah Right now. I've I'm just doing farm punk right now But when it slows down I work at low grocery co OP and also have another job with another small-scale producer. So yeah we definitely if not working for foreign punk still exist within the world of small food in Portland Portland. One thing I would think from the outside is crowded market. You alluded to it being crowded. How'd you differentiate yourself and you talked a little about that? Hey we're not going to go a diversified CSA. We're GONNA have salad dressings in addition to salad. But can you elaborate a little more on like what was the game plan of like we have two different here? And what did you look at? And how did you arrive at where you arrived at knowing that you saw? Csi customers were frustrated with their currency essays. And getting too much vegetables. So how do you differentiate? And if there's other farms just producing Greens. How do you compete with that? How do you stand out? How do you become your the new green producer? But how do you become? Doug Greene producer. Yeah I think a lot of that came. Initially from our marketing and branding. From the very get go. We wanted to have an icon wanted. Have a logo symbol that you could just see in. Its stood out you know and having this very beautiful display. That's attractive in POPs in its unique. You know like our colors are black. Green and white We both are big fans of the color black and so let's be our own flair. Let's be ourselves and let's extend that into farm pond and that's one thing that will really make a stand apart because we do feel you know unique in that we feel like we listen to different types of music than a lot of farmers we listen to electronic music and we. I love to do silly little crafts in where like pom-pom names and I don't like you talk to us in you wouldn't allow people don't think that we are the farmers. They think that people working at the booth where the farmers like this. That we're here to you know at so yet from the get go just like having an icon. Having named to I mean I make a little rings that have bubble letters on them and you wear them on your knuckles so it Kinda came out of my desire to get knuckle tattoos. But as I can't commit to the certain set of four letter a letter words like I have too many different moods you know and so Farm punk I came because we made the rings at Said Farm Punk and I was wearing them when I was working at the Co op. I feel so seen in this like this is me. I'm a farm punk like I'm this farm person that lives in a city in lives this peri urban life we really resonate with word. Peri urban because that stands for perimeter urban. It's basically those rural spaces within a city. Because I often feel like you know your neighborhood Coyote in terms of being in Portland than so you know having the name farm punk definitely people like what. What's that name about? Where's that come from Gives us an opportunity to share? Who are in a lot of farms are Sunshine Valley Farms or Flower Daisy Farm? You know like the name farmers at the end. We'll let's put it the beginning in. It's like it's more of an identity. It's more like a living thing. More like a brand versus. It's tied to a place because we don't have a piece of land right now. It's not about I mean. Headwaters is where we farm in it is important to our story but farm fungus more an idea of like how to engage with food and it's like fresh salad in it's easy to eat. It tastes really good. So you know our branding with art like we've very much prioritize very high quality salad. Greens and have that consistent th-through the I think that's one thing that differentiates us from a lot of farms. Is that no matter what time it is. You can get amazing. can get amazing cut salad. Greens they're already ready to go. Nice big bags prewashed so it just makes it really easy for people to come and also the dressing to you know like we offer a salad kit so if you get a bottle of dressing in bag of Salad Greens you said two dollars in just is we have within our booth. There's a lot of rebelled up. Sell a lot you know. Oh you know you need herbs or do addressing like Oh you know our roots are one for three to five you know so there's a we're able to kind of engage people more and I think a lot of people do come back to us because we talk and we have personality and we care about people that were selling vegetables to. Yeah I think. More farmers need to embrace that that being their personality in their farm brand it does feel a little sterile at times and a little bit all to rush sticky old school. I mean you definitely have to cater towards what your audience identifies with your customers. That's what they're looking for you. You gotta go that route and then try and find your personality within that because you got to sell product the end of the day. But I think differentiating yourself especially in someplace like Portland where there is a wide array of people. I mean you got us out. You've got to look different you. You are looking to identify with a certain crowd in probably certain people walking through the farmers market say well. That person looks like no offence. My GRANDPA that that looks like Dad Governor with and I think if you look at a lot of microbrews and stuff I mean you kind of see that in the beer scene like there's all these opportunities for unique designs and bottle designs and each brewery kind of has its own brand around it yet like you said all all the farms are a place. I think I don't want to discount that. I think it definitely does work. But when so many people are reluctant to sell their not people people they they have trouble standing out there entering crowded markets use. Some of which you have in that is just who you are. That could be dialing up the religious side of things that could be dialing up you know hobbies or what you do or just the way you express yourself with colors or your culture. Whatever it is I think holding back holds businesses back and you try and let that leak out and suddenly it becomes more fun because this is who I am. This is who we are. It's really authentic. If you identify with it you're really gonNA identify with it and if it's not you it's not you but it's not distasteful and that was something that we really had to like work on. I felt like I. I've always been a very bold person you know and I remember. The conversations with the book can use the word punk offend people. I think it'd be scared of us you know and let's do it. We're not a punk. Where a farm punk like? It's a different type of Pong. Were a person that doesn't really play all the same thing you like. Rule is you know and it's like you come over to our booth more like playing dance music having a dance party in. It's like fun and definitely has taken courage in us to stand apart in that way. Because it's like yeah. I L like different in. That feels like very scary. You know people don't know how to the you know they don't know how to engage with it but Or at least I like I project project that it's not actually the truth but the truth is like when you are being authentically yourself. That's captivating people WANNA come in. See THAT YEAH. I mean one thing that you know in talking about this. That really comes to my memory is in on a world of Hobson. Denny's I remember going to Seattle and I stayed up there in the downtown area and I ate at this restaurant called Biscuit Bitch and they opened pretty late at like honestly like eight o'clock or nine o'clock on a Saturday line out the door. Tiny little bowling alley style restaurant. You Walk in. And it's like ludicrous on volume ten and tattered up people risque stuff on the wall. Food was amazing but you remembered that experience and I remember it today and if I went to Seattle I would go out of my way to go back there. Where mom and pop joe's diner serving normal stuff yet? That's great is what it is so standing out. It just is what I'm trying to. If you're not standing out you are blending and if you're not blending in why is your business going to survive or gain a foothold in a new market? And I think you risk more by blending in then you risk by pushing the limits a little more and I mean Portland. It's probably already a pretty liberal city as is so I mean you kind of have a little bit more freedom to roam there than you would and I dunno more conservative city. Yeah AB absolutely.

Portland producer Co op Said Farm Greens Seattle Csi Sunshine Valley Doug Greene Hobson Denny joe
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"I think it really became a a unified vision and I think it we really were able to to kind of look at what we each as individuals were bringing to the table and In in that really on my end was was kind of desire to grow food. And I'm Quincy on was Was was really working with it from an artistic perspective really using her her flavor profiles and in desires in enjoys around making making food for people and In in kind of combining those together. Yeah there's definitely and definitely a collaborative and and thinking about as well you now is like well. What what would we want to eat? You know it kind of I feel like farm punk salads kind of came out also of well like we just WANNA be authentically ourselves. And how can we make something that represents us? Unlike represents a side of farming that we feel like is slightly unconventional and work together to make this successful and have it be so that both of us are seen in a you know and I really do feel like we have defined roles and skill sets. That are really cohesive in and help us through the process of creating kind of felt like it always. It always was that way. What do you feel like are some of the challenges it for starting a farm for younger people? You're new to community. You have this vision year and a half in the making thinking what you WanNa do. You had worked at farm so you saw farms you had experienced but when you went to actually start your own thing when it came time. We're doing this. What are some of the real world challenges that you faced? I think that one thing that we saw was that it can be very easy for farming with younger people to be really idealized really kind of glorified and it's just like utopic thing and in so many ways it is so beautiful but there's a lot of really hard work that's not always fun and so. I think that sometimes I feel like I've seen people like have a hard time with that or like you know. They like farming but they don't like the business side of it they don't like the bookkeeping and they don't like the marketing and they don't like the sales because it just WanNa do the farming you know and I feel like for us. It's been really cool because I feel like we do have that desired. Also be business. People in the farming is also there and so. I think that's probably something that I think. People have a hard time with as well as using older models that may or may not be where culture is at right now and you know with the. Csa's too it's like Portland's like there's so many ceus as like. How are you going to compete with that? Is that even the model that people want these days especially as Portland continues to be more of a metropolitan city and there's more like on the go convenience and also like many different diets to you now. There's a lot of things in CS as that. Certain people can't eat like corn or potatoes or beans or whatever. It's an so as you know as diet also comes into it. You know we saw like solids being kind of been most net neutral of all events like pretty much. Anybody could eat salad or you're not with obviously some caveats there..

Portland Quincy Csa
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"You are returning home you're happier more pleasant person to be around to look practically exactly on the on the farm level It it's really good to know your numbers where your numbers are coming from your firm But even if you don't have down on paper you can get a pretty good sense of just like your weekly sales at the market or to your restaurants Okay Migraines for example on my farm It's probably forty or fifty percent of our total sales. But it's one one out of a of revenue me but it's one out of twenty twenty five crops that we grow so Migraines are such are the he le hanging fruit because it provides In itself pays for all the Labor and Seed and potting soil bill on my farm. It could run the engine of that those basic things just by itself in the really repetitive tasks so One thing that made a huge difference between this year and last year was last year spending the first three or four hours on average average two to four hours depending on the day doing the micronutrients with my employees But I realized that everything that we were doing was so trainable that it was is the low hanging fruit and it was stuff that I hated enjoying. I hated enjoying it was stuff that I hated doing because it was very easy very repetitive. It had to be done but it was very time consuming and all I can do while spending two or three hours using Chris's words being an Automaton was was all the things that I had to do later that day in the outdoor farm so this year we completely changed it. I spend ten or fifteen minutes. This at the micro Greens facility and I identify everything that needs to be done and I handed off to my employees employees and he did ninety five percent of that work and it was a lot less stressful in that small space. When I wasn't there for him because he was was able to focus on what he was doing? I didn't have all these ideas being spat out at him and kind of breaking his concentration focus. He actually worked. Faster asked without me being there because there are certain steps that he's able to follow and he liked the work better. I liked not being there and then when I was has done at the end of the day I didn't have to run around between two operations and I kind of consider the micro Greens Separate operation for my outdoor farm. So psychologically when I'm stepping in the door at home I'm a lot more pleasant to be around now things on the farm that are also at low hanging hanging fruit that I have identified this year that I'm going to offload onto delegate to My father who's been working with me on the farm this year and there are things that he enjoys doing. He's efficient at doing and things that he doesn't enjoy doing these inefficient at doing and we identified those and delegated the Labor between the two split the labor between the two of us and it just keeps us out of one another's way we we have our own domains of expertise that we take care of on the farm and we're just going to double down on. That identified the low hanging fruit again for next year and do the same thing on the farm that I did with the micro Greens operation this year. And if you just do those things you're you're out on your business just identify the easy places where you can delegate the work that you don't like doing to other people who do like doing work or at at least an efficient data and can manage it it's going to have An amazing mental effect on you over time if you identified as a few things every year By the end of two or three seasons. You've taken off ten time consuming burdensome tasks that you didn't enjoy doing that's just going to revolutionize how are you interact with your your farm business and then it's going to revolutionize how you interact with the people you love at home I think having a A Better version of you at the end of every day at the end of every week at the end of every year is just better for all of us in. That sounds sounds. kind of like hippy. dippy but it is true. I mean if you want a true test go to your husband wife partner whoever or is most close to you and and ask them honestly. What did you think this year when I was really busy whenever that is if they know it's August August and July? Would you think this year in July and August. Algebraic me in telling me the truth and that could be scary. Could not be a fun conversation. But it's a productive conversation that leads to hopefully better future results. Because you're hopefully getting a non-bias opinion of somebody who knows you the best interacts with you. The most in they're gonNA see who you really were instead. Dead of you telling yourself who you were or pretending to be somebody who you weren't. You're you're probably more of a jerk. Then you thought you were. You're probably less present than you thought you. You probably worked more than you thought you did. You're probably angrier than you. I thought you were you. You probably had some signs of being depressed from time to time or at least mentally disconnected is getting that outside opinion can also just just put it in your face and say look this is how it was and maybe that shocks people into changing which is good. You know getting better are all the time. So we're late. Twenty nineteen now given your year and thinking about what we talked about in this conversation member station looking ahead to twenty twenty in. What would you like to see change for for Jordan in twenty twenty or what? What is your plan for? Twenty twenty to make you feel physically or mentally better next year. I think first first of all I'm GonNa take what you just said the heart and just sit down on with My fiance And ask her how I did this year. 'cause I mean we did have some conversations throughout the year when I was just becoming a bit too much to deal with when I got home and That feedback is helpful throughout the year. But also just having a year end recap and just saying how did they do this year. How can I improve for next year and really taking on her perspective in how I'm going to plan To be in how I'M GONNA plan my business So that I can be better next year. That's going to be not task number one. I think just actually sitting down with her and having a real conversation about that in and then I think I need to fall out. And maybe farmers general we need to fall out of this trap of Underestimating how long things are going to take over. Estimating how long how much we're able to do in in a in a day or a year Humans are extremely talented under estimating along things are GonNa take your how much they're going to cost and there's construction principle however much you think it's GonNa cost. Yeah because there's always these hidden costs and when I'm planning next year I'm actually GONNA plan for seventy percent capacity because I know that there's GonNa to be a thirty percent. That's going of work and costs. That's going to sneak in there and if I leave myself space I can take advantage of opportunities entities if no surprises. Come up in surprises. Dude come up you know the greenhouse Plastic rips open to dedicate another two days to replacing that For example one thing that happened this year I'm going to have space for that without ruining their plans So on the personal side. I'M GONNA sit down that conversation with her on the firm side going to just be more realistic about mind personal limitations and plan for seventy percent capacity so I have room in farming. You think oh I'm going to dedicate myself slowly to this farm and I'm going to have productivity activity in wealth in reputation and good impact on my community but if you're doing all that at the cost of the relationships that you have with yourself and the people you work with and the people people you live with what's the point in the long run everyone's going to appreciate you a lot more and you're going to appreciate yourself a lot more. If you give yourself that time to restoring not your humanity develop relationships check in with yourself and just overall be kind to yourself as you try to do this overwhelming task of affronting farm. The farm is not the most important thing in your life. That's for everybody. The business is not the. The people are.

micro Greens affronting farm Twenty twenty Chris partner Jordan
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"In a world that is increasingly only charging more and more for online content. And I get why people have to do that. Don't neglect the free resources out there. oftentimes free means poor quality. But I stand behind this show. I know a lot of guests stand behind their episodes. And I think the quality that you get here for free is just as good as some of the content that you pay for that is why today in this year has been sponsored Ronsard by this own show support the show by reviewing it sharing it with a friend and going back into the archives rush all things that will benefit you in won't take any money out of your wallet or show up on your credit card bill. Thanks a lot and thanks for listening this year for today's episode. I am talking to farmer Jordan. mcphee of Maple Bloom Farm Jordan. Somebody who's been on the podcast in the past talk about marketing and also growing his farm while hiring employees today the conversations a little different. Because we're talking more of the mental interpersonal side of things. Jordan had some challenges on the farm this year. Like many of you like all of us do in our lives in our business physical and mental challenges that made life in running the business heart today. We're GONNA talk about how he dealt with some of those challenges or some of the strategies that he put in place to try and improve his own self care. This is a great time of year to think about these things because you are not on the hot seat. There is no urgency on the farm. Right now for most of you think about the year. That was how did it go physically mentally for you. How would other people view you this year as you interacted with your business? Would they say the things went well or were. They say you weren't so well you weren't the best husband or the best wife or partner or dad or mom do this type of mental review. Now while it's fresh and then think about ways you can correct those problems. Going forward or for mitigate the problems. You're not going to be perfect but you can be better in. This episode is about being being better not being perfect. It's about being a better you with Jordan mcphee so Jordan when you look back at the year that was twenty nineteen what stands out to you. Well I mentioned when reached out. It's been kind of a tough tough tough year. it's been mixed Lots of slow downs Both on the personal side professional side On one side of things we achieved Our highest revenues and profitability ever farm which is Great But it was also combining that growth. It's also the toughest year psychologically logically physically since we started farming on our own in two thousand fifteen So basically that's the. That's the gist. We're just looking being overawed the entire year you see here first response. What stands out more the tough stuff or the successes as a knee-jerk response I'd say the tough stuff I think our brains are kind of prone to Dwell on challenges that we can can solve rather than replaying the successes over and over again in our heads. It's unfortunate because they'll probably has a negative mental toll but it also is the positive because that means we strive to make things better rather than just kind of resting on our laurels. If there's anything I want people listening to this the conversation to walk away when it's just incredibly important to take care of yourself. Psychologically physically because Staying in check with where you're at mentally and keeping your body and your relationships healthy Overtime are crucial components of running any business especially firm given the intense physical component Just so you can stay motivated energy. Energize keep going from season to season so If I could just boil that down it's keep yourself healthy I Then you'll be ready to act on larger stage so when I'm looking back at the year that's kind of the mantra that I have going in my head that despite all the challenges in struggles that had had If I if I'm just focusing on kind of keeping myself well I'll be able to keep on going through those challenges and struggles and You know there's always a light at the end of that tunnel. How would you rate yourself on that? Is that something you're saying. Hey in hindsight. I need to change that. I need to keep myself more well or do you think that you actually focused on that. In that really helped you endure some of these trials and tribulations. Well I'M GONNA I'm GonNa Follow Jobbins Advice and stay away from the sevens so if I was going to rape myself at a ten I I probably give myself a six Because there were a lot of really great things sir. I think I did this year. Is I stayed away. This is also what I didn't twenty fifteen or first year when I just knew that. There was no room for distractions. I just just took the entire year off or the growing season of drinking So that had a clear head and the first hour to In the morning warning if each day were a lot easier to overcome. That's very specific thing. the thing on the on the on the physical and mental title side There's routines that I wish I had kept up with more. That's why I'm more of a six out of ten than eight at attend ten. I didn't keep up with a meditation practice. I didn't keep up with Stretching exercises even for just a few minutes every morning in the rare occasions maybe once a week when I did those things instead of daily while which I would prefer to do I noticed a dramatic attic shift whenever I did. Do you know. Ten minutes stretching or five minutes Sitting with my eyes closed focusing on my breath the The the mental clarity and just a lack of physical tightness. I would feel Made the start so much easier and that has a compounding effect throughout the day you get more done in the morning you feel better. You better mental Conversation going gone with yourself and then that cascades throughout the day so you end up winning the whole day yell at out agree with that. I mean usually I find that if you can get rolling rolling early whatever that is for for anybody I mean. I'm recording this year. At Five am on the Pacific coast a lot later where you're recording. But if you get rolling early early and get some momentum going I always find that the days go better because it's just more is getting getting done quicker in your building on positive success where the days where I sleep in a little bit or I kind of just waste the morning a little bit and I'm starting later. I'm thinking Oh okay well. It's already eight thirty and I'm getting onto this stuff. I feel behind even though I can probably you still get everything done that. The day is totally different. If I wake up fresh get right after it knock a whole bunch out and feel like I've made excellent in progress by the time eight. AM comes around and then it's almost like everything beyond that is bonus for me so I'm with you in getting the day rolling early and whether that means sleeping more I mean that's something I've really tried to do. This year is is take more rest and especially on days. That are hard or following days. That are hard and I cut out drinking a few years ago. I still drink occasionally but I can tell you not having any sort of alcohol. My system the following morning of for sure one hundred percent makes a difference and makes a better morning. Oh Yeah I can't I mean and I'm I'm going to be honest. I'm hung over right now and I cannot imagine if I was feeling like this in the middle of August in having to wake up at six. AM and Beginning a ten hour day in thirty degree heat it would just be one percent hell. I can get away now as we're recording this in mid-november over But case in point even though I know all of these things that are good for me I still have trouble Cemented the discipline myself to stick to the Religiously why do you think that is part of it is a lack of discipline and part of it is recognizing. Hey this is a holiday. Hey this is an annual rituals with friends. You don't have much going on tomorrow. You can afford to not be running at one hundred percent capacity Today so I gave myself permission to do that. And well I still regret it anyway. Because I don't feel great but That's kind of just giving myself a little bit of leniency. So I can live and have fun and that balance is at the time of the year four or five months straight where I'm always. He's trying to be one hundred percent on the ball and keep up with everything that's being thrown at me it's I guess at the end of the year and in the fall in the winter. It's a bit. Take my reward. But I just. I'm I'm getting much better. These days at not overdoing it too frequently. I think I'm I'm starting anyway chief a bit of a balance But I think I still have room for improvement there. Do you find that the things you're trying to do this year to stay day. Well are things. You're more imposing on yourself. Maybe maybe taken onto much verses. They're just a natural fit. I say that because one thing I found myself doing in the past is is trying to force myself to do you a lot of things that are you know quote unquote good. Have a green drink and little things but all these little things that you have to do every day or you think you have to do every day a start to add up in a lot of those things. I kind of realized were me just saying I need to do this when they were they were purely really optional. And I wasn't fully into them at the core in the mind in the Didn't stick and eventually eventually those things fall off and over time I've kind of loosened up on myself and said okay limbs find what is really important and really exercising unsleeping a bit more and also taking a break during the week and being okay not during doing work all the time have been the things that really really have worked for me. I'm not saying everybody needs to do that. But finding that list of things that just US came naturally and it's like I miss him if I don't do them but I'm not so dogmatic about him like if I don't do it every day. I'm not beating myself up about it when when you look at just general wellness and navigating the hardships was it an imposition. Or was it more I like doing doing this. I need this well. This all ties together really. Well What you're saying about you know imposing structure on your life And dealing with that resistance and getting more sleep in managing..

Jordan Jordan. mcphee Maple Bloom Farm Jordan Ronsard partner rape US Pacific
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

09:08 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Yeah that's about thirty four okay. So thirty four. What made you ask those? Holistic context questions Russian's the reason I asked that question is because most people don't they just they look at the now now and what's GonNa either relieve pain now relieve pressure now or what feels good now and usually that surfacing it doesn't involve deeper more contextual questions like I I want my son maybe if I'm going to have more kids to have a good longterm relationship with their grandparents. Why were you thinking about that? Not The the grandparents thing but these bigger deeper holistic questions. Yeah that's a good question. I wonder if it didn't Wasn't a product of needing a little older her and realizing that Marching up and down the hill you know to fetch water and fix the ramp on even when we have that running Those little things starting to realize I need to needed to figure out lifestyle debt would ultimately You know be farmable for another twenty or thirty years and I think that was part of it realizing as I was getting older I was also just getting more logical article about what I was doing and also feeling a little bit more in my bones and my muscles Yeah and I think it into there was also just A very logical answer very specific answer to that too is that We were listening a lot to the farmer number two farmer. PODCAST think. I'm pretty sure it was Dan. Breeze flaw who came on and talk about turn the soul and was talking about how they all went through hosting management training. And I I think in hand and I will just listening to that together. We kind of looked at each other. We need to do that. That that makes a lot of sense. We've never done that and The ad I think that's kind of where it started and just thinking in another person on that same podcast. That was something something we do. Is we listen to your podcast. And we listened to farmer to farmer and we just kind of think about what we were doing and those were the first time that you know our mentors. Tour's were very much like we are now homestead driven but also know. They have to make winning. So that's what they're they're focuses and then and you know the only other person that we really knew of. That was doing anything like what we wanted to do. Was Elliot Coleman. He's never been You know we would read his books. But it was never hyper focused on finances There was so still sort of his spirit of of you know kind of doing being being back to land Of which a movement of which he was a big part so Yeah I think that we didn't have until you. You know you and and Chris that we didn't have a lot of guidance in that direction and then we started listening to podcasts at night map that kind of put into us to start thinking differently about what we were doing school. You thought about that. I mean it's one of those things that I wish somebody had taught me to think about. Now I try and instill that in every entrepreneur. I talk about it a lot. And the grass fed life side and I've created a whole course module around that and worksheets worksheets of just from the struggles. That I went through with my wife starting a business of questions. I wish I would've asked or things would have sat down and talked to her about or think about plan plan. And I love Allan Savory. I've talked to him. I met him in person and I think he's done such a great service but holistic context context. You try and read that book my God. It's a nightmare. And it's just simplifying and distilling down into something. That's more digestible has been huge. But I'm glad you you thought about that. You put some time into that. You guys made a decision together. Here's what we want to do. And then you went to start up the farm senior starting up a farm with well knowing what you know today interviewing all the farmers you've ever interviewed all the videos you've ever watched on Youtube all the podcasts. You've ever heard would you. What would you say in having having done this to somebody who wants to start up a farm with? I don't WanNa see zero capital but limited capital like. Let's say a dream farm on the cheaper side costs fifteen thousand dollars set up in so many as fifteen hundred bucks or less would you tell them. Yeah Yeah hold on second So that's a great question Diego. 'cause I've been thinking almost exactly about that you know it's our tenth is my tenth year as a farmer. I guess if you count my two years and turning and and I've been thinking what ten things would I tell myself and I don't know that I have ten yet but I've been thinking I think well the first thing I would I would think is if you have fifteen hundred dollars really ready to go but you don't have experience to get the experience to find a farm where you can work on to to get that experience because one of my biggest regrets is not working on another farm. Another farm another farm that was more production oriented wanted that was more not that are far more production oriented something that was maybe more bio intensive because I was definitely really interested in the pre market garden style But there wasn't really to my knowledge. Nobody was doing it locally or at least I haven't found them yet and I wanted to learn farm where I wanted to end up farming which I knew Kentucky so That having the first thing I would say is that if you can wait and get as much education as you possibly can. It'll feel like you're not getting started fast. Enough but farms are very. You can start a farm faster than you think you can. And you're always younger than you think you are. And it's not as hard to get the soil up to to what you want it it to be and get things in the ground as you think it will be Because you know we're all starting late. Most throughout history people live inherited their farms. Were starting so late. We're having to do this from scratch so all of those things orchards. And all the things that you WANNA farm to be our where we get the opportunity to start that. But that doesn't necessarily mean Morgan on the once they get to enjoy it like the goal is to start at the family or to start it for the group of families or whatever it is and And so taking your time to get it right and and raising that capital. I think that's another thing I think I would tell myself is just hold on take a break. Go find a job somewhere and and work part time to farm work fulltime at a farm and do some part time freelance writing or whatever you have to do just makes you you know. Get some money money in the bank and worked really hard for one solid year. Even if it's bussing tables at night or whatever I think that I would do that and in washed videos. Read the books Have a small garden. Get your hands dirty. Do all those things take a urine really figure it out because but the funny thing is like I could probably sit in a room for for two days with my old self and just still not convinced him so it has acidy somebody that still wants to do it. It wants really really wants to do farming right because we all I know me I just wanted to get started and and I would have been really hard to convince me and my wife said the same thing that it would have been really hard to condense us to take our time to go get some capital and to get some more experience but does it. That's I mean those are the three that really come to mind. We're given your experience. How would you finish this sentence if you don't have enough capital then if you don't have enough capital then you're not starting at farm and I'm going to continue on the sentence because you're putting yourself in a position to always be a little bit behind and I think that the reason that is is when.

Allan Savory Youtube Elliot Coleman Dan Chris Kentucky Morgan
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Dot co onto today's episode in today's episode. I'm talking to now farmer. And Former Home Senator Jesse Frost of the rough draft farmstead instead. Jesse is now a farmer in host of the no till growers podcast but before he was a farmer before he started the podcast he was a home center. A hard core home center. That lived off grid in Kentucky. He started out that way because him and his wife were looking for a homestead type lifestyle and eventually along the way they decided. It just didn't fit for them and where they wanted to go with their future so they decided to transition Shen from home setting to farming in today in this episode. Jesse's GonNa talk about that journey going from homestead to profitable income-producing farm. Would that journey was like the costs involved and how that change their view upon living off the land was it more fulfilling being a farmer or home center. I know a lot of people WANNA get into farming. Here's a realistic. Look of what. It's like to get into farming with a low budget from somebody who actually did it. Let's jump right into it with Jesse Frost of rough draft farm said so Jesse when you look back at your journey right now. You're farming commercially. How far does it feel like you've came since you first started not with farming but just getting into the whole idea of home setting farms setting now eventually farming? You have a great question. It's funny because in some some ways I feel still very tethered to the idea of home steadying and although I've kind of learned to to take it you know how far I need to be away from it. There is always this especially with my wife and I we really feel like we don't want to go so far away from that we forget why we got into farming to begin with which is that we you know wanted to kind of provide ourselves? Grow your own food but Yeah Yeah I mean. It's been a big journey because we've gotten when it started out. We never thought of our farm is a business. We went through the business steps of like setting get the LLC in all those things but that that was just a formality to us we never even really conceived of our farm as anything more than kind of enhanced fighter glorified homestead and from there. We realized that's not really thing. And so so now. When I look at it you know we I think I think my wife has always been really level headed about it because I I can? I'm I'm really good. Good at kind of just being like well. That was a terrible idea. We should have rethought this whole thing. And she's like well. We gained a lot from the homestead years ears and we try to every different animal. Tried to plant so many different things we tried. Who will culture all the different things so we got some really great experience? -perience those years and I think that's always a good reminder But now that were actually living off of our a farm and not having to do odd jobs and you know all the all the various things we were having to do to kind of in home setting years it's It's been a big shift so we can actually spend a lot more time in kind've even carve out time to do the homesteaders things that we always love doing but what we had to focus on it as business that that was a that was a major shift for us and even a little bit of a begrudging shift a note that I don't know that we were super excited to start really starting to crunch numbers and and Think about production a little bit more and really I mean we always thought about production. We loved growing food particularly GRANDDAD STAPLES BUT I don't know that we really wanted to jump in to To the business side of things very quickly in the end when we dated was kind of it was kind of a hard thing. You know. We've kind of come to appreciate it. And it's afforded us more than the homestead instead life ever did so. We definitely come a long way in that way. A lot of people get into farming via home setting a lot of people exit the corporate world via the home setting or they they start home setting on the side and I I look at home. Setting is really a hobby. 'cause it it takes outside capital to make home home steadying work like you're not paying for the homestead by home. Setting and very few people are true. Living off the land you know Bushman in Alaska Living off of what they grow with a family. It's really hard in today's Day and age to do that and I don't think a lot of people want to go after that lifestyle when you guys were doing the home setting route. was there just a point in time where that money question really came to the surface of like. What are we gonNA to do here to keep this going or build savings or for the longevity of it all? Yeah they're a specific point. I mean I think when our spur son was born that kind of shook us a little bit into realizing that we needed to be more profitable but at the same time You know just knowing. We wanted to afford him a good lifestyle and be able to. I don't know when he grew up. Take Karate classes and maybe save suffered his college or be able to try to travel back and forth and see the grandparents and those sorts of things just little things but also kind of bigger picture stuff But then there was also we were. We lived off grid. We had like seven and a half acres in Bug Tussle Kentucky which was kind of in the middle of nowhere. I mean I say that but I I get scolded sometimes for calling it. The middle of nowhere because Weren't Wendell Berry country. And they they don't believe in the middle of nowhere here but It was great and we lived kind of than hour and a half from everything But that that was very expensive and we The lifestyle was expensive at the travel in the move around very expensive. So we didn't have tables at all You know we didn't have running water or electricity. We just hold our water and made everything really simple but that with that simplicity. There was a lot of complexity so it was a very difficult work and It was very time consuming and we had to start a fire to cook every meal and I was three or four years of that and realising light kind of around the time that our first son was born that we wouldn't be able to do that forever in that we needed due to start setting up systems to take care of ourselves and we set up a rim pump systems. Take care of the water so we finally got water to the house to be a grabby fed ramp And that was kind of a step but then all the other things. Let's say You know electricity in those those sort of elements we new and then just finishing our cabin. We knew all the little things Would start to add up and we had no capital for. That's one huge thing about our farms we started with nothing nothing We were given some things which is a form of capital ARC's. Our neighbors gave us a little time on that property to build our cabin seven and we built a cabin with money that we crowd funded and In after like a couple of years. Here's a few years after the damn. We bought the land from those neighbors but we were allowed time to live on there for a while so we were given things and that was our only capital. But we didn't have anything to invest into the farm in so yeah I mean that was I think you kind of nailed it with the. It's it's home setting as a hobby I I. It's kind of like I said my wife is very scary. Logical levelheaded about it but part of me that feels. I don't know At that time was not is if that home studying was kind of a silly pursuit in that in that I viewed it as what I could do for the rest of my life just that just growing enough food to feed my family and sell the excess assess But but yeah it's not. It's that's not a viable prince because you end up in these situations where you can't afford to build things you need to build or are Or Save any money or fix your vehicle just it becomes this If you're just doing the home setting it becomes this very all encompassing famous is You can't do anything more than just survive day. It's Har- that's hard right you know. It's draining training. especially if you have when you start having kids like you mentioned like you maybe can do it for a while. I think partner can do it for a while. You in a partner and one two three four kids. I don't WanNa work without a safety net for twenty years thirty years like I. I feel like so much stress comes out of that that is just. I don't know that the experience worth. Yeah and it's so hard to see that when you're kind of young idealistic especially me not really coming. From a background of business or financing SORTA way always been kind of artistic type. I guess And I just never really. That stuff never appealed to me because doing it was never satisfying so focusing on money was never really that satisfying. I enjoyed saving money when I had money coming in but focusing on the business side of things like it never really wanted. I'm to be an entrepreneur that I started to farm not knowing that's what I was doing and I was kind of ironic. Now I love it But it's taken several years for me to kind of embrace that because yeah like we said we started announced. That was the goal. Wasn't necessarily start a business in urine that same farm. Same same property today right. No so We were there for about four years from two thousand twelve until what do thousand in sixteen in November two thousand sixteen. We moved to closer to home so another thing that we did in that period of kind of realizing he likes that That home said he wasn't getting enough. Was We also sat down and darker listed goals and We kind of realized. Does it where we were. Living Wasn't going to achieve ultimately especially when we factored in the the kind of life and relationships. We wanted our the our son to have so we wanted him to be close to his grandparents And have a good relationship with them and we just we were about three and a half half hours away and like I said it's very Bug Tussle is the closest town is like twenty five minutes from there and it's a small town in northern within tennissee and it's just it's very Very Small and very isolated and we felt like all the things that we wanted to do. We're going to be very hard. And so when we sat down and did our political that that was a huge reevaluation for us and so we started realizing like the the navy. That wasn't going to be forever home. which is really hard because we have that cabin and had kind of cleared most of the force by hand and done a bunch of work there And but we realized it wasn't we could do it forever and it wasn't necessarily achieve what we wanted to achieve we weren't trying to fit our goals To the property we were trying to you know achieve figure out what would help us achieve our goals so moving closer to family was a big part of it and also moving closer to a market. Yeah we spent. We had to drive an hour. We are going to bowling green or an hour and a half. If you were GONNA go down to Nashville to self produce And we weren't able to produce enough on our the property for that to be viable. We have roughly in not quite an acre introduction kind of right before we left It was in the woods so the White was kind of rough through through especially going into the fall in the spring before the sun is really high was we. We lost a lot of the sunlight so so yes that would grow slow and it was really challenging. How old were you at that time when you had to make that decision? I'm going to move to stay day. Gosh it's a good question. I must have been thirty Let's see I would've.

Jesse Frost Kentucky Shen Wendell Berry Nashville ARC LLC Alaska navy Bushman tennissee
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Here it is another farm five on farm small farm smart one who sort of back get some perspective maybe you see things slightly different angle maybe you don't but as you just are decluttering your life you start cutting off Offbeat unnecessary information you start getting some clarity of your own thought. I mean when other people stop telling you what to do or whether it's advertising your people you know bill you start realizing there's some regional ideas between your ears and the longer this process goes down it's like stealing. maple syrup down into the fine sugar and once you start getting to a point where it gets really thick and really really sweet then you I realized that what I do by default just because I'm following intuition like you said the or lifeline. following my heart for following not however you want to say it but once you start doing this from the very pure perspective like when it comes from within then by default they happen to daycare people they happen to take care of your and your naturally returning surplus so I've just found that quite interesting maybe not the same for all people but that's one thing served myself at least and I also realize something else those quiet interesting I was not bad farmer pretty good farmer but I'm not the best farmer not by far there's a hundred guys out there that you know been doing it for forty years or even ten and they they can do it while they're sleeping so that was one of the things that I learned very quickly that yes I can do this there is a way the blueprint is made the way has been paved I can go make a Korean permaculture I can go become a professional farmer I can do any of these things but then realized that my gift to permaculture remind the way I can express myself in used the resources that I have within myself they are combination of all of those mistakes of all of those failures of all of those successes allows experiences those conversations that have led me to this point in time called right now so for me that was the realization of using permaculture in combat nation with the skill set that I have to create something of value for people in to help them in a way that they might not be able to do it themselves researches.

forty years
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

26:45 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"D. I. E. G. O. Today's episode of Farm Small Farm Smart is brought to you by paper Pot Co pay pot co is your source for all things paper we will be slitting the employees I'll be you know the wedding silently paying or glaze salary farm would be paid new onyx on intern attend dollar average customer into twenty or thirty dollars average customer so that that absolutely is part of the goals while with flowers were the potential add on products or how could you increase dollars per sale at a given market we were saying earlier veg let's say just sold Greens will now I can bring on tomatoes and root veg and try and upsell you buy Greens also by in route veg when you guys go there with really one bouquet how can you up that price or how can you up that transaction per customer at one market yeah we got a lot of different thoughts on that first we're going to diversify our case sizes so that right now we're only selling Lina ten dollars. Okay we're going to offer a more expensive bouquets as well so that'll be sort of our our low end and then we'll have Out between a fifteen and a twenty dollars K is sort of doubles the number of stems that are in the sleet so price point wise that's not ask whole lot more and recoup from that bouquet from arcade with the way more so will diversify our sizes and then we're also going to offer a herbal bouquets so we're going to grow five or six different kinds of herbs and then just put them in a bouquet together and and seldom is also an opportunity for people to just put that in their kitchen and how like something that is bringing beauty to their countertops while also they can just take a day choose from those herbs to acquit we're also going to do so luke as just one type of flower which we've noticed are fairly popular for people who just want to have a quick grab and go opportunity so will I'm just son Barbara Kay's hopefully over the next year or two when we get our perennials going we'll have just hydrangea book as we're thinking about like so lavender we have liked customers who stop by in their always smelling bouquets they're always telling their children to snow the case I would say that Mike as many as one in four people stop are smelling the flowers and actually a lot don't smell and so we're we're looking into putting a lot more aromatic or fragrant flowers McKay's in one of those is going to be lavender which is rate to grow in and we can easily put it into our arrangements and also sell though is as Solo ks so you know just within the flower there's there's a lot of opportunities to diversify and that's not even getting into the value added stuff that we've been considering cell and to add to you know the woman who was saying products we explored adding a house lance into the mix we haven't exactly flush that out Aso were something that we're still working on another product that we probably will do next year is bringing back the it's just a little bit of in more of a flower sway so we talked about doing a lettuce mixture strictly less than adding edible flowers in you those those bags and branding it as some kind of like floral again the like a cat she named or something like that we're still discussing in trying to figure out and another element which is kind of a judge beneficial factor to the farm tiny an highlanders going so well flowers in Knossos on selling selling honey farmers market is a lot more options there than I would've would've expected which is cool because I almost think of and I don't know that you guys did this but it's like okay here's what we're selling let's make a list of anything and everything we could potentially do that doesn't stray too far from brand doesn't stray too far from what we're known for in his isn't GonNa look out a place in the list and I think that's the kind of ideas you have to throw out there because not every one of those things is going to be a huge success or work at all and you got to kind of try a bunch of things and this is this is the danger of farmers markets right because you can't control customer flow you can either try and convert more customers that stopped impasse by which is hard you can probably do that to some extent and otherwise you have to turn up the sales per customer in that's the point you're at you have to add more sales per customer in these other products are interesting ways to go and I think a lot of them the herbal bouquet I think is really interesting I mean the different size case I think are really interesting how much does it let's say you've named off eight things if you took on four those how much complexity does it add is that where the employee also comes then were doing all these different things managing these additional four units on the table and preparing all that it now becomes more manageable because we have somebody else there who can help put this together yet that's when it comes down to what we do harvesting is one of the most critical element it's and you know you you a lot of larger scale farms and they have all teams that are just simply dedicated to harvesting that's all you're gonNA you're out we replacing that same challenge and thankfully for most of the products that we discuss we know the formula behind reduction of them for example the less knicks recording was talking about for done that we've been there done that and we're not going to get into the twenty different routes hi is of your ruge mustard greens in bady cuts were just going to focus on four different color heads and I know we've done that for for several years we've grown those as less flints were just GONNA do Zalono and make it pretty and then put you know just view says the nuance there is that we're going to grow a few flowers that we haven't before that will go on top of the minister showing actually have before so it's just a few different kinds of flowers that were adding that will put that that color pop in there and and we know how to grow these flowers pretty well so so complexities is actually pretty low and the employees are really what they're gonNa do is allow us to bring the volume that we need to rockets any type of expansion relating to or surrounding of Okay is a very easy way to mandrakes Erbil Bouquets Sunflower Okays Dalia bouquets adding elements of fragrance elements to the bouquets said those elements are very easy to add on because we're already doing that work essentially a so the the complexity will come in when we're adding you know things like honey potted plants are lettuce with edibles ars because the whole process you know post harvest process in the harvest process is a much different than what we're already doing so will those elements will be introduced when a time you know over the course of many years just so that we can get one Park Down see how does and do we want to continue doing as do we wanna add in you know are we ready to add in another one of those more complex elements but the right off the bat will definitely just start off with a lot of ease diversifying our our sizes in our types of bouquets and then having the ways to help with the now agars that we need to grow to produce all of these extra elements how do you decide how far you're willing to push the border there's of the brand I think about this a lot with paper pot we've looked at a lot of products that other people manufacturer and think about should we all this fit and you know sometimes I find myself convincing myself that it's a fit and sometimes it really is a fit and oh you want to be known for something you want to specialize in something you don't WanNa get so broad that you dilute down your own knowledge judge time quality those types of things other bouquets easy tie-in honey say okay easy tien lettuce bringing that you can make a case for it but does it feel like or is there some warrior what are we pushing outside of repression I I thought million times about bringing let us back because it was our most successful products when we were selling and we were known for it our packaging was really a pristine and we we worked really hard on on pushing the green things in and they sold at market we could updike just rely we know that we were going to sell out of what we brought and so I've been thinking about that forever and then all of a sudden and I was just like a little lightening hit me I was like wait a second why don't we just put some flowers on top and and so it's all about the flowers like to answer your question if there's a flora element to what we are presenting in selling to the customer than we feel that we're on brand and we feel like we're still giving them this very boutique lob lolly clower farm experience and and so we won't sell Lettuce Greens without those flowers on top we will try and get into just roubaix present shore people are gonNA come up and ask us that and you know we're just GonNa have to to educate I share that that that's our brand in trying to bring these lovely at Bolles tertia in there so tasty have you tried them just kind of direct the conversation that way yeah I think it also has to do a lot with our that actual branding the fiscal branding and what type of packaging were using out how we're designing our labels making sure you know that's where he lived through our hearts stand so that's you know because we actually start there I- away when you walk into our stand we want you know the same or similar type of branding label to be on the flower sleep the bouquets lease as well as the label lives on the less as the same as illegal honey or the potted plant or you know whatever product reselling so we work with in amazing brand designer she's a dear friend on someone we met who used to actually were as a Weber when we I started arming way back when she has really helped us kind of expand our brand and to keep that cohesive throughout as throughout the market's down so will probably change things up a little bit instead of stamping ray now stand are okay sleaze will probably than at a six you're just to keep everything the same do you feel like you're at the point where you have to say some of this stuff might not feel percent perfect but we have to do this we have to look to introduce other products because of the direction we want our farm to go in and if some things aren't a total fit maybe brand wise maybe farm management wise maybe just fit wise we kind of have to downplay that because growth is here we need that.

Greens Farm Small Farm Smart paper Pot Co Lina intern thirty dollars twenty dollars ten dollars
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

12:02 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Out there. I think that the market gardens incredible way to cash flow business assuming you have the success thing comes cash flow. You know they get to cash cash flow. I think that like the style of is sellable marketable like interpersonal I personally socially and if you wanted to have a bigger farm or go commercial on just one or two crops and really specialized yes I think I think this is the model yet into sort of explore some of those opportunities. Get the cash flow and then take it where you want. It quite frankly like I don't think there's I don't think the backyard garden is the end all be all You know I don't say I don't think I you know I. I have a couple of four wheel tractors at some point. You know it just depends on what I WANNA. Do what we WANNA do one thing. I've found just backyard gardening. It's almost like if you we WANNA grow a lot of food in a backyard garden essentially do it the market gardeners do and then depending on how much land you have at that point then you are a market gardener. That's just not selling your product so the next step is sell the product again asked the match or context of what you WANNA do but it's not that far fetched if an option for an aggressive backer gardner owner well to be honest with the Chadha my boy Nathan Disease Listening to this you know he worked for us you than incredible employees and you live down the road you know he's done working for me but he's taking the techniques that we were developing and you know rocking and his backyard aren't some of his neighbors doing whatever he's trying to. Do you know but I know that's a tidy now. He's doing it right. You know so whatever his goals are sure when it hit you know in so you're evolving. You're adding infrastructure to the farm. You're adding customers. You're getting more systematized what you're doing to put this into context for people listening in house sales and profitability been for y'all. What are your numbers are first first year we we were like just shy rate even by like a grand and we gross fifty two thousand dollars last year sorry in our first year. I should say and then this past year. Tom really focusing on some crops in doing a lot of listening onto our chefs finding some of our production systems you know we were able to gross just over one hundred forty thousand this year before starting before realizing realizing we needed to spend some money and in reinvesting in key areas of our business for twenty seventeen where we were netting around fifty two percent. That's read to here so you're you're doing really well and I'm glad to hear that it's nice to have examples of people and farms doing doing well in terms of reinvesting in the business. You've hit on a couple of ways that you're doing that the paper pot transplant or hiring employees. I'll call that reinvesting in the business business. Where else are you looking reinvest to continue to. Do things better in to continue to grow the business based upon where you're trying to go as a farm. I'm business well. I mean you know percents. How important micronutrients are to US likewise transplants as well so we we put a good chunk of money into our new nursery. You know which is nerve wracking to do but it's really fun to see the space starting to take life as we get into springtime. You know it's really starting to fill out having the extra spaces letting us develop new ways of Rowing Micro Greens allowing us to experiment new products so so all of a sudden you know the simple easy. Clay is like a lot of things for us and that's three weeks citing so the nursery space so you know we're taking more of a long term approach and a short-term approach. I I mean it's not the nursery we went hard on this nursery because migraines is fifty two weeks it cashless for us and yeah we could have bought down on some more like four seasons You know some produce stuff uh-huh and assure you we will it's just the logical. Goto was the nursery because micros is our brand and our entree with new customers because it's available fifty two weeks out of the year end because we're consistent Tom and in so we know that will pay for we know that the greenhouse would be paid for by the Micros and then if all of a sudden micro Greens are just not ocular anymore rich. You know we have concerns about fats food industry. you know we can still grow transplants and you know all of a sudden. We don't need the space for Micros. We can really boost our fuel production because we have all that added space for our transplants so as far as investments go. We thought it was proven to go this way because you can afford because we we have the cash flow from you know a a high net and crop like Micros I- netting for US I can't speak for other people people and then and then the insurance of well. If that doesn't work we can do their enterprises in this control space so we'd like to turn the momentum from that and then we want to be able to grow our salad crops out in the field for season as well interesting climate change and and going to stone barns actually in seeing how much they're getting away with outdoors and like four B or whatever they're in like oh man. Can we just a little bit of protection down your we can really be carrying some of our major earners. There's a lot farther than we initially thought so. That's where we'll be looking. You know we'd also like to provide control culture for a tomatoes. We special tomatoes that our customers are fond of. It'd be nice to improve yields and consistency there. I think that's a good year for goal for us. you know we're getting to a point diego where it's like. We know how to gross stuff really. WanNa start growing things very well. We want to get to that sort of master status right and you're doing all this on half an acre right. Yeah yeah so we'll be. We've opened up a couple more plots. we'll see if we need them production or this space where we decide to act cover into the rotation but we'll be at around eight tenths of an Acre where we wanna be we would you know in our minds we we think we do want to take it to this. Acre Hagen eight and a half ass scale but do take it as you'll be. Do we go as diverse their product offerings as the as the gems for farm. Do you know or do we really just focus is on the crops that cell and you know the best dress will How's this ping pong ball bouncing around in your head. You you WANNA master for everything get. There's also the potential to go bigger so when you go bigger spreading more out harder to master just more things to touch more things to do. How do you weigh those two out. I don't know I like working with a team like running team and so far we've done a good job tracking the right labor and I hate that we're tracking the attracting the right people were with us us. You know so getting people trained right being very explicit in our direction finding ways let employees demonstrate their own competency and their own one way to meet my expectations and then hopefully that relationship starts to flourish where it becomes more of a follow instruction and becomes more of a when appropriate when when time allows less. Let's collaborate. Lewis problems off else together. I'm a major things though is when we're working eight to five or eight four thirty in were stuck with that you know we've got seven hours to work those hours that we needed to be reductive and so we have explicit acts tat. Gosh explicit task sheets Y- talking clear and responsibilities are are highlighted in outlined locations are given with the expectation that folks are going to follow through to achieve the goal. Is they begin to how we do things in that become easier. That's where the conversations happen when folks become familiar with how we do it. The thing is we up. Obviously don't claim to know the the best way. We just know ways that work well for us. We're always looking to refine assign involves. were looking for people who can get that and help us do that. Yeah I strive. Dr Have an open leadership style on you know so most most folks program figured that out. It's really cool to here. I love your story. I loved the direction that you're going with everything. Thanks for taking the time today to to come on a chat for people that want to follow everything that you're doing. Where can they go to stay in touch. Were Fair share farm in Winston Salem North Carolina. That's fair share farm dot net and Ron Instagram love instagram. Were Fair share or I guess we're fair. Underscore share underscore farm. I'm on Instagram and then we're on facebook to like market gardeners success through will dabble get our feet wet in there sometimes but you know email to folks are interested in getting in deeper it's fair share farm and see. We like our state. North Carolina had gmail.com so that's the gist of it you know just on the farm work in most great great. Thanks for taking the time to share it today. Elliot Good Luck to UNM in the future. I think you're thanks for listening to this special best best of episode of Farm Small Farm Smart. If you WANNA thou- along with everything that we're doing here at paper PADRO check us out on the web at the link below or at Paper Pot Dot Co...

Farm Small Farm Tom US North Carolina Paper Pot Dot Co Rowing Micro Greens facebook Ron Instagram Chadha Winston Salem North Carolina Clay Elliot Lewis Nathan Disease fifty two weeks fifty two thousand dollars fifty two percent
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

17:11 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"We have the passion question. When we make cold calls like I was doing yesterday. You know folks. Folks are like wow I can sell. You're passionate about this like it really interested that's huge man like being able to just hang you like you know. I. I'm just like the anger people and that's what a lot of people who work in a kitchen do so we get along really well and so that you know now nobody nobody at worked for really sold to restaurants. I hadn't seen that and then when you get into more sophisticated understanding of how farm businesses Ron on you can sort of start feeling in variables so k. if I'm running a hundred members. CSA and you know what my point is is that CSA's are not terribly lucrative. and you're growing a lot of crops. There's a lot of effort lot of management to be he does I don't have a list in front of me but let's our first year fair share farm. We were we the only way to for us. The plan a farm was that we need to start vegetables because I cannot wrap my head around how to plan anything else so a really great book Doc Dam Reservoirs. The exact name escapes me but it's a practical is like a Canadian organic a practical guide hi to starting a farm huge. You know it's just like okay. What do you need every week. What what are your your household income goals for the year or needs for the year. What do you need to do weekly for your thirty weeks season or whatever it is to make that reality possible and still have enough cash. I should start over for the next year so setting weekly sales benchmarks as a place to start was an important way. We know okay okay. We want an eight to ten produce items her her week you know then you start plugging eggplant and ear and then let us in here and tomatoes for this extended period and starts coming together and all of a sudden you got a garden planned out for better or worse and it's. Kinda working you know and people are Greece unitive but that didn't work for us as our get going if you don't have any brand recognition or if you're not like deeply networks in immersed in your community from the beginning we didn't have that we were new to Winston Salem be he has been living in a county Jason to Forsyth County for a year working at a farm and you know again not spread any roots. We wound up getting in touch with the family. You're chace family. Were released say what used to be a dairy farm so I I know wandered off point Diego but yeah can you give me a little guidance. Hands Your yeah you hit on some interesting stuff so one thing I really want to pick your brain on is this idea of UNM are good at selling produce and cold calling in restaurants. SOC- fine restaurant you WanNa try and get your produce into walk me through call so if you call a restaurants. TORONT- it'll go on telephone goes something like this is like hey my name's. Elliott local produce produce grower. May I talked to the chef police. the person picks up the phone. Okay cool hang on. Let me see if he's here. Hey Chef are you. You're not you're sir. He's not in right now. Can I take a message. That's how it goes okay so that's that's not a great way to start. I mean it's a way to start you know because you will get the you know sometimes chef owns the restaurant and he's there earlier the only only guy on staff for the first couple hours and then you get them and he's interested in. That's awesome but it's like applying for a job. You know you just have rafted hit forty places until you get one nibble so it takes you know some dog dog get after it nece to get after but then beyond that you know okay. It's a restaurant WANNA find the back door. WanNa talk probably the dishwasher. You're GonNa see I or somebody doing right. They're like hey it's Jeff. You're like yeah. Let me go find him and then all of a sudden you talking to the chef. It's it's fairly simple. It does take some balls to do it. Some people aren't comfortable with that probably probably not a great way to market your produce. That's not how you like to do it. I don't know what the answer would be to sell the restaurants but to me. That's how that's how I thought to do it. Why would I go in the front door because it's just like calling on the phone you know no one's GonNa let me in the kitchen. If I ask I gotta go in the kitchen so it's simple but it's hard to do United States confidence. What are the points you lead with. You're you're probably approaching. It like you know a lot of sales. It's what value can I offer you. What problem can I solve for you. What are you conveying to the shaft. When you're talking talking to them about what you can bring to the table. I find that specific product names. Don't help the often. Don't matter you you know for us. It's rain mix. It's not that it's organic. It's not that it's not sprayed. Zombie listed pesticides like many farmers do me. We ought not to spray when we can. We do a lot of exclusion as well anyway. I'm getting joint in that doesn't matter you know fundamentally. These people are looking for a fresh product that they can afford is out of their price range. It's gotTa meet certain of benchmarks to get to actually have consideration is going to last better than what they're using. Does it look better. Does it taste better. Can they use less of it and do more with it than what they're using now. There's a number of these criteria that you know if you can hit summer all or one or some you know you may have any end you know so you know we were marketing Micros in a new area for US and you know we know okay. We know there's great produce growers there. We're we're not trying to say. There isn't one thing that we're leading with your now because we respect people that we we compete in grow with one one angle or or something that isn't unreasonable to say that we know there's great produce growers here. We know you're working with excellent people. We think our product what is up of an incredible quality in. It's only going to be complementary to the products working with now so it's it's that sort of thing that it shows that you're compassionate to their concerns. you know he also want you. WanNa lead strong show people. All your products have information there. Tell them you know you WanNa have had you do your sales sorted out and not being left to figure a you're out. you know all of this. You know you know all of this is stuff that folks listening should not assume that I take for granted we had the experience coming in both from working in restaurants in working on farms and then at this point we have a a couple seasons in we've had good traction and had the opportunity to develop more functional systems that for for sales and accounting invoicing that give us give us this sort of semblance of legitimacy like wow these guys use quickbooks. It's like they're real business. They actually I've rented invoices. You know it's simple stuff but it's legit. Eh You know slate. Our customers respect that we're professionals okay and that goes a long way. What percentage of your businesses restaurant sales in which percentage is farmers markets seventy thirty in the order yet okay some of the majority of its restaurant sales sales and one thing we were talking about. Earlier is following the opportunity and that's really what led you into microns and I'm assuming now this is my assumption. Can you tell me if it's true or not. A big chunk of the seventy percent of sales are Mike Arenas. Go into restaurants sure but yes I mean. Migraines are huge twos things they account for about fifty percent of our business but we're highly diversified within Greece themselves so we're not just doing t shirts and radishes. We are doing nearly thirty different crops micros basically if you want we'll figure out how to grow up for you and we'll do that quickly and well so are you grow in all thirty of those varieties or twenty plus varieties this on a weekly basis consistently or you visit change seasonally or degrom on demand. How do you manage that many different varieties. It's a work in progress and yes. Some things are seasonal. We just built a new nursery space so we'll see if we can push or eliminate some of the seasonality issues issues and then yeah like I said where young businessmen were figuring stuff out there. If you're asking do we overproduced sometime. Hell yeah do we underproduced yeah. nonetheless we were high-performing you know there's his heirs and whatnot and sometimes we have to compost try. We may we'll take crops on and off it. You know even even just taking off for a couple of weeks running back be like up back and then you'll see a little spike in sales there beads for instance. No one was buying the microbes for awhile Valentine's Day sold a ton of peace. You know it's just just whatever the whatever the women is fine me generally have ways to we attend a farmer's market your rap so that helps awesome US absorb overproducing on summarize you know 'cause I can be worked into a mix. I think I think a lot of savvy. Growers will do something like that. you know so. We don't have terribly much spoilage outside terribly much. How do you balance out variety with variety of crop with getting really really good inconsistent at crops in not overwhelming customers like call it the out philosophy in and out Burger which I don't think you have their they have have a very set menu. It's small a few things versus the McDonald's menu which is ever changing. It's big they offer breakfast Burritos Reito's through burgers. How do you balance out offering at all with really controlling what you do offer to the restaurant she sell to. It's difficult yeah. It is difficult and it was even more difficult when we didn't have enough space. Do Nets this sort of outgrown. Our nursery space built another nursery space. We're facing continuing to build these small nursery spaces that in the long run inefficient they were too small on a large person so they were uncomfortable me to work in ventilation was poor air circulation's for US leagues for Internal Condensation Tunnels Poor so yeah so consistency and stuff like having the space inside make this stuff work in analyzing this like you know but I you their son. is things like some crops that just don't make it you know will be seating it week after we nobody's buying it and then ultimately we just cut it. You know it's funny. Though it's like wall will do twenty varieties but still sell best every week. You know it's it's you know now. We still have our people like them. You know 'cause they're accessible but then we have some customers who are willing to pay for the real oddballs and were excited about that were always excited to bring new products on board or be first to market with certain type of product that known see the huge you know being the best. We're vow so I don't know like I said we make mistakes. We definitely L. FAT but not not that bad at the end of the day we can eat many trays the week and still be turning tidy profit or micro the operation. It's an interesting evolution in it's one that I think a lot of farmers go throwing one thing. It sounds like you're trying to evolve. Is your infrastructure here. You're you're. You're getting some new stuff. Let's go back to the beginning though with your infrastructure and twenty five thousand dollar loan initially to get started that something something a lot of people I've talked to on the show. Just hasn't came up a lot loans to get started. What was the idea there. And why did you do it. We didn't have avenue money. We've been moving around every year for like five years since college or so in at this point we just SORTA SORTA like man. We've been working on farms. Making under ten bucks an hour. research like a money. I think I had seven grand my own slaw that was like lawyers sees the formulate the LLC so that was that was sung and Emma was working gain and yeah we needed money so we borrowed ten thousand from my Dad Generous the the loan that US us and we borrowed two thousand from the USDA. We got a micro loan finance the initial startup stuff so so yeah so that money would be by like our first hose rod for do we you know we put up the no okay so we started our microbusiness than like an eight bytes well. Avi Nursery that didn't avenue plastic on it on the roof so I had this unit myself and we just put lull. Let Space Heater in there. I mean we did it. We just right you know I think like most do some special things about our property the that nager were was you know fifteen fifteen minutes from downtown. Winston which is a fun small medium sized city so we knew versus versus where we were living prior. You know okay. We can be fifteen minutes from downtown like there's a chance that we're. GonNa just be business somewhere. Somehow so at least close to it because most of the farms at work on you're talking at least an hour to the city in that seemed really elite tough to do no money. We certainly didn't have money for delivery vehicles back in the truck so we what else do you know. I bought fertilizer compost. Just bought the stuff that I needed to get growing seed course what else some some row cover. You know just not much. Would it have been possible without that loan or those loans now and that's not a lot of money either so we really roughed it. Emma Emma mentioned irrigation and that's for sure like yeah we we needed..

US Winston Salem Greece CSA Doc Dam Reservoirs Emma Emma Ron WANNA Micros Forsyth County Avi Nursery chace family Elliott Diego Jeff Mike Arenas Valentine Jason McDonald LLC
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Diego. Dri Ejido today we're going back in the archives lives to pull out a previously aired episode. It's the best of episode. Let's jump right into it. I hope you enjoy it today. I'm talking to a grower. WHO's admittedly a little bit obsessed about growing high quality produce. It's an obsession that's fueled his farms growth in an obsession which which is necessary to feel the farms growth to bring his fiancee onto the farm full time and while. Elliott seldom owner of fair share farms obsession session may be on growing high quality produce. It's not only on growing high quality produce because Elliot realizes the importance of work G- life balanced and the need to have time in place to enjoy the other things created on in by the farm today Elliott is going to talk doc specifically about how to do that in part by focusing intentionally on making the far more efficient through appropriate technology no till strategies Jeez and optimizing equipment. Elliott's also going to talk about how he and his fiancee are approaching farm transition because she's currently employed is a schoolteacher a necessary step in their farms evolution but one that's only a step where the long term goal to get her onto the farm full-time looking into the future. It's the farming methods used by Emma and Elliott which will make all of this as possible a farm that provides multiple incomes on just over half an acre. Let's get into it with one of the Masters Astor's a farm efficiency Elliott Cellular. We're we're having success with that enterprise and it's been huge for us. We've just sort of followed. The opportunity and we didn't really start a business micros in mind all of us. A good credit is up to our market manager Martin she she suggested that there was an opportunity in our marketplace and so we in fact we couldn't sell produce our first season going to the farmer's market well. I guess we did We showed them that we were able sir. Do some pretty good stuff too but Microsoft is what we were held to initially and then we've been able long story short. Is We know about growing produce in Microsoft fairly new to us. It's just what happened to have slow be had much traction with early on for service. Okay you guys worked in the restaurant industry right yeah as kids basically was able to work for this one duties in Austrian Austrian chef the Austrian and chef in the under the restaurant and he was just an interesting fun guy to work for him and his wife owned a restaurant Iran. They were into sharing technique and just they just wander staff doing things well and that's where I started in. I I guess sort of Post College for a period. They're doing like Saute at a restaurant in the morning and then doing pantries stuff in the evening at another restaurant even thinking that might be career path that was sort of in between some opportunities but then we just started change the acting sure you learn little tips and tricks when you're in there and know what to expect and you see the good bad and ugly of dealing with it yeah. I mean you know the the secret is probably just having the Not I guess confidences is a way to say but like you know you just oh you scrubbed dishes with these people before you know it's a different restaurant different people that you know the people and you just you walk in and where can. I talk to the chef than yeah sure so I'm I'm GonNa be twenty nine in March my partner and must say she's twenty eight to to she's a high school teacher and we've been able to leverage her her degree to get our business gallant. I've got a degree in English and you know never really did anything with it but is like how he started. The Business Zabel the sort of keep us afloat when he grant really certain about anything for a while. You know this is what what I think. Many people are going through twenty five to forty Mary engage trying to transition into this this trying to get one or two people out of full-time job. How do you make it happen. I mean that's kind of the umbrella that catches. Almost everybody under it seems like definitely and you know. We'll talk to some folks. They're like you're so young to be on your own business in this and that in you you know it's it's been the right time for us. We you know we we don't know much else. This is sort of as we've sort of grown up into this and this is all I've done with my adult life and so we're here on the beginning of year three of doing our own business and with about getting close to ten years of experience in I guess if my math is fair. There might be not right but the end of college I myself and appear. We got the dining services to like fund. A community garden idea was that we were gonNA grow some vegetables for the garden and I that was in my as far as goes for me cerebral failure. You know we didn't really I didn't know what I was doing a great experience a maybe less people down at the college college for poorly. We did it because it's just like had. No you what we were doing there so but that started it. I went to to Saint Croix via the University of Georgia. I wasn't going to do a study abroad thing but tag along incre summer sort of like audit sort of course eighty three G. A. and so it was Professor Sara Workman. She was doing a agroforestry Staus permaculture stuff. This was at called creepy. He Dan Farm Virgin Islands Sustainable Farm instituted their calder were called at the time and that was really neat the subtropical all suit foresty thing going on people living there and just sort of growing crops and doing stuff so that that was a that was a really exciting time to do that and we had sort of done some scenes in places like that similar to that the United States or mainland and yeah on spring breaks we go too far out places and that was the start of everything and then we were working mood sort of bovine it worked at the dining services you know went home at work in restaurants like over breaks and whatnot and then you know my first real experience. I I signed up for an apprenticeship and Kentucky working for Karl Benson and and he's just you know the farmer on the Atra list-serve looking for apprentices and so we went worked there Emma went to Hong. com is US teaching English there for a year and I worked for Carl for the better part of a year and that was my first time eating like a charity purple heirlooms made out that was delicious. All the delicious organic food was really cool really tasty an exciting place to be for me really rural too and so there is a lot of privacy mixture of exciting new stuff being out remote a spiritual a little bit and then but also a little bit lonely too yeah so that was like car was doing five or six anchors with the with the small power track takes thirty thirty three and oddly or S- powered tractor and farm also did a farmer's market at it's time and some wholesaling this little bit knowing that he was doing five acres. Would you think about how he was doing. Five acres is now or the experience of farming five acres when you're only on half now that influenced are all mindset. We thought we needed attract or to grow produce in most cases you do and it made a lot of sense. That was really cool. You know you're able to plow the field we use the Rototiller at his farm quite a bit of poultry maneuvers and things cover cropping wasn't quite there when I was there but it was something he was familiar failure within China implements and he was he was well experienced to you is like twenty years in yet done sixteen years in Vermont than down down really cool and he was managing Ariz doing an eighty or ninety member. CSI and so. I thought that's how you did it. I thought that was the way to do it and so that informed decisions and stuff from there on out you know but yeah now looking back We certainly do it a different way for us. This makes a lot of sense number one. I'm not a mechanic. I'm not terribly Andy so we don't S- so not having the tractors great that would be something we'd have to outsource services attractor and then as far as ask like caring for the land we not using a rototiller stuff now doing mostly hand tools. That's the it seems like our no till soil over. Just two seasons is some of the most mellow stuff I've worked with anywhere. It's very forgiving. You can handle you know handle swings moisture accumulation really well like we had a decent rain storm storm and you know my soils ready to work. It's a little wet. We opted not to work it today but no one or two days soil workable. We'll is your impetus artistic. Go No till basically it seemed like it was gonna cut out a number of steps and so that's something that's a focus of ours too. You know getting getting more technical about saving labor you know and and hopefully making more money as a result of the you know like. I can't care for tractor. I not entrusted in taking care of it and I don't like switching implements and to do a really good job. I know at least by hand. I have many different types of tools that I like to use to get exactly the results that I want and I don't know how to do that. I will say that you know I think some of these techniques would be easily in and welcome a scale to attract your size ethnic. You could be kind to the land tractor to but yes we wanted to save steps given what our I know how was so. That's the simple answer. Would your basic process of turning over a bed with no till I ask because this is the hang not by think with people going no till it's. How do I turn over our crop. I'm used to using the tiller now. I gotTa do it manually. What your process that you found the his works for you. Or what have you evolved to that. You're currently using yeah. I don't know if I figured it out for every occasion but we're looking for opportunities to do multiple things with one like say you know in Elliot it Coleman wrote in new organic grower. You know like remark about artsy tomatoes. You WanNa fill your hand with several several tomatoes before you move from the plant to your basket. So you know one thing we're doing right now. Is We have some really lovely heirloom winter spinach out in the field. That's going to be replaced with another crop in a couple weeks and so were harvesting interesting all crown baby spinach which is lovely and delicious and then. We're also weeding the bed because we for some. There's some stuff out of our control. Some some some painting going on we had to keep our plot covered longer and so we got away from US anyway. We're harvesting the crop and then we're also clearing the bed at the same time so specifically an extension of that would be transplanting in cross of because we know how many plants go in we also know how many plants are movements. It's GONNA take take those plants out whereas a direct seated baby Greens bet which is really easy to establish given certain cultural techniques can be very difficult for somebody just using hand tools to remove and slip so yet. We're not that hard. One of our production systems moving more towards transplants better accommodate that when you harvest say.

Elliott United States Microsoft Elliot Emma Dan Farm Virgin Islands Sustai Elliott Cellular Masters Astor Saute Martin Iran Mary partner Kentucky Saint Croix Karl Benson Professor Sara Workman G. A. school teacher Andy
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Here it is another farm five on farm small farm smart when you show up here you're an entrepreneur you're looking at these fields thousands of acres blanket of green and would otherwise it'd be a sea of grey. What are some of the takeaways that you started to think about like maybe I could adapt this to my farmer? If I did this. This would really help or is the stuff they're doing only applicable at scale and you can't scale it down. I mean I've thought the most about this exact set right. How does it apply to me doesn't even apply to me and it's the questions people have asked me the most? I think I think a couple of things one to say. It doesn't apply I think is. Excuse to put your head. In the same obviously applies it has to apply. It's the same variety of the same crop just in a different place selling millions times more than I do so I think I'm of the persuasion that has to apply even if that application the decision is I shouldn't even grow it. They're doing about right but I think it has to fly but here's here's where I think it does apply. We're big fans of lean manufacturing on our farm. I'm a big fan of that. I was fortunate to meet somebody somebody locally who helped train people in that so he and I've gotten to talking and obviously been Hartman wrote that book the lean farm that's been a great resource to share with our crew and things like that and big big fan of lean manufacturing in general apparently. Apparently so are these drones. This was a pretty lean mean operating machine but I think some of the ways that it applies I would say is one. The emphasis on food safety was paramount paramount and that's a spot that I think small farmers notoriously even sometimes deliberately <hes> come up for and by that I just mean you know wearing gloves and you should be wearing in gloves washing your hands washing hands making sure the tools are in place to ensure that you can do those things so when you're out in the field the middle of nowhere there's running water. There's more gloves available. There's hairnet. There's bathrooms. There's just there's first aid kits. Just all those things are are givens and there's somebody in charge of supervising that process so I think that was the takeaway that <hes> obviously with his. Mother Food Safety Modernization Act which would be less voluntary or gap audits which are more voluntary. If you choose to go that path I think with those types of things I've sat in on a lot of those sessions at conferences through our extension group what what have you and intends to be a lot of resistance from small growers because all the things they're suggesting are changes to how we currently get to do it and obviously everybody resist change for human so so that's kind of been the world I've been in but then to go somewhere where is not up for debate. You're not picking unless you're you're doing these things. There's just a culture around it. I was Kinda like you know. It's really not that bad every loves you. Just get your gloves and and you don't start ups and you wash your hands and you make sure people can wash your hands and you just do a couple of things and you just make it a non-negotiable you. Just you just say this is what's going the happen or you're not GonNa pick and I think that was a culture ship for me. You know I it was easy to slip into that like I don't WanNa do that and we're not gas inspected and we're not fully compliant with everything for business suggests that I came home and like updated ended a ten page food safety plan because I was so inspired but but I will say like I got home and I I bought gloves and glove rack

Hartman
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Welcome to farm small farm smart. I'm your host Diego D. I. E. G. O. Today. We're going back in the archives to pull out a previously aired episode. It's the best of episode let's let's jump right into it. I hope you enjoy it today. We're talking about the flip side of tools the opposite of the physical the mental side of things in particular hustle the best as tools in the right stuff without the right business sense hustle and effort won't mean anything the tools make the job easier but just owning them doesn't get the job done. You have to do the work and it's that hustle to do the work from bed preparation to production to sales they can give you the advantage over people who just have money and stuff because his Stephen C Hogan said. You can't can't have a million dollar dream with a minimum wage work ethic if you do. Where's that GonNa get you left with an unsuccessful business and a collection of expensive stuff? A lot of success is unquantifiable with a dollar sign instead being measured impure blood sweat and hard work and the beauty of it is that none of that cost anything and could be applied by literally nearly every person on the planet regardless of their particular situation. Today we'll get to the importance of the hustle in the areas like sales in preparation where hustle makes the difference between between you and the person who isn't hustling as hard so the irony of the Saul is we were talking about cooler is in one of the past episodes here recently and your refrigerator compressor are actually died in. Luckily you had cool by on hand what happened yeah I mean I knew it was coming. Just these these compressors on <hes> old walk in coolers they need maintenance but they're expensive to maintain so I didn't WanNa have to maintain it and it just started to kind of tweak out wasn't really running. <hes> and I didn't even bother having a look because I knew you like if you WanNa get a compressor fixed you gotta go to a specialist. You can't just go to like any appliance repair person at least for the commercial refrigeration compressors and so I just didn't WanNa bother going through that because I've done it twice before. It's always come up costing me thousand dollars or something like that and so I I knew this is going to happen eventually. So I had a cool bought. I ordered last summer with anticipation of this happening in yeah this cooler kind of tanked and <hes> yeah went down to the hardware store and got myself a new air conditioner and then put it together did a video on it. I should be putting it out this week. Just I knew it was going to happen in so I was prepared and it was a lot less stressful than it wasn't passed however I did have some problems getting it all set up in the news kind of funny actually is soon as I got that one setup the air conditioner on my other cooler tanked as well it fro furrow just completely seized up which is apparently what happens to them after like a couple of years of of random especially you don't have a good air conditioner. This brand called the Danby and <hes> yeah it just freon just Kinda like.

Diego D. I. E. G. O. Saul Stephen C Hogan thousand dollars million dollar
"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

Farm Small Farm Smart

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"farm" Discussed on Farm Small Farm Smart

"Here it is another farm five on farm small farm smart in previous email you sent me you had a passage in there that i was really intrigued by this is what it said well curtis stone nj m concepts of six figure income on one acre sound super attractive those numbers just don't really pan out in reality here meaning where you're located i think people try to get into small scale farming with those elite numbers is goals then there's bound to be a lot of frustration and disappointment can we be satisfied is farmers and survive financially making thirty forty thousand hours a year why not what you're thoughts on that well i think that there's there's a lot of farmers out there these days that are doing exceptionally well doing small scale organic agriculture for instance you know like j m curtis don't like many other people out there in that's that's excellent you know and that shows there there's a that possibility exists that possibility from what i've seen mostly exist in urban situations where there's there's a lot of people and there's a lot of interest there's you know a lot of restaurants and other outlets that you could really move a lot of pro deuce quickly i ain't good good prices for it if you have a good quality customer service and receptive crowd in that receptive crowd doesn't exist everywhere in the country it's just a there's a lot of areas at a rural farms that a a rural area that is that a just don't don't have that interest they're not gonna pay ten dollars a pound for rubella they're you you know they're they're interested in basic crops that they've been used to buying for extremely cheap for instance tomatoes peppers cucumber sweet corn those things early popular in most parts of the country in due to a lot of factors over the years in the developed with industrial farming is a farmer's generally being exploited to produce crops and and get paid very very little for them there's been a lot of expectations that have been set up end it's created some some unhealthy patterns of behavior 'em where people expect to get protesters even good quality protesters really really really cheaply so what i've found is were were were in central kentucky anna born and raised in kentucky a traveled around like in touch more on that a little later and we developed this farm here and i had a lot of experience selling produced and doing farmers markets and marketing and so that has helped us a whole lot to develop but we have developed here but i also found it there's a lot of limitations a living in a real situation to where you really have to create a niche for yourself that you're not gonna be able to just go to a restaurant and having excited you know kinda hipster chef that gets really you know excited about purple tomatoes in a wrinkle on his willing to pay you.

thirty forty thousand hours ten dollars one acre