20 Episode results for "Far-Right Freedom Party"

What does the Freedom party scandal mean for Austria?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

27:13 min | 1 year ago

What does the Freedom party scandal mean for Austria?

"Earlier this week, a video was released, which showed Australia's vice-chancellor conducting an unwisely amenable conversation with someone claiming to be connected to Russian money in the video shot on either in two thousand seventeen Heinz Christians rocker of the ultra-conservative Freedom Party appeared to be offering government contracts for political favors. He has now resigned and the Freedom Party has quit the government plunging Austrian politics into crisis. It is an extremely we'd scandal. Indeed verging on inexplicable, if you are a remotely sensible politician is only one rational response to any suggestion by anyone with a Russian accent, that quantity, rubles might be on offer in return for certain surreptitious services rendered that one sensible response. Is this stand up? Thank them for the drink and declared as loudly. And as clearly as possible in the direction of any lamp shades handbags that might be secrete. Eating cameras that you are. Absolutely not interested. Not now not ever. Not for the first time angry. Populists have demonstrated themselves temperamentally unsuited to actual governance. Can Austria's chancellor Sebastian Kurz survive this and seeing as how he brought these dubious far-right Yahoos into power does he deserve to this is the foreign desk? He tried to distance himself from this a little bit, and tried to portray himself as having been sort of transformed, but that infect was not completely true and could took one and a half years. Now to say that this is really enough. And he didn't do this. I mean this video just showed too much of the moon face of his coalition partners. You don't have to take very far to understand that Russian money per meets European politics in a really big way. Loads of Russian money makes its way into European parties through think tanks through various kind of campaign. Pledges. There is a huge problem post himself as somebody who suffered who week demised himself for the nation for the country. But this is sorry to say nonsense, because it was him who built this collision, it was also him who would have had so many possibilities and options to say something nobody told him to suffer. You're listening to the foreign desk with me, Andrew Miller on today's show. We'll take a detailed look at the scandal, which has both up ended and bewildered. Australian politics and ask, if there is a lesson here for voters elsewhere, in Europe, considering supporting populist outsiders, like, for example, don't but I currently of Monaco's correspondent in Vienna outlines what has become known as I beat the gate. It's hard to convey to the outside world, the extent to which the scandal has gripped the Australian imagination everyone who was talking about it in every cafe in every home up enough to guess drinking video was, he comes Alexandrian, a quarter of the population watch that historic speech by chancellor Sebastian courts last Saturday. The one where he said that enough was enough skin. Skin is and that was in the same night as Eurovision and in the spirit of vision. The scandal has given a new lease of life to this nine thousand nine hundred nine hit song by the she adults group, Bengals gets cold. We're going to be, so it's at the top of the charts in Australia. Why? Well. Because of course it was on that Spanish on that the secret video was recorded. Seriously, though, the video came as a complete bombshell, but the fact that it was the Freedom Party, the FBI mass down. So spectacularly was actually not that surprising until compared to if the social Democrats and the conservatives have long very long tradition on their values on their ideology on their programmatic basis, and this is quite different to f f is a party that opposes and not creates. And this is one answer why they always fail by themselves, did Luke was a spokesperson for the former conservative chancellor, Vulcan Schuessel, who also led a coalition government with the F the in the early two thousands. She was that, when that government collapsed would say their challenge is not being. A responsible party who governs? It's more being a party of the opposition. And this is a different role and blow up. It was their own failure. It was not the failure by others. Nobody would think about having another if a if a coalition for the next future. So I think they really knocked out themselves. Is in trouble then. So is the of a pay the conservatives, but things could go either way for them. It all depends on whether their leader chancellor courts survives the no confidence vote on Monday courses being under five using the fat his own ends, and Fulmer coalition with the F the fest place. His public statements have the past week. Have also come in for some criticism. He post himself as somebody who, who suffered two week demise himself for the nation for the country. But this is I'm sorry to say nonsense, because it was him who built this nation it was him. Baba taught is reporter working for the Viennese weekly defaulter, the only Australian publication that was given access to this talk video before it was released. She's written a biography of court since she's been watching his behavior in the public's reaction stood closely Ostrom people. They're beginning to scrutinize in to deconstruct would he's doing because. It's, it's easy now to see. I'm the anchor and I will guarantee stability, but people are beginning to ask, who's he takes responsibility for this crisis, and that's him. So it's going to be not so easy for him to have the same run during the election. Like trees Sebastian codes loses the no confidence vote on Monday. He'll remain the most popular politician in the country. But what does all this mean for the? All the all fall ride going to slip from political infamy into political obscurity. Alost word from baba told no Mike, my answer would be no. Because we believe experienced the end of the F in the beginning of two thousand to two thousand three some thought, it's the end in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s so I would be very careful to say. It's the end let's, let's remember, do not Trump during his campaign when this recording. When pop Nick, where he talked about what he does with women, and everybody was shock. Then everybody thought this is going to be the end of Donald Trump. And he was he was elected. Similar to this. I think it can even help to mobilize Motus, who will see the effects, the something. Francs to Alexi Carlisle, multiples. Correspondent in Vienna. Join now by Tessa Shishkov. It's and Nina's. Schick Tessa is the UK correspondent for the Australian weekly magazine, Profil Anina, Schick is a political commentator who has worked across Europe, both join me in the studio, he in London tests. I think it's fair to say that the subject of Australian politics doesn't come up very often in the non Austrian world. But this is a pretty big deal, isn't it? It's a political earthquake a week ago we were sitting in Vienna. And we thought this far-right government would be in place before two eight years because chancellor Sebastian quotes was really successful. And it looked as if he would be able to pull the F word far-right Freedom Party along with him for quite a while. The fact that this video was published and showed what basically people knew that this is a party of far-right crooks who are in bed with Russian forces around, PU. Sins party and maybe secret services, all these kind of unpleasant, things that were not outspoken, but were more or less known now has just proved the point that the far-right Freedom Party is not capable of being in government. And so this appropriately ended their reign and this completely changes now the entire political landscape in Australia, because it's unclear if Sebastian quotes as the lead of the People's Party, the conservative, right? Can sustain his popularity on the circumstances or not, or just want to follow that up before we look at the wider implications of this, and there is clearly a great deal to unpick here. But I think win the Freedom Party got into government, the reaction around the world was was fairly aghast, but also quite bewildered as to how this would even be possible. This is a party that was founded barely ten years after the second World War by an actual. Fulmer SS officer, which you would hope at that point would not be helpful savy. And yet there it is in government in a western European democracy. How is it possible to explain that? How does that even happen, especially in the country with Australia's history? This is really the thing we have a Nazi twist to everything we do because of our history. So you would have hoped that the Austrian population is sensitive enough to not bring people like this into government, but they didn't. And partly this is due to a phenomenon that we see in Europe all over that far-right policies, which are often called national populists or something like that. I think it's this is a way of making them look a little bit prettier than they are. So they all campaign on anti immigration policies on anti Islam propaganda, and and these type of things in this country. You have twist with the European Union hostility, but also the hostility towards the European Union was part of the FBI. Ideology up till Brexit, because since then we know that it's not so easy or not prefer to leave the European Union just like that. And you're right, that the FBI was founded by former Nazis to collect the voices in a way that was legitimate, because you also need to start a new face a new democracy. So to not have them being able to vote would not have been an option. They also transformed, of course, over the decades and over the generations. The surprising thing is like how far right this f boo that is currently has been in government till Saturday. Now is and was there's a leader Hans Christian track who's sort of main actor in this famous video, now, who in his youth was playing neo-nazis sports game in the woods in the forest around Austria, and he tried to distance himself from this a little bit, and try to portray himself and his group of leaders in the F. As having been sort of transformed in are far away from this early use arrows that they made. But that infect was not completely true and could took one and a half years now to say that this is really enough. And he didn't do this voluntarily. I mean this video just showed too much of the real face of his coalition partner millionaire as Tessa profiles, the peo-. The they are quite a, a singular bunch of charms. There is a tendency when we discuss far-right populism in Europe to think of it as if not necessarily a monolith, then a linked phenomena that, it's, it's all much. The same thing is, is that the case where the Freedom Party is concerned, or are they specifically Australian phenomenon for the reasons that the tests, are outlines, I think, as Tessa very eloquently, laid out, they are specifically Austrian in many ways. And I think the really interesting thing is the specific Nazi history and twist because obviously I'm German, so it's. Slightly different in Germany, the atmosphere. Vis-a-vis the Nazi connotations than how this has been traditionally, you know, more bubbling closer to the surface in Austria than in Germany and not that it's wiped out in Germany. But there are some factors that unite all these far-right parties in Europe. And I think the biggest one is, of course, that they present themselves as the parties that have recognized an existential threat to identity European identity, where whatever that is in your national context, Christian values, and they see someone as the perpetrator of destroying that identity, right? And in this case, it is immigrants and almost, I would say that they have some kind of Saito populist bent because in the absence of policy, you need to find scapegoats to blame for all your woes. So that may be the EU in the nineties, it was immigrants from different parts of Europe as you Slavia. Was breaking up more recently, it's been refugees fleeing war from North Africa in the Middle East. And so, I think they are United in this existential battle for identity. And I think that fundamentally what they do very, very well, is that they present themselves as the real Democrats. They say that they are standing up for the people, and I think that, that's something that all of these parties have in common Tercel, we will come back to the Freedom Party. And what this means for the they might do next. I wonder what else about Johnson Sebastian cuts and it possibly seems like an idol question given what has unfolded in the last week. Or so in the fact that he, he does now face a confidence vote and an early election, and it may end up ushering him tools, an extremely early retirement from frontline politics, but leaving Sony the association with the Freedom Party and again, are recognized that is a substantial caveat. How has? He been doing well he's extremely popular. And this is why we cannot be sure how the scandal plays out because the two schools of thought and both are infused by wishful thinking one is his critics who say, like he has been a part of this disastrous coalition. And he has failed to, to a successful thing, so he should go the other part in it might be the bigger part of the Austrian electorate who brought him to power in the first place is saying, okay, so he realized that you cannot govern with the F the losing votes. Now, we will see now on Sunday in the UP in union elections, how they are doing, but it might be that people say he's still the only one of all the politicians in the front line in Austria, who can build a center, right, coalition together, maybe with one or two other small parties, which will come out of the new elections in. Timber as potential coalition partners. I think it's over for the effort, they are sort of burnt, they will not come back to coalition government now in your future. Maybe in twenty s again, we have to every twenty years actually, but at the moment it's over. But if courts can use the scandal for himself to present himself as a stable hand or if he falls over it, this is to be seen. We cannot be sure his big advantage. Is that the opposition is relatively weak because the social Democrats, they're still polling at around twenty seven percent. So the, you know, the SPCA in Germany can only dream of that they are not as a small party, but they are not very successful in pushing opposition policies and hunting the government now for everything they've done. So the, the leader of the social Democrats is very capable politician, who is not very happy to attack. And now is the time, of course, to attack a government that is. That has been failing in to such an extent that it's falling. It's political crisis. That is bigger than anything. We've seen since since the second world worry really Tursun mentions the both the, the EU elections and the, the concept of wishful thinking where we're in a slightly, curious interregnum as we go to where on the Saturday that we don't know what the results of those elections are. And they are a these weird you elections in all sorts of countries for all sorts of reasons. But looking at them overall, is it possible to think of them as some kind of referendum on populism? I think that's certainly how it will be framed in many of the kind of postmatch analyses. Right. And I like in twenty fourteen which was the last time we had these elections, the kind of anti EU anti-establishment parties across the continent will do well lost time around. They want about a third of the seats in the European parliament. But it is also important to remember that when. You consider the political spectrum. It is not only the parties on the quote unquote far. Right. Who are going to be doing well, there are loads of other parties that are going to be doing well, you know, the greens on the left socialists. So this is much more a story about the fracturing of the traditional parties and the center in terms of what these parties will actually do when they constitute the new European parliament. Absolutely. There will be some crazy loony bins in there. But will they be able to work together because they are not a coherent block? You know, for all the kind of coals of Nigel Farage going to it's late. Call Lega Nord to block or an extension request, and so on and so forth. They are similar broadly, in terms of ideological bent or campaigning tactics. But they all have their own priorities, which is very, very much dependent on the national context in which they arise. So I think the big story of the European elections inevitably will be populous wave sweeps Europe. But I think that. Actually, what you're seeing is a splint tring of the traditional parties, and it's important to remember that for some of these parties, even they've been around for a long time f one twenty seven percent of the vote in one thousand nine hundred ninety I think there were even in the government in two thousand they've had a long and turbulent history with European Union. So if you are coming at it from the view that, oh my God. It's worse now than ever. Well, yeah, it probably is quite bad. But remember the historical context just a the frame that same question about the idea of these you elections as a referendum on populism, and focus it. Once again, on, on the Freedom Party, which is where we came in is it possible this scandal. And it is a monumental scandal, actually won't affect the mole that much in terms of their popularity because the one thing that populists all over the world have had in common is an understanding of the som undefinable power of shamelessness. Is that likely to be the tech that the Freedom Party? Well on the one hand they were very apologetic. Now, they really, really felt that that's unusual. And it also it was really, they were whiny self pitying in their press conferences incredible. Yeah. And less unusual the warning every, but they were sort of struck a himself, sort of the politics to his wife because he made some comments in this video of over the seven hours of drinking, and what else that were quite sort of, you know, unpleasant and embarrassing for him. But I think that if we will try to survive this by presenting itself, a little bit more moderate nicer. So they now announce the new candidate for elections in autumn. So they're trying to keep out an on the sideline a little bit more radical voices in the FBI if that works or not. We will see they, I think a really burnt for the moment. I also don't think they will really have a big election success now because people feel slightly disgusted they went. A little bit too far with all of this. And a lot of their voters could actually go to Sebastian coots, or back to the social democrat, so that we will see an in Australia. It's, it's not clear to sit in on the European level. It will be quite interesting. If the scandal has the same effect as Brexit that these parties, don't get so many votes that these ideas, they represent are not popular anymore. But unfortunately, Australia, very small country, you know in the polling today. I think marine Le Pen had the same level of support in McCall's movement. So I'm afraid that the effect of the schlock of video will not be, so as great as we would hope maybe I'm actually quite surprised and perhaps this is because Australia's a much smaller country, you know, that they didn't go down the route of what we're seeing in some other countries specifically in the United Kingdom, and the United States when an Opole Titian is called with his pants down, or her pants down. They just go down the denied deny. Latent. So what if I did it and double down? Right. So the fact that in. Yeah. Populist play you just refuse to accept any responsibility for anything and it plays. So well, with your base, obviously, no in Australia. But in other countries that has it doesn't matter what the politician does or says, as long as you deny, and you continue to say that, you know, somebody's trying to smear you or your the victim of a conspiracy campaign. The facts do not matter their form like quite interested in why in Australia, this has reverberated such an extent, and why Shawwa didn't actually try to stick it out. It's really on a video, how he tries to sell to hand over state contrary. You offer state contracts, still some as in Austria. I think you would have you would have difficult is in other countries through to really say, like two Russian oligarch, whatever that she can buy into Australian companies and media enterprises. And for doing that in helping they have to win elections, then get state contracts in infrastructure that are now going to, you know, a free competition of tenders. I mean it's incredible that he said something like that. There is a potentially. I think why the point the Nayna that ridiculous and scandalous, though the video was it did at the very least show elected politicians in serious, western country, definitely showing willing to take Russian money. Does that suggest that Russian money might actually be even more of a thing than we might already suspected is how absolutely I mean, you don't have to take very far to understand that Russian money per maids, European politics, in a really big way and not only through direct. Loans from Russian banks or deals with the Kremlin. I mean, the FAA actually even publicly had a five year agreement signed with the largest party in Russia. This wasn't like cauti- under the, you know, swept on the carpet loads of Russian money makes its way into European parties through think tanks through various kind of campaign. Pledges. There is a huge problem, but it's important to point out that Russian meddling in European politics, is not necessarily ideological in the sense that they only support far right parties, Russia's tragedy, and improve in very clearly stated this when he pivoted in about two thousand twelve after they had another UN well rigged election in Russia and became quite clear that Russia under Putin was not gonna come a democracy that he saw the e EU as an existential threat, an die wrecked threat to his own vision of kind of Eurasian, customs union, therefore, anything that we can see you is in his long term strategic interest. And this plays out in Europe by Russia, sowing discord, so just as they fund parties of the far right? There are also known to have links to parties of the far left. I'm thinking about parties like de linka in Germany, Russian money, Russian influences all over your pin politics. But of course you can't say that. That's the reason why our politics is Flint touring. There is already something rotten. They're, they're pulling at the threat in the sweater or want to go back to where we came into at the top of this show is at all possible. Do you think that this scandal might have taught a plurality of Freedom Party voters in Austria, something of a listen, if you look at the Facebook pages of the politicians who resigned now he'd be astonished how much support they still have? I mean, the conspiracy theory that I don't know them. Sad plant that this video or foreign forces that are not as kind to us as the Russians it might be. Germans, it might be German comedians who were behind that in order to smear bad mouths, the of the Freedom Party politicians, all these things are pretty out there. So I would hope that it has an effect of education, political education may be interested in extended probably has because there will be more and more information coming out. This is just the iceberg the tip of the iceberg. Now that we understand that strategy was just not walking away when he was offered non-clean money coming from Russia. He did not get up and leave at that point. He said there for another hour few hours and discussed it to the how they could handle this money into Austria. So in that respect, I think they will be much more. Coming out, more stories over these last eighteen months that happened in that government, and we will see how this will be looked at in the next few years. Let's hope that people understand the point that this, this type of party should not sit in government. So, so she. So she covets an initiative. Thank you, both very much for joining us. But is it for this episode of the foreign desk, where back next week and look out for the foreign desk? Explain available every Wednesday. The foreign desk is produced by Yolene Goffin and Bill Lucci. Bill, also edits the program. My name's Andrew Miller, thanks very much for listening and until next time goodbye.

Freedom Party Australia Europe Austria European Union Freedom Party Germany FBI chancellor far-right Freedom Party chancellor Sebastian Russia Vienna Andrew Miller Sebastian Schick Tessa Fulmer United Kingdom Donald Trump Sebastian Kurz
NPR News: 09-30-2019 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 09-30-2019 1AM ET

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity. Some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Nora Raum House. Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff says the whistle blower at the heart of the impeachment an inquiry against president trump will testify before Congress very soon he told ABC's this week the person has agreed to testify and arrangements are are now being made including that the whistle blowers attorneys have the right security clearance set whistleblower will be allowed to come in and come in without a minor from the Justice Department -partment or from the White House to tell the whistleblower with a cannon cannot say the government employees filed a complaint that president trump had sought the help of the Cranium Rain Ian President in investigating Democrat Joe Biden and his family protesters in Hong Kong have spent the last four months demonstrating against the Chinese government for tightening its grip on the semi autonomous region. The demonstrations reached sendo Sunday as protesters and police engaged in street battles. NPR's NPR's Julie McCarthy reports the protesters who have taken to the streets now for seventeen weeks running are angry career at Beijing. They say is trampling their quasi democracy eroding. Their freedoms promised them in the nineteen ninety seven handover. A season of unrest is culminating this weekend five years ago. The movement comment ended with no concessions from the government today. Many of these protesters say they are picking up where Hong Hong head left off five years ago yeah and they say they have no intention of stopping Julie McCarthy in here news on Australia's youngest ever chancellor. Chancellor is poised to reclaim his job. After partial results in Sunday's parliamentary elections voters appear to have handed his Conservative Party. It's big as victory in years ears. Joanna Kakissis reports. The party did well despite a scandal involving. It's far right coalition partner which brought down the government in May the cheering crowd greeted thirty-three-year-old Sebastian courts. One projections showed his conservative People's Party winning thirty seven percent of votes keun in May upskilled wideness van. It's been difficult for months court said but today the people have chosen us again courts previous government came crashing down in May because of a video stinks scandal involving his former coalition partner the far-right Freedom Party in the video former party leader and Vice Chancellor Heinz Christian strata appears with a woman posing as a rich Russian with ties to the Kremlin he offers her government contracts in exchange for party support report. Their Freedom Party lost ten percent of its voters in this election for NPR news. I'm Joanna Kakissis. This is NPR news from Washington. It may be fall but a record-breaking major winter storm is leading to dangerous conditions in the North Western. US NPR's Amy Me Hill reports snow in Montana doesn't always make news but this much snow this early in the season one for the books the National Weather Service in great falls Paul says around nine and a half inches fell on Saturday a record daily total for September by Sunday the snow had topped one foot with more on the way it's causing power outages and making for slippery roadways with reports of semi spinning out the storm is forecast to move on into Canada by Monday night not before dumping up to four four feet in Montana's mountains. The storm is also impacting northern Idaho and Washington state homeless shelters in Spokane said they were relaxing entrance policies policies to accommodate those exposed to the elements amy held NPR news forever twenty one is in bankruptcy the fashion retailer said Sunday it filed for chapter eleven protection to allow it to reorganize the company says it plans to close one hundred seventy eight stores in the US and most of its locations in Asia and Europe Europe forever. Twenty one joins a growing list of retailers trying to stay in business in the face of online competition. The strike against General Motors is now in in its third week members of the United Auto Workers Union walked off the Job September sixteenth seeking higher pay greater job security and protection of their healthcare Keira benefits. This is the first nationwide strike against GM's is a two day walkout in two thousand seven. I'm Nora Raum N._P._R. News in Washington.

NPR Washington NPR Chinese government Conservative Party far-right Freedom Party Joanna Kakissis chancellor Julie McCarthy Nora Raum House partner trump President People's Party Nora Raum Hong Kong Hong Hong Adam Schiff Vice Chancellor Heinz Christia
Lebanon receives Interpol notice for ex-Nissan fugitive.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Lebanon receives Interpol notice for ex-Nissan fugitive.

"Coming up on five minute. News Trump reverses plan to cub teen vaping by exempting flavors. Lebanon receives Interpol notice the X. Nissen fugitive and Austria backs green agenda with new coalition deal. It's Friday January three. I'm Anthony Davis US Health officials will ban most flavored e cigarettes popular with underage teenagers but their plan now includes major exemptions the benefit vaping manufacturers retailers and adults who use the nicotine emitting devices the trump administration announced on Thursday that it will prohibit it's fruit candy mint dessert flavors from small cartridge based e cigarettes that a popular with high school students but menthol and tobacco tobacco flavored e cigarettes will be allowed to remain on the market. The flavor ban will also entirely exempt large tank based vaping devices which which are primarily sold in vape shops that cater to adult smokers together. The two exemptions represent a significant retreat from Donald Trump's original plan announced four months ago which would have banned all vaping flavors including menthol from old types of e cigarettes. The new policy will spare a significant significant portion of the multibillion dollar vaping market and the changes mark a major victory for thousands of vape shopowners. Who Sell the tank based systems James which allow users to mix customized flavors anti tobacco advocates immediately condemned the decision to permit menthol an exempt tank based vapes they have lobbied the trump administration to follow through on its initial pledge to ban all flavors except tobacco arguing that teenagers who vape will simply shift to using menthol if it remains on the market e cigarettes are battery powered devices that typically heat of flavored nicotine solution into an inhalable Arizo? They've been pitched to adults as less harmful alternative to traditional cigarettes but there is limited data on their ability to help help. Smokers quit even with the exemption for products. Sold vape shops industry advocates were not happy with the restrictions Gregory Conley if the American vaping Association Association said Narrower Flavor Options for jewel and similar devices will result in more adults smoking Interpol issued a wanted notice yesterday. For former Nissan champion Carlos gone to jumps bail in Japan. Dan and fled to Lebanon rather than face trial on financial misconduct charges in a dramatic escape that has confounded and embarrassed authorities. The Lebanese justice minister said in an interview. That Lebanon will carry out its duties suggesting for the first time that the automative Titan may be brought eighteen for questioning but he said gone into the country on a legal possible and he appeared to cast doubt on the possibility that Lebanon would hand gone over over to Japan. The Interpol notice is the latest twist in guns daring escape which spanned three continents and involved private planes multiple OPA sports and international intrigue. Turkey made several arrests Thursday as part of an investigation into how he passed through. The country goes arrival arrival in Lebanon jolted the nation already in the midst of a crippling political impasse and its worst economic crisis in decades Lebanon anonymous now decide how to deal with the Interpol issued a red notice which is a non-binding request to law enforcement agencies worldwide that they locate and provisionally Stanley arrest a fugitive. How he was able to flee Japan avoiding the tight surveillance he was under while free on one point? Five billion yen. Bail is still a mystery. The Lebanese will thirties said he entered the country legally on a French passport. Austria's right-wing leader Sebastian. Kerr's has put forward a coalition plan with his new green partners including more ambitious officious measures to decarbonised the country. They aim to put Austria on a path to becoming climate neutral by twenty forty ten years earlier than the eagles goal climate neutrality means balancing greenhouse gas emissions with measures that absorb are eliminates carbon. Mr Kerr's says the joint joint program also included many of his people's party priorities like low income taxes and stricter controls on migration the O. V. P. had been in coalition commission with the far-right Freedom Party until a scandal toppled the government in May the FBI got entangled in a video. Sting scandal dubbed I beat the gate involving cash for favors. The green leader said straight after the September election. That the next government would need to see radical change changed from the right wing policies pursued by the previous coalition. A Green Party. Congress must still endorse the coalition with the People's Party. It's roughly two two hundred. Eighty delegates are however expected to approve the agreement. You can subscribe to five minute news with your preferred podcast APP. Ask Your Smart Speaker or enable five minute news as your Amazon Alexa Flash briefing. Having scale visit US online at five minute dot knees five minute. News is an independent production covering politics inequality quality health and climate delivering unbiased verified and truthful World News daily.

Lebanon Donald Trump Austria Interpol Japan nicotine Mr Kerr Lebanon American vaping Association As Green Party US justice minister Turkey Anthony Davis Gregory Conley far-right Freedom Party World News Amazon Nissan
NPR News: 09-29-2019 10PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 09-29-2019 10PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jim Howard the House of Representatives steps upset said pitchman inquiry this week with a closed-door meeting of the House Intelligence Committee at the center of the investigation are communications between president trump and the leader of Ukraine and a whistle blowers charged that trump asked Ukraine for help investigating the son of political rival level Joe Biden the president's lawyer Rudy Giuliani tilt ABC's this week the impeachment inquiry is a strictly political exercise defending client the best. That's why I know how this is not about getting Joe Biden in trouble. This is about East that Donald Trump was framed Michael Atkinson inspector general for the intelligence. This community will testify in the closed door session scheduled for Friday. Austria's youngest ever chancellor is poised to reclaim his job after a partial results are in today's parliamentary election voters appear to have handed his conservative party. Its biggest victory in years. Joanna Kakissis reports that the party did well despite a scandal involving its far-right right coalition partner which brought down the government in may cheering crowd greeted thirty-three-year-old Sebastian courts projection objection showed his conservative People's Party winning thirty seven percent of votes wounded. GonNa give them in. May Update wideness van. It's been a difficult for months court. I said but today the people have chosen us again. Courts previous government came crashing down in May because of video stinks scandal involving his former coalition partner partner the far-right Freedom Party in the video former party leader and vice chancellor Hans Christian appears with a woman posing as a rich Russian with ties. I said the Kremlin he offers her government contracts in exchange for party support the Freedom Party lost ten percent of its voters in this election for NPR news. I'm Joanna Kakissis. The European Union may start cutting funding to countries that violate the blocks principles TERI Schultz reports the new mechanism could affect the large sums Brussel missile sends each year to help Hungary and Poland both of which are clashing with the EU over some of their government's policies. This idea has been debated in Brussels for years that countries entries breaching E. U. Ideals such as the integrity of their judiciary or freedom of the press should receive less money from the central E. U. Budget than more democratic counterparts finish Finnish Prime Minister Rene currently heading the blocks six month rotating presidency says he expects all EU governments to approve what would become an annual vetting procedure elmont tells finish radio. He's optimistic. The measure will be approved in connection with current budget negotiations. Hungary and Poland are already facing infringement proceedings for repeatedly violating the E. U.'s founding values they also are two of the highest net recipients of EU funds for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. Meanwhile Britain's trade ministers predicting the UK will get a trade deal with the European Union on Brexit. You're listening to NPR news in Washington. Hundreds of people are lining up in Paris to pay tribute to former French President Jacques Chirac who died on Thursday. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports Monday Sunday will be a national day of mourning across friends. Lizanne bellied where Chirac's body is lying in state will stay open all night to accommodate the crowds coming to sign the condolence Coghlan's book and see his flag draped casket on Monday. There'll be a ceremony attended by President Emmanuel Macron and around thirty former and current heads of state including Russian President Vladimir Putin Chirac who served as president from nineteen ninety five to two thousand seven is especially being remembered for his sense of humor and love of regular regular people in two thousand three France vigorously opposed America's invasion of Iraq. Chirac said a friend should be able to tell another friend when he's making a mistake AAC French Jews are also remembering Chirac for being the first leader to recognize the country's responsibility in deporting Jews to Nazi death camps during World War Two eleanor Beardsley. NPR News Paris Pope Francis celebrated a special mass today in Saint Peter's Square to mark World Day for migrants and refugees the pope called for compassion towards the world's poor and outsiders he also criticized what he says is the indifference to the global migration and refugee crisis during the Mass Francis unveiled a bronze on statue depicting migrants crammed into a small boat in baseball. The Saint Louis Cardinals have clinched the National League Central Division. The second place Milwaukee Walkie brewers will play the Washington nationals Tuesday night in the National League Wild Card Game. I'm Jim Howard N._p._R. News in Washington.

NPR far-right Freedom Party Vladimir Putin Chirac European Union president Donald Trump Washington NPR Joe Biden Joanna Kakissis Jim Howard TERI Schultz partner Eleanor Beardsley Brussels chancellor Hungary Ukraine Poland People's Party
NPR News: 05-27-2019 3PM ET

NPR News Now

04:56 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 05-27-2019 3PM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Louise Schiavone more heavy weather is heading to Arkansas, and Oklahoma heightening flooding risks, along the very high Arkansas river some residents of Tulsa county in Oklahoma have evacuated. Their homes, closed roads and flooded buildings are the order in Fort Smith. Arkansas Oklahoma Governor Kevin stood says the President Trump has been responsive who just saying he's just devastated in, but they're here to help, and he said, call him if he if we need anything, the national weather service says a storm system will move into the central plains tomorrow with more showers and thunderstorms in the region. Fiat Chrysler has proposed a merger with the French automaker Renault, the combined company would be the world's third largest auto manufacturer. And PR's Camilla domino ski reports Fiat Chrysler is one of Detroit's big three automakers with brands like Dodge Ram and Jeep. Meanwhile, Renault is popular in Europe and ROY. Russia, mostly with smaller vehicles. Mark Wakefield, a global auto consultants at Alex partner's says merger talks like this are being driven by the need to make some big investments, all these new trends coming into automotive that aren't profitable yet, but that everyone believes are the future, combining forces, let's carmakers split the cost of investing in electric cars, autonomy, and new business models. Like shared cars, Renault's board of directors says it is considering the proposed merger Camilo domino. Ascii NPR news. Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz and his center. Right. Government of been forced from office. He broke up his coalition with the far-right Freedom Party last week after its leader was caught in a covert video sting, that suggested he was open to corruption, the BBC's Bethany bell reports from Vienna. Jeff days off to Sebestyen cuts is can take a government was sworn into office. It's lost a vote of no confidence. The motion was brought in by the opposition social democrat. It's and was also supported by the far right Freedom Party, which until last week with Mr. Kuc his coalition partner Australia's president Alexander funded Belen must now appoint a chance to form government that can hold until the next national election, which is expected to take place in September. The BBC's Bethany bell President Trump became the first world leader to me with Japan's new emperor on a trip filled with ceremony. The president told reporters that US Japan relations are rock, solid, the essence of our protest is peace through strength. And this is a strong alliance. Indeed, the US panel lions is steadfast and ironclad. The president disagreed with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo obey about recent short ranch North Korean missile tests, Trump saying he was not troubled by them. Japan's obey calling the tests, a matter of quote, great regret. This is NPR. President Trump's national security advisor John Bolton is under sharp fire from North Korea's foreign ministry, which is called him a war mog are Bolton has said recent rocket launches they are violated, UN Security Council resolutions, Pyongyang's, official Korean Central News, agency, quoted an unnamed foreign ministry spokesman, who said the missile tests were a rifle exercise in self defense fishermen, in Bangladesh, are protesting after the government imposed a two month ban on fishing to conserve fish, Sushmita paddock has more. I'm of fishermen carried banners and mosh to the city of FOX's bazaar in southern Bangladesh. These said they won't be able to make any money if the Bank continues an oath the government to dig it back, what did short in it do compensate for losses? The government has announced free rice, Russians for some of the worst had families. This isn't the first I'm Bangladesh has barred fishing. But this ban is one of the most restrictive, yet it applies to all. All types of fishing, boats, not just big commercial ones. Authorities say the country's navy and coastguard will be patrolling the bay of Bengal to enforce the ban. It went into effect one week ago and is scheduled to continue to July twenty third for NPR news. I'm Sushmita partook in Mumbai. It's very hot in the deep south and Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina that chambres at least one hundred grease. The same is true in Wilmington, North Carolina parts of Georgia, and Florida are also blanketed by a record breaking heat. Wave the forecast is for continued high temperatures. So the middle of the week, not much rain. I'm Louise Schiavone, NPR news. Washington.

President Trump president government NPR Renault Google NPR Louise Schiavone Japan Oklahoma Bangladesh Arkansas Freedom Party Washington Bethany bell BBC Fiat Chrysler Governor Kevin Fort Smith Arkansas river
NPR News: 05-18-2019 9PM ET

NPR News Now

04:55 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 05-18-2019 9PM ET

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst strong thunderstorms moved through Texas, and Oklahoma today with flash floods and tornadoes left a path of destruction in several communities, Heatherly, born of member station. K C you has more. The national weather service confirmed an e f two tornado hit San Angelo, causing damage to the west Texas boys ranch, firefighters freed one boy who'd been trapped in the rubble of a building as the storm tracked eastward it spawned tornadoes in Abilene and balancers. Well, the twister and Abilene damaged around one hundred houses half of those moderately to severely city manager, Robert Hanna says he's overwhelmed by the generosity of the community that was on full display today as I saw literally, the hundreds of on tears out there, rolling their sleeves up fell citizens helping each other out loud. The storm took out power lines and triggered flash. Flooding officials say they're grateful that there were no serious injuries. Or fatalities for NPR news. I'm Heather clayborn. Oster chancellor says the country will hold a snap election after a scandal involving his coalition partner. The far right Freedom Party Kerry, Skyring has more from Vienna a day of high political drama in Austria vice-chancellor, Heinz, Christian Straka resigned over a video in which he promises, lucrative government contracts in exchange for financial support from a woman posing as the niece of a Russian oligarch. Now, the conservative chancellor says enough is enough a reference to other scandals involving his far-right coalition partner Austria. He said should hold elections as soon as possible. Meaning the government will have lasted less than two years. The video scandaled has shocked Austrians of all political persuasions and thousands directed anger at the chancellor chanting outside his office resign now for NPR news. I'm Kerry Skyring in Vienna. Former vice president, Joe Biden, officially kicked off his presidential campaign in Philadelphia today. NPR's Domenico Montanaro reports Biden took us swipe at. President Trump saying the next president shouldn't rule with a clenched fist. He said that people should choose hope over fear hearkening back to that hope and change message of Obama. But the question is, whether or not this Democratic Party wants that at this point already very quickly after that, there are a lot of Democrats who are saying that they feel like anger is something that's been a motivating motivating force, and that they are angry about President Trump at the same time Biden still leads in the polls, and you're going to see if that continues. NPR's Domenico, Montenero, Federal Aviation regulators are warning commercial airliners flying over the Persian Gulf that they risk being targeted by miscalculation or mis identification by the Iranian military. That's according to a warning from the Federal Aviation Administration related by diplomats at comes amid heightened tensions between the two countries after the US sent an aircraft carrier and bombers to the region. Over still unspecified threats it perceived from Tehran. You're listening to NPR news. The Netherlands has won this year's Eurovision song contest singers, representing twenty six countries competed in the grand final held in Tel-Aviv as NPR's, Daniel estrin reports, Dutch contestant Duncan, Lawrence was crowned the champion with his ballad called, arcade votes came in from television, viewers judges, mostly from Europe and also other countries Eurovision is one of the world's most watched televised events with about two hundred million viewers. It's glitzy pop music affair with extravagant costumes and pyro Technics, Madonna was a guest performer, pro Palestinian activists called on contestants to boycott Eurovision in Israel, none did, but Iceland's contestants held up flags marked Palestine, and Madonna's performance feature to surprise political message with two dancers wearing Isreaeli and Palestinian flags and featuring the slogan wake up Daniel estrin, NPR news Tel-Aviv change of plans for former president, Jimmy Carter who just underwent surgery for a broken hip. He knows says he won't be teaching Sunday school tomorrow. After all his spokeswoman says the ninety four year old is progressing, well, but that he underestimated the amount of time that he would need to recover from the hip replacement surgery Carter broke his hip on Monday as he was leaving to go Turkey hunting, a devout Christian. He regularly teaches Sunday school and plains, Georgia in twenty fifteen he was treated for cancer, that had spread to his liver and his brain scans. Now showed no signs of the disease. Jimmy Carter is the longest living president in US history. I'm Janine Herbst. And you're listening to NPR news from Washington.

NPR NPR President Trump chancellor Joe Biden Jimmy Carter NPR Janine Herbst president Kerry Skyring Dulles International Airport Washington Texas Vienna Austria Domenico Montanaro US Daniel estrin partner Abilene
NPR News: 05-18-2019 5PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 05-18-2019 5PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine, Herbst, Missouri. Lawmaker is apologizing for using the phrase consensual rate before voting on a Bill that bans abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy, NPR's, Bobby Allen reports, cetera public backlash. The legislator now says he misspoke, Missouri Representative berry Hovis was arguing on the house floor that eight weeks is plenty of time for a woman to have an abortion, Hovis, who is a Republican and a former police officer talked about his experience investigating rape cases, most, my rapes were not the, the gentleman jumping out of the bushes that nobody ever met. That was one or two times out of one hundred. Most of them were date rapes are consensual rapes, which were all terrible, Missouri Democrats, and legions on social media lashed out at Hove is over the comment. Hovis now says it was made in air, Missouri lawmakers passed a Bill Friday criminalizing abortions after eight weeks with no exceptions for rape, or incest victims. The governor has promised to sign it. Bobby allen. NPR news. Federal judge has sentenced a former CIA spy to twenty years in prison for spying for China and here Shanna van Zandt reports Kevin Mallory was convicted on charges of conspiring to transmit US defense secrets to China. The Justice department says Mallory had many sensitive jobs, with government agencies and defense contractors, including as a covert case officer for the CIA and intelligence officer for the Defense Intelligence Agency, Mallory held a top secret security clearance and transmitted classified documents to China and exchange for twenty five thousand dollars and Pearson ovens. Aunt reporting Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kerr's says the country will hold a snap election, after a scandal involving his coalition partner, the friar far-right Freedom Party, carry Skyring has more from Vienna a day of high political drama in Austria vice-chancellor, Heinz, Christian struck resigned over video in which he promises, lucrative government contracts and. Exchange for financial support from a woman posing as the niece of a Russian oligarch. Now, conservative chancellor, says enough is enough a reference to other scandals involving his far-right coalition partner Austria. He said, should hold elections as soon as possible, meaning the government will have lasted less than two years. The video scandaled his shocked Austrians of all political persuasions and thousands directed anger. At the chancellor chanting outside his office resign now for NPR news. I'm Kerry Skyring in Vienna. Another round of severe weather is hitting the central states officials say, three suspected tornadoes touched down in Texas and Oklahoma in balance. Your Texas homes were damaged and trees revived down, local media video shows flipped cars and building damage in Abilene, Texas leaving thousands without power. The national weather service has issued tornado watches for parts of several states, including Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Missouri. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. Amid rising tensions in the Persian. Gulf Bahrain is ordering all of its citizens to leave Iran and Iraq immediately, the country's foreign ministry cited what it calls the unstable situation in the region and threats against security and stability. But crane is a small SUNY ruled island nation the coast of Saudi Arabia. It regularly accuses of Ron of stirring dissent in its showed majority population. The Navajo nation council pass legislation this week to renew a training program to become a medicine, man or woman. The drive is concerned about losing its culture and ceremonies. Laurel Morales for member station. K J, Z Z has more. Traditionally, the knowledge of a medicine, man or woman was passed down to a son or daughter. But as more and more young people move away or lose interest in their culture. Navajo leaders have decided to open up vocation to the whole tribe, Banji nez overseas the program, we still are losing our culture and our language, and our also are where medicine people because often are passing on with the what the ceremonies the knowledge into wisdom that they have people in the program apprentice with healing practitioners to learn specific ceremonies that are in danger of being lost for NPR news. I'm lorrimore Ellis. Inflec- staff preliminary talks are underway about the possible sale of one of the biggest casinos in the northeast win resorts, and MGM resorts are in discussions about the sale of wins Boston Harbor casino complex to MGM. This comes as win is about to open another casino. I'm Janine Herbst. And you're listening to NPR news from Washington.

NPR Missouri berry Hovis chancellor Janine Herbst Washington Bobby allen NPR rape officer Texas Vienna Austria Kevin Mallory China partner CIA MGM Saudi Arabia Defense Intelligence Agency
World Today

World News Analysis

53:25 min | 1 year ago

World Today

"They. Provide you with in-depth news and heads for the malices telling the who story hunt. The bigger picture, you the news. You want to know only on today. Locum to world today news programme with different perspective. I'm joing voters in twenty eight EU countries are heading to the pools for the European parliament, elections with Brexit looming, nationalist, populism on the rise, this year's election. A political event held every five years is seem by many as decisive for us future. So how will the both changed to make up of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who on Jin, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought Beukmann from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon, Theresa May stepping done as British Prime minister, she announced to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha study, was could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation of leader of the parliamentary party in the Commons on relates few days ago. And she felt she had no where else to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrew Bill through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the Scholtz ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to help death the by now because the government has failed to reach a deal that satisfies either the British parliament, all the EU they are now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MEP's to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? Well, that's a very good question. I mean, Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate possibly road near few weeks to take this before Britain comes out the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the post jet that the Tores could come. Behind, for example, the greens, and that election result, which will compete they election was yesterday Britain. But the results coming on some the eight would be absolute Anonima for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wants to go now before there's oh, come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling all the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. buckman polls, actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in the European parliament or actually, those who are most determined that Britain was leave the Hugh vista Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come. Come on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Just paid break. Good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. buckman was her take. Well from looking maybe from a bit more far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual power is limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up, and they want to really, you know, show their government that they're really not happy. Doctors say, how do you look at those widely think the Brexit party has been doing so well in the European elections? Loiseau Mr. Rogers party indeed. We can find out not only some very specific background in the bracket, because so far as a lot of disappointments from Aggie people in UK, about the conservative party and a neighbor party, and they are in thirty of in a push awarded some bracketed process. But of course, I think, generally, we can find out environment recently special written years as we noted vice off the popular, Latam, as the voice for Mr Farage and his party and was a very big showcase forty some general Trent. But now of course, I agree with, you know, wear points is to a large degree the European parliament election has to be regarded by most of European people us. As we know secondary vote, which means it could not be decisive by resort daily life, by the daily life. But of course, it will become very, very opportunity to express the disappointment, and they are companies about of the politics about the even the European Union. Well, Mr. Buch man, could you explain to us more how the European parliament elections actually work, because that really looks complex or confusing for outsiders? Yes. And you asked me, I mean, I mostly focused on international politics, and of course, preparing for tonight. I have looked at the elections, also and institutions of the UN, I totally agree with what you just said. It is extremely complicated. Simply put the elections are national elections all across Europe, and in each country, people vote for the parties that are available in their countries and these parties, try to kind of form Eurropean parties. They are aligned across countries. But in some places they have different names than in others. They tried to have this one bitten candidat, which is like this one head figureheads to drum up voters, but it's, it's not really unified parties with an authority across Europe. So each national party can do whatever they like Indian. So for example, Merck. German CD party is the same European party as Hungary's rather. Senel full anti-foreigner anti immigrants party there in the same European populist party. So it's, it's very confusing set of many local elections, put together a Nash, a European parliament, which, of course, is not the official explanation of the process. But this is looking from a distance at how it actually happens. Well, Mr Perry, actually, the voter turnout has gone down in every single European parliament elections since they began in nineteen seventy nine on, do you think the load turnout main stat you has actually failed time? And again, to not European people with Brexit, perhaps being approved out. Yes. The Turner has been very low as you said, for well election to the EU, Paul, but conceivable we don't know the exact truth, yet possible that the turn out will actually be Ordina. We'll be higher this time because the, the news people want to bend their anger, again, the slowness of bread as you airing because galvanized people to have a not. Oh, break day or to come. I meet Leo for those remained day in though is possible that the turnout will actually go up, I but you're absolutely correct, the Turner, happy, very low therapy, and that tied into this whole drama, the undergoing now because it the EU by. By many as a remote organization institution that is full of bureaucracy. They don't want, they don't want to be positive, and they won't hire the voted to clear, but those who remain one day head, they don't bureaucratic over that teach number across, and that has been hearing, split, Britain, and is having a huge affect on Europe as well. Well, we serves a how do you look at the low turnout and do you think it will go up this year? Indeed. The now turn out. Fully saw European parliament, you'd action. I in a past. Many it is because of the I think very no. I mean competence via European parliament in the decision making process in the European Union solution. But since Lisbon Treaty, I mean especially refuted fake it in a year for two hundred ten at night. It looks like a European parliament, got some more competence, only decision making process in European Union. But I think who lots also first time, we wait an Easter voice of Popular Party in European parliament. So this year, I think, maybe there will be some different because absolutely no. Firstly. The establishment parties that try to defeat the populist party in his election, perhaps, they will have some more mobilization in various states, and other, I think the reason is because of the now the European parliament get a Parisian as Jose the co on policymakers along these European Union commission and also European Council. So I simply the wheel, maybe some more confidence to voters to. To active more actively. Yeah. Well, Mr. man, how does the general public think about e you these days, especially young people in Europe? I can't speak for five hundred million people, of course. But what I feel as myself below forty in Europe is that. There has been a massive rights in a European identity, especially among the higher educated Europeans, it's, it's very natural to travel between European states and no people across borders. And so there is something coming up that people start feeling of themselves as Europeans, even though it may not be a patriotic feeling. But it somehow irrational feeling of we are all somehow connected through one European Union, and at the same time, I would like to talk about this concept of procedural, legitimacy versus material, legitimacy, and in my view, the west has much too much focused on this procedural legimacy of government. What I mean is, we only talk about how does the government get elected, and as long as there's a free and fair election? Nobody questions whatever happens afterwards and the Apas. It would be to say, well, a government is only legitimized, if it does something good for the people, which, for example, be a socialist. Take not only, but also socialists, and that second question is, I think where people are very unhappy with Europe? And with a lot of national governments within Europe, because time and again, people vote for higher wages for normal workers for less power to large corporations for not giving billions of euro two big banks to save them. But then when common people get in trouble, you know, they don't get money. They don't get retirement money. They get cut stay get all these kinds of challenges of common people. And so from this material perspective, what the governments do is not satisfying. A lot of people. There's not been enough positive economic development or social development in. In general, in Europe. And I think this is what gets people more and more dissatisfied makes them feel, powerless helpless. And that's when people start vote voting for extreme parties just to show. Look, if it doesn't matter anyway, what I say, then I just say something because I know it makes you angry you being the current politicians in charge while Mr. Barry, just now Mr. Buch, NAT mentioned about all those problems facing the continent right now. And with own notice the rise of nationalism populism. What do you think are the key issues that are likely to sway the vote in the actions? Well, thirteen terms of Britain, they are only nasty. Issues. So people vote, according to how they warm, the policy in Britain be pursued generally, there are also issues in relation to climate change, and all is a cross-border issue. But the main thing is, as much as I wanted to be the main thing is that voting coats to national politics? So in Britain, anyway, particularly is, you know, whether or not threes may won't get Britain, or whether other people do better, all whether other parties think they want Britain should I should be another referendum British's staying now? There are other issues in relation to the Konomi and, you know, how comic change should be tackled in other countries, but I certainly issue here. That the they are issues in relation to how affects Britain, and that is not what the with mentally about it to be about a two Pranati thing. And it tells you pull beta, how precede within Britain, the people vote because national issues. Well, what about in other countries? Dr Chang, we've seen also seen a rise of populism nationalism and other countries like France like Germany cetera. Yes. If we take some major Member States, especially I think this year saw European parliament election will be very rare decision for its domestic politics for them, perhaps, the frost, as we know, mR Macron, party so far. Not yet has a single cent seat in parliament. So this election will be a very big showcase for how cute president Macron got the support. I mean substantially from French people, especially the very, very big gaming between mR Macron party, and Mario Lopez party are so, you know, it'll actually they would be a decisive. I mean. Resort for this new party by Macron, and also existed populist party by LaPointe, another, I think very big issue is how Italy now mississau- Winnie, try to play a goal, to be a leader of the some public party, not only in Italy, and also across the border of the other European countries. So I think the resort of the election, Felisa, European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on the French politics in future, and also toured the attorney politics well in this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway. But how much of the Ray configuration of party, alignments and party system, are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't wanna speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly that I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are. And the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders, Marin lapenne occupancy trees, German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. And now these countries sent their right wing people to congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants Tetra, but still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to just dissolve the European Union, and then end up in, in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement I went to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populus, which is people, right? And the biggest party is the European People's Party, which is Iran, because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people than is demos, and from that re is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say. Yes, we're populist. And that's a good thing, because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this sheet rise of populism or nationalism on a continent think they have perhaps become softer compared with a hundred years ago? Well, it's very very definite feed as you airing. And. It is actually correct far better to how have the past wall. But it is a great source of concern for those who are in power that we are seeing issue, where in Hungary, for example goal bind, and, you know, Farrar. She Britain, the Brexit party, we're going to sing a Asia where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to right. They want far-right fall. And they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the we have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what has happened. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties, such as break their party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern torture today phone when did we start to see this latest fragmentation of European politics and the rise of nationalism. And euroscepticism. If we look back to the past I sing a year. Players, especially the euro crisis would be a worry of big stimulation to Royce of populism in Europe because we know this that crisis explored a lot of contradictions. So a lot of the problems or challenges will in European Union, especially so far. So we, if we can find out situation in European Union, especially very peak divergencies between the so-called Las part of Europe and south part of Europe and especially eastern, part and western part, so I think it gives a I mean, the earth or soil for ROY for populist, because it take a chance. The. To find some more, how to say extreme policy on annoys extreme principles in the name of people. I think just I could all come look, I mentioned populace to partisan voice Misir, too. Very pickets disappointment with establishment parties, and those comments because they are not, they could not lay are not successful to deal with the issue of the development and also that crisis. So he gives a space for your populist party, another issue, I think to the change of the political situation in Europe with the future of the vice of populist means it's also a part of. Huge change. You know, some countries include indeed. It's kind of result of this. We have very short break here coming back. We'll continue our discussion. You're listening to world today. I'm joing stay with us. Combat. You're listening to world today. I'm John Wayne Jordan, by doctors Mahone. Jen, head of the European studies department was China Institute of international studies, Mr. Herat book man from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international politics, and feel Perry editor of the I, an investigative news site in wells UK. So just now we with mentioned about the rise of populist parties on, on the European continent. So Mr. Buch men, if we do not look, as far back as maybe a hundred years ago of juicing the populace in Europe has softened their agenda in regards the, you just compared with maybe seven six months ago, because once vouch show, the European Union banal breeders, like Salvini or lapenne. They are talking about altering the European Union from within. So do you think they have maybe learned lessons from breakfast? Or other issues that makes them softer on their agenda. Yes. Very much. I think in these, it's one reason for that has been the Brexit experience and. As a result, also of this very unsuccessful road towards Brexit. Also in many countries poll shows that people are less eager to leave the EU, and I think that's also reason why these far-right forces are toning down on, on destroying or wanting to destroy the U N, rather one to reform it, I think there's other reasons too. I mean Europeans are very much aware that the tone from the US has changed. So instead of having a big ally, a big brother who protect you against all evil. Now, the US more more seem like a threat to many Europeans. At the same time China has been on the rise. And whether you agree or not the China could be a threat or is just another powerful country for sure. It shows the Europeans that the time of individual nation states in Europe is just coming to an end. Because a middle sized European country is just too small to be of any importance on a global stage anymore. And I think that's another reason why more and more people realize, if Europe wants to have any say in the world than it needs to be a United powerful European Union. One thing that I'm very worried about the right wing though is foreign interference and I'm also priced because while a lot of people talk about Russian interference potential Russian interference. I hear very publicly that an American like Steve Bannon is touring Europe and, and trying to, you know, drum up far-right nationalist, and he's, he's an outspoken, nationalist slash Leninist in his own definition, which I found very weird. I mean that's. Dangerous personality, who's openly interfering in European politics? And I wonder why there's not much of an outcry that somebody so out open interferes into inner-european discussion yet. Dr tic- was in Paris, as we can as Mr. men said he's been accused by many of interfering in European parliament parliamentary elections. How'd Unocal these accusations? Indeed. I think that to why this some Jessica, we talked about the earlier to how about this some. I mean, the summer public party, it's why to change the Tong and maybe the skills to his issue. And how is the intervention of so-called outsiders on these Thomas of everything? Now it's just a pot of Lia. We call the political evolution in Europe, because we know once the Rosa populist party, they are ready to be part of the mainstream politics in Europe, they had they have to I mean atop the. Principal, some policies for them to from so-called ING dividing European Union, and to kind of reform reforming European exact. But now I think it's also a situation to now more and more Popular Party, the find out more and the more hopes and in the pasta several years to say that they could be in the center of domestic politics in some counties, so they try to enlarge the basis of the supporters. So I think it's also requirement to four scales to attract more average people to support their policies another issue. I think these. Into wishing some other. Now, I think it some was so part of a skillful minster party to fight against the populist party, because everytime, share some elections in Member States of European Union. Always the fake news issue, were some intervention from our site, become very hot issue. But finally is difficult to find the ending. I mean substantive substantial evidence to prove that there's a very strong linkage between the probably the party and Osama, you know, a political forces from outside has now, also become a part of the. Dilemma or Mace of the European parties or any well, Mr Perry from your perspective, is Donald form. Exacerbating populism Europe? That is one of the fears that he's wrapped up in the rise of popular them. We are seeing the rising pumped as in the US, and in America, don't Trump affair among remains and three. The maze thing supposedly until after his quote state visit to. But now he is a divisive figure, and it is quite possible. He's poss- on this ride in up this mid certainty that way, my Lucy boaty poll remain, that you have Trump in America, the right engaging, the tariff war with China, and he's positives. Farraj Wilders Berina pan in Hungary, Obam, this brise in the populist extreme. Impolitic. And so Trump is part of that it's quite conceivable on the gray irony with Trump is that he has this faith the poll, and yet it appears, the terrorists are off hitting the consumers tickly produces some of them in the following Ariza of, of the midwest, and yet, they are still supporting them also supporting Trump. They're saying, yes, it's bad for us. But he didn't write thing. So it is. Seen him being positive whole rise about the rights in the world and Europe, in election thing, well, Mr. Buch man, besides the American elements. How'd you look at the video scandal of the Austria's far-right Freedom Party? I mean, that comes at really out of a very awkward time, just a few days before the European elections. I mean first of all, it is a big scandal to have somebody in power being so openly talking about corruption and selling state power for money. Basically, I mean, that is shocking even for the standards that we've seen recently in, in some far-right populist parties. On the other hand, as we've discussed today, mister Perry said it and. The European elections still very much is a national elections across different countries. So I strongly doubt that it will have much of an impact on other far-right parties. I believe it will be an Australian thing and even in Australia. We'll have to see if the supporters of these of the F word, the far-right party, if they will take it as a scandal from that party or rather blame it onto people and say, yet they did that they were drunk, they're bad people. Now they lost all their power. But the ideas for which there party stood and still stands is what we want. And so we still vote for this party. I think that's actually very well possible. So I, I doubt that it will have a short term massive impact on the election results, whether it will have a longer term impact on the. Credibility of some of those populous, who came with the promise of being totally different from from all other politicians that is still possible. And I think that's also what's happening with Trump, who started as I'm the outside of politics guy. I'm different from them all. And now factually, what's happening in the US is not much different from what happened before. I mean it sounds differently. Looks different but there's not this positive change that voters who voted for him were hoping for. And so, so this it's kind of. They lose their their image of being totally different from other politicians and for that, I think this video, we'll also play a big role. Doctors read you think this is going to affect the elections, and maybe even the far-right movement in Europe, because, you know, the far-right Freedom Party has actually been playing well before the scandal. I think it'd depend on, how could is different parties, especially fully mission party, and populist party, how to describe it and how to interpret s-o-f-i. Yes, for most of the establishment parties, the toy to interpreted it as a very, very strong proof to, was you are probably the party certainty. You will be very, very easy to be influenced by outsiders like that. And of course, now I think because Australia is special far, right? Parties in Austria now before the scandal, they were in government so certain now they have to, you know, retreat from government, and it looks like a big loose for his party in arsia. But indeed I think now for all. Other Member States for our properties of parties in other Member States because to have their own. I mean, some are in a strong support and to have their own. I mean very specific. I mean manifestos so I don't think that it will give a large influence on this election in whole Europe, at a large, while the Mr Barrot using this, my serve as another avance of the close ties between Russia and the populist parties in Europe and does have a maybe long term impact on the far right movement. That is certainly a worried the there are there is evidence that, for example, Trinh. We talking about the Austrian issue that and the star. Right. That one of the issues that will crush tension vote, -ment, the sting was supposedly Russian contractor wanted policies. So it's quite possible that this will feed into this whole issue and Russia's sees this as a way all the, the into control in Europe becoming quite close to Saudi, and other in the right wing, and in the past. And, and, you know, we have an issue where for example, Russian television is beamed into homes within Europe. And some of them. The release how programs on that. And, and I should like that. So there is a concern about the rushing within year in America within Europe as well. And that will be exacerbated by the rise of right wing parties in Europe in these next. Well, Mr. Buch men, there are people, people also say that these populist parties. They also have significant divisions among themselves on issues like on migration and on shoes like relations with Russia. So do you think they are going to find unity even after the elections? Certainly they have big divisions and other one that I would like to mention also environmentalism from from being totally anti climate to being actually quite green there. There are big divisions and the only uniting factor is, is this anti immigration theme. And to some extent, the anti-establishment theme that they have. But in Europe in the European parliament on that level, that is actually quite common for all the parties. I mean, take the social Democrats six socialist parties. They are vastly different from, from Portugal, Spain to Germany to, to Greece to have very different stances. I mentioned at the beginning European populist party going from Oregon to, to miracle, I mean, okay, organised, leaving our expected to leave the populist party now. But. That is the common thing in Europe that these pan-european parties to not have an aligned mission or an aligned goal, even though they are by name in one aligned faction, and that's the same for the right wing. And as long as they find topics on which they can corporate and as long as they can push those agendas. I don't think their differences, will be that important. It's even conceivable that on certain topics they will vote divided and on other topics they vote United behind their stance. I think that's not a big issue. Yes. Well, doctors say German Chancellor Angela Merkel has recently said, in an interview, the vise of right wing populism has fundamentally shifted the mobile order alliances and leaves Europe and its political and economic union on the defense. So which way do you think? E with heading in terms of throw on the world stage. I think the charter Mercker talk issue crackly, because we know the logic behind the Publix party is to take a, I mean, another Papa reort already are so called national interests. Does Mr. Trump mation American, I and also Missa Sarwan also co a kind of Itani Italy, I so which will give I mean, very big impact on this so called a European degration firstly, because we know the traditional logic for European degration is to, you know, to give some more, I mean popica- or collective powers to institution in process, and then also returned to have a lesson less sermon. I, I mean, powerful national stay nation state and for Member States. So I think it now why some more national interest also requirement it will change this logic. I mean, politics oil, your integration, and it will do some more, perhaps are conservative influence on the policy. So I think I can't take the understand the deep concern from chancellor marker and some other an politicking in mem- parties in Europe. So Mr. Berkman, athle-, Merckel also said, she thinks the post war global autre built over seven decades over, and she grouped the United States with China and Russia as rivals of Europe. So is she talking about a resurgence of great power politics in today's world that Europe should engage us as one of the great powers? I think to some extent she, she is definitely saying that. And I also think she is probably the most threatened one by this rise of the right wing populace because she's the target of many of those right wing populists. Because while in theory, the European Union is in charge factually, Germany, has wielded an enormous amount of power within the European Union. And as head of Germany head of state in Germany. She she was the one who's wielding that power. And she's been in office for a very, very long time. Now soon people with start voting who have never seen anyone else leading terminate and her and I think she's also somehow feeling that an air is going to end where she is saying, which way you are up is. Going. And I think she's also bit afraid of that because I don't think this rise of populace is really going to change the European outlook on the world that much. Because honestly, I haven't seen that much of a European outlook on the world because most of what foreign policy has done was done by national governments to French have their foreign policy, the British determines and there's two sixteen plus one, for example, where China with central and eastern European countries has cooperation on Belton wrote Italy has chosen to join in while Germany has a very negative stance towards it. So it seems to me, she is realizing that her power is waning, but she's not realizing that, that's natural thing that has was bound to happen, because it was too much power focused on her. Well, Mr Perry. Do you look at myrtles view that he, he said, Europe should put he was together with China and Russia as the rivals hero of g thing that transatlantic alliance is, is dead, as she's been suggesting? Well, the transatlantic lines is definitely one but the levers want to pursue and they stress that all the time. For them like Americal all the people, also you until it feeds into domestic politics in Britain issues like that. And they want to strike deals with people like America Rancho around eight year. I thought the EU and at the moment they come from a say and they come within the EU because it's easier to deal, so they want to stress that trans Atlantic aligned with America of the, the Brexit happened. And that is something spread into this debate. And we shouldn't overlook the pie. But a lot of the heartbreak details won't come out like Michael goes, and always Johnson have endorsed, Trump, Donald Trump and Michael grow go with being over to steam back. So they all link to not way and putting the minds of remaining, they all linked in relation to this transatlantic line. And they are part deep. As link past of this populist, search within the European Union as time Dr today, do you think what we've been talking just now is it a temporary thing only because of Trump's America policy or shall we see it as part of a lasting change which started before, don't Trump? And we'll also continue after him so frustrated bench only judgment. Firmer European perspective harbor natural THEO church identical relations, because ashington a lot of steel habitant from European scientists say to watch. Missile chomp jump down in the general election, the United States, perhaps they would be renewal of the traditional transatlantic relations if. Mole European politicians, keep this, some judgment, I think, to indicate the singer. It just a very temporary. I mean situation fullish relations, but at the same time, I sink to maybe two I mean situation for the Trenton rations is. So Trump and not a single voice single figure in United States to have race. We got on the art, transatlantic relations, because once the to keep American I become a successful I mean policy, especially in is of Mr. Trump and also in some. People average people even in the United States, I think this situation will keep going on you and Mr. Trump will drop down in next election. Another issue is in now Foley's, issue between e European countries and the United States Senate. His resume timeless a major member sleighs for your opinion, including Germany, and France, there, try to take the issue the so-called a strategic autonomy and against the United States to play though. I mean to push forward European decoration, because we know because of a lot of divergence now within European Union. It looks like a modification to get some dynamics from internal I mean from European Union himself, so too. Shape, China's washer United States as a kind of a compensator, or kind of a rivals from outside. We'll be perhaps goot for his son, Newton amick for European degration. Well, miss your book non talking about the strategic atonomy, how realistic is that given that Europe still relies on Washington for security? It's a very good question. And actually, I think it's more realistic than many people think if we just look at the security aspect, because yes indeed Europe relies on a lot, but it wouldn't really have to because the military threat towards Europe, even without NATO is not that big. I mean who would militarily try seriously to attack? You're up the Russians surely not. I mean, the French have nuclear weapons as well. I don't see anyone in a traditional war who will try to engage a major power, like the European Union. So the question or the reason why I don't believe Europe is ready to Thomas is because it's not able to act as a political body, it's so divided. Also, institutionally between national states between a lot of institutions within the European Union, that there is no one who has vision, what should Europe be whereas going, what does it want in the world, and it's very easy for other powers like the US like China like Russia to divide Europe time. And again, and that's why Europe is not an autonomous body in international politics. Well mister Perry on what is the kind of European future that you'd like to see. Well, I would like to see an issue that we touched on. In fact, that small and medium sized countries and witness book, our country is part of bigger block. And we are going to see they shoot where in the future years to come the will will be made up bigger blocks like the EU. And so on the world thing, each a person of sixty million people whatever they cannot be a major player, I don't think in future, but within the EU it could exist greater influence. I mean, the EU has private million people unless much bigger than Britain will ever be on the world faith e you can't quite possible Britain will not count in years to come, and that is something remain within Britain up pushing big. Time, you know, the we are should be part of bigger block like the like the you have them. So the reformed in and basically, but how the influence which Britain as a small country would never have in pitcher. Well, we serve Okinawa. What about you once? I would hope for a more United Europe, that has a really strong leadership, and most of has vision for its people. Thank you. Mr. Bill, man expert on Chinese and international politics, feel Perry editor of the eye and investigative news website in wells UK, and Dr Houghton and head of the European studies, -partment, China Institute of international studies, thank you for listening.

European Union Europe European parliament Britain United States mister Perry Mr. Buch Donald Trump Brexit European People's Party UK China Brexit party Hungary Freedom Party Germany Popular Party editor America Russia
June 14, 2019: Bill Gates On Tech And Privacy; Trump Blames Iran For Tanker Attack

Here & Now

42:54 min | 1 year ago

June 14, 2019: Bill Gates On Tech And Privacy; Trump Blames Iran For Tanker Attack

"This message comes from here and now sponsor indeed. If you're hiring with indeed, you can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast. President Trump says Iran did it. He says, Iran carried out the attack onto oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, yesterday. The president made the statement during a nearly fifty minute interview on FOX and friends this morning. You're no they did it because you saw the boat. I guess one of the mines didn't explode, and it's probably got essentially Iran written all over it. And you saw the boat at night, trying to take to mine off, and successfully took the mind off the vote, and that was exposed. And that was that was Dan, President Trump is referring to rather grainy video released by the US military that purportedly shows Iranian special forces, removing and unexploded mind from the side of one of the damaged oil, tankers, Assan Ruhani, Iran's president denied that Tehran had anything to do with the attacks Jim Walsh is here now security analyst. He's with us acuity studies program at MIT. Hello, jim. You're gonna be with you. So set this up for us, what exactly happened between these two tankers? In the Gulf, and what led up to it. Well, what happened is we've had two attackers from two different countries. That were disabled by mines now there's still some dispute about that. The Japanese owner of one of the tankers said that he believed based on, I witness testimony from his staff, that a shell or projectile of some kind had a hit his ship, and there's a debate, you know, could it be torpedo was it a floating? Mine was an attach mine. I mean, the video sort of suggests that if the video was real that it's an attachment. So we've had two tankers disabled, no one killed no one injured the but this isn't a broader context, you'll remember few weeks ago, another couple of tankers were attacked. And then really the starting point for all this, if we really are trying to get to the origins, is it the US adopted a policy. President Trump's policy of maximum pressure, including trying to drive Iran's oil exports to zero the president's trying to strangle, Iran economically destroy its economy and surprise. Prize rather than simply lying on the ground in saying, kick me, again, you know, it may be that Iran is pushing back now it may be that, there are others who are responsible for this is a so called false flag operation. But I just don't think you know, we have enough information to be able to assess that at this point. But if these two tankers neither of these tankers were flagged to the United States. So why would Iran want to attack to d- had nothing to do with Donald Trump presumably, of course? So the, the reason is that Iran has said for again, if it is Iran, Iran set for some time that if it's denied the ability to export oil on the Persian Gulf, then no one is going to be able to export. These are their words not mine. And it's a way for them to sort of raise the cost of this maximum pressure policy, that's being enforced upon them by trying to basically scuttle or at least interrupted any kind of oil flow. I mean in some ways this is like a fight, you know, at a sporting event, some guy throws a punch the other guy retaliates the recipes sees the guy retaliating and calls the foul. Now, of course, no one should be punching anyone and no one should be killed, you know, hurting tankers in the Gulf. But the reason why we are here in the first place is that we're trying to deny Iran, any ability to export its main the backbone of its economy, which is oil. Well, in the case of sports is usually a pretty good quality video in this case, there is a rather grainy video, which you have seen does tell us anything, you know, I don't think it tells you that much. It is grainy. You can't really tell the density of the people I mean you know if it was a false flag. Again, I've some doubts about this. You know, people would be in a boat in uniform that were of the country. They were trying to implicate. It's weirdly cropped. It's sort of starts way you know, we don't see the bona coming. We only see the video of someone trying to remove something. And then we don't see where the boat goes afterwards. So hardly conclusive, but I. I would urge our listeners to to not focus on this. This is sort of the equivalent of a horse race coverage for politics who's ahead who's behind in this case, it's the who done it who, who is responsible for this. And we have this exciting grainy video, this is a distraction. The question is not who the question is, why, why is this happening and it's happening because we're pursuing a policy that's intended to strangle, Iran. Iran is pushing back and if we continue down this path, we're going to end up in yet another war in the Middle East. That's the big question. Why are we doing this? So I wonder if you can answer that, because at the same time that the president is blaming Iran. He's also talking about negotiating with Iran. So he's gone back and forth on this. Right. I when he announced these pointing out of the deal where we wanted to go ship. We're, we're not ready to do it then a couple of weeks ago when we had a couple of incidents. He said, call me, you know, he gave out his phone numbers at call me imagine you're in a relationship a business relationship, a family relationship. Integration ship, and you have a commitment with someone. And that's the person walks out on the commitment and not only walks out insults. You threatens you hurt. You threatens your allies and tries to steal all the money out of your Bank account, and then they say, call me come for dinner. Yeah. I mean, do you think the United States, the President Trump wants a military confrontation with the rum? I don't think the president has a strategic bone in his body. And so I think they're days when he said, no, I don't wanna get tangled up in a war in the Middle East, and then they're going to be other days when he says, I need to hit back. I just, I there's nothing in this presidencies that suggested me through curvier that suggests strategy. I think he's all season himself a counterpuncher it goes with the gut. I don't think he has a plan. I think there are other people in the administration who have a plan, you know, the national security adviser, and the secretary of state have called for regime change in the past. So I think you know. Anything could happen on any given day. And, but the general trend is towards accidental or intentional war in, you know this part of the world, very well on the chances of this happening happening accidentally some kind of confrontation. Well, what happens is something happens. And then each side feels compelled to respond to save face or each side feels well if I take it up a notch the other side will back down and some ways President Trump sort of encourage the Iranians to have that view because when this whole thing went down again two weeks ago, he sort of caved, sorta rushed to say, oh, I want to talk. I wanna talk well what did the how do they think about that? They probably thought any of this guy's a softy, and then they do something, and then you're off to the races. So that's why it's so dangerous Jamal's here. Now security analysts with the security studies program at MIT. Nice to have you here. Good to be with you to Europe now where the rise of populism is changing the political landscape across the continent, most far right? Parties are still minor player. In policymaking, but that is not the case in Austria, the far right freedom. Party shared power with conservatives until a scandal brought down the government last month as Joanna kakissis reports. The party is still popular and could make a comeback. When the government smell last month some of the loudest cheers at a celebration in Vienna. Came from Carlita coats on who's part of a group called granny's against the right. We are all older women, and we all experienced different time, an open society. She says that open society changed in late twenty seventeen. When the conservatives invited the far right Freedom Party into government. This gave licensed hateful values radicalism, and antisemitism and racist society in general. It's all moved more to the right and even more to the extreme rides. She leads the crowd in a song about granny's fighting wolves the war is not won. She worries the far right will return after elections. This September despite a recent scandal involving former Freedom Party leader Heinz, Christian Straka. He was forced to resign vice chancellor last month after a twenty seventeen video of him on a Spanish island surfaced. In the video, he seems to be making Lucy deals with a Russian woman, hosing is the niece of an oligarch close to the Kremlin. The tape was a trap and it brought down the government, the scandal shook up the Freedom Party's leadership, but not its affinity for Russia at the nineteen th century era imperial cafe longtime party member Johan is Hubner explains. The worldview, who's an interest to have a balanced worldwide network of allies to be a US colony. The thing is in Europe. There is overwhelming US influence through NATO through the control of the financial system through the media's sued entertainment industry, other far-right parties in Europe, share this pro Russia stance Reinhard Heinisch a political scientist at the university of Salzburg lists other traits in common. They're also an anti-immigration party there an anti foreign. The party. So they are nativist their unabashedly, nationalist. And this means something in Austria, the birthplace of Adolf Hitler. When he comes to interpreting Austin history, there's certainly many in the Freedom Party who see the defeat of Nazi Germany, not as a victory for the Marcus. But see it as the defeat of for their cause many Austrians played a role in the holocaust after Hitler annexed, their country in nineteen thirty eight Austria, though, did not go through the same process of education is Germany. I mean, it wasn't anti-nazi political consensus in the years of the nineteen forty five, but that was never a consensus that you cannot call rate, politically with the far-right that's Bernard vitamin or at the documentation centre for the Austrian resistance in Vienna. So the two big parties, they've always been flirting with the far-right, and that, of course, contributed massively to normalize policies of this. Nutty. So today, the Freedom Party enjoys the support of nearly one in five Austrians. Like lead. He's a retired IT administrator who runs a monthly meeting of party faithful at a beer and schnitzel restaurant in the NF Miki that side, we may not have as many members the other parties, yet, he says, but each month we grow for NPR news. I'm Joanna kakissis in VM. Support for here. And now and the following message come from Imber wave the revolutionary new personal thermostat. That's designed to help you find thermal wellness in any situation. Amber wave can put you in control of your comfort in places like you're freezing office uncomfortable airplanes in restaurants, or feeators, after a workout at home and more. Learn more at ember wave dot com and use code NPR to say fifty dollars at checkout, amber. Wave own your temperature. There was an underground culture in New York City during the nineteen eighties. And among its hallmarks were gay and transgendered drag bulls, the FX TV series called pose follows members of New York's drank bowl seen the first season of pose was set in late nineteen eighties and the second season fast forwards to nineteen ninety both cracked the lives of the shows characters during the heat of the aids crisis. NPR's Eric Duggan's has been watching the new season higher. Right. Could you first reintroduce us to the drag ball seen in New York, and who was part of it? Sure. So anybody who knows the Madonna song, vogue, and that video will get a sense of what the drag ball scene was like it was contests where different groups of folks would dress up in these costumes, and it was a way to have chosen family for people who were often rejected by their biological family when they would. Come out as transgender come out as gay posed as a great job of sort of recreating that whole scene giving you a sense of what it felt like to be in the middle weather say that in terms of season one during drag shows that were quote, so fabulous. It'll make your eyes hurt, but that was contrasted with a lot of grit and hardship. And you just alluded to some of that what happens in, in season, two well season sort fast forwards to nineteen ninety and we're in the heart of the aids crisis. The league character impose played by Jay Rodriguez Blanca is HIV positive and in the first episode of the new season, she's talking to her medical professional about the progression of disease, and we get a sense of what people knew what they didn't know about how HIV and aids worked, and her medical professional is played by Sandra Bernhardt. So let's check it out. We've got a clue, so. But it's, it's just a number. It's a way of flagging how much care patient needs. Not I'm feeling fine. I've been amazing actually last winter. When my kids got sick. I didn't have a sniffle at all. I mean, sometimes you can't tell what is doing to your immune system. So I'm dying. No, you're not dying. You still plenty of t cells to fight with. But we can't let those numbers drop any lower and back then there weren't medications available debt could help rebuild your immune system like we have now so it really wasn't death sentence. Yes, it really was a horrific thing that happened to people, and it took longer to figure out what was going on in part, because it was such a stigma attached to getting the disease in the first place, then some official outlets, including the US government were dragging their feet in terms of providing resources for research for treatment. Eric, I to ask you about some of the other actors in, in this series. The show made an icon out of one of its lead actors. Reporter let's listen to a clip of his character, the announcer Pretell, who's getting in the face of a trans woman who didn't show up for a protest concern about winning trophy, then you are about our government spreading lies about us and an effort that. And we're and we're queer. They don't give. So we better start caring about ourselves. So Billy porter has also gained fame for peering on red carpets in tuxedos that then morph into evening, gowns, as I think he did on the Tony awards the other night, I witnessed his finery in person at the Peabody awards, just just last month. The brother bring it. Yeah. Well, I mean, what's amazing what's great about Billy is that he is a bridge between that seen being a person who was there when it was actually happening, and now playing a character in the show. But yeah, there are a lot of great new performers. I mean pose makes history by featuring the most transgender actors and most gay series regular characters in scripted series in mainstream television. So I talked about in Jay Rodriguez who plays block the main character. And there's this powerful scene where Billy Porter's character, and Blanca, go to a place where they are interring unclaimed bodies, you know, the people who died from. Aides or sort of placed in these unmarked graves, just boxes and boxes stacked up in these large holes in the ground in this, the flip side of this joyous celebration that the drag ball, competitions are, and it perfectly sort of encapsulates, the two worlds that the series is negotiating. It's, it's really an amazing thing to see it in mazing thing to see recreated. If you're old enough to remember what it was, like when it was happening the series is called pose. It's entering its second season on FX before we let you go, where the weekend is upon us. Do you have any picks for good viewing over the weekend? There's an interesting series called city on a hill that starts on Showtime, featuring Kevin bacon as this corrupt FBI cop in Boston. And if you have extra time you can always go back and see when they see us on net flex people are still talking about it. You know, some people are losing jobs, and resigning from positions over the impact from the series which retails the story, the central park five from their perspect-. Tive. There's a lot of great stuff out there. That's come to television, the last couple of weeks. So it's, it's good time to catch up NPR critic, Eric Diggins. We have our assignment, thank you very much. I've always of leisure, and here's a taste of what it sounded like last night in Toronto. Toronto Raptors fans going wild as their team beat the Golden State Warriors one fourteen to one ten to win the NBA championship. This is the first time a team from outside the US has won the NBA title. And in fact, it's the first major sports title for a Canadian team in a quarter century, the CBC's David common joins us now from Toronto, David, I hear you were out on the streets last night with people celebrating this victory did Candida like wake up with one big hangover today. Yeah. I think absolutely. And I would say it's not just the city of Toronto. This really was across country thing that reviewing parties in stadiums and arenas and homes in bars and restaurants from coast to coast to coast, like even into a are Arctic region that when people up and loud and excited, but certainly on the streets, hundreds of thousands of people who'd either been in Jurassic Park outside the arena, where the raptors normally play or had themselves been at home or or wherever, and we're just overjoyed. Yeah, I bet know I was going to say in the United States when a team wins the championship it's it's a victory for the city or the state where that team plays. But as you say, this is a a, a win for the entire country. Can you talk more about just how captivated all of Canada was, you know, I think there's a lot of bandwagon people. I'm certainly a bandwagon person. I do go to raptors game. But like one season and I don't know all the stats and all the players and everything about them. I certainly know a lot more now. And I would I would suggest there's a lot of people right across the country who are like that. But at the same time in the Toronto area itself, I kind of look back to nineteen ninety two when the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series for the first time in many ways that was the moment where we said, you know, Toronto were we could be a world, class city Canada. We can actually compete here. It was this sort of an inferiority complex thing going on. And there was a little bit of that, as well with the raptors but the city has changed so much since the Jays one that. World series. It's grown by two million people and the kinds of people are different. It's much more diverse. You know much richer as a result. And so to look at, on the street compared to when I was in, like early high school back in nineteen Ninety-two to today. It just looks different. Same kind of energy much bigger crowd, but a total togetherness, and in a world where we are so divided. It's just nice for people of all backgrounds can be together and hugging each other. And there was that I was on, on the air last night, people were coming up and just hugging. Well, this was a very close game came down to the final seconds. The raptors were playing a team in the warriors that had been to the NBA finals for five straight years did fans feel confident that they could pull this out and win the series. Do you know I think there was a lot greater confidence on Monday for game five? I think there was a feeling of certainty that, of course they had to win at that point, ultimately. They didn't they lost by one point. And so last night, people came into Jurassic Park and other places perhaps, with a lot of hope but with less absolute certainty that this was going to happen. And then as the game, progressed, like it was it was tight through most of the game, even into that final minute a complete nail biter. So where I was in Jurassic Park this, you know, this area, right outside the, the arena. It was, it was tense like it went from really excited to really, really call them to give you an idea Drake. The rim of the rapper whose from Toronto and is this icon for the raptors in his at so many of the games and has been to so many of the games, whether it's in Oakland or here in Toronto through this final series. He was sitting on this stage into route Jurassic Park with his entourage, and he was sitting for most of the game in that final minute. He. He was up. He was up the entire time and dot kind of energy, you felt not just in Jurassic Park, but on an all the surrounding streets, where people had gathered in front of big TV's, hundreds of thousands of people. So the raptors big star quiet Leonard. He was the most valuable player for this series. But he's also a now a free agent. What's the sense? There is, is Leonard staying. We don't want to talk about. We got to talk. Should we just go onto the next? I think the only the only question to co I Leonard here during during the play offs seems to have been if you bought a house in Toronto you bought a house in Toronto yet. In fact, there's a condo developer whose offered in the penthouse suite for free. Come on long as he stays. No. He doesn't need that, but, you know, it gives you the sense of the desire to have this guy, staying not see this team broken up. I don't know what happens. And there'll be lots of talking about that, but it probably won't be till after Monday the victory parade. Yeah. Let the party go on. That's the CBS's David come and speaking with us from Toronto, where I guess, now the question across Canada is when will your NHL teams win a championship. David, thanks so much. No problem. And it doesn't matter as much the country, shifting the country's shifting terms of what it likes. Bow sling season for retailers in the US. The Commerce Department today reported strong gains and sales in may. And this morning's report also revised the March and April numbers upward. That's a good sign for the economy, but experts say there are clouds gathering on the horizon. Mike, Regan is senior editor at Bloomberg news. I Mike, so tell us about the retail numbers. What is driving Americans to shop? More this spring, that consumer element of the economy, which is supremely important is still pretty strong. If you look at unemployment, it remains at an almost fifty year, low consumer confidence was another report that came out today, and those readings remain near some of the highest levels of this century. And also, you have gasoline prices remained pretty tame down a little bit compared to this time last year. So all in all the consumer is a holding firm at this point, despite like you said some uncertainty about other. Elements of the economy. Yeah. So it appears that the higher prices because of tariffs on China are not yet having a fact on consumer behavior. But despite the good news that hasn't stopped Wall Street for mooring Morgan Stanley's, saying, business conditions are on par with two thousand eight the year of the financial crisis that you're at first began tell us more about what they're seeing. So what we're gonna Stanley does is it creates an index. That's basically aggregation of a bunch of different economic signals from the services, part of the economy, the manufacturing part of the economy, and that ever in putting job market and all of them did cool recently. So there gauge of sort of the big picture, did take a big dip. It was actually the, the biggest drop on record. I believe in as you said to the lowest level since two thousand eight so as you pointed out, despite this consumer remaining point there are, what appears to be softening patches in the rest of the economy. A lot of investors are thinking the Federal Reserve would cut interest rates in July to keep the economy. Coming along is still likely it's still appears to be the base case for, for traders, you can sort of suss out the probability of a rate increase, or a rate cut based on what the market for short term interest rates show. And right now it's about an eighty five or eighty six percent probability priced into those markets of a interest rate cut in July. Now that said, not everyone is convinced we just had David Causton of Goldman Sachs on Bloomberg television this week's and he he's not convinced. He's not sure that the fed actually will cut rates between now at the July meeting, and they're really there's a lot that can happen between now and July, so we'll have to sort of stand by and watch wonder what's happening in China because things they're slowing down industrial outgrowth OPEC growth, slowed to its weakest point since two thousand two but it still grew about five percent. How long can China keep growth at a level like that? Right. So obviously, they are feeling some of the facts of the trade tensions with US. Bath remember, China has a lot more flexibility as far as the government responding. And introducing stimulus into the economy just because the way the government is set up there. The, the head of China can can sort of pull a lot of different levers to boost demand in the economy. That would take a lot of political wrangling in the US to, to pull off. So I suspect, China will continue to respond and have the government and of things boost the demand that is, is waning in the private sector could to talk to you, as always Mike. Regan senior editor at Bloomberg news. Thank you, Mike. Thank you. There were some dire predictions yesterday on Capitol Hill about the future of technology. Former FBI special agent Clint wants went before the house intelligence committee to explain the risk of deep fakes or doctored videos on the internet. That appear to be real over the long term delivered development of false. Thank media will target USA officials institutions, democratic processes within enduring goal of earning democracy and demoralized the American constituency in the near in short term circulation of fakes may incite physical mobilizations under false. Pretenses initiating public safety crises, and sparking the outbreak of violence, that he's one of many issues facing tech companies today that have led to calls for more government regulation, and that is why congress is now holding a series of high profile hearings to how does all this look to the man behind one of the original tech giant's Bill Gates is co founder of Mike. Christoph. He's also a philanthropist with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which is an NPR funder, Mr. gates welcome to here now. Thank you. Let's start with the hearings on Capitol Hill this week looking into the power of tech giants like Google Facebook, an Amazon. Do you think these companies are monopolies? Well, there's certainly have high market shares. Some of those they work in and they have impacts on a lot of sectors of the Konami. And then become, you know, key tools for communication and even getting news. So they're important companies so important companies, but how much regulation should the federal government have over these companies is there not enough? Well certainly areas where people are using social media for bullying in where you have of foreign actors doing election related activities in even the companies involved say that given the mainstream role there is room for election related or child protection or privacy, type rules and what is good regulation look like to you. Well, each of those areas complex, you have examples coming out of Europe that you can look at on the privacy front. And some of these areas. It's new ground number of twenty twenty candidates on the democratic side who are running. President of called for breaking up these tech companies. I want to listen to a little bit from, Elizabeth Warren who speaking here in New York City in March, they think they can still up all of our personal data and sell it to whoever they want for whatever purposes, they think they can run their business to just roll right over every small business every entrepreneur, every startup that might threaten their position. And what does our government in Washington? Do nothing. So do you agree with Elizabeth Warren, the some of these companies should be broken up, the generally got laws in the country and you ask companies to adhere to those laws? I'm not aware people are saying that they broken laws in such a way that the remedy would be to do that. It doesn't seem like just going around break companies solves privacy issues. I wanna ask you something else that I heard today. Facebook engineers have created in artificial intelligence system that clones, the voices of famous people, including you. So I wanna play this recording of the Bill Gates AI impersonator. He's reading a phrase that says a cramp is no small danger on a swim. It's, it's, it's a phrase, as you probably know that engineers use to test AI program. So let's listen to that a cramp is no small being jour- on a swim. Okay. So there it is Bill Gates. What do you think about that? Pretty good. Yeah. No, there's no doubt that technology can synthesize speech now. And you have to think we're is that helpful Moore of inappropriate, right? What do you think are you are you concerned with the direction that some technology is taking? Is that is something that, like, what we just heard a, a risk that worries you, if it's used in the wrong way, certainly? The distrust in news media is got to be concerned for everyone in the so-called, the Vache capability could make that worse. These these fake videos, deep fake, they're called you're referring to there. Yeah. Either video video or audio. Yes, listen. I want to ask you about another issue that I know is very important to you. You're headed to Capitol Hill later this month to talk to lawmakers about the Trump administration's proposed cuts to the State Department. What is your concern and have you spoken to the president about this? Well, I think the United States should be incredibly proud, how on a bipartisan basis, the support for health. Aide including pep far which went after HIV in global fund in they've kept over ten million people alive. That would be dead today. They allowed these African countries chance to get their health systems organized to make it less likely that epidemic start in those countries. And so, I think given the strength of the economy, I think the US should at least maintain if not increase these budget items in, I think the congress will override the proposed budget cut. But I'm going there to talk about this because I get to see this work in the field I get to see that. The money is very well spent. And so, I think it'd be a tragedy, if there were were cuts, but in cuts secretary of state, Mike Pompeo has said that cutting back on the aid will allow other countries to be more self reliant. What? What do you think about that? I mean, why should the United States taxpayer be be investing in those sorts of issues? You're saving lives, very small amounts of money, and certainly the global fund is fantastic. Requiring countries to finance, along with the United States as much as they can. But this is government at its best saving lives lifting countries avoiding instability in pedantic would threaten you as citizens. It this was done on a bipartisan basis starting under President Bush, boy, if you, you know, if you can't support this, it's hard to know what you can support, and you've spent something like ten billion dollars on global health initiatives, and I know you spend a lot of money investing on issues in the United States as well. But people ever ask you, you know, why is it that you spend so much time and effort on foreign countries as opposed to some of the issues here in the United States, like are you doing enough? For instance to solve poverty here. Well, I don't think even the us government has solved poverty. We're very involved in US -education, and trying to make sure that no matter what your background is that you get a great education at the same time. You know, we believe that the deaths of children that in a we're up over twelve million a year back in nineteen ninety the fact that that's been cut in half. Now is giving countries in places like Africa chance to grow their economy, and become self sufficient, and so in a we've stepped in and global health is gigantic program for us because we do think those human lives have value. Some Democrats who are running for president have said that there should be a wealth tax tax on the richest Americans is that something you'd be willing to pay. Well, I think taxes can be more progressive. You know if the government's going to take on the increases in. Ical costs and eventually not let the deficit get too big. There are you know, there's a need to find revenue. And I think that can be done in a progressive way a wealth tax particulars is complicated implement, but, you know, if that's part of a progressive tax plan that the country wants then, you know, that's great. Well, what do you think would that impact philanthropy all if, if the richest Americans were paying more money in taxes, they'd be giving more less of their money away to charity? Well, the first thing is to make sure the state, which provides education and health and roads and Justice that it's properly financed to do the things that the voters want it to do whether that leaves room for deductions for philanthropy, people are going to give money no matter what the tax treatment of plant is under certain tax structures, they'd give less, you know, I do think the estate taxes a good tax, you know, could be. Hired that as lead to some in a very good philanthropic giving. But I you got your taxes, and then in the philanthropic impact is comes after that. How closely are you watching of the race for president is in is there somebody that you like so far? I don't follow the speeches of all twenty four candidates, you know, I'm, I'm fairly private about in my political approach because our foundation really. Has engaged in willing, gauge with all all administrations Bill Gates. Thanks for speaking with us. Thank you. That was story that highlights the concerns that many Muslims have about their safety here in the US in may. There was an arson attack on a mosque in New Haven, Connecticut. It came as Muslims were observing the holy month of Ramadan, that arson attack in the recent mass shootings at houses of worship is prompting some leaders to take action officials at another mosque in Connecticut of hired more guards to patrol at Sunday school. And as a Connecticut public radio's of an Esa dilatory reports students there aren't just learning about Islam they're being taught how to respond to misconceptions about their faith. When I make a mistake. Bear with me who's next at the Muslim Sunday school in Berlin, Connecticut. Dr raisin on Soroush coaching a class of mostly teenagers, and how to be what he calls modern voices of Islam, by the way, somebody. If you use an Arabic term, and you don't translate dinged, one point. Okay. So that's Lamar commits God's peace be with you. All on sore is president of the schools, musk. The Islamic association of Greater Hartford, and he's big on translating, Slavic phrases and words take the word jihad. For instance, it means a struggle, usually a personal spiritual one. But when you hear the word jihad in the media, he says, it's almost always associated with extremists commit violence in the name of Islam. And when Islam is viewed as a threat that makes Muslims target just measured. Someone call you terrorist until you to go home ISA and solemn seventeen he's in the Sunday school class. I had one of my friends say that they were scared to come to the measured because they were fade that they were going to be shot on recently. They're mosque had an active shooter training with the local police department. It's one of the security measures, they've taken since the attacks at the tree of life, synagogue, and Pittsburgh in the two months. In Christchurch New Zealand? But when meant sore talks about security, he also talks, a lot about changing the narrative, he tells us students Slama phobia is driven in part by false information. So he wants them to correct. Those misconceptions than Muslims are anti-american the next generation of Muslims to be able to show that somac- values and American values completely compatible after nine eleven months, sore founded the Muslim coalition. Connecticut group e started to counter, the anti Muslim rhetoric that he says is perpetuated in the media, the teenage students in the Sunday, school grew up after nine eleven and soon they'll be heading off to college. So today, they're practicing being modern voices of Islam by having a debate. The topic is whether America is the best place to practice is not, and you can bring Slama phobia rhetoric media all of that into it. They split into groups when team leans heavily on the constitutional protections for religious freedom. I usually pashas says that's nice and all but government, that's going into moss or synagogues and holy mass shooting. The people that believe in you. Idea. Students also bring up the so-called Muslim travel ban by President Trump, despite that much source says he still thinks America is a great place to practice Islam that remains a safe haven for immigrants like himself on sore came from Sri Lanka almost thirty years ago after his medical school. There was bombed. He's now cardiologists we don't want the Muslim ban on these Lomb hates Americans stuff to change this nation that welcomes immigrants, and that has made a mad cow, such beautiful country. All right. Good. Job guys time for pizza. Outside a security guard is seen patrolling the property student missing Muhammed says she feels safe at her mosque. But as a high schooler in Connecticut, who wears a headscarf. She says she's had a deal with people calling her terrorist my friend, and I also wears a scarf. We took our time to explain to them that our religion, does not motivate our like promote violent in that were religion of peace like Muhammad Ameen parks is one of the only Muslims at his high school. He says he tries to be a good embassador for his faith just like he's been taught Sunday school. But when an incident involving Muslims happens out, in the world harks is expected to answer for it, stereotype that go along with as well racist, jokes, and things like that. So I mean I tried to clear things up, but a lot of people you just can't change there really stubborn. So park says he tries to change minds by just being himself. It's best just to show people who you really are stuff like that. And if they take it they'll take it. But if not just. Try not to feel the fire sore. The teachers says people of all religions are welcome to visit the mosque and if his students come away from class, filling in powered in their identity as Muslims and as Americans, he says he'll call that a success for here. Now I'm Vanessa de LA Dada. Here now a production of NPR and WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Lisa Mullins, and I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here now.

United States president Iran President Trump Bill Gates Toronto NPR NPR David Causton MIT Europe NPR raptors Jurassic Park Connecticut Persian Gulf So park Mike Pompeo NBA HIV
European Parliament Elections

World News Analysis

54:55 min | 1 year ago

European Parliament Elections

"Today provide you with in-depth news and expert analysis ten the who story bigger picture for you. The news you want to know only on today. Welcome to world. Today news programme with a different perspective. I'm joing voters in twenty eight EU countries are heading to the pools for the European parliament, elections with Brexit looming nationalist, populism on the rise, this year's election, a political event held every five years, it seem by many as decisive for ease future. So how will the votes change the makeup of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good a predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a you heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who Jen, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought boop man, from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news, Beppe side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon. Theresa May is stepping done as British Prime minister she anals to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha, study was the could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation leader. The palm tree party in the Commons, unrelenting them few days ago, and she's out, she had no where to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrawal, they'll through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the shelties ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to have deft the by now because the government has failed to reach the old that satisfies either the British parliament or the EU. They're now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MVP is to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? That's very good question. I mean. Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate, possibly Rhodia few weeks to take this before Britain comes out of the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the poll suggests that the tower is could come behind, for example, the glean, and that election result, which will compete. They election wall yesterday Britain, but the results coming on some day would be absolute anathema for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wanted to go now before the results come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling poll, the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. bug. C'mon. The pools actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in a European parliament are actually those school are most determined. That Britain was leave the issue with the Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come up on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Great good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. Volkmann was her take. From looking maybe from a bit more a far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual powers limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up and they want to really show their government that they're really not happy. Doctors say, how do you look at those think the Brexit party has been doing so well in the European elections? Saw ROY Sophie Mr. Rogers party indeed. We can find out. He not only some very specific background in bracket, because so far, they the lot of disappointments from Aggie people in your K, about the conservative party and a neighbor party and the in Tallahassee of push for wadley some practice process. But of course, I think, generally, we can find out the environment recently special written years as we know that the pope Latam as the voice for Mr. Faraj and his party. And there was a very big showcase forty some general Trent. But now of course, I agree with optimism point is to a large degree the European parliament election has to be regarded by most of our European people us. Us as a secondary vote, which means it could not be decisive by resort daily life, by the daily life. But of course, it will become very, very cute opportunity to express the disappointment, and they are companies about of the politics about the European Union. Well, Mr McMahon, could you explain to us more how the European parliament elections actually work because that really looks of it complex or confusing for outsiders? Yes. And you asked me, I mean, I mostly focused on international politics, and, of course, preparing for tonight, I have looked at the elections also and the institutions of the and I totally agree with what you just said, it is extremely complicated. Simply put the elections are national elections all across Europe, and in each country, people vote for the parties that are available in their countries and these parties, try to kind of form you repeating parties. They are aligned across countries. But in some places they have different names than in others. They tried to have this one bitten candidat, which is like this one head figureheads to drama voters, but it's, it's not really unified parties with an authority across Europe. So each national party can do whatever they like Indian. So, for example, Merkel's German. Cd party is the same European party as Hungary's rather. Centerfold, anti-foreigner anti immigrants party there in the same European populist party. So it's, it's very confusing set of many local elections, put together Nash, a European parliament, which, of course, is not the official explanation of the process, but this is looking from a distance at how it actually happens. Well, Mr Perry, actually, the voter turnout has gone down in every single European parliament elections since they began in nineteen seventy nine on, do you think the low turnout main stat EU has actually failed time, and again to unite Europe, Ian people with Brexit, perhaps being approve of that. Yes. The Turner has been very low as you said, for well election to the EU, Paul, but, but it conceivable we done the exact truth, yet possible that the turn out will actually be now, we'll be higher this time because being the news people want to bend their anger. Again, the slowness of breath as you airing because galvanized people to have a not, oh, breakfast or to come. I need all those remain to day in though, it's possible the turn will actually go up, I but you're absolutely correct, the Turner, happy, very low therapy, and that tied into this whole drama, the undergoing now because it the EU is in. By many as a remote organization institution that is full of bureaucracy. They don't want, they don't want to be positive, and they won't hire the voted to leave those who remain one day head. They don't bureaucrats over that number across and that had been hearing, split Britain, and is having a huge effect on Europe as well. Well, we serves how do you look at the low turnout and do you think it will go up this year? Indeed. The now turn out fully saw European parliament, you'd action. I said in a past. Many because of the, I think real. No. I mean competence via European parliament in the decision making process in the European Union institution. But since Lisbon Treaty, I mean, especially refitted fake in a year for two hundred ten at night. It looks like a European parliament, got some more competence, only decision making process in European Union. But I think who lots also first time we witness to voice of populace party in European parliament. So this year, I think, maybe there will be some different because absolutely no firstly establishment parties. Try to defeat the populist party in his election. Perhaps, they will have some more mobile. Relation in various states and other I think the reason is because of the now the European parliament get a Parisian also house. The co on policymakers along these European Union commission and no-show European Council. So I think maybe some more confidence to voters to. To active more actively. Yeah. Well, Mr. man, how does the general public think about e you these days, especially the young people in Europe? I can't speak for five hundred billion people. Of course, what I feel as myself below forty in Europe. Is that? There has been a massive rise in European identity, especially among the higher educated Europeans, it's, it's very natural to travel between European states and no people across borders. And so there is something coming up that people start feeling of themselves as Europeans, even though it may not be a patriotic feeling. But it somehow irrational feeling of we are all somehow connected through one European Union, and at the same time, I would like to talk about this concept of procedural, legitimacy versus material, legitimacy, and in my view, the west has much too much focused on this procedural legimacy of government. What I mean is, we only talk about how does the government get elected, and as long as there's a free and fair election? Nobody questions whatever happens afterwards and the Apas. It would be to say, well, a government is only legitimized, if it does something good for the people, which, for example, be a socialist. Take not only, but also socialists, and that second question is, I think where people are very unhappy with Europe? And with a lot of national governments within Europe, because time and again, people vote for higher wages for normal workers for less power to large corporations for not giving billions of euro two big banks to save them. But then when common people get in trouble, you know, they don't get money. They don't get retirement money. They get cuts. They get all these kinds of challenges of common people, and so from this material perspective, what the governments do is not satisfying. A lot of people. There's not been enough positive economic development or social development in. General in Europe. And I think this is what gets people more and more dissatisfied makes them feel, powerless helpless. And that's when people start vote voting for extreme parties just to show. Look, if it doesn't matter anyway, what I say, then I just say something because I know it makes you angry you being the current politicians in charge. While Mr. Barry, just now Mr. Buch mentioned about all those problems facing the continent right now. And with own noticed the rise of nationalism and populism, what is think are the key issues that are likely to sway the vote in the elections. Well, the terms of Britain, they are wrongly nasty. Issues. So people vote, according to how they warm, the policy in Britain be pursued generally, there are also issues in relation to climate change, and all is a cross-border issue. But the main thing is, as much as I don't want it to be the main thing is that the voting coats to national politics. So in bitten anyway, particularly it's, you know, whether or not threes may won't get Britain hours or whether other people do better, all whether other parties think they want Britain should I should be another referendum should stay in. Now, there are other issues in relation to the Konomi and you know, how climate change should be tackled in other countries, but I certainly issue here. That the they are issues and relations to how it affects Britain, and that is not what the with mentally about. Is that to be about a supernatural thing, and it tells you about how precede within Britain, the people vote because national issues? Well, what about in other countries? Dr J we've seen also seen a rise of populism nationalism in other countries like France, like Germany, etc. Yes. If we take some major Member States, especially I think this year. So European parliament election will be very rare decision for its domestic politics for them, perhaps, the frost as we know, mR Macron, party so far. Not yet has a single cent seat in parliament. So this election will be a very big showcase for how cute president Macron got the support. I mean substantially from French people, especially the very, very big gaming between Mr. Macron's party, and Mario Lopez party. Also in Italy's, actually, they would be a, you know. You know decisive. I mean. Resort for this new party by Mitch Macron, and also existed populist party by the LaPointe, another, I think very big issue is how Italy assume now Mr. Salvini, try to play a Zoll to be a leader of the summer publisher party, not only in Italy, and also across the border all the other European countries. So I think the resort of the election for this European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on French politics in future, and also toured the Italian politics on this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway, but how much? They rake configuration of party, alignments and party system. Are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't want to speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly did I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are, and the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders marine lapenne foul Kapit of German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. Now, these countries sent their right-wing people to a congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants cetera. But still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to dissolve the European Union, and then end up in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement, I want to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populace, which is people, right? And the biggest part is the European People's Party, which is ironic because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people then is demos, and from that re is, is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say, yes, we are populous. That's a good thing because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this issue this rise of populism or nationalism on a continent? Do think they have perhaps become softer compared with one hundred years ago. Well, it's very very definite the'd as you be airing. And. Is absolutely corrected far better to how have the past all far better? But it is a great concern for those who are in power that we are seeing an issue, where in Hungary, for example goal band, and, you know, Farrar Britain, the Brexit party. We're going to staying a issue, where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to write, but they want far-right fall, and they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the year. We have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal low, historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what is happen. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties such as for our break the party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon. When did we start to see this latest fragmentation of European politics and the rise of nationalism and euroscepticism? If we look back to the past year. Shogo special euro-zone, that's crisis would be a very big stimulation to listeners ROY so for populism in Europe because we know this that crisis explored a lot of. Contradiction. So a lot of the problems or challenges will in European Union, especially so far, as we, if we can find out the situation in European Union, especially the very peak divergencies between the so-called lost part of Europe and south part of Europe, and especially eastern part and the western part. So I think it gives a I mean, the earth or soil for ROY so populist because it take a chance. Thea. To find some more, how to say extreme policy on annoys extreme principles in the name of people. I think Jessica Oakham hokum mentioned populace to parties Misir, too. Very big disappointment with his establishment parties, and those comments because they are not, they could not they are not successful to deal with the issue of the development and also that crisis. So he gives a space for populist party, another issue, I think to the change of the political situation in Europe with the feature of the voice of populist me center, it's also a part of the huge change in western countries. Indeed. It's kind of result of these. We have a very short break here coming back. We'll continue our discussion. You're listening to world today. I'm joing stay with us. I am on car sharia. I teach at the university in today has organized its programs, and it says, on bringing in a lot of views from all over, it is an extremely good platform for information and analysis than I should all success in the future. China plus dot cri. Dot sin is your home for everything you want to know about China. The latest news in China and everything China related from around the world, everything can focus only one place, bringing you vital information, feel business and travel, Chinese culture, language, lining, and mall. Shine A-plus dot CO, arrived dot C, N China, plots dot cri dot C N, your portal entities, middle kingdom. Online on air and on your flown. Take today wherever you go and stay ahead of what's changing our world from politics and the economy to business and technology today, covers regional and international issues that affect China and the world Jeep up-to-date with today. Welcome back. You're listening to world today. I'm joanne. Jordan, by doctors honed. In had of European studies department was China Institute. Jiffy international studies, Mr. Harare, book man from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international politics, and feel Perry editor of the I an investigative news site in wells UK. So just now we with mentioned about the rise of populist parties on, on the European continent. So Mr. Buch men, if we do not look, as far back as maybe a hundred years ago of juicing the populace in Europe has softened their agenda in regards the, you just compared with navy seven six months ago, because they once vouch shutter, the European Union banal leaders like Salvini or lapenne. They are talking about altering the European Union from within. So do you think they have maybe learned lessons from food or other issues? That makes them softer on their agenda. Yes. Very much. I think indeed, it's one reason for that has been the Brexit experience. And as a result, also of this very unsuccessful road towards Brexit. Also in many countries poll shows that people are less eager to leave the EU, and I think that's also reason why these far-right forces are toning down on, on destroying or wanting to destroy the U N rather one to reform it. I think there's other reasons too. I mean Europeans are very much aware that the tone from the US has changed. So instead of having a big ally, a big brother who protects you against evil now, the US more more seem like a threat to many Europeans. At the same time China has been on the rise. And whether you agree or not. China could be a threat or is just another powerful country for sure. It shows the Europeans that details of individual nation states in Europe is just coming to an end because a middle-sized European country is just too small to be of any importance on a global stage anymore. And I think that's another reason why more and more people realize, if Europe wants to have any say in the world than it needs to be a United powerful European Union. One thing that I'm very worried about the right wing, though, is foreign interference and I'm also surprised because while a lot of people talk about Russian interference potential Russian interference. I hear very publicly that an American like Steve Bannon is touring Europe, and, and trying to drum up far-right nationalist, and he's, he's an outspoken, nationalist slash Leninist in his own definition, which I find very weird. I mean that's. Dangerous personality, who's openly interfering in European politics? And I wonder why there's not much of an outcry that somebody so openly interferes into inner-european discussion yet. Dr ties defense was in Paris those week. And as Mr. boatman said he's been accused by many of interfering in European parliament parliamentary elections. How'd you look at these accusations? Indeed. I think that to why this some Jessica, we talked about earlier to how about this some. I mean, the some public party, it's why to a change the Tong and maybe change the scales to his issue. And how is the intervention of so-called, outsiders on these Thomas politics, everything? Now it's just a pot of Lia. We call the political evolution in Europe, because also once the LUSA populist party, they are ready to be part of a mainstream politics in Europe. They had they had to adopt to the. Principal, some policies, for example, to from so-called ING dividing European Union, and to kind of reform reforming European exact. But now I think it's also a situation to now more on the more public party. The find out more and more hopes. And in the pasta several years to say that they could be in the center of domestic politics in some counties, so they try to enlarge the basis of the supporters. So I think it's also requirement of four scales to attract more average people to support their policies not issue, I think these into wishing or some other now I think it's was so part of a skillful instrument party to fight against the populist party because everytime, she are some elections. In Member States of European Union. Always the fake news issue was some intervention issue from outside become very, very hot issue. But finally is difficult to find the ending. I mean substantive substantial evidence to prove that is a very, very strong linkage between the Popular Party, and Osama, you know, a political forces from outside has now, also become a part of the. Dilemma or the Mace of the European parties, or eating low, Mr Perry from your perspective, is Donald form exacerbating populism of Europe. That is one of the fears that he's wrapped up in the rise of popular them. We are seeing the rising populism in the US and in America. Don't Trump is a fair. Among remains and three. The maze thing supposedly until after he's close state visit to Britain. Now he is a divisive figure, and he's quite possible. He's pass on this rise in this bit. Certainly feel that way. Those voted poll remain, that you have Trump in America, the right engaging, the tariff war with China, and he's positives. Farraj Wilders Berina pan in Hungary old. I'm this brise in the populace the extreme. In politics. So Trump is positive that it's quite conceivable on the great Alrighty with from his, he has this faith the polls, and yet it appears the terrorists are off hitting the consumers tickly produces. Some of them sixteen in the following areas of, of the midwest, and yet, they are still supporting them also supporting Trump. They're saying, yes, it's bad for us, but he didn't write thing. So it is teen as him being positive whole rise about the rights in the world on the Europe in election thing, well, Mr. both men besides the American elements. How'd you look at the video scandal off the Austria's far-right Freedom Party? I mean, that comes at really out of a very awkward time, just a few days before the European election. Well, I mean first of all, it is a big scandal to have somebody in power being so openly talking about corruption and selling a state power for money. Basically, I mean, that is shocking even for the standards that we've seen recently in, in some far-right populist parties. On the other hand, as we've discussed today, mister Perry said it and. The European elections still very much is a national elections across different countries. So I strongly doubt that it will have much of an impact on other far-right parties. I believe it will be an Austrian thing, and even in Australia. We'll have to see if the supporters of these of the F, the far-right party, if they will take it as a scandal from that party or rather blame it on to people and say, yet they did that they were drunk, they're bad people. Now they lost all their power. But the ideas for which there party stood and still stands is what we want. And so we still vote for this party. I think that's actually very well possible. So I, I doubt that it will have a short term massive impact on the election results, whether it will have a long term impact on. Credibility of some of those populists who came with the promise of being totally different from from all other politicians that is still possible. And I think that's also what's happening with Trump, who started as I'm the outside of politics guy. I'm different from them all. And now factually, what's happening in the US is not much different from what's happened before. I mean it sounds different. It looks different. But there's not this positive change that voters who voted for him were hoping for. And so, so this it's kind of they lose their, their image of being totally different from other politicians and for that. I think this video will also play a big role. I do think this is going to affect the elections, and maybe even the forest movement Europe, because, you know, the far-right Freedom Party has actually been playing well before the dental. We it'd depend on how could is different parties, especially fully mission party in populist party, how to describe it and how to interpret so far. Yes. For most of the establishment parties toy to interpreted it as a very, very strong proof to, was, you are probably the party certainly, you will be very, very easy to be influence by outsiders like that. And of course, now I think, because Australia special far far-right. The party's Austria now before the scandal, they were in a comment. So certain now they have to, you know, retraite from garment, and it looks like a big loose for his party in Austria. But indeed, I should now for all our Member States for other parties in other Member States because they have their own. I mean, some are in strong support and to have their own. I mean very specific. I mean manifestos so I don't think that will give a lot of influence on this election being a ho Europe a lot, while the Mr Barrot. You think this my serve as another avance of the close ties between Russia and the populist parties in gear up and does have a maybe long term impact on the far right movement? That is certainly a worry. The there are there is evidence that, for example, trim. We talking about the Austrian issue that under star. Right. That one of the issues, dad will rush tension vote, the sting was supposedly Russian home tractor wanted policies. So it's quite possible that this will feed into this whole issue and Russia's sees this as a way all the, the thing into control in Europe becoming quite close to Saudi, and other in the right wing, and in the past. And, and, you know, we have an issue where for example, Russian television is beamed into homes within Europe. And some of them. Lease how programs on there and, and I should like that. So there is a concern about the Russian influence within year in America winning Europe as well. And that won't be exacerbated by the rise of right wing parties in Europe, in these election. Well, Mr. Buch, then there are people, people also say that these populist parties. They also have significant divisions among themselves on his shoes, like on migration and on his shoes like relations with Russia. So do you think they are going to find unity even after the elections? Certainly they have big divisions and other one that I would like to mention also environmentalism from from being totally anti climate to being actually quite green at there. There are big divisions and the only uniting factor is, is this anti immigration theme. And to some extent, the anti-establishment theme that they have. But in Europe in the European parliament on that level, that is actually quite common for all the parties. I mean, take the social Democrats six socialist parties. They are vastly different from, from Portugal, Spain to Germany to, to Greece to have very different stances. I mentioned at the beginning European populist party going from Oregon to, to miracle. I mean okay. Organised div ING our expect to leave the populist party now but. That is a common thing in Europe that these pan-european parties to not have an aligned mission or aligned goal, even though they are by name in one aligned faction, and that's the same for the right wing. And as long as they find topics on, which they can cooperate. And as long as they can push those agendas. I don't think their differences, will be that important. It's even conceivable that on certain topics they will vote divided and on other topics they vote United behind their stance. I think that's not a big issue. Yes. While doctors say, I'll German Chancellor Angela Merkel has recently said, in an interview, the vise of right wing populism has fundamentally shifted the global order alliances and leaves Europe and its political and economic union owned the defense. So which way do you think? EU with heading in terms of role on the world stage. I think to charter Mercker issue crackly, because the logic behind the Publix party is to take a, I mean, another Papa reort already also so called a national interests. Does Mr. Trump mation American, I and also mississau- Walney also co a kind of a tiny Italy. I so which will give I mean, very big impact on this so called the European degration firstly, because we know the traditional logic for European degration is to, you know, to give some more, I mean, popica- or collective Apollo's to institution in process, and then also returned to have a lesson less sermon. I, I mean, powerful national state, national state and the full Member States. So I think it now why some more national interest also requirement it will change this logic. I mean politics oil, Europe, integration, and his interview, some more perhaps are conservative influence on the policy. So I think. I can't take the understand the deep concern from for marker and some other politicians MIM parties in Europe. Some Mr. man, actually Merckel also said, she thinks the post war global autre built over seven decades is over. And she ripped the United States with China and Russia as rivals of Europe. So is she talking about a resurgence of great power politics in today's world that Europe should engage us as one of the great powers? I think to some extent she, she is definitely saying that. And I also think she is probably the most threatened one by this rise of the right wing populace because she's the target of many of those right wing populace. Because while in theory, the European Union is in charge factually, Germany, has wielded an enormous amount of power within the European Union. And as head of Germany head of state in Germany. She she was the one who's wielding that power. And she's been in office for a very, very long time. Now soon people with start voting who have never seen anyone else leading terminate in her. And I think she's also somehow feeling that an air is going to end where she is saying, which way you are up is. Going. And I think she's also bit afraid of that because I don't think this rise of populace is really going to change the European outlook on the world that much. Because honestly, I haven't seen that much of a European outlook on the world because most of what foreign policy has done was done by national governments to French have their foreign policy, the British determines and there's two sixteen plus one, for example, where China with central and eastern European countries has a corporation on Belton road. Italy has chosen to join in while Germany has a very negative stance towards it. So it seems to me, she is realizing that her power is waning, but she's not realizing that, that's a natural thing that has was found to happen, because it was too much power focused on her. Mr perry. Do you can't miracles view that she's, she said Europe? Should put he was together with China and Russia as the rivals hero g thing that transatlantic alliance is, is dead as she's been suggesting. Well, the transatlantic lines is definitely one but the levers want to pursue. And they stressed that all the time for them like America, all the people of the EU until it feeds into domestic politics in Britain issues like that. And they want to strike deals with pays like America and China, and India, I thought the EU and at the moment, they count from say, and they come was in, because the us to deal so they want to stress that trans Atlantic aligned with America of the, the Brexit happened. And that is something spread into this debate. And we shouldn't overlook the pie. But a lot of the heartbreaker tears won't come out. Like Michael goes, and always Johnson have endorsed Trump don't Trump and Michael go go with being over to Stephen fact. So they all think in that way and thirteen the minds, though remained. And they all linked in relation to this transatlantic lines and they are par deep as link past of this populist, search within the European Union. And I'll try. Dr today. Think what we've been talking just now is it a temporary thing only because of Trump's America first policy or shall we see it as part of a lasting change which started before, don't Trump? And we'll also continue after him so too. I really depends on the judgment. Firmer European perspective? Harbor natural year church and undeclared relations, because I know a lot of steel hesitant from European scientists say to once chomp jumped down in the general election in United States, perhaps they would be renewal of the traditional transatlantic relations if. A mole. European politicians, keep these some judgment, I think, to date, the things that it just a very temporary. I mean situation for these relations. But at the same time I sink to maybe two. I mean. Mean situation for Trenton rations is. Trump is not a single voice. Go single figure in United States to have race. We got on transatlantic relations because once to keep American I become a successful I mean policy, especially in is of Mr. Trump and also in some. People average people even in the United States, I think this situation will keep going on you. Mr. Trump will drop down in next election. Another issue I could now Foley's, issue between e- European countries and United States. I sent it at the same time, it's a major member sleighs for European Union, including Germany, and France, tried to take the issue, the so-called a strategic autonomy and against the United States to play Zo. I mean to push forward European decoration, because we know because of a lot of divergent has now within European Union. It looks like it's more difficult to get some dynamics from internal I mean, from European Union herself, so too. Shape. China's law show United States as a kind of a compensator or kind of arrivals from outside. We'll be perhaps goot for his own Newton amick for your integration all miss your book nine talking about the strategic atonomy, how realistic is that given that Europe still relies on Washington for security? It's a very good question. And actually, I think it's more realistic than many people think if we just look at the security aspect, because yes indeed Europe relies on a lot, but it wouldn't really have to because the military threat towards Europe, even without NATO is not that big. I mean who would militarily try seriously to attack? You're up the Russians surely not. I mean, the French have nuclear weapons as well. I don't see anyone in tradition. War, who would try to engage a major power, like the European Union. So the question or the reason why I don't believe Europe is ready to Thomas is because it's not able to act as a political body. It's so divided. Also, institutionally between national states between a lot of institutions within the European Union, that there is no one who has a vision. What should Europe be where is it going? What does it want in the world, and it's very easy for other powers like the US like China like Russia to divide Europe time? And again, and that's why Europe is not an autonomous body in the international politics. Well mister Perry on what is the kind of European future that you'd like to see. Well, I would like to see an issue that we touched on. In fact, that small and medium sized countries and businesses for country is pass of bigger block, and we are going to see they shoe where in the future years to come. The will will be made up bigger blocks like the EU. And so on the world thing, each a person of sixty million people, whatever it is cannot be a major player, I don't think in future, but within the EU it could exist, great influence. I mean, the EU has p- hundred million people unless much bigger than Britain will ever be on the world faith e you can't quite possible Britain will not count in years to come, and that is something that our main within Britain up pushing big. Time you know that we all should be part of bigger block like this like that. You you have him so the reformed and basically, but have the influence which Britain as a small country would never have in pitcher. Let me serve Okinawa. What about you once? I would hope for more United Europe, that has a really strong leadership, and most of all has vision for its people. Thank you, Mr. Buch, man expert on Chinese and international politics. Feel Perry editor the I an investigative investigative of news about side in wells UK, and Dr Houghton had of the European studies, -partment, China Institute of international studies. Thank you.

European Union Europe European parliament Britain China mister Perry United States Brexit party European People's Party Germany UK Mr. Buch Mr. Trump Hungary Member States Brexit editor Russia European Union institution America
Friday 11 October

Monocle 24: Midori House

31:34 min | 1 year ago

Friday 11 October

"This is Monaco's you're listening to Monaco's house view first broadcast on the eleventh of October Two Thousand Nineteen on monocle twenty four saying that eighteen people were detained at Kito Apple and the majority of them were Venezuelan says accusations from the and a warm welcome to today's program I'm joined first of all by MARKLE's America's editor at large at stocker and it might be a shortcut to the snazzy wardrobe with your dreams that's all ahead I'm Tom Edwards Motorcycles House view starts now indigenous groups that make up around eight percent of the population now argument being that raising fuel prices is only GonNa make the economic inequality in good order because of violent protests what exactly it's been happening indeed you're right the government's move to Guac Hill from Kito basically a week of protests that started regime of Modano who is broadly speaking more more conservative or more sort of market friendly rather than his predecessor you get rid of subsidies to to feel that have worked a Lotta people around the country most notably doing says about the power of art artifacts in international diplomacy and he asks this more are fashioned it's Jamie waters will join me to ask if private rental let's start with Ecuador serious upheaval but it lightly over the past few weeks if a government relocates you know generally speaking things are not being accused of heavy-handedness from the place indigenous groups are climbing at least five people have died the government says that numbers only I listen I worked very hard getting ready for this we're looking at latte affairs and add all come to you first of all good to have you with us in London thank you as the opening gambit of the International Monetary Fund that is looming large Ecuador reached an agreement with them back in February for a cash injection really speaking over austerity measures imposed by the government of Lenin Modiano basically the decision by that government to the couple of years has this week been making the news for more of the right reasons more Nichols culture editor Lamelo will pack what a disagreement over one of the world's most famous you too and then on top of all of that really kind of swell of accusations and misinformation just recently one government minister is it too early or is it impossible to have a bit of a read on potential outcomes here is there a you know a stabilizing effect what could prompt nat- or does this feel excu days whether these indigenous groups are prepared to listen to the government the government has tried to table certain measures like debt restructuring for companies that is the important elections around the corner. We'll also hear from Chris NOCCO acting fast for a closer look at one of his home countries Australia which often if dates various austerity measures need to be taken in order to save money and put the country on the right path it really just depends on how good the negotiations are going to be over the net the in the country that tends to affect indigenous groups more the non indigenous groups even worse so they've been protesting the chick correspondent and Latin America Broadcast Linchpin jet an endo goes oh no snickering for tongue. We have an amazing turnaround in the next few weeks but it it really is down to the fact that the the the economy has been struggling again as I was saying read the risk of asking you an impossible to answer question you've described a situation that is fast moving it's rather fluid and has a great deal of uncertainty claiming counterclaim so often some you know economic crisis a lot of corruption scandals but the poverty level never reached at that point and when mockery was elected it was such a hope for a lot of Argentinians you know a government that Venezuela is somehow embroiled in this whole mass and they are wanting to destabilise the situation isn't great and I think really the reason that Mudie Sumatra is going to lose or looks like he will lose he he you know because he had this more kind of central image more market friendly but I mean he wasn't a very good president in those terms so I think that makes struggling but it's not enough for these groups so it really will depend on both sides being willing to to listen to one another otherwise could will whoever the next president is be looking to clean up I mean a big mess down to the economy as Manda was sort of alluding to a bit like you know so often in the region but if a powder keg well it's kind of and we'll get into about Argentina and strange the in both of these two cases there is the sort of figure I am I am F- and years of struggle and so this idea of going back to the IMF is very unpopular with boss. Wade's very easy for about two Fernandez the main candidate of opposition to win and Christina kitchen various mart as usual she was not leading candidate because she knows she's been talented she used to say sort of very sort of negative way that you know Argentina tended to have an economic crisis every ten years they were sort of just waiting for the international community is their investment in a potential winner is there someone that you know the broader world would prefer to see innocence I've been wondering because you know inflation is over fifty percent you know the past is just losing value there's been a devaluation oversee that was implemented by Argentineans in such a state poverty levels rose to eighty five percent which you can say anything you want a bonus Turkish near Chris acution redoing the presidency. There's over the country I I don't know how Argentina gets out of this sort of cyclical mess that it doesn't seem to be able to get out of I remember from the time that I lived there people four point two billion dollars and that sort of in a way the the bogeyman of the you know the the groups are against because obviously the IMF then dictate A divisive figure to say the least where where do we stand in terms of her popularity both within and I guess we'll see importantly without Argentina is at the end of the month alpes reports the release of prisoners linked to Christina kitchen his previous administration is this related to the possibility of electoral success for Care Kito Ecuador I've only been Jones I've only been there once but it's just the one time Newsweek let's go to Argentina though where with election I sort of sort of world-weary expectation that this is just the way things aren Argentina and sadly at the moment that sort of seems to be and Tina it is hated by some sectors of society because one can't forget the two thousand and one economic crisis which of course led to a huge bailout from the she has her like I don't know twenty five percent of the vote but then she'll get the moderate as well we've auto let me ask you obviously the benefit I suppose that much of a she's really been keeping a low profile like Fernando were saying she is tainted and she's aware of that she's been spending a lot of time in Cuba where her he is market-friendly so he tends to make investors and organizations like the IMF and the World Bank extremely happy compared to someone like this next up today with joined by Monaco's new acting affairs editor. Chris CIRMAC Chris Russian is going to be defined speaking of this of strangely cyclical nature of politics and under what about Kushner because you know some we've talked about so often around this table here has a fairly good relationship with many leaders around the world so I think a lot of people you know they feared the return of the populist measures of Kieschnick even though I don't think this will happen cree but again as I said earlier the the you know macrey had to go to I'm F which is a serious bogeyman if we think it's in bogeyman in Ecuador who announced indication's she's a Fernandez to make things confusing you know who are worried about populace measures is super interesting about this election is that we haven't seen what do these long periods of watching this country that incredibly close up or from your your station in the US what kind of mess perhaps Fernando well I think you know I would be very surprised actually if mark would pull off a reelection because you know frankly the the economy in motoric government we're not going to be the same as under Cristina Fernandez Decatur and the populace measures so I think a little bit of image smoothing is happening at the moment as well sure is actually L. and spending time there so she's been traveling a lot to Cuba I'm what's also interesting is that Fernandez Alberta that is has been eating itself I'm not saying it's going to be as as terrible as in two thousand and two thousand and one but the economic situation is really how this really escalate even further the inside serve at soccer did you have been your best in Buenos Aires in Argentina which will come to just a moment for awhile it spend much time in in we'll post face to the world perhaps yeah I think there's various ways that we can talk about that but when it comes to the politics it's been in the ice or even the international community AH rough few years for Austria I think they've become most famous or you know the chancellor they had a bus includes first of all became most famous for shutting down essentially talking openly quite openly about corruption that he was considering doing with with Russians so now we've had an election there crisis within the Freedom Party the sort of far right party that he was in coalition with which had this huge scandal of a video that came out of their leader essentially stopping the refugee crisis by shutting down the bulk convert back in twenty sixteen and then we've had this tremendous because this time she has a very different characters the main candidate we're very interesting to see how the relationship with Brazil will be with scenario because both of us had clearly that he a bit of a mix there but yes I thought you know we talk enough about the states and Austria has been specially in the news it feels like this week and on Monaco's various checks so had a similar shift recently of you know the the five star movement kind of I having a coalition of the far right and then now moving a bit for a lot of the votes from the far right Freedom Party after their scandal so now he's back in a position to form a government in Austria and he might do almost a comedian like swing cranston complicated and mixed but my father's Austrian so I do speak German I should say with a bit of an Austrian accent my mother's Americans think motives to market is that kind of president that is more respected abroad then in Argentina because he always you know looks like a statesman he travels of his from the Freedom Party on the far right to the Greens and that's that's everything you know everything that Joe is talking about right now would this actually be possible sending people to the US to try and show up the image of the next government he's trying to allay the fears of investors of business people to say this is going to be and what's fascinating to me is to put it in a interesting positive it's the same person coots who came out right on top he sort of stolen skepticism it's probably okay yeah I think I think it should be viewed with some healthy skepticism I mean for me it's interesting to compare it say with the with a place like Italy because Italy figure in the you know the the five star movement even though they are now back in government Lost a lot of support as a result of that Sebastian quits I find fascinating the far right by being quite anti immigrants in in much of his rhetoric at it's meant that he has been the central figure and stayed the central figure of Australian politics instead of the far right and that gives him now this opportunity to try and swing in the other direction again I do find that fascinating one of the things that he said quotes he gave because there are few as you mentioned so the very monocle friendly reasons why we're interested in particular does it feel a bit like Australia is I don't know showing a bit of a new Dr Movement struggled for a long time to rein in Salvini on the far right if you will they sort of took all the oxygen out of the room if you will Slovenian he became the main gentlemen fantastic to insights from both today that's Monaco's at stock and Ferdinando Gustav Sheku here on Markle's house view and we'll be right back after this because he has somehow managed to keep the far-right at bay during this coalition and there was obviously a scandal that brought the far right down some ways but even before that he's sort of taken the two left again what the interesting thing maybe you know as much as you can have skepticism about the interesting thing for me about Austria is in the case of Italy say the fives over some newspapers on the briefing and Chris you're GonNa talk to us a little bit about Austria but tell us first why you are particularly well placed to do exactly so being preconceived wisdom about the structure of this political spectrum from from one side to the other and that maybe true or is this alarming about someone who can shift oh come to you thank you very much good to have you in the studio you you sound surprised to be here you are regular listeners of course will have spotted or heard already view coming up today a special appearance from our beloved America's editor at large ED stocker for a round up on what's been disruptive week in Latin America and look ahead on and that's this is where it gets interesting right how far should he go should he have not gone in his rhetoric in his policies he's sort of taken the wind out of the about cooperating with the Greens for example migration he feels might not be much of an issue because he sort of united in and he just said well nobody is in favor of illegal illegal in wax and wane like that I don't know cause for concern when someone can as you called it chameleon like a reinvention I guess as long as we view it with certain degree of healthy that we won't get into let's talk a bit about Australia exactly a lot of the press if we're looking Austrian politics particularly not super positive over recent times but things may be shifting I four somebody who seemed to be very far right to then go to the New Orleans for coalition well I guess in some sense is one should welcome such a shape shifting and and look at how it's challenge hidden want a better financing Christina to win then I think it'd be a terrible relationship between Brazil and Argentina but let's wait and see who's GonNa win I mean yeah I mean the Max also it was good it was good opportunity to introduce myself I'm talking about one of my home country is exactly one of one of your home countries I feel I feel envious particularly big and Britain gratien and nobody's in favor of people drowning in the sea either so I think we can come to an agreement on this he certainly capable politician nothing else and a and a man who can work the room work the space well so politically things may be back on the rails for Austria which were ongoing Chris Segui facts if you needed reminding my name's Tom Edwards from me and all the rest of the team thank you very much tuning in in just a moment we'll have a word Monica's house view from fashion editor Adia from the Germans it was a German postal worker who first proposed essentially sort of mass producing publishing postcards and having this as a souvenir the idea of fifty years of the postcard and what intrigues me about this particular is that I never knew this was an Australian invention and yet maybe I was right because we oh resale of items has become easier more commonplace than ever before but other companies are starting to branch out offering common rental facilitating transact transaction fame for for different inventions that have been created and I'd say Austria is no different I find it interesting because in this case they yes they in some ways you could say they stole it a postcard self had already existed as well format but nobody had done it as a souvenir or something that you send around through the post and a year before This one hundred fifty in my experience of the German ones was not as positive I did a trip from Berlin to Frankfurt on the trains and it was one of these where was in you know carriage with six other people yeah so this is an interesting story I think because it's an opportunity maybe that Austria scene and those who have heard Tyler would have heard about this but yes it's an option it was the next from across the like these origin stories tell us briefly about this one so yes origin stories are always complicated aren't they every country likes to claim a certain amount the next thing you know various other countries that's a lovely idea we're going to take that as well and you had it in you know it moved to Canada and Germany eventually as well and other countries and we can make make the night train sexy again and they're doing a tremendous overhaul which I do think which I also agree make sense 'cause like you I've done this I've done this trip Austrian has taken when essentially Germany's Deutsche Bahn shut down its overnight operations and Austria's kind of swooped in and said well we see an opportunity here me anniversary the Germans decided thought and thought long and hard in this postal worker was like I'd love this idea we have to do it there's a huge discussion the German Postal Service and they decided no it's too Oh and it was all quite dingy and it was an old train and just it wasn't this sort of glamorous experience that you imagine so I'd welcome a bit of an overhaul from the Austrians on this now I fashion rightly picks up a stick for its deplorable carbon footprint while fashion houses waking up to this developments in tech comes enabling action at the consumer end as well between fashion Easter's Jamie autism uncles fashion editor joins me now to tell us more what do you make because this is a trend that we've talked about for some time I think I don't know maybe it fits with soda the old imperialistic if you will ambitions it Austria once had to now go back to the old the overnight train time and it's certainly something that's not going anywhere yes I mean sustainability is one of those things that everyone generally is talking about rush on doing it a year later Australia well we'll take it we're happy to do this. We find this a great idea Austria Hungary in those days and they went for it and then right Matt Spider that we can all get on board with wow another pun I'm on I'm on fire today let me just ask you very briefly about another sort of anniversary one hundred. I don't think you're right there helping these accusations charges so-called greenwashing in certain areas but I wonder is this being driven by more sustainability minded consumers Tori House I guarantee you he'll write back to everyone receives every every single one of clunk he's not crossing he's crooked fingers or anything I get from you it's it's definitely like probably they major talking point in the fashion industry at the moment and it's one of those terms that kind of can be used and

Argentina International Monetary Fund editor Monaco Christina Ecuador Chris NOCCO Australia Kito Apple Monaco Kito America MARKLE Tom Edwards Lenin Modiano Jamie waters Modano Lamelo Nichols
Friday 27 September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

58:55 min | 1 year ago

Friday 27 September

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the twenty seventh of September Two Thousand Nineteen on monocle twenty four the briefing is brought to you in partnership with Rolex hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio one here Midori House in London. I'm Andrew Miller coming up. I think the whistle blow it did the right thing I think he followed the law every step of the way it isn't looking good for. US President Donald Trump then very often doesn't is the Ukraine scandal really going to be the one that finishes him and also ahead. We'll examine the pivotal role that Australia's main tabloid could be playing in this weekend's national election. All Stream parties need the support of the corner insight. I took they want to succeed. It's still the main source of news for staggering number of Australians news panel will look at the United States torment of of Cuba's first family brexit as seen from abroad and the prospect of a week on the beach in Saudi Arabia and we'll look forward to tomorrow's Australian rules football grand final in Melbourne with a celebration of the Australian Football Leagues quaint tradition of clubs songs. That's all coming up right here. On the briefing on monocle twenty four welcome to today's edition of the briefing with Andrew Miller. Donald Trump has now been president of the United States just shy Roy over one thousand days and it feels like there has been at least that many variations asked of the question is visit is this at lost the point point at which the wheels have come unquestionably and irrecoverably off the clown car so far the answer has been no inexplicably but the gathering scandal over the President Trump's we'd interactions with Ukraine does appear to have legs a complaint by a credible whistle blow appears damning calling trump's conduct serious this or flagrant problem abuse or violation of the law impeachment is underway will join me now to assess the depth and the wolf of the soup in which the President finds himself is Scott Lucas Professor of American studies at the University of Birmingham Scott especially in the last twenty four hours in particular. What have we learned. Where are we with this well. The trump clown car rattles on but the evidence is pretty damning. We have the combination of the transcript of the phone call between Mr Trump and president of the landscape in late July and we now have the complaint of the US intelligence official which is based not only on that call but on months of behavior by trump is attorney Rudy Giuliani and the complaint which is based not just on this one. US intelligence official but on what he has been told by multiple White House officials. What does that say look. Donald trump up in late. July told the president of Ukraine repeatedly to investigate Joe Biden who is the former vice president and who is standing for President who thousand twenty twenty now that alone is a possible crime which is interference in the US election but beyond that trump implicitly linked that to pressure which was I've suspended military aid to Ukraine. Trump personally ordered the holdup of four hundred million dollars in aid only a few days earlier if you would like that aid you need to do this investigation. And what is significant about the document from the intelligence officials. This was not a one-off incident instead since late two thousand eighteen trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani had been pressing Ukraine officials to dig up dirt on Joe Biden had been dealing with disgraced Ukraine officials who had been fired for corruption who he thought could support that case and this entire effort against by his son hunter is not based on any evidence which Ukrainian officials have confirmed but is based on a conspiracy theory and unfounded conspiracy theory that bind intervened arraigned to get a prosecutor fired two thousand sixteen to protect his son so the combination of working conspiracy theory trump has done that before approaching a foreign government to have him help and his election effort just think about Russia but the habit so crystallized in these two documents which is directly approach approach a president or a foreign country and say investigate my political rival that is certainly I think sufficient for Nancy Pelosi to come off the fence and say there should be impeachment inquiry on the basis of what we know about this is there how far we stretch our imaginations and the bounds of credulity not is there any potential known dull g explanation for all of this well. The the president's explanation which has shifted has been that off off first of all. Oh what from call did it was. I didn't mention Biden on the phone call that it was oh. I didn't ask for any investigation of Biden in the the phone. Call now that this is out. I don't think there's any explanation on the basis of the facts that can justify what has occurred the most that trump supporters can say is is that the both the compliant and the transcript or not explicit about linking the threat of suspending foreign aid over to the investigation of Joe Biden but I remember the trump folks don't work on the basis of facts their counterattack will be this is all hoax. This is fake news media. This is presidential harassment. This is just like trump Russia wrong ignoring the fact that trump Russia culminated in finding of evidence of trump's obstruction of justice they in other words will try to shoot the Messenger and hope that we don't actually consider the evidence in the message. I mean it's another question I feel like I've asked at least two thousand times uh-huh as well possibly a thousand times to you alone but on this particular occasion do you detect any signs of nervousness now among Congressional Republicans and yes. There is nervousness. Now I want to preface this by saying that unless I say -nificant amount of Republicans cut themselves loose from Donald trump he he will not be convicted of impeachment in the Senate where you have to have a two thirds vote and where the Republicans have the majority but we have had three Republican senators the most prominent being the two thousand thousand twelve presidential nominee Mitt Romney who said they are disturbed by what has come out and what is more striking as a larger number. Republicans who just would not comment on Thursday who were reserving judgment some of these included normally people you would expect to support trump so at the very least I think they're rattled by what we are actually finding out in the end. Does that mean that politically. They'll make the jump away from trump. I doubt it but we're in early days. the the next step will probably be that the intelligence official who lodged the complaint who was the CIA liaison with the White House over Ukraine matters will probably appear before congressional committees and we'll see what more he can add to the story. I wonder what finally about how this is going to play in terms of domestic politics takes in the United States and I'm not talking so much about trump's base. I think we understand by now that there's about thirty percent voters who aren't going to budge even if Donald Trump announces insist that he's real name is Sergei Baryshnikov that he holds the rank of colonel in the Gi you but is there any possibility at all that any of this actually works works for trump that he can get the idea out there. There is something vaguely weird about why Ukrainian Gas Company would want to hire the vice president of the United States Sun and and maybe he's flinging up enough cough that some of it might stick indeed chopsticks. I'm not entirely sure that metaphor hundred together but you know what I'm saying. Let's go with throwing dust in our eyes remember. That's better that this has been the trump tactic ever since he ran for president since you had stories during the campaign of his sexual harassment of women and that is you respond by being aggressive by putting out disinformation by denying that anything on tortoise occurred by saying it's is all your enemies and you try yourself as the victim now remember there are multiple investigations against Donald Trump we also have to consider the investigations into its tax affairs his financial affairs where he has been accused of fraud the accusation that he and his trump organization person profited from the presidency and that the trumper invest Russia is not closed but I think ultimately because I doubt there'll be a conviction on impeachment you put the core question and that is will enough Americans and forget about those who will stick with trump. Come hell or high water will enough. Americans think that there needs to be accountability and they did a needs to be a judgment based on evidence rather other than on disinformation diversion that they hold them accountable at the polls in November twenty twenty. I think the ultimate test Donald Trump is whether he can get away with us to get a second term-in-office if he does realize what that means that means the dot attempt to disinform to divert triumphs the trump's over the US system system trump's over US values and where America goes next beyond Donald Trump as a system well. It'll be very uncertain and I think well dark times times ahead. If that happens but we're ahead of ourselves let's go back to the fact that we at least have evidence which does point to abuses of power does point to a crime and if people keep focused on that at least there may be some level of accountability in the weeks and months ahead. Scott Lucas. Thanks as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing now with a look at the day's headlines here is Monaco's NOCCO tackles hippie. Thank you Andrew the president of the European Commission. Jean Claude Garcia is doing all he can to get brexit deal and if talks fail it would be the U. K. 's Response Ability Young also told the German newspaper the Abu Allgemeiner that it would be a disaster if the UK leaves the EU without without a deal Saudi Arabia is opening its doors to international tourists for the first time the move is sparse off abroad a push to cut its economic dependence dependence on oil the kingdom is also expected to relax it struck only and dress codes for female visitors will have more on this story of today's business is headlines and today's monocle minute reports that delivery drivers in New York should probably get used to working night shifts. The city council has recently gently approved a bill that will require all deliveries to buildings owned to buy the seat to be made overnight for more on this heads to Monaco dot com forward slash rush minutes. Those are the day's headlines now back to enter. Thanks Marcus now for a look at the business news we are joined by Bloomberg's you and pots Ewan on a number number of fronts Ukraine's President Vladimir Zelinski is having quite a week of it yeah. It's been a pretty Ross in week for him had been carrying all so well for presidents for the president of Ukraine dazzled invested with a flurry of reforms brought by prisoners from Russian captivity. I'm enjoying an approval rating which would make even Vladimir Putin Blush Josh over seventy percent in many polls the former TV comic who of course shots apparent that landslide election has been caught up rather. I'm on winning the Abbot Imagine in this transcript of the fungal visitation with President trump which has been all over the world's media today a lot of bits of that pretty tricky for the Ukrainian any president not least his criticism of the European Union and also of course the business of being off repeatedly to dig up on on Joe Biden but today another economic blow to Ukraine as an International Monetary Fund mission left Kiev today without the preliminary deal for five billion dollars of funding that the Ukrainian government was seeking now. It's discussions on a new program. We're going to continue but the IMF really didn't pull any punches in statement. It says that growth in growth in Ukraine is held back by a week business environment it also cited shortcomings in the legal framework pervasive corruption large parts of the economy dominated by inefficient state-owned enterprises so a bit of a blow for the cranium presidents so far the currency is the best performer against the delays really being a bit of a darling of investors this year but this this is not a welcome news in Kiev and also you into seems to becoming a recurring theme of this spot another large share offer receiving slightly less the teacup that might have been anticipated twenty nineteen was supposed to be Wall Street's obvious J. finally bringing long-awaited public debut share offerings of many of the hottest startups and of course the healthy fees and the deal prestige that come with them for the banks on Wall Street a really hasn't gone as planned a tool now fitness startup. What's up Peleton interactive become the latest major sheriff ring to full flat on its face it drops eleven percent on its first day of trading being the roll? Call of companies are not doing so well in their share off as getting pretty long now we've had uber and lift of course the ridesharing. APPS and Smile Direct Club which sells is a dental products over the Internet shares are all down some thirty percent from their offer prices and of course we importing on monocle about we work the flexible office provider which had me. I mean for the second biggest listing of the year and that's what we put off now and in fact the CO founder Adam Newman has quit as chief executive active over the failure to get the share offer out of the door. the overall the dishes have been lagging behind the market. They've been they climbed just just six and a half percent from their offer prices on average this year the WTA market the S. and P. Five hundred has gained about nineteen percent you in with Bloomberg. Thank you conjoining us. You're listening to the briefing coming soon Monaco Rolex. Bring you the pioneers. The pioneers is a brand new series that tells the stories of people improving the planet. You'll hear how Rolex supports these innovators with whom they share a passion to safeguard the F for future generations gain precious insights into the fresh thinking that his disrupting corrupting received wisdom for the better and learn how Phyllis action continues to be the crucial driver of change the pioneers coming soon to one twenty four You're listening to the briefing with me Andrew Miller. It's time I'm now to take a longer look at the day's news without news panel which today consists of Oscar for your Rivera professor in international law and International Affairs at Birkbeck College and you'll see Mickelberg professor of international relations at Regent's University also a columnist for Arab News now first of all listeners whose memories have not been obliterated by the various political nonsense of recent years may still recall the time at which looked fleetingly like the United States was going to adopt a policy towards Cuba rooted in something other than the fallacy of sunk costs in two thousand fourteen. US President Barrack Obama began a winding down of the half century embargo which had accomplished little little but the isolation of Cuba and the entrenching of the Castros the US has now re sanctioned Ralph Castro for Secretary of the Cuban Communist Party and his children children. This is by way of retribution for Cuba's support for President Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela Oscar. Am I missing anything here or is this just about as petulant and silly as it looks Ralph Castro's support for Nicholas Maduro really make any difference to anything. You're not missing anything anything. Andrew Washington seems to be missing that will Castro is no longer the president of Cuba to be he's still project to to joke elite unless he still has weight of course but it's a falsehood to anyone who knows anything about the internal the politics of Venezuela to argue as Mike Pompeo deed that Issa Cuba who UNICEF propping up my Lulu. Oh Lewis is still there is because of the absolute failure of the opposition led by one why though he is quite surprising thing that these new wave of sanctions takes no account of the fact that two weeks ago every single newspaper in Latin America beginning with Columbia Columbia no sympathisers of the government published pictures in which way door is seen with drug dealers and leaders of the far right wing Win Colombian paramilitary which of course means that he's you know he's acceptance potential acceptance within Venezuela. It's a closer to zero and in fact the government need sign an agreement with sectors of the opposition two weeks ago so no surprises he's here just a new wave of sanctions of course this is more part of the reaction of the trump administration against anything on everything that the Obama Administration did but he has no betting on the situation in Venice when we will come back to that theme short just wanted to follow up this quickly though Oscar you mention the new secretary of State Mike pompeo he has been muttering darkly that Cuba's security forces such as they may be making some sort of contribution to the president medeiros apparatus of repression. Do we know anything about that for sure and does end or does it sound likely well. It is being said are we have evidence of human rights violations within Bene- sweater but what matters in terms of international law human rights is whether these violations relations are being carried out by the government who should be protecting its own people there is there have been reports reports on that we we have no clear evidence of Cuba's engagement with that particular issue what we do a half evidence for is for the fact that this sanctions were will continue to hit the people of Cuba and Venezuela the hardest not the leadership. You'll see also has already raised the the psychodrama that might be underpinning this. We've seen it time and again with President Trump's administration. If if Obama did it we must undo it or override it or I'm Pickett'll destroy. It is that what's going on here. Is it as simple impulse that because this was this was one of Obama's great showpiece foreign policy moments. I I will end this nonsensical blockade of Cuba. I will normalize relations. He went to Cuba in two thousand sixteen. I think off the top of my head the first US president to do that since coolidge is it basically that is just trump trying to to undo Obama. There is element of this because it's the health policies. It's any points system that we know but I think why the moving the model I don't think anyone is a is against it but what happens right now under the trump administration that identify a problem and the prescribe all wrong and and you can go while the world and you see exactly so did restrict the movement of an eighty six years old Lee. They're not a teaser Guinean the Oscars as very much in the bag out. There is the new generation the reason you constitution in in Cuba changes are the changes Saturday at at the rate. It's many of us would like to see maybe not but they'll doing that. In the Cuban way in moving forward allowing private porperty allying investment in Cuba it it opens up in the way they should find the right way for Cuba for the United States to keep on after the pain inflicted on Cuba since one thousand nine hundred sixty them boggled it and they beat the way Paul along a lot of what's happening in Cuba has down to the United States because in the end of the day there is no American foreign policy to with Q. But there is an obsession grows also follow probably goes all the way to the splendid little off eighteen ninety eight and be we are entering the citizen of of of elections in the United States and these plays well in Florida and he's not only compel the speech by John Bolton few months ago when you went to talk about the brigade invaded in the Bay of Pigs and talking about how unfair will the Cubans that the dead mall to ops there then then then then the exile because as it is a football game that you need you too every eleven against eleven so I think look at this as an obsession in the domestic politics has nothing to do with changes either mentally ill or in Cuba well. Let's life seamlessly along on the subject of countries pursuing counterproductive policies for no clear reason and take a look that is to say at the UK and try to see it for the next few minutes as the Non British will season and listeners who've picked up the accents around this table will understand that this panel has obvious abuse advantages on this front a long standing stereotype of Britain's politics is that they are properly British sensible series decorous to coin a phrase strong long and stable. The last few years have been if we might attempt. Here's some British understatement something of a test of these assumptions. So what effect is this having having own brand Britain abroad an Oscar first of all we we should reflect slightly on the events of this week even by the Standards Aww Brexit. How mad has this been as mad as the mad hatter or even worse. I mean let me let me you speak to the reaction in my part of the world in Latin America the widespread reaction in news outlets in in the Americas welcome welcome to the Third World. We've been missing you this. This is Britain's the banana monarchy totally fact among ready to quote a couple a couple of pieces one published by Francisco Theaters in Columbia newspaper espectador another that can be so Moslem former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff who says interview with L. as in both cases what is happening in the UK is being seen in the Americas against the backdrop of the emergence of the far writing the Americas and they see exactly the same elements rightly or wrongly they see exactly the same elements appearing at this point of the Brexit madness crisis these these point of the use of language is not a matter of politeness is not a matter of political correctness. If you take Brazil for instance you can see that hey language has been being used by the bolts on administration to isolate indigenous communities in the Amazon thereby affecting just Brazilians interest but but the entire world we saw it again when we also now does poking the United Nations so for ask that in Americans you know we we've been dealing with this search for quite a few decades in we can identify it a name it for what it is. These are the real life of form of for beginning to look behind deep divisions within the people itself. Probably it also means. We need to talk about the people Iasi is is there much talk in the Middle East as it beholds. What's occurring here assembling some sort of peacekeeping force well. I I was relieved to sit in the release. No one called it's just a British Hamburg really don't want to talk about this anymore but in all seriousness it's buffers and indifference. I think from from Latin in America the the connection with the UK and the colonialists colonist heritage or legacy if you like in in the Middle East because some people think goes as long as the Middle East they say oh we depletes then we sort everything out and now with everyone is watching these in Kobe so this this really belongs to a different era in the UK and look a trade relations between between the UK and the Middle East the strategic relations relations military relations all of this sharing intelligence and all of his own if he call it's an animal or or anything. I guess you know we might have some homeless. Monarchy's you know at the end of the day. This is a serious matter. When you have such a large economies oh no me such a important member of NATO descending into a false and the inability to take decision and the as the parliaments until the middle. I love the night or the early hours of the morning. We followed the ability to take decisions. This is for instance at the time that there are tensions going in the Gulf and part of it. You would like to see Britain. Involvement is this is this is the prime minister. We are going to rely on to to defend some for interest. Maybe not on that subject Oscar if we can narrow this down to the figure of Boris Johnson who has spent his entire life playing the part of the specifically English in fact not even British but specifically typically English caricature of the sort of artfully dishevelled upper-class eccentric it. It's a it's a a reliable trope of of British fiction British literature of British movies. It is a it's a figure with which the whole world is somehow familiar but does the will take it seriously as the leader of what is as Yossi remind still in theory at least and extremely serious country well. I'm sure Andrew as many of us did you witnessed bodies. varies a speech in in New York when in after after he was told of the decision by the Supreme Court he sounded very jetlagged not only that at some point look at the audience this reaction at some point you know the viewer begins to wonder I are they laughing at his jokes or are they laughing at him. at some point it becomes the latter. I'm afraid that East clearly the case. I mean it takes a lot of cars for letting Americans to you know to joke and say you know welcome to the world. Now you see now you you you. You see how how it is like but again the more serious part of these is a we heard that we are beginning to see the how are you most beloved principal separation of powers and so on and so forth are just not nearly enough. They're not you know ready an APP to the task of taking a decision when the people itself divided so we we need to begin to rethink all of these concepts including the concept of popular sovereignty and so on and and so forth or to put it in a battle brats famous temps. We might need to elect ourselves another people well. Let's move along finally on on the news panel to Saudi Arabia literally if we found it the hitherto inhospitable kingdom is to liberalize its visa regime in a bid to open up a tourist. I industry not exclusively reliant on religious pilgrims visas will be offered to the citizens of forty nine countries yet to be named and some concessions to visitors his will also be available. Female tourists will not be confined to the full abaya and will even be permitted to travel by themselves golly. Imagine the ban on alcohol will be upheld however Yossi you are you tempted by the prospect of a big side holiday in Jeddah. I would like to Google for holiday resorts on the let's see I know I know the Red Sea from the other side so I wouldn't mind to see from Saudi Arabia but you know it. I think we have to take the reforms in Saudi Arabia seriously. I know sometimes we take very Weston's attitude and say oh. Why can't they be will we are but the same time if you look at the reforms in the West they took very long time between the American constitution until that's you know African American didn't even have to give a seat in Alabama true enough and so sometimes we we need to look at the direction is the right direction but not always to push on on the pace even if you like to see a much faster pace of of a foam but this is another move forward in Saudi Arabia again it might look for us really small steps women but having a allowed to travel getting their own passport but all of these are moves that shows that under the counts monarchy the accounts monarch and all of MBA's there is a way folding. Why not I think the motorist coming there. The more engagement it more it opens up and the the changes that you know would like to see I I did want to broaden this idea out a little bit to talk about countries which are difficult to get into with the exception of a few countries like Saudi Arabia Travel and the acquisition of visas has become much more easy generally than it used to be but I can remember when it was quite frequently a terrific past Oscar. What's been the hardest country you found to get into all remember. I'm Colombian so it was pretty much every it until very recently now hilariously it seems to see if my Colombian passport my become more handy than it might British one. If brexit keeps going this way because we can now travel without visa through the Schengen Treaty countries so the walls time still zeal is the case that traveling to the United States very very complicated for Columbia see still very difficult. It is still it is difficult for letting American students who want to come to the United Kingdom to get their visas very very complicated unnecessarily certainly complicated and he's affecting that sector of the economy if you want to put it that way so yeah I remember very very well you know after nine eleven when I was very nervously passing my Colombian passport all of a sudden. I'm told Okay you go. You know Paul McKenna. I mean you'll see as a journalist. I've attempted to get visas to a few places which clearly won't K. North Korea is I found the the two impossible Belarus I tried with and they did that thing of just never quite saying no but never saying yes obviously in the hope that you would would get bored and go away eventually and in fairness I did so it worked Israel. I have found on a couple of occasions very hard country to get out of having been I love guests exactly they just wanted to be to stay at the airport that little bit longer and have you found yourself facing any particular difficulties getting in anywhere anywhere. We've easily passport still many countries. This is one way ticket indeed supposed to be at the expense of the government wherever they will walk me so there's a lot of countries that still for example why did admit anybody with. Israeli stamp in their policy yes but you know if I want for my research which would be fascinating fascinating. Dakota Iran probably not a good idea Lebanon and you know there is a of of of countries that on these can do it on the British passport but not on Monday they said on the other end unlike Columbia. The lot of of of of countries that welcome Israel is even without visas. I think they still you know I cherish my British possibles. Come to traveling because it's way easier then at least to some parts of the world we've we've they really want we physically to security and sometimes over over offers doing that in. Israeli airport in wants you to spend money and we eventually let you go yeah we. Columbia's are popular now. It seems yeah philly Matza upbeat note Oscar Rivera and you'll see Michael. Thank you both very much for joining. You're listening to the briefing on monocle twenty four You are listening to the briefing monocle twenty four tomorrow. Afghans will vote in the country's fourth presidential election as is always the case with after an election. Visiting a polling station will be depressingly far from a risk free exercise. The country has recently been plagued by a series of deadly attacks by the Taliban and they are not noted enthusiasts of Democracy President Ashraf. Johnny is seeking a second five-year term a field of fifteen other candidates hope to thwart him while I'm joined now by Lynn O'Donnell who was AP's bureau chief in Afghanistan Afghanistan for a number of years Lynn first of all to that point about Election Day security how dangerous election day in Afghanistan going to be well as you said it's quite dangerous simply because the Taliban have made it very clear that they going to launch attacks against people devoted. They don't support democracy. They don't recognize the government they see. President Ghani as an American pop ish and any participation in in democratic activity as betrayal of Islamic values now when people go to vote they line up and often they line up for hours and hours so they become standing targets August and the Talibans history of attacking Election Day Abu Tinsel is is a ATTRAC- history so and yes. It's dangerous to vote in Afghanistan. Those those extraordinary indeed mortal risks that many many Afghans willing to run in order to cast their vote are of course both heartening and humbling but when you were working there what was your sense from speaking to people of why they thought it was worth taking this risk a lot of people have signed up to the democratic projects that was introduced after the Taliban routed in two thousand one the I I am election was in two thousand four and there was a phenomenal turn out there was a more than eighty percent of people who were eligible to vote and since then the Afghan people just become weary of the corruption and the difficulty in the lies and the g body associated with the with the count don't end ballot stuffing and the fraud. That's been involved in so over the years since then. You said you know this is a fool's. There's also parliamentary elections and district. Council elections and participation has just fallen away to listen forty percent. I think that in two thousand fourteen which was the last presidential election there was like thirty five percents people getting sick of being had and they're expecting the same thing now so yea I mean we've seen it in in Iraq and other troubled countries people do want to get out and have their voices heard but if they think that the voice is not being being hood that they just shouting into the wind then they get tired of it and then they don't go on the other hand. You got a lot of them. Media reports over the last few Diet coaching people saying I'm not going to be bothered. I'M NOT GONNA go out vote but as I found when I was living there an Afghan can tell you one thing and do another thing thing when he's changed his mind a couple of minutes later and that's not an indictment John Character. It's just the way it is so people might say they won't go and vote and then they will the backdrop or backdrop to this election is of course the peace talks between the United States and the Taliban recently abrogated at the United States insistence assistance but it's clear I think to everybody that the United States has long since lost interest in Afghanistan and doesn't really want all that much to do with it anymore is there fear among Afghans and especially among the Afghan government and the people who've worked for it and the people who have signed up for the idea in the structures they might be on the verge bring sold out by America a very much the the prices the so-called peace process that was initiated by President Trump and carried out by his envoy. Zalmay Khalilzad worried an awful lot of people in Afghanistan women's groups civil rights workers people who signed up to the you know the constitutional rights that they've been given journalists freedom of speech advocates people were very worried that they were being sold out by Khalilzad. WHO's a very very ambitious socal diplomats who doesn't really have a track record of success behind him but really wanted to come out of it with a peace deal so you know what he didn't do was included the Afghan people and the government in that process that was sidelined Ashraf Ghani's government was utterly de legitimized as these were going on and if a win they start up again there is a fear that this will also be the case people are under any illusions about what the Alabama no matter what they say on a matter what Zamel Zalmay Khalilzad state what about them they misogynistic violent Islamist extremists who reached the country in the five years that they were in power and there's a lot of date memory in Afghanistan honest about that so just finally how confident will President Ashraf Ghani be about winning the Presidency Again Dude yes. I think he can be confident. He's going up again against Abdullah. Abdulah who has paid his chief executive which basically means Prime Minister without the title title for the last five years Ghani as the incumbent has the running and I think he probably has the support of the international community as well I think it may be a close run thing. We might see re page of twenty fourteen where they were very close but I doubt very much. We're going to have a second run-off this time. I think they'll be one the weather. It's fraught with fraud which is more likely than nausea. I think Johnny will probably prevail and he will be feeling vindicated by the collapse. The trump pays if it's with the Taliban and he will want to be the man who brings pace to the country Leno Donald. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing on monocle twenty twenty four this is the briefing and proceeding seamlessly on the theme of countries trees beginning with a which are having elections this weekend to Austria specifically to the Kronen Zeitung Australia's most widely read newspaper with an extraordinary daily circulation accusation of around seven hundred thousand copies Kronen Zeitung is aimed at a broad section of society and Serves Pretty Traditional tabloid fair but because of its reach it also has the power to on horse politicians and change public opinion this power might yet prove deadly for Australia's far right Freedom Party which lost the the newspapers support following the visa gate scandal Monaco's Alexi Korolyov reports from Vienna. Ooh This is the infamous it'd be a gate video brought down the Australian government in May named after this Spanish island where it was recorded footage shows former vice chancellor Hans Christian talk talking turn turn alleged Russian investor. The investor turned out to be an actress office to buy a large stake in the corner site on tabloid and changes Detoro Oreo position to openly support his far-right Freedom Party in exchange taller promises her lucrative construction contracts. That's corruption eruption pure and simple but why the corn settled. It's just the basic numbers. There are still about more than two million people who read on content on every day and on the weekends it's even more. It's two point six million. We have above eight million inhabitants in Australia. So according to Tatton just reaches a big part of the population Gal Gekas bad guy is deputy editor in Chief of dossier vienna-based Investigative magazine that devoted a special issue to the corn inside hunk earlier. This year for longtime has been. I'm just saying that as party. You can't really survive in Austria. If you have to Conan's against you but Conan's Adam has always done very cleverly or very well they have identified the mood kind of the general mood in the public and have reported accordingly. What special corn inside is that if they identify topic if they started campaign the whole newspaper rights for this cold so you have the reports with also the opinion pieces the all aim with the same direction. That's why it's so powerful commonly known as the corner the coinciding first came out in the nineteen hundred in nineteen fifty nine it was acquired by journalists. Hans Deante who led it till his death in twenty ten when it was taken over by his son Christoph the newspapers political sympathies detoro policies policies have fluctuated over the years but the freedom policy has always been. It's friend Gayle gekas beggar for three decades. Now the CONAN's atom has been in sort orphan alliance with the Freedom Party Australia the goals of the newspaper and the Party. I think just matched both anti immigration. They're both can't blade blade with antisemitic symbols and codes then it. Beatha Gate happened and the Cornyn site and was ambiguous in its response. I think Um stuff and even the chief editor in chief of cornerstone I think they felt personally betrayed by style and by the Freedom Party in general because there has been sort of loop trust that has been built up that kids that I think is really harmful. This shouldn't be such a close relationship between the Party and the newspaper but now they really felt betrayed it and I think they kind of reacted like a friend who who feels betrayed by his best friend wrote pieces to promote critical. I think today's after the pizza's scandal they you had the headline on the first page that said this is this is the end of the year so what does all that mean for the freedom policy and for the Sunday elections. I think this election election we'd show if the corner still as powerful as it used to be if I would have to guess I would say it will not harm the free party matronly and the main reason for that is that we don't have to say media landscape is ten or twenty years ago their social media and the Freedom Party's especially strong on social media. They have their own TV station. They have really huge facebook pages and so they don't rely as much on the traditional media as they usurped except whatever the power of social media all Austrian parties need the support of the CONAN's Sytem if they want to succeed it still the main source of news used for staggering number of Austrians so has the Freedom Party shot itself in the foot there. We'll find out on Sunday for Monaco in Vienna. I'm Alexey Korolyov. Thanks Alexi. You're listening to the briefing coming soon. Monaco Rolex bring you the pioneers for the founder founder of Rolex Hands Villes dove. The world was like a living laboratory he began to use it as a testing ground for his watches from the nineteen thirties sending them to the most extreme locations supporting explorers ventured into the unknown but the world has changed as the twentieth century unfolds exploration for pure discovery has given way to it creation nation as a means to preserve the natural world to make the planet perpetual lend more with the pine is coming soon to wonderful twenty four Tom now on the briefing to take a look at the day's newspapers joined once again by monocle twenty four page Reynolds. I can't believe the whole front page. News is just now occurred to me we need. We need a jingle and a theme lacking on inside defense. Okay well until we have your jingle. In place we all just kind of have to correct on and review what he's actually in the newspapers Where are we starting. We're GONNA START WITH A store. That's GONNA. Most of the newspapers are following every lead on today as well. That's of course the trump impeachment story most papers a- leading on information that White House officials potentially attempt to cover up this phone call that trump had with Ukrainian landscape but I found to slightly more interesting takes one the first one in the F. T. trump's gondola leaves. Ukraine president caught in a trap so this Oth- coup is is essentially saying this is a delicate going to be a delicate balancing act for new presidents. Alinsky overcooked strikes me as quite the understatement indeed he's he's sort of came to his presence presidency promising to bring peace in eastern Ukraine so he can't afford alienate trump a US leader whose softer on Russia's Putin not at this time also documents how Ukrainian officials McCain to build a chemistry between Kiev and Washington and the article says this has now been poisoned poisoned at a critical juncture. It's a weird bind. I think trump puts all other foreign leaders in because everyone now I think understands the way to get him on board which is just to grovel and flatter but obviously when that the reality of that is presented an transcribed or annotated you do they just end up looking like well like a grobler and a flatter exactly and I think they all schools points this out quite passionately one analyst noting the while it's it's important to keep good relations with the current president. It's also really crucial to maintain a bipartisan support something there's Alinsky might struggle with and it's not just these hopes for a coordinated Western pressure on Moscow. That's at stake but his reputation is a liberal reformer if he looks like he's got a acquiescing to trump's demands in any way to the Ukrainian. AM people that says hey it will look like he's not serious about judicial reform and fighting corruption. You know the very promises. He came to presidency on. What else do we have in commercially indeed so I think if you're looking to understand sort of trump's fixation on Ukraine I would suggest having a look at the front page of the New York Times the headline fixation on Ukraine led to crisis for trump. This ought to links all back to a pool manager for the Clinton emails and two thousand sixteen election in interference on trucks trump's personal were redid. Giuliani's efforts in the pasta to collect information and tried to push the Ukrainian government issue corruption interface. investigations are politically beneficial to one cannot at the moment possibly read enough about Rudolph Giuliani I I am. I'm so looking forward to the bio. Pic can't imagine who they go to get to play him. Does it cost any particular light on why Giuliani is doing and saying being the things that Giuliani is doing because it is it is remarkable. He's the PR the personal attorney of the president of the United States and he has basically gone full loyal normal hops off the simpsons. Yeah 'cause that's pretty crazy. Actually has so Giuliani basically started this. I guess sort of information collecting effort in Ukraine kind of response to the star of the Mueller investigation and he's saying I decided to do this because I couldn't couldn't get law. Enforcement agencies interested in doing their job. Arba just put out publicly and I would see if anyone was interested in it so I mean I surely within that. We kind of see the the things he's investigating. Perhaps aren't particularly above board. I do want to mention my favorite Giuliani quote from the last twenty four hours and this was cited by Elena plot whose the White House correspondent in the United States. She spoke to him by phone yesterday. Giuliani's quote to her and I quote precisely was it is impossible that the whistle blow oh is a hero and I'm not and I will be the hero exclamation mark these morons when this is over. I will be the hero that all sounds normal. Doesn't it you you couldn't screw up to it's pretty crazy but and a couple of other sort of interesting insights with the New York Times article that's cool not only did sort of trump and Giuliani sh the freezing of AIDS in Ukraine but also documents trump's outraged outrage that removal of the country's top prosecutor Yuri let Sankoh widely. I is believed in Ukraine to be corrupt who was Kinda wanted Giuliani's Powell's so I suggest having a having a diving into that later story that I was very keen to talk about is in Japan today which which we must now get to this is a I have to say the angle on the you know the life and times of the late President Jack Cheer that I- fallen was not expecting and I feel terrible that I failed to mention this in my monocle twenty four obituary of him. I I really yeah. I didn't see coming. We'll it really was just in this today. Yeah please do introduce the premise right so so this great story in Japan today online fine the headline Chirac who Japan moans Chirac sumo ultra-fine for many in Japan French statesman will not not be remembered for his opposition or support for European unity but for his deep love and respect of the sport of sumo he was a sumo megaphone on here actually insisted that the from Suma he learned everything he needed to know in life on a party. He wondered whether he could have made the grade. He said maybe if I'd started young he Musa in one thousand nine hundred ninety. I was told enough as for the weight well you can put on with time. Let's say you started young started eating cakes. I don't I mean it season absolutely extraordinary story because as you point out this is not merely the head of a foreign government visiting country and taking some vague passing interest because you have to do that when you visit a foreign country that will you out in front of their incomprehensible national sport. You have to sit there and watch yes. This is this is marvelous. I find genuinely very interesting. I was massively into went went much further. His interest in sumo apparently started in the seventy S A couple of highlights from this piece the French embassy in Tokyo while he was in office how to send him dispatches of the results of each day. So as soon as the session was through he also arranged with French broke Costa's to obtain the tapes of the matches before they went on air while he was mayor of Paris organized the first soon sumo tournament in in the city and he even named his dog Suma. Finally we do have to note that. His passion was not shared by one of his success Nicolas Sarkozy who is quoted here. I can't do a Frenchaccent which you need for this quote please if he would do the honors you can do the accidental not do the accent but it's a great lawn. It's I'll do the line without the accident the line from Sakai's easiest. How can anyone be fascinated by these battles between fat guys with slid down. Tells sumo wrestling is really not a sport for the intellectuals. maybe ALBERICI. Fiona Wilson would disagree with that. I she's a big fan of sumo so perhaps we'll be following this story page Reynolds. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing This is the briefing with me Andrew Miller and finally today regular listeners. We'll be accustomed adhering at around this time on a Friday a selection of Julius music in the hallways of Financial Augusta Pacheco's global countdown however phenomenon is on holiday and so here is some dubious music. I've chosen myself. The Australian state of Victoria is certainly unusual probably unique in observing two public mccollough days for sporting events one. The first Tuesday of November is Melbourne Cup Day in fantasy. The rest of the country pretty much takes the afternoon off for oh the rice as well the other the last Friday in September is grand final eve the day before the climactic match of the Australian football league eggs season for which more than one hundred thousand people will fill the Melbourne cricket ground to watch the Premiership decided the football. They're watching hiring is of course Australian Rules Football Australia's peculiar passion the code correctly described by one trillion prime minister Sir Robert Menzies as the the greatest winter game devised by mortal man the club's contesting the grand final this year Richmond from the inner suburbs of Melbourne founded in eighteen eighty five and greater western Sydney from the outer suburbs of Sydney who only joined the AFL in two thousand and twelve a creation of the league. Get spectacular expense with generous assistance to further the cause of Australian rules in territory traditionally dominated by rugby league so there there are many subtexts to Saturday but one of the Wieder is that this clash between the Tigers and the giants is also a contest of the two best. AFL Are you fill club songs. He's Richmond's yeah and here is greater western. Sydney's from in the club songs are curious quirk of the AFL. All eighteen clubs have won and they are braid and bellowed by fans in the stands and players in the dressing rooms in the event of victory. The League's older establishment teams have mostly borrowed their's from familiar tunes. Jillang's is the toreador song from bees as common law. They calling woods started life as the music whole standard goodbye. Dolly Gray in Carlton's stately anthem is the minstrel Choon Lily of Laguna it and the saints of killed a a serenade. The historically infrequent wins with an obvious choice in the canonical versions were recorded in the early one thousand nine hundred seventy s by choir of Melbourne jazz players wrangled by a record record company called fable the expansion of what was once the Victorian Football League to become the Australian football league during the one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred ninety s sought what new teams added to the competition and therefore the necessity of new songs in several regrettable instances original works were commissioned these all absolutely sucked and indeed suck still non worse than the non more eighty s abomination which phone fares the West Coast Eagles onto the field old goes greater western Sydney's splendid swaggering stump. It is the work of Harry Anger Solve Melbourne rock band the Cat Empire the no great football fan and understood what was marvelous about the original club songs an album is that blend of Macho Braggadocio and arch high camp into something that sounds like it might have welcomed Soviet tank divisions back from the battle of Kursk Greater Western. Sydney are a new club with few fans and little history. Richmond are an old club but one of the best supported in the country with a glorious heritage the two thousand nine hundred nine grand final this Saturday shapes as quite a game innovation Vatian versus tradition money versus passion Sydney versus Melbourne but whoever wins will have an appropriately rousing song to sing when the final final Siren's gone ah and that is all for today Richmond to win. I think by probably six or seven goals today's edition of the briefing was produced juice by Reese James and Daniel Beach Research by Baluchi and we'll Higginbotham studio manager well Steph Chungu. I'm Andrew Miller. Thanks for listening have a terrific weekend

President Trump US president trump Ukraine Cuba Saudi Arabia Rudy Giuliani United Kingdom Andrew Miller trump Joe Biden Oscar Australia vice president America Barrack Obama official Taliban President Ghani
Monday 30 September

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:45 min | 1 year ago

Monday 30 September

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the thirtieth of september two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four the globalist an association with UBS hello this is the globalist coming to you live from midori house in london i'm emma nelson and a very warm welcome today's program coming out we'll opposition and pays ps seize control of britain's parliament to stop the UK leaving the EU without to deal or should remain as look to hungary's president viktor orban is the greatest threat to the british crushing out also coming up five years since protesters he's their umbrellas to shield themselves from tear gas we look at the way hong kong's pro democracy movement has had to adapt to stay alive all that plus look three mondays newspapers and the latest news in australia too that's all ahead right here on the globalist live from london could the british parliament beyond the cusp of yet another showdown and leadership battle the weekend saw gathering storm opposition voices who said they were prepared to call vote of no confidence in the british government meanwhile there's been the suggestion that while superhuman efforts being made by some in the UK to stop britain exiting the EU without a deal by october the thirty first hungary's president viktor orban may try to veto any delay the forcing no deal brexit from the european site which joining me in the studio as it's a political journalist terry on the line is vincent mcilvanney urine eases UK correspondent he's currently at the conservative party conference in manchester fucking t. both i'm sorry could you just briefly explain to explain to us what has happened this weekend to think that we might be in for nothing showdown well i say before the weekend we know that the conservative party conference is going ahead despite the fact that parliament wouldn't vote for a recess in order to have the conservative party conference and originally it was discussed the during the time the conservatives were away in manchester they would discuss less contentious sort of cross party issues things like the domestic abuse spill but then over the weekend we heard suggestions particularly from the SNP and from nicholas nicholas sturgeon the the opposition parties ought to be talking about having another vote of no confidence in the prime minister so the next stage is not not really all they're going to be meeting in westminster today in this so called rebel alliance over main alliance on the opposition parties to talk about what's going to happen happen next and one of the things that they are considering at the moment i think you know i get the impression that the vote of no confidence is actually not so high on the agenda for this coming week but one of the ideas that they might try to move the date in low that boris johnson is required to ask the EU for an extension unless he says he's going to find ways not do it move it back from october the nineteenth tried to get this deadline earlier in october and the reason that they give that is that they are worried that if the prime minister tries to defy the lord and there wouldn't be enough time after the european summit and before the brexit deadline line in order to be able to challenge decision in court vincent normally when a prime minister is asked whether he would like to have a vote of no confidence thrown in his direction he or indeed she normally box in horror the interview with the prime minister this weekend suggested that he actually quite relish the challenge yeah it is an unusual situation that we find ourselves in the prime minister is very much setting this up as a forest johnson versus the establishment mint election at the other parties of the ones who are frustrating the whale he wants to end up in a general election but at the moment is unable to get one and so although the prime minister knows that it would be embarrassing to lose votes no confidence really on top of all the embarrassments have in the past month losing seven votes losing his majority losing his brother losing the supreme court case it's just one more thing that he thinks that he can weather because he is such a teflon politician he's an astonishingly resilient man i mean given the fact that this weekend we had in addition to the issue of vote of no-confidence terry we had him sankey was a model of restraint even when he was discussing cussing the fact that he used the word humbug in response to allegations of female MP's getting death threats because of brexit he then his sir withstood allegations of impropriety with of with an american businesswoman plus the front page of the sunday times yesterday suggested that he he had groped and other journalists while as a lunch a couple of about twenty years ago none of these seem to have affected his absolute determination and and unquenchable thirst for brexit no i mean again we keep saying in these discussions that other politicians are other talk these would have caused them serious problems they would have probably considered resigning i mean in regards to you know the allegations of groping at lunch one thousand nine hundred journalists involved too said in this is definitely her recollection of what happened in her memory of the event is presumably she says better than boris johnson's comes in response to number ten suggestion that these allegations are untrue up but i don't think these issues have gone away i mean it was interesting that even one cabinet minister matt matt hancock said he knew the journalists concerned and the cina he found her to be completely trustworthy and i think actually the more serious in a way i mean obviously that is a very in a very serious issue and other ministers in the past of hats resign over similar allegations the connection of the possible we'll financial connection with jennifer curie this american businesswoman who was based in shortage and the question of whether she got privileged access access whether she got grants that she wasn't entitled to get i don't think these have gone away yet despite boris johnson in saying that he there was no impropriety involved i think people will continue to work around this i think is going to be a continuing problem for boris johnson esu what women think of him and and what is the mood at the conservative party conference given what do other MP's and other pe- met party members think of the way that things are going well i mean i mean here the party conference there is one mantra being put out everywhere and that get brexit don it's on all of the signs and you're hearing it multiple times being said in any the institute menaces all being given and i think yesterday you know we have quite a lot of protests here in manchester and people being confronted in the streets about brexit and i think both both sides off the with having to fight this fight day in day out they were fighting on the streets yesterday arguing with each other you know there have been debates around conference that i've heard it definitely feels like the kind of member who is coming to consecutive posse conference and then you have to be a pretty die hard fan anyway overpasses come to a political conference they aren't you know great days out and has to be said unless you're a political eek but they're all kind of more of the right wing of the party who are coming to this conference this this year feels and i think that everyone is frustrated trying to talk about the policies but none of that is really cutting through whilst brexit question is still going on and with boris johnson remember illness personal side this is the party which was given total straitlaced character jeremy hunt to his happily married has children's opens new allegations of any infidelity party ever and they voted two to one for the other guy knowing his full history and knowing that all of this stuff might welcome out because because a lot of it was common knowledge before he was elected and knowing that there is possibly more success as well and this is absolutely playing into the hands of the conservative leadership isn't tara given the fact that this vote of confidence that could come this week there is a high possibility that where they go to general election the poorest johnson would enjoy a resounding victory given the fact that the rhetoric that he's using the incredibly strong powerful image mitch that his projecting is playing absolutely into into his supporters hands they love him i think i mean as been says if you go if you would conservative party conference offers you can find a lot of people in the room who do love him and the air opinion poll suggests that the despite everything despite everything that has happened in the last few weeks the conservative party is still ahead in the polls with labour and the liberal democrats pretty much level pegging further down that's possible an election leads still leads to sort of an inconclusive outcome come i think we'll ever election we have in the next few weeks or months is going to be a very hard one to predict just because the votes are going to break in a in a really untypical way but yes one of the risks of having a vote of no confidence is that you know the whole idea of brexit extension just get sidelines that you can't you know trying to force the prime minister into agreeing this extension or or some interim prime minister perhaps if he were to go is a difficult thing to do in the face of somebody the who has not really accepted the supreme court judgement said he acted unlawfully over prairie gatien you know this is someone who was prepared to bend if not break the rules in the procedure of getting brexit done so it's a tricky game to play vincent let's talk about this impending deadline of the united united kingdom scheduled departures the thirty first of october parliament as suggested or has that she created a law which present prevents the united kingdom from crashing out without dale boris johnson said he'd rather die in a ditch than for that to happen and there is now mentioned of foreign european european leaders having discussions uh-huh perhaps with the united kingdom victorian from hungary has been mentioned as one of those who could in fact willfully veto any extension of article fifty and forced the british to crash out without a deal but it being the europeans volt what what have you heard about this i mean i just i the only UK domestic excites a former prime minister john major has suggested some privy council a paik rules could be used by the prime minister to try to suspend this lauren get around this rule rule that way and there are socks that opposition parties will possibly kind of tough some kind of emergency amendment to that legislation whereby the most senior civil servants in the land hand might actually be then authorized to sign the lesser incentive are johnson won't but his hands of the kind of foreign side i mean victory van is a perennial problem for the european union i'm not sure how serious a threat this is from him to do this may just be that he's trying to get some concessions out of the EU elsewhere and and so he decided to play this card in order for them to back off on some of the problems they've been causing for him in other areas or it may be you know there are he is on the rise of politics there are links across right wing policies in the across the world right now and stick the across europe and america the kind kind of people steve bannon is one character who has been proven to being contacts with pundits boris johnson prize in going into number ten downing street and he there's also been active in european politics and particularly in hungary as well dealings with the government so this could be some kind of move that's trying to be played by back channels like this but i'm not sure how much of a threat i mean when you think about how france and germany will come deal with hungary three i think the cost of them might be more than they're willing to risk when it comes to doing this does destabilize the EU point of view doesn't it terry yes i mean it's interesting i think the last last time that this was floated a couple of weeks ago the possibility it was hungary's own for minister said look it's not going to be down to us ultimately it is going to be the bigger countries countries france and germany that decide although in technically any one country could veto britain's requests for brexit extension seeming seaming that that request is actually made these things tend to be done by consensus yes and hungary would have to consider if they were going to consider doing that what the trade offs for them would be is exactly is finished said in terms of you know what france germany might say if if they were minded to accept it and then other countries tried to stop it you know the these summits nor only about one issue brexit it's just one thing happening there's always other things in play as well and it's quite a high risk thing for another country to do do but then people playing for high stakes moment terry's destiny and vincent machiavelli thank you both for joining us on monocle twenty four breath eight thirteen in zero seven thirteen hit in london you're listening to the globalist with me melson now are we looking at a showdown between the protesters justice and police in hong kong with the fifth anniversary of the umbrella movement just passed and the seventieth anniversary of communist rule in china coming up there was fresh unrest on the the streets of hong kong this weekend with tig and water cannon fired at demonstrators join me on the line from hong kong it's monocle james chambers welcome back to the program james just describe the scenes of violence again from this weekend there was a real edge to them wasn't there yes normally on a monday morning hong kong's the very good job of cleaning up from the protests during the weekend but today it still looks like a a bit of a mess out there they're kind of loose bricks everywhere the city seems to be covered in graffiti at the moment there's there's all kinds of posters denouncing communist china and president xi jinping and this all came from from the weekend which into started on friday night and continued into saturday and sunday in recognition of few different anniversaries as as you said the the umbrella movement to start the umbrella five years ago being the the big one there was it's kind of usual story in terms of clashes between police and protesters rest is tear gas being thrown by the police petrol bombs being thrown by protesters one police officer undergo please fight alive around in the air an awful lot of arrests were made and for us i guess the big one is is coming tomorrow and and perhaps they might have a suspicion that people you would have perhaps been preparing for it and kept their powder dry over the weekend but actually that wasn't the case they were they were out in force again it was a very busy weekend and there's a slight lull today but we're all looking nervously anxiously tomorrow was suggesting that this weekend's protests which were widespread and included it both families marching to people throwing molotov cocktails as you just described and was acting as a dress rehearsal for what could happen tomorrow well i don't know whether it's a dress rehearsal because i feel like they're pretty much used to what protesting enter what's been going on this clashes following a similar model a similar routine it i don't think the over the weekend it was any different into what we've seen in the last few weeks or even months but that doesn't mean that we should rest easy about tomorrow there's there is a there is a nervous feeling in cities today i think the weekend sounded like fit felt like business as usual but businesses building up to something big and i don't know quite what's going to happen tomorrow but i it doesn't it doesn't it feels like it's going to be big it feels like it's going to be a step up from what we've what we've seen so far and how important is it for china to use this opportunity it's the seventieth anniversary of communist rule in china the anniversary anniversary of it tomorrow it very much wants to consider it as a celebration for everything that china's stand for how is that being played out in hong kong we have the protesters which are making enormous news all over the world but what does beijing doing to try to change the mood where you're woah what in hong kong you you you wouldn't even know that it's going to be the seventieth anniversary tomorrow because any signs that we're put up to celebrated ratings have been torn down an unburnt over the weekend in china it's quite the opposite you wouldn't know there's anything going on in hong kong they keeping that under wraps and it's all all about the the anniversary tomorrow there's all kind of bunting is up and posters and all kinds of flowers and celebrations so it is it is a tale of two different two different different cities the but the battles going to be played out in the international arena beijing can control coverage on its home turf it can and make sure that whatever happens in hong kong more doesn't spoil the birthday party for for people in china but to be honest they really care about and whatever will be watching is how this plays he's out in the international media and of course to a going to be linked there's going to be scenes of choreographed celebration beijing and they're going to cut to the chaos in in hong kong and obviously the the the case in hong kong is what everyone is going to be remembering so the protests are going to be able to kind of poke beijing in the eye tomorrow beijing zhang won't won't be happy with it and then we'll all be thinking what comes next what what's going to be the reaction from beijing tennis a little bit more about the the way that beijing camden camden with this in in hong kong i mean we have seen the focus very much on carrie lam the hong kong leader she has been in many people's eyes discredited but is there anything that the authorities in hong kong can now do to to stop what is planned for tomorrow others and being heavy handed because those a police ban on the protests this weekend which were openly defied what what do they have what's the authorities have left to play well in terms of what's going to happen tomorrow laura they've got there's there's nothing they can do other than respond to events on the ground you know i feel like it's going to get very ugly very quickly tomorrow there's going to be the it's going to be a lot more extreme we've seen i i believe in it'll be a lot more clashes between police and protests nothing's going to change is we're going to see the same scenes role again the question is you know we'll escalate to a level where people do die it it is amazing that over four formats nothing nothing like that has happened in hong kong he just look at what's been going on in indonesia with their protests and riots and two students were killed we haven't had that that those those very sad events happen in hong kong but it wouldn't take much for it to get to that stage and and that would escalate things even more so when it comes to what's going to happen tomorrow that's just that's just going to play out like it has before and the police and the protest going to clash all across the city and i do feel like it's going to be a long day and a lot of AM and a lot of carnage when it comes to off after that the hong kong government has not offered any any solutions carrie lam dotted supposedly listening to the hong kong in her consultations but all of that was three or four hours of hong kong is telling her how how terrible she's at her job so she's hes- hesitated when it comes to if invoking emergency powers so short of that that that doesn't seem to be any solutions on the table of the more of the same so here in hong kong we're all trying to get through tomorrow and then we'll see what happens next james chambers in hong kong thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty-four you're listening to the globalist UBS has a nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries nine hundred of the sharpest moins and freshest i think in the world of finance find out how we can help you in contact with us at UBS dot com welcome back a little later on today's program will find out about the return of the satirical programme spitting image plus we head to australia the latest news but first voters in tunisia go to the polls this week tune is being the arab world's democratic secular state and the starting point of the arab spring but there are warnings at the country's fragile democracy hangs in the balance poverty hunger and lack of opportunity are still huge problems one of the leading candidates for the presidency is running his this campaign from a jail cell where he trial for money laundering and corruption but compassion is is situation with that of egypt wants another site of popular uprising and he sign of dissent they sent to ever is being cracked down upon with violence and arrests well i'm joined by salma el-watani he's a writer poet speak and broadcaster he covered the two thousand eleven cairo protests i welcome back to the studio so just explain to bring us up to date with tunisia because i think from the outside you often think will visit is secular democratic state it's it's fine it's going to the polls but that isn't really the case is it yeah i think tim is year is kind of upheld as perhaps the country that started all often kind of was the catalyst for the rest of the arab spring and they're the last kind of freehold of democracy shall we say because they don't have that grueling dictatorship so lots of people have looked in his ear but the truth is that tunisia is a country that is logistically prepared for democracy crecy or for ruling or there have the infrastructure for it and he just had the people awaiting who are presidential candidates ones in prison and they don't have you've got mental experience they've never they've never been in positions of government in that way so it's really then difficult to to look at them and say well they're going to uphold hold democracy across the arab world that's a huge expectation for people who've never been in government positions before and we've seen it in democracy not necessarily flourish it's in democracy crecy grow however you have that issue that the problems that many people suggested democracy would fix have not gone away and and gymnasium people's need is greater than ever yeah absolutely the cost of living is extremely high unemployment rates exponentially benchley hi so the standard of living isn't really guess they've had revolution and overthrow dictatorship but their standard of living hasn't gotten any any better in this kind of this assumption that once we have democracy anywhere it will automatically fix the economy or fixing employment rates and we all know that's not true you tell us for what might happen tells about the candidates neither one of them is imprisoned but was raises neighbor for money but also the idea that when you give people exercise people exercise the democratic right right often they vote for democracy to be rolled back slightly i mean what is the likelihood for this to happen in tunisia was not question is not great question i think it's really difficult to call currently just because we do have potential candidates candidates that on really in a position to then go out campaigning to talk to to kind of lead the front of their of their political campaigns so that's really difficult nicole to find out exactly that policies whether out with things what they plan to do what they hope saw and everyone is looking on a ground level like you said people are hungry there is a there is a desperate need poverty is extremely high there is a need for for the simple things yes we need to talk to presidential candidates about the economy about ah plans but actually i think a lot of people on the ground just looking for a better standard of living looking for food on the table now that's what it generally boils down to i think a lot of people have been talking about is low bread across tunisia and take that as as a metaphor as well for people put a hungry and we've got to two characters the main character k site he's a professor of constitutional law no party barely campaigning and then now bill carrey his television mogul who's i think he's imprisoned i mean do we do if you don't have a democratic structure you can't have politicians who can run it openly right exactly so you're you're trying to play to to kind of what we do over here or or the countries have had democracy for years and years but i've had democracy in a bill that's that structure from the ground up where you kind of gutted two zero of whatever political leadership that they had and rightly so the revolution you you know happened but then you'll putting in place stroke kinda putting in place these people and trying to get them to stand up to structure that's not that which makes it which makes it really difficult i'm not sure if he is imprisoned but he's he's certainly awaiting trial for tax evasion which is never really great when you're evaluating the tax of the country that you want to lead but compare it with egypt we so all kinds of protests absolutely just removed from the streets of cairo this over the last couple of weekends and the idea that descent will absolutely not be tolerated there is there are crackdowns upon crackdowns in egypt they they were the country he almost got there but they i know the hope that we had for cairo egypt to kind of take everyone there yeah an currently bentley cairo is in one of the greatest periods of arrests of political activists of people speaking out against c. c.'s regime i think sixty thousand political prisoners across egypt currently an see the president is absolutely not tolerating ting any kind of political dissent and there's been measures put in place especially the last few weeks that let everyone for example you know there's there's more police on the street this is great army surveillance the harris square which is kind of which was the epicenter of the revolution holds such significant kind of political memory for oh everyone and significant hope is inundated with with checkpoints and military people are being checked in and out of the square at some checkpoints around around prevalent spaces like to her square and government buildings army checking people's phone so they're allowed to just stop anybody take their phone off off them and check to see if there's anything that's kind of speaking out against the government on their notion that they'll find it in terms of what they really looking for and unless someone has kind of flagrant grint anti military sentiment as a screensaver or something but they are doing that they are stopping people and give me your phone and have a right to check on so he really is cracking down across korea egypt and i think there's a real fear that about come we go out to the streets can we protest because he's gonna stand for it some elva donnie thank you very much cernan his own monocle twenty four you're listening to the globalist with me emma nelson a little later we get the news headlines from australia and we go through monday's newspapers to first time seven seven twenty eight here in london a quick summary of some of the other world news headlines saudi arabia's crown prince mohammad bin salman who said he accept some responsibility for the murder of journalist jamal khashoggi in the saudi consulate in istanbul mr shaw was killed in saudi arabia's consulate in turkey on october last year mohammed bin salman denied he personally ordered it however australia's conservative people's party has won a clear victory in sunday's general election the party led by the former chancellor sebastian put on more than thirty eight percent of the vote up from thirty one percent last time round his former coalition parties the far right freedom party received it just seventeen point three percent shop four and octopus is being filmed changing color while sleeping suggesting that it was dreaming the footage captured by PBS s. for documentary shows the sea creature changing from gray to yellow and then to camouflage who scientists suggest it's processing real life events as it sleeps this is a globalist blissed stay tuned spitting image was watched by fifteen million people every week in the nineteen eighty s a satirical puppet based program which was produced by the legendary comedy man john lloyd lampoon the politicians of the day now it's back but with a wider remit mint and georgina godwin spoke to john and started by asking him what is expectations when the first episode came out well i think we thought it was going to be rather other niche thing you know went out at ten o'clock on sunday night off to the news which is a pretty much a graveyard slot i was followed by the south bank picture which used to get slightly under a million and so so it started quite honestly but by the third series if you say it was getting fifty million years every nine voice and weeks house to worry it was like the number two show in the country sometimes even better than that and it was really surprising that it got such traction action and particularly we were stunned to see the ads in the middle of the things like apple macintosh computers and BMW and so on so it's sort of it didn't it didn't just reach a loss of people in a very very wide demographic you know getting just lots of as as say ordinary normal people washed it in that millions millions but so did all the movers and shakers all the politicians the big business people that kind of show biz guys all that we couldn't really understand what we've done right really because we weren't trying to appeal to audience i know that you're not involved with with this remake which is taking a much wider remote it's looking get global politics featuring a americans to a parent SEM clad vladimir putin megan markle wearing a glittery the princess t shirt and puppet donald trump his tweets composed by his anus how satirize the unsubtle horizon well it said that sesa thrives under a strong government to govern with very strong opinions because then you've got so many found self it doesn't do well you know in the years blair and one of the reasons why spitting was pulled off justice league is because there's only seventy jokes you can make about major being ingraham classes of decent color sorts of personal and somebody would blaring cameron and clegg minivans that's sort of consensus politics they don't worry much to say what you want his people who are really going for it as obviously faris and trump uh you know that it's and it was dramatic but the commit ICS was a very divided political society politically you know people either love mrs they really didn't like us so and of course the characters is that we have to the we'll has is able to take something that all lingerie life i'm forrest and farrow and seventy two ten trump implicit very very big i think what i'm saying easy to make because caricatures difficult whoever it is but they don't blend so i think it's a shame that we didn't have this five years ago really comes the thing about the program back then was that they had every television programs and people use politically behind you there was some you know raging marxist stunned the basement making costumes and the you know the right says were probably some of them very very middling some a little bit right to censor and but there were certainly people who wanted to bring down the government in in the company not me i work for the bbc online very measured and balanced and objective and all that but the relapse sheltered the really positive thing that came out of special interest that the particularly a young but fifty million people were informed about politics away which was and painting and memorable so that's the average eating your old could've eason in nineteen ninety five or six named ten members of the cabinet without thinking about it and for members of the shadow cabinet and you can't say that today and it's part of the reason is that people have generalized just like the politicians have all comes really they don't really know who they are they don't know where they come come from the now familiar faces particularly there's just you know another home secretary comes and goes i don't think that's healthy and i also think it's healthy that the society comes laugh at itself so found its leaders and the atmosphere we have now is not just divided but it is as the papers keep saying it's toxic you know it's it's come down to rollins abuse from all sides not good for anybody that was john lloyd the original producer of spitting image and we understand that a pilot of the new series has already been filmed and funding is being sought for its global release for monocle i'm not nicaraguan thank you georgina in a moment we look through the day's papers you're listening to the globalist joining me back once again in the studio is the writer broadcast north of terry stephanie welcome back terry to to go through the papers let's start off with the austrian elections we had in the headlines the sebastian kurz is back on his way to being chancellor of austria korea yes so he has done excuse me really quite well in the recent elections and it's quite good coverage of this in the british papers today okay the guardian in particular has got a picture of his delighted supporters celebrating in vienna as the exit poll comes out suggesting that the a policy would be on thirty seven percent of the vote and interestingly also will matter when the australian has tried to form a new coalition so he's obviously not enough not for an outright government on his own but the former the far-right freedom party have actually really suffered in this election and it was basically scandal affecting them that meant that this election had to happen because the leader who was the former deputy chancellor hans christian trucker hat to resign after he was filmed became known as the visa scandal because he was on holiday in a beatha and was filmed one being prepared to accept accept bribes from someone who claimed to be the daughter of the niece in fact russian oligarch and they were in fact such thing and they were actually just somebody doing undercover the filming but it was his you know rush to to be willing to consider this that men he had to resign today suffered as a result and interesting they may now look to try and form a coalition possibly with the green party who have done very well in the elections and this is also covered in the f. t. who are saying yeah sebastian kurz on course to return to the chancellorship with significantly strengthened mandate at the expense of his former parties and they quote him that's having said it had been a hard for months but the people have voted us back and so he's he's actually done fairly well and so naro but now the talks to find on that he's gonna be an extra australian government we'll we'll begin it lots of people who had had backs sebastian court thought that actually his departure last year was untimely timing as is reported in the financial times but more importantly this was this was the moment when the for the freedom party had decided that they were going to position themselves as potential vix because they had a new leader robert hoffer who had said look we are determined to win here this is a great comeback moment they were trying trying to make themselves the most the loudest voice in austrian politics it's an enormous blow to them isn't it and the FDA suggesting that this could actually plunge the freedom party got into absolute crisis yes but it see that's actually that's certainly true but it's important to remember the freedom party has actually has gone through loads of crises before four and it's had in it has lost leaders in dramatic circumstances call crushes and so forth and it has gone refer and say it tends to sort of search each and then something happens and then it tends to crush back again as in and it's it's quite reassuring is supposed to see the you know the they've crushed back again and people and not really prepared prepared to to consider them at the moment some people have often said that the the position of the freedom party in austria is actually an incredibly good bellwether for populism across the EU when the freedom party's doing really well guess what it exactly the same thing's happening in europe yes just in the the stadium is true i think certainly in the past in austria the freedom party was seen as you know they would not the establishment party they were the ones he said we're against the kind of the cosy just at shot between the big parties the you know the center right and the and the social democrats now as they've had more and more of their end scandals they've not come to be seen as that but is interesting looking we we were talking earlier about victor orban his role and also in the financial times here just saying realizing how much trouble auburn is in within the EU and there's the ah the f. t. is reporting here that it says hungary believes it can end an acrimonious e disciplinary dispute by the end of the year insisting other member states are tarring of a standoff and they're looking into article seven proceedings about whether hungary has been obeying the rule of law particularly because of its hungry laws on the judiciary on the media on foreign universities and facing possible sanctions just a reminder that while we might think hungary's concerned about about brexit actually hungary and the EU have much bigger fish fry let us move on to the EU to the to ireland and the issue of the backstop nope has become the great thing that has been impossible to resolve when it comes to the brexit negotiations what happens between the public violent and a northern ireland when the united kingdom leaves the european union and arlene foster the leader the dp who has a who used to have rather sort of strong voice in parliament must be no longer has been saying that all the suggestion so far that have been placed in front of her is to how to resolve this the potentially unsolvable problem haven't come up to scratch yes this is a all in foster was speaking at a fringe meeting at the conservative conference yesterday and as you say they used to pay such a key role in under the theresa may's government when they walk guaranteed the government majority now the government has managed to to lose his own majority by sucking taking many of its own MP's but she told a fringe meeting that she would not accept any extra regulatory checks between northern ireland and the mainland beyond health inspections for animals and food or any customs border in the irish sea says she's not saying we don't want any heart border we don't want a sort of notional border in the see where they would have to be checked the she did say that she might back a time limited version of the existing proposal for the backstop so something that had a fixed time line on it but uh she points out the rest of the EU notably the irish prime minister lee radka has already said we can't have time-limited backstop the point about the backstop is it's something that's a permanent guarantee against the reintroduction of physical infrastructure on the irish border and there's an accent article in the guardian today which goes and examines camman's exactly what it will be like for people living on the border and as a fantastic pitcher of a small town with one man on a moped going driving through a very very very quiet street and saying this is the border yes i would really recommend this article here by lisa or anybody who is not gonna make it more simple for you but it we'll actually show you what it means in real life to real people ensues interviewed a former here called lamps and he's land is on the border and it says here it's easy z. y. you know it's complicated drive out of her age and turn left and you're in the republic of ireland turn right and you're in the north but in within minutes back in the south again so because he does the very the very zigzags across the border her farm is in the north she gets electric steve from the south her children go to school in the north a neighbor's farms in the south and they talk ought to other farmers you know the importance of this dairy farmer says she they paid twenty four cents a liter for their milk but e tariffs some imports to the republic would add twenty one cents a liter to the cost and somebody who runs interestingly sports center that was built with EU money deliberately to try and bring communities closer together he says that they're eight roads into the town but only two or three open in the troubles it meant that people pull from nearby couldn't be bothered coming into town and you know this is had such a huge impact on people in the recent past the four mile journey from arlene foster's hometown turned into a sixteen mile journey because of the details that were caused by the road closures so you know people would go to different towns at obviously affected businesses businesses it affected where the communities met each other in this article really explains what matters finally let's move to the world of spies you've written novels novel about spying heavenly urine you're well placed i would imagine discussed the article on patriots telegraph where the ahead of mitt six the british spy service which spies on foreign agents has accused john kerry of getting it wrong wrong i love the stories and this is the richard deal of former head of six say he's he's shocked shocked to discover that carries novels are exclusively about betrayal trail he was speaking at a literary festival i think is the the clifton festival which is very small circasian and he says his books are exclusively about betrayal trail he writes in the tradition of the counterintelligence near lists and he accuses the carrier obsessed with his former career and saying well he was in the service for three years something must have happened happen to him while he was there to breed cynicism so as i'm saying somebody who's written about about spies about politics people don't tend to write books about happy bunches of colleagues working together in complete harmony which is what sir richard appears to suggest that one should do he says he's licari corrosive intelligence organizations are based on trust between colleagues it's as if the head of the metropolitan police said you know all all these books about police detectives who are grumpy and didn't get on with their colleagues exist and not like real life because we don't sort of expect that infix she was happened last week the head of the metropolitan police today accused the makers i think it's line of of being far too sexy and corrupt and then she had to accept that the way that the metropolitan police had been portrayed main had led to an increase in applications to join yes thank you very much indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four this he's a globalist UPS is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people we bring fresh thinking and perspective to all while we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and heart to create lasting value for all clients it's about having the right ideas of course but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivalled network of global experts that's why at UBS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference tune into the bulletin with UBS every week for the latest insights and opinions from me bs all around the world earlier this month the hotel in london had a refit the famous ellen run restaurant reopened after a speedy two month refurbishment and it was kitted out entirely from corkery too soft furnishings by peer you ivanovich the pioneering french interior designer took a moment to sit down with molecules designed edison nolan jails to tell us a little bit more about the project and then the hose is very very superstar chef in france and she asked us to do in between feminine and also classic and fine dining restaurant then for us things to do to keep the spirit of the connaught very english tie with this wood paneling who were before very dark and we wanted to give more happiness in the restaurant more caller with this being wall with everything is much softer we design ever everything in the restaurant which was very fun for us because we didn't want to buy something from another really want to design everything to really do a total strategic through then we designed so far the chad table the land sheltered yay cancers the carpet and yes as we try to do inbetween classic because we want to do something in car moving the time not to be too radical to over over designed because like this she's a very sick woman we really are really good relationship doing this project and now you can see it is nice it's soft and smooth happy abundant prochet and it's really interesting so you don't want to be over designed signed yet you've had to design every single thing in this environment how'd you achieve that balance that softness and keeping things toned down arm whilst commissioning incredible artisans around europe to build and design furniture for you when when i say design i don't mean timeless timeless also also for me it's a war that i don't lie because it's also minutes can be bored so then i want to push as much as possible but in a classic way in i mean not too aggressive color or too aggressive shape to keep the material very classic like the table we did craftsmen i wa- quiz everything has to be solved then you highs even if you come very often in the same place you are never bought where i guess about about the project and distancing they see you know when you walk in here you do feel kind of immediate sense of calm you're relaxed and i'm guessing guessing that has a lot to do with the colors particularly i guess this beautiful would you call it a pink on the ceiling can you take the color choices the color choices it's it's more this is yeah it's in between pink and kuta which is the house where the food can from finally because they'll end the house she used a lot of vegetable and the vegetable come from the earth and do hers discolor sometimes the like the heart is really natural color i think is very important in part because it's bring the architect to stronger because when i started my career i really use more wide moore coun at most fat and then i realized more and more that carla i love brings something else and also is bringing softness which i'm completely the opposite of this softeners because i'm so nervous inside or meet and i knew when i walk doc to bring as much as softness because i need calm and the call the help that kind of softens everything exactly the color bring more come and when i coming into space when they see when it's finished my pressure coming down and let's talk a little bit about the furniture because you know you wanna create an environment that is is relaxing but it also has a function which is place of eating place of entertaining can you take us through the choices made with with some of the seating and dining areas yeah the portland jose sink we really have to do like haute couture the home because he wants to see see bring also for the client for for the people who love food would something very exclusive then we wanted to design all exclusive sing for her like this table and all the table a different shape defeat feet on the metal the top in solid wood and also we wanted to something more contemporary no way to have this find any or experience to avoid loyd the napkin and which brings something to classic then now the people that have the experience to to eat on the salad rude and i think it's something more contemporary fresh and young we had dinner last week here and we experience also for the first time to not have in napkins i think it's very nice is because you you enjoy more the table and bring something new then everything has been done for like really exclusive for her because because they think i understand whole hose rox and one of the most interesting things about your work is the level of detail that you have when you're working with autism ends when commissioning furniture it seems like everything in here has a story behind it but if you highlight maybe one or two pieces and tell us a little bit about this story that'd be brilliant yes i'm usually walk with craftsmen artists because it's really bring something very excuse even also it's the way i like to walk to bring something different in every project and even even in this project every table of different shape it's what i say then now i can talk about this for example this is the sun tabloid with the team hide all the folks folks a walk with arnold which is amazing ceramics beijing-formed she's french she did this top in ceramic like unmanned you can feel the deep ness of the walks and this is bring something far from industrial for me it's important to avoid industry designed nine and it's amazing the fact that something that is quite functional which usually see maybe at the back or hidden away in a restaurant somewhere for them to store the cutlery is kind of front and center in the middle of the restaurant almost created an art piece here for me i think it's very important to do functional thing even when you design the chairs you know that you have to be comfortable autobahn because it's really we work with people people have to be happy for everything and this is really what i do all the time i do a mixed functional i'm channel in beauty interior design appear your vantage they're talking to nolan giles you're listening to medical twenty four let's head to australia now to find out what's happening in the knees that to help us with that tusk i'm joined by clarisa sea fury he's komo nichols sydney correspondent cure so welcome back tell us what see what the headlines are way you're well one of the headlines that new south wales on the state of nissaf wales has decriminalized abortion which is quite surprising they batonga a one hundred and nineteen year law which said that it was a criminal offence to get an abortion or to give an abortion doctor this is something that has been really become a huge sticking point in australian politics how much is this going to resolve things once and for well i mean the reason i said it was a surprising is because i'm very very few people get prosecuted under this law so so it has been sticking point but at the same time in practice most most women can get abortions very very easily new south wales what the new law has done is said that there's a ton of nation of pregnancy in the first twenty two weeks is now legal and after that twenty two week period to doctors can um consign off on it aussie follows island one of the last western countries to legalize abortion preganant last year and it's the last jurisdiction addiction in the country that wells' last restriction in in australia to two now decriminalize it so i think this will be the end of that discussion hopefully and and it will be at least you know an old old very out of date law behind over women's heads anymore let's let's move onto facial recognition this is becoming a big issue australia as well absolutely well the national on the federal government has has sort of said that there will be a new national network a facial recognition database which is sparking massive privacy concerns and the states dates of tasmania and victoria have already begun to upload driver's license details to state databases which will essentially allow government agencies in private businesses to access facial ID's held by state and territory traffic authorities in the driver's licenses as well as possible photos held the foreign affairs department and this has opened up the very very contentious issue of the compromise of giving up some of your privacy in order to guarantee public safety and it's it's it's an argument that cannot be resolved so so often exactly well they the government's justification is actually the identity fraud they say the idea fraud costs an annual two point two billion dollars a year on that obviously as in all countries where this is happening there there were concerns about the fact that it will be highly invasive the australian privacy foundation said quote we are on our way to automated real time surveillance of public spaces vessel so a couple around false positives even if you do much people using facial recognition it actually remains according to the human human rights commission really an unreliable way to to track people ought to see the person who is wanted for ford or whatever it is so so yeah it's it's it's it's a tricky issue and we'll see how they solve it let's move on finally to lady elliot island a very beautiful sounding place and by the pictures as beautiful as it sound yeah exactly what this is an island in queens off the great barrier reef and and it has been turned into an eco resort where they also things searches solar power station for trinity desalination plant for water but the big the big new thing is that they have a scrap eating machine which has cost just one hundred thousand dollars is called oscar a s s. c. a. and is turning kitchen waste and cobbled into life-giving compost which is then being put on the coral reef to regenerate the reef so tell us it's exactly how how sustainable and how and how much of a success were expecting this to be well the refinish particular area of lady elliot elliot island was really destroyed largely through guano which is burg ninety operations in the eighteen sixties it destroyed the island's top saul which really has a negative the impact on the coral reef so this machine will be will be giving back compost which will return it to to that reef to to make carl gardner again it's yet to be seen whether how effective it is there's been a lot of positive press about sofa so so we'll have to see indeed i mean there is such an enormous issue in terms of curling great barrier reef oh is one of many projects now trying to stem the stem the destruction of it yeah yes there are many many many different entrepreneurs and inventors trying to come up with ways where people can still enjoy it for tourism purposes say and protects heck's that industry as well as protecting natural natural beauty of of of this massive echoes ecosystem that's in australia i think there's lots of the different things going on when when they find something that really really changes things and let's hope will be rolled out across different areas of the reef pleurisy back wounds if you're many thanks for joining us on monocle twenty four you're listening to the globalist and that's all we have time for today's program many thanks

british parliament manchester UK australia president hungary terry british government UBS london hong kong viktor orban EU UK britain emma nelson midori house five years one hundred fifty years
Monday 12 October

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:00 min | 3 months ago

Monday 12 October

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the Twelfth of October twenty. Twenty here on monocle twenty four, the briefing is brought to you in association with Novartis. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live for. Monaco's newsroom here in Zurich I'm toddler coming UP ON TODAY'S PROGRAM Alexander Lukashenko continues his clamp down on political opponents in Belarus but is his twenty five year old rain looking increasingly precarious plus Japan begins to ease travel restrictions our news editor. Chris Chairman explains the outcome of yen local elections and then I'm Guy Delaunay Monaco's man and Slovenia and I'll be revealing how I may finally be able to enjoy the cooking of one of the world's top chefs by making it myself. Good luck with all of that right here on the briefing with me now the. Good afternoon from a rather gray and dull Zurich but we're going to try to keep it fresh and brisk over the next twenty eight minutes. Riot police in Belarus have deployed water cannon and stun grenades to break mouse protests in the capital. Minsk demonstrations gripped the country since Alexander Lukashenko's disputed election victory in August. But critics say the authorities are now routinely using violence to suppress political dissent will join in studio here in Zurich by monocle twenty, four security correspondent. Ben. Ben Who is also a researcher at the. Center for Security. Studies at eight here in Zurich and is an expert on Bellarusse good afternoon. Welcome to the roofing. Thanks can often and tyler. Let's start as this is something that we've been living with since August and like many things with the news agenda other stories have overtaken Belarus in away but bring us up to date on really what is happening. As we said, we've seen obviously what is seen as as a spike in violence by the government but where where do we stand right now? Indeed. This is the yesterday was the tenth Sunday of protests including election, Sunday? Exactly ten weeks ago that we've seen massive protests in better than we talking hundred thousand people or more particularly in the capital means but in other cities across the country, the thing is it's probably hasn't has hasn't been in the headlines as much as in previous weeks is that indeed, there has sadly not been any political progress that these this protest movement has achieved, the government keeps cracking down. On protests and this Sunday was yet again, more violent than previous Sundays. So we've seen disturbing videos of people being beaten up in the streets in prisons and hundreds of arrests set again including lots of journalists you mentioned that this is it's it's nationwide and but of course, obviously, the focus is probably on the capital. Are there other areas where you would say that also that there is more attention to you see greater agitation towards frontiers or anywhere else in the country? Sutton in the foreign policy realm, we've seen an escalation as in the EU and contacting you for ministers are discussing sanctions against betters on this very day we've seen this realm escalating in a sentence number of countries have not only enacted sanctions against Belarus officials. We've also seen nine countries currently pulling back staring Bassedas from as a signal of discontent. So that's certainly an escalation and that includes all of Belarus neighbors apart from Russia including, for example, Ukraine with which relations have so far been actually quite quite quite cozy, and this is certainly an escalation. Domestically, we actually shouldn't even talk about the tenth Sunday of protests which was yesterday, but maybe about the sixty four, th day of protests because we focus on these massive rallies in the capital as you said, but as local activism across the country and particularly local neighborhoods where people probably feel more safe from government repression and there's been for anywhere from concerts, small gatherings, distributing leaflets, hanging out flags, these white red white flags of the opposition that we've seen everywhere and even honking by bus drivers honking bye-bye trains. There's these many quiet signs of solidarity that Belarussians have. Given each other over these weeks. But indeed, no political progress whatsoever as someone who's spent time in the country what do you think the the political divide looks like I say political divide. I mean for the man and woman on the street are we talking about? Could you say there's a twenty thirty percent hard line know super pro Lukashenko backer of versus the rest of the country countrymen. Do you see people buy into the vision and he'd it's obviously very hard to say because we lack reliable survey data this moment but there is room about exactly these twenty to thirty percent which are still staunch supporters of Lukashenka, and that can. Be for very material reasons because they owe their positions in government jobs or the social benefits. This very government I would doubt though that these would be the people who would go out and rally in his favor because I think I've said it in the past as well about Belarussians that tend to be quite pragmatic because there is so little way to voice wants political opinion. that. They look they have the need to make ends meet and that certainly a factor. But what we can tell the shore is that there's a majority that is unhappy with the way the country is ruled and with his person in particular maybe less. So with the political system as such but certainly, with Lukashenka, he's lost all legitimacy in the eyes of majority of Belarussians. How they behave in their everyday life is certainly a different story. We we only see in the end, a minority that goes out to protest and shows their faces. Towards to authorities because obviously, they will become a target of repression and we've seen so many instances of arrests. Also of people being snatched from their own homes from the streets of from. So people are hesitating but the certainly majority that wants to see taint change and won't have any to emphasize everyone so far is peaceful apart from state security forces and that's quite remarkable given. It's been months since the protests that we haven't seen any escalation on that end if we turn to Brussels and e ministers, the discussion that they will be having today the the probably having it right now. Aside from recalling ambassadors, which is, of course, is is wonderful symbolism but I guess when we talk about potential sanctions, one would be thinking clearly economic where can the EU and well I, mean I guess. The. The first point we have to recognize as well that there is an a manufacturing base there are a number of big companies are you based companies that manufactured Belarus the not probably slapping not right at the front of or at least that made in Belarus on the front of their labels but nevertheless, you do have an economic base which is based on manufacturing what, what can e you do and how hard will the EU push on sanctions Indeed so so far we've seen sanctions against the vigil individuals to say we've seen in the past as well. So we talk ministers, we tone security heads of security forces currently not look Shaneco himself, but that may change, for example, German foreign minister, high comas also for sanctions against Lukashenko. Deed this very limited political signals that the US currently sending can send whereas economic sanctions as you indicate, that could particularly be restrictions for access to capital same as a sanctions against Russia. In certain areas those would certainly hurt the regime more particularly the. Elite that is still dependent on Lukashenko as well and the state-owned enterprises that are important factor in Belarus the problem with that, and that's really the pickle you for ministers are in first of all this hurts. European. Companies probably negligible but second, it hurts workers in Belarus themselves. People working in it in factories, they will lose their jobs, they will lose their income and the only access to capital to investment. will be left for Belarussian authorities will be. Russia. So this dependence on Russia is already. So high would only increase and that's part of the hesitation of EU officials indeed to enact such broad sanctions that will not hurt the public but also make Belarus more dependent on Russia and just before we go, you're finishing up a paper on the Belarus topic right now as well. will it be available for listeners to consume when it to hit screens? It will certainly be published anytime soon we haven't. Put pitcher with a specific institution it but it will be on Belarussian civil society, which indeed is very tricky because we've seen in a way the remake awakening of civil society these days but this decentralized nature is grassroots movement that we see is so strong. It's so convincing box decentralized nature lack of organization lack of centralized leadership is actually part of their weakness as well. So. We're looking at that how does protest move and translate into political force? Begnaud, Zog for you Bennasar, our security correspondent here in Europe now over to London join. Office with headlines Thanks Tyler Donald, trump's pick for the Supreme Court Vacancy Amy Coney Barrett will begin her confirmation hearing in the Senate. Later today Barrett is expected to tell senators that she will judge legal cases impartially. The Chinese city of Dow is testing its entire population of nine million people for Corona virus over the next few days, the virus which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has largely been brought under control in the country. Austria's Democrats have comfortably won Vienna's municipal. Elections Mongols News editor. Chris Turmeric will be joining us for the very latest a little bit later on today's program and the monocle minute reports on Hungary's attempts to house foreign stakeholders from important domestic companies with Budapest airport the latest business in the CROSSHAIRS FOR MORE HEAD TO MONACO COM slash minute those today's headlines back to you tyler. Thanks very much earlier in London we're going to head to Japan. Now, to get an update from our Tokyo, Bureau chief and Asia Editor Fiona Wilson is there good evening Fiona. Good evening. Good. Often named fee. Sorry. Not. To. Talk. A number of things to go through. Maybe let's just take take the temperature of the truly in in Japan at the moment. Autumn is, of course upon us a at this level of of the hemisphere I and I'm wondering, are we seeing an uptick on the street where people out out shopping What's what's the economic? Because we've seen a couple of indicators depending on on where we look that may be consumer sentiment out will and also some elements of, of course, industrial output is on a bit of an uptick. Yeah I mean I think this weekend we had a typhoon pulsing. So being out on the street on Saturday was quite difficult torrential rains that weren't of being good for retail figures but generally, there's a feeling. This is optimum song some quarters and obviously if there's optimism in China about the economy, that's good news for Japan, the recovery of Japan very much tied to to China so. Some good news there I mean, the the bad news I think these figures that came out about the tourism industry this four trillion yen hit that the tourism industry is. No surprise visits down ninety nine percent. What did anyone expect I think what was interesting was break breakdown if those figures and what people saw was that It was actually shops retail. That was has been hit the hardest and that's something you do not so. I I noticed more people are out, but it's a very different Tokyo this autumn to what people would have seen last year and you know at the moment not much sign of tourist reappearing a moment they're saying maybe next spring so we'll see about that. Let's just talk about travel right now we've seen of course, there's there's discussion If we look further south in Asia now opening up potentially between Indonesia and Singapore of course, you've got Japan and Singapore with this travel corridor and then also we've had discussion now about about Korea and Japan opening specifically for for for business and necessary at travel. What what other murmurs other that area I mean that's definitely such a move to get business travel opening up again certainly feel in this part of the world, you know where people feel sutton bars is not under control, but it's being managed in this part of the world. So all the negotiations happening in the countries around this region. So it's you know Singapore Australia New Zealand. It's it's it's around as well and what Japan? It's always the rumors are coming out the came through the Shinbone the big big newspaper was reporting at the weekend. The travel warnings on eleven twelve countries including China will be dropped from November Two that's people going to those countries from here and also the business. Absolutely as you mentioned South Korea Singapore already in place and Vietnam is now on that list and there's even talk that Prime Minister Sogo might be visiting Vietnam soon. So I, think that's a very positive sign. So you can see that they're trying to open up and also to lessen the restrictions to you know this distinct about quarantining is obviously you're going to put people off they're trying to make it easier very restricted countries, but they all trying to open up. Just mentioned new newly appointed PM. suge now. I guess. Things getting not spicy but but certainly as as ever. There's always interesting. maneuvres in and around the the South China Sea and Japan currently playing a role or at least a more active role in the region. Yeah I mean you know that's always that's just an ongoing discussion is now we saw last week we had Mike Pompeo in Japan should have been a longer trip to Asia but for obvious reasons trouble at home, he just came to Japan for the day but he had this quote meeting is very symbolic really group of Japan India US Australia and it's really seen as certainly seen by China anti-china coalition. It's a SORTA trying to contain China, that's how they're framing it and Chaigneau the. Cold War point of view Japan as always walking this tightrope trying to keep China happy. But also trying to keep the US happy and so is not a natural diplomat. It has to be said he's not a foreign policy person, but he's you know he he came out of it sort of okay. I think Mike Mike Pompeo said, you know he's a force for good but it was very much i. felt the Mike Mike Pompeo show rather than the Prime Minister Soga show and Yeah Japan is involved in these exercises. They released very limited information but we know that the Maritime Self Defense Force is out in the South China Sea doing these anti sub drills. With they stopped at Vietnam we know that of the weekend. So you know we also know that the US is doing drills in the area. So you know you're putting two and two together and Obviously, it bothers China Lot China has been reacting to that they've also been you know vessels were near the Senkaku again. Over the weekend. So you know it's always pretty active here and I think he's trying to keep a level head. He's thinking about economic recovery. But at the same time, you know he doesn't want to be a pushover as far as China is concerned. We go is suge seen is more hawkish than than obey was What's the view? Of course? We were only a few weeks in. Under under his current watch anyway. I mean I think that you know what happened. Last week is really indicative I think people were looking to that I mean, all the signs are he is not as hawkish as Shinzo by obey takes a very strong ideological view on these matters of nationalism and Sokaia is you know we keep saying this? He's a pragmatist he he knows that Japan has to get along with China economically you know if the of course there are there issues that plenty of issues of contention, not least the issue around the Senkaku islands but so is giving all the signs of of he keeps saying we will get along with China, Russia and other countries where he's trying to get along. With everyone that's going to be impossible. Of course in China has goes own issues with a number of countries in the South China. Sea. Many people making claims the South China. Sea, and China is pretty much claiming the whole lot. So you know I it's a difficult for Japan but at the same time, you've got the election coming up in America and of course, Sokaia will be looking at that and thinking how do we know that Japan US launch is absolutely critical he doesn't want anything to jeopardize that. So I think you know so far. He seems to be doing right. His ratings are very high. So at the moment he's he's enjoying that sort of first flush of popularity. Theater Wilson, our bureau chief in Asia Editor in Tokyo. Thank you very much for that. You're listening to the briefing is just gone thirteen seventeen here in Zurich. We're back right after this Navarre's is proud to partner the briefing on monocle twenty. Four. Novartis is a company that is committed to reimagining medicine. Global health care leader intent on changing the practice of Medicine Novartis's has been exploring unchartered territory in science for more than a century today, the company is working on breakthrough treatments that pushed the boundaries of human understanding and biology data science and engineering to develop and deliver therapies that help people live longer and healthier lives around the World Novartis reimagining medicine. Your back with briefing here in Zurich with me toddler relate. Well, we're going to pick up on one of the stories that Julie mentioned a our news bulletin. Also, we touched on it as well. Yesterday talking to hair. Novak. The editor in chief of. A and of course, that is one of Australia's newspapers of record and we're. Also fellow Australian Christian Mark Our editor our news editor I can't promote you to editor just yet and get quite angry. Chris is in studio London Good Afternoon High Tyler. Yes. I news editor is a new title in itself. So I, already have a little bit of a change. Absolutely well listen tell us It was no surprise as we were speaking to Mr Novak, the editor of depress yesterday everyone sort of new generally which direction the certainly at the municipal elections in Vienna were were going to end up but in a way, maybe even the odd surprise in terms of maybe the thumping that one particular party got. Absolutely. So if you look at the headline, if you will it's not that particularly interesting. The Social Democrats in Australia have been in power for decades in Vienna and they will remain in power. They won forty percent of the vote so far the counting is still going on and that's a even a couple of points up from what they got in two, thousand fifteen below that is. Where you have the sort of microcosm in Vienna of the rather dramatic shifts, we've seen in Austrian politics over the last couple of years because you've seen the rise of the sort of mainstream conservatives under chancellor, the best and quits they rocketed up in popularity in Vienna garnering almost twenty percent of the vote which for them in Vienna is a strong showing and as you alluded to there, there was the. Collapse of the far, right Freedom Party that until two thousand eighteen was actually in a government a coalition government with Sebastian quits until the infamous obits scandal that some of our listeners I'm sure remember where the then party leader hands staffer was recorded offering sort of suggesting political favors to so many thought was the daughter of a Russian oligarch. He wanted to actually now enter politics back in Vienna his. Home base he didn't succeed the far-right lost about two thirds of their vote, which is a tremendous drop in a in a period of four years. So it just goes to show you what kind of shakeup we've seen in Austria over the last couple of years, and if we look ahead at at Brand Vienna one, where the topics that we also touched on yesterday Chris here's a city which has really Gone to great lengths, of course to to try to build up their aviation hub. Now, in a world of overnight rail travel, they really WANNA fashion. Of course, they're great train stations as place that you want to pull into at seven o'clock in the morning after you've jumped off your plane off your train from from Zurich or elsewhere. So it's this is the city which is really puts quality of life its position in the new. Well, it's position as being you know the new heart of Europe in many ways really really front and center if from your perspective, and because we're talking about a government, Social Democrats have been in power for so long. What does need to happen? They know what were the unease looking for and how and what needs to be delivered to you think. Well, you know I think the interesting thing is that the Viennese were in this particular case I would argue looking for more continuity. I. Think What was interesting if you go back to two thousand, fifteen was that it was a very divisive election and so even though the Social Democrats one then to below that, you had mich- issues also national issues, the refugee crisis, which is what sort of led to the far right really sort of surging in those polls. Now they stayed home again, it was sort of more of an election of continuity of competence. I. Think because of the pandemic and the coronavirus as you say to your point, Vienna has really sold itself as this city with a very. High Quality of life I don't think people wanted to mess with that. At this particular point in time. The one thing I'd add is within that the only interesting development in terms of where Vienna might go is we don't know who the Social Democrats are going to go into a coalition with will they stay with the Green Party or they might. Actually, go with a new Liberal Party the Nieto's that also did very well in this election and have sort of their sort of centrist sort of business friendly liberal party but they've also attacked a little bit to the left in the hopes of maybe entering a government with the Social Democrats. So that could have some kind of change on how is governed. Christian back in London, Our news editor, we're going to have to leave it there because we're going to stay certainly points east riding to Slovenia after this. And finally, on, today's program Slovenia has been making. For itself on the gastronomic. Front for a few years wine included, and that's why they've been recognized by the Michelin Guide serving up a total of seven stars to Slovenia. Restaurant Tours in its most recent edition. Two of those went to the country's most famous chef and rush. Who's he's the Franco is both in the middle of nowhere and his fearsomely expensive. But now she's linking up with a Slovenian supermarket to make the most of a couvert induced surplus of quality ingredients, and that means Michelin meals for the mouse as well for more on. That are very hungry correspond inland Liana. Guide. Lonnie's there hello guy. Aloe Totta. I'm still hungry because I've failed to get some of this this Anna Rauch Mitchell. Masters Mahfoud for the masses, I couldn't get it in in in the two supermarket that I went to. They said try the big branch in the BBC's shopping centers. So I was going to tell you what it's like but a failed. Okay. Well, let's let's just rewind for for a second. So this is, of course we were familiar a major. Food retail groups, of course, tying up with famous chef bartenders. All kinds of people to do collaborations was that the start of this or was this driven by by something else or is this just pure marketing? I think it's it's actually a I think it's a sort of a project of passion really as much as anything else because. The chef in question here who is unquestionably Slovenia's most famous chef with these two mission stars. But she's been been famous for years even before getting these stalls and was quite outrageous that she didn't have any before now but she's got this big thing about the food she serves being extremely local. She does this whole zero kilometer thing that whatever served in a restaurant he should Franko is meant to have been sourced as far as possible. From places which zero kilometers from he should Franco itself and that just happens to be a really good dairy nearby. I have been to the dairy. I haven't been to here's your Franco because I can't afford it frankly but this dairy Mlakar Planning Cup is in the town of Colbert in the civilian in Slovenia and does exceptionally good dairy produce and like many other. Places making exceptionally good produce. It's not being able to sell them to the restaurants in the usual numbers. So between them and rush on this dairy McConnell plenty of come up with this plan, what can we do? Let's get together with two supermarket and we can come up with a line of products that use some of the surplus. So right now, if you go to the right branch of to, she can get some some Yawkey. Cottage cheese and also Pumpkin Yorkie which created by ANAEROBIC herself and you can give them a gun at home. I want him back to what we would find on a typical obviously a very slightly elevated Slovenian at plate at this time of year. But before we do some business guy I think you can certainly speak to one of our editors or certainly one of the producers you work with and I'm sure that. You could pass your expenses by if if you went if you made your way to Franko at some point and if that doesn't work, just send them to me and I listen everyone wants you to sample it my screen is lighting up with people who don't want to see you go hungry and and miss those two stars. Now, let's just go back to Let's let's go back to this time of year, and hopefully everyone gets the geography but we're talking about a country which on one side shares a border with with Italy and also The really region Meteo, a region, which has of course, fantastic zine and then of course, you've got Austria as well and not of course, another land of of wonderful delicacies. What does that mean though on the Slovenian played if we're going to sit down whether with seen certainly with Ms Ross cooking or with a very, very you know I have a good a good Slovenian family who who knows her way around a kitchen while I happened to have the he sha Franco menu in front of me, and this is that early autumn many tireless I mean obviously we're keeping things seasonal. We'll start off with some Hey bread. With cultured beeswax butter, and then we've got finger bites involving everything from Sardine. So reflecting how close we are to the Adriatic here, Plan Tago TACO and white, wild plants, My Goodness Mountain Yogurt Sat Zeki, style, Istrian summer truffle bite, and it goes on, and then we're of course getting Pumpkin Amal Vazza Great Almond Soup Forest Consol, may I mean trout Philip again reflecting the fact that they're in the Sasha Valley? So the to- you've obviously got the fresh water fish. Going through their suckling pig as well. Regional specialities. Things which are. The Not in many respects, sophisticated dishes. But the idea is that the quality of the ingredients and letting the ingredients shine through that's that's what we're looking for both from an Arash. And from Slovenian cuisine a as a whole I think a lot of shafts have either taken inspiration from animal show that just happened to be doing similar things. They've got a lot more confidence in the quality of their own ingredients. In that own traditional dishes, the certainly numerous restaurants around Slovenia now, which is saying we're doing grandma's cooking and we're doing it in a very high quality way. Okay. So so break it down in percentages for me Austrian fo formed former Hobbs Berg Empire Italy and and and then, and then give me sort of former former Yugoslavia in terms of of how that looks if we had to divide up that plate. Yeah I think with a Russia's plate, it's looking a bit less hardy than than some of the places you get here some places in Slovenia would say, okay, we're going to divide it. It's probably going to be sort of thirty percent really hearty Balkan cuisine thirty percents sort of Italian Mediterranean cuisine, and yes the other the other thirty percent is going to be your austro-hungarian stuff. You can get Goulash here I mean you could say that. You know Slovenia's got a little bit of Split Personality when it comes to culinary matters on the other hand, you could also say that we get the best of several different major influences and I left that other ten percent that'll be the unique Slovenian magic itself. Just of course, it nice glass of Wine Guy Delauney It's a thirteen, twenty, nine and thirty seconds. It means it's almost time for lunch here in Zurich and we have to. Say. Goodbye that's all for today's edition of the briefing are show was produced by reese James Joyce. Often our studio manager was Christine Evans Debris. Thing is back at the very same time tomorrow. I'm off to Geneva. Now have a very good afternoon. Thanks for listening.

Japan Belarus Slovenia China Zurich Russia Vienna Japan news editor Alexander Lukashenko US editor London Austria Franco Novartis EU Tokyo Belarussians Tyler Donald
Edition 2101

Monocle 24: Midori House

26:05 min | 1 year ago

Edition 2101

"You're listening to molecules has fueled fest broadcast on the eleventh of February Two Thousand and twenty one monocle twenty four. This is molecules house few coming up. Today the Iranian regime might be bidding itself. Happy Birthday but is anyone else my guest Tim. Marshall and Robert Fox will discuss that and the day's other news is including what Angela Merkel's recent troubles can tell us about the challenges of smooth successions and does infrastructure equal votes. Boris Johnson appears to think I think so plus has an Ireland. One question will continue split Germany's conservatives. Is there ever a time to partner. With the far-right. We reflect on a pair of of major political upsets in Europe. I'm Andrew Mullah Monaco's house few starts now welcome. Come to the show on joined by Robert Fox defense editor of the Evening Standard and Tim. Marshall Author Format Diplomatic Editor of Sky News editor of the what and the why dot com. We will start start with Iran. The forty first anniversary of anything is not traditionally one of the big ticket anniversaries. It doesn't even have its own designated gift looking that up up. He's five seconds. I'll never get back. The forty first anniversary of Iran's Islamic Revolution has nevertheless been observed across Iran today the celebrations length. Perhaps APPs somewhat more than usual by the Great Satan's recent assassination of General Qasim salamone commander of the force of the Revolution regards in a drone strike in Baghdad. Last month. Tim We have seen those big crowds huge crowds in fact in the streets. Is it possible to tell how enthusiastic they really are It's difficult but when you know that sort of regime when you've been over there you do know that people get bussed in by the thousand. ID cards taken taken away. You get them back when you get off that said there are also hundreds of thousands of people genuinely do do still support the regime. But you said the forty first and yet I mean it's not a big number for them. The importance of it was it comes after the Cellini assassination and it and it comes at a time when they're under so much pressure Russia and they wanted to make a big show of it. It doesn't seem to be that it's energizing the entire country. I think more importantly what what will happen around it. What happened after the Sulejmani killing which is that people are demonstrating huge numbers of them? Now realize now is not the the time to stick my head above the parapet and the demonstrations just dropped away. The Anti regime demonstrations. Today's not the data on the street and demonstrate against the regime bought. Not In days or weeks they will be back on the streets because the underlying factors of the economy and the anti-regime sentiment that none of that has gone away way and the economy is going to continue to get worse and so it's all going to come back and the battle between sections of the population in the regime will some point goat it come to a head. I doubt they'll be a fiftieth anniversary. Robot did you get the impression or do you still have the impression that the Iranian regime were startled and or spooked boot by the popular response not necessarily to Qasim Solomon's death but to the shooting down of Ukrainian Airlines flight seven five two. In in the immediate aftermath. It was clear from those demonstrations that significant numbers of Iranians were genuinely appalled and embarrassed by what what the government Matab done. Well it's more than a Cliche to say that national pride assume steak and this would account for the rather extraordinary will bid. I think in quite orchestrated turnouts. Turn out for the funeral of Casula money himself but the thing that the really totalitarian regimes which essentially it is in Iran and we're finding it with the corona virus in in China as we have discussed on this show frequently then not on top of the information flow by alternative media and through the Internet for all they claim but Beijing and Tehran a not complete the-they're but what is also I think must be quite embarrassing. It quite embarrassing understatement for the regime in Tehran is that everything is going wrong abroad The the great 'cause I'm still money projects and by the way I do Demar from other people. I don't think he was a great strategist at all. I think he went with the flow. He was in and around all sorts of people like Emad book near the very beginning of Hezbollah and so on but you just see from his body language he he was a boy. Oh that wanted to be on the front line with the lads beating his chest and so on because if he was a strategist then the strategy is really falling apart. Very very badly from Yemen particularly through to Iraq and Syria the moment now the counter opinion Dan. I mean whether you get it through the BBC website. And I'm I'm I'm being seriously doubt seep through and this is getting through because As Tim said that up against instance because It's not a great propaganda success. They've got themselves into a lot of trouble. They got themselves. Frankly a bit stock both in Iraq and a- An- and and in Syria but above all. They're running out of money but brief briefly on on I was going to exactly what Robert said about the corona virus. Ah Iran tell turn regimes can survive with the bargain is. Don't worry we're going to take care of everything where omnipotent and everything we do is fine and the trade off is you. Don't get to choose but you don't mind because everything we do works. Well I need to shot down an airliner and killed hundreds of people all hang on easing of covered up this virus and at that point own. Hang on your line to us. About how bad this nuclear reactor explosion is all those things and then the facades nuts to crack. And that's why these are dangerous moments Robert on a on a defense note The parades in Tehran Day did include food quite a lot of missiles of perhaps dubious operability but nevertheless they were there President Hassan Ronnie did hasten to reassure that they weren't intended did for attacks on neighboring countries. How reassured should know neighboring countries? Bebo either be completely on racially. Because they had a satellite launch which which didn't work and then it turned out not really to be a satellite launch but a rocket that does have a capability of carrying quite as major would say quite a considerable pay light over medium distances and that spooks everybody from Greece from the fringes of NATO or all the way through. What are you really up to? And they do want to emphasize besides just just looking at the fact that Israel has been carrying out an air war very successfully against Iran's initiative Tiv- to Hezbollah and the militias in Syria. I mean they bunk t four on a weekly basis and the world doesn't baton. I did with the About this and they're not being armed in a way that Iran says that they could and should be talking about the militia including Hezbollah and I and not being paid this is the point that the bargain with Hezbollah particularly Lebanon. which was the most obvious? One was Iran. Would pick up the TAB for. Aw Veterans are for injured veterans for war-widows. Because they didn't very reluctantly to they go into. Did they go into Syria. Now they're struggling to pay. Hey that and they're struggling to do what Mundus the other principal who was killed in the strike against Sulejmani was up to the fact. Is that the dollars. Aren't there from Iran to pay to pay the militias to pay the The popular of Brigades it had to be fiddled through the pro-iranian elements the more dubious elements in the of the of the Shia Iraqi regime. Two final quick thought on Iran. Going back to the assassination of Qassam Soleimani. Is it your impression that Iran now regards these matter as settled their launch of rockets in the vicinity of a couple of bases in Iraq. Shortly afterwards clearly with a certain amount of coordination with the targets represents the end of their responsible. Will they be you saving something up. I'm you know none of us know the future but they had to respond militarily and they chose a middle option in that they sought of struck directly directly back at the Great Satan as in firing at their base but didn't really because they quite possibly deliberately missed and that was for national pride and world opinion but I I would suspect probably down the line in x months. There'll be an incident somewhere an it'll be related back to this Alanine. I mean we don't know but I don't. I don't think they can take such a punch in the face of that magnitude without coming back somewhere. Some point Robert Fox and Tim Marshall will be back with more from you both in just a moment but first here is multiples. Ben Ryland with some of the other stories. We're following today thanks. Andrew through several senior Chinese officials have being removed from they have hosts over their handling lovie corona virus outbreak. Those who've been sacked could face being punished by leaders it is in Beijing. It comes confirmation that the virus has now killed more than a thousand people. Fianna fail has emerged as the largest party following Ireland's at general election. It means that they have just one more seat than the left wing nationalists Shin Fain who've made big gains on the two main parties he's the outcome could lead to a lengthy negotiation to form a government. Voters will cast their ballots in the New Hampshire. Primary today is the second stay to declare the choice of Democratic Party. Candidates fully twenty twenty presidential election. And you can read more about what to expect from the New Hampshire primary by heading over to Monaco dot dot com and signing up to our daily email bulletin the medical minute and finally it's been confirmed that the most senior diplomat to defect from North Korea. Intends tends to stand for election in the South Tae Yong Ho worked at the North Korean Embassy in London. When he defected in two thousand sixteen he since become a vociferous a syphilis critic of his former paymasters? I'm Ben Reilly and that's what's making news back to you Andrew. Thank you Ben. This is molecules house view. I'm Andrew Molested Me Autumn Marshall and Robert Fox. Well let's look now at Germany and it's ongoing attempts to map it's post angle Merkel's political landscape medical who has led in her party since two thousand until very recently and our country since two thousand and five is due to step aside at some point in the nearish future. It was widely glee assumed that her success it would be Undergrad. crump Karam Bal who succeeded. Michael as leader of their party the Christian Democratic Union in two thousand eighteen however crump com Bowie has announced that she is standing down and has therefore effectively ruled herself out as the next chancellor is the succession of a long serving leader. Always going to be weird wherever it is. I think you have to turn it on its head Andrew. Because I think that what they're engineer which is where this really kicked off. This is where the AFDC were briefly forming a government or being a heck of a shock. And I think that has led to Karumba CRAMPED KARA AK Going aside it's part of a movement of Native mm-hmm of actually ty Romanticism. It has political hostile gypsum. That going back to which is really bedeviling European politics. I'd including in my own country the United Kingdom it was mapped and we were talking before coming on. It is matt very well in Wonderful Info Book Wonderful Essay by even Kristof and Stephen Holmes called the light that failed. What he what they argue in that book is the Post Nineteen eighty-nine eighty nine is the antidote? This book by the way to the Fukuyama end of history thesis is saying they fail to Expo liberal democracy and the idea that the the imperative imperative from Brussels and from liberal Washington such that it was was liberal imitation that you market it to the world. I'm these two authored very skillfully. Say how it was never built over. They pretended to initially in the early wild west years of Yeltsin was never bought by Russia. But the way that the new new recruits to the new liberal Europe whether NATO but above all the EU have a there's almost like a Tissue will open rejection gang on them and they depict that Very very clearly and obviously the visa grabbed four are very very good. Example put particularly Ah Poland and Hungary but this is all very clearly seeping into German politics and add. This is the thing that I don't. I'm Tom Stand about the December election in the UK. I reading Sofala just off to Sofala. Just yes I can get that that that makes me sent road who move from Labor to vote for conservative. Why and every answer that I have received? It could have been from an old communist regime Jayme to every question why there is always a because it doesn't necessarily have to be true. I have not got a true answer as to why on attitude In the north of England in Scotland in Wales in the left behind areas. It's too simple to say that as to why people are going back and hence my big thesis thesis is a rerun a romantic nostalgia late nineteenth century politics where you look you know that it is a Hark back to a past accost stability. The kind that Tim was talking about with how people tend to follow the deal with totalitarian regime. But it's a past that never existed at. This is what Germany is now not facing. And I think both Merckel AK K. A.. Quite right they're taking it very very seriously. Indeed what happened in theory because it probably means An irreparable change for the CD for Christian. Democrats Tim there is kind of an overlap. There I guess between even authoritarian regimes and democratic McCormick institutions. In the win. They've been led by one person for a very long time. It actually becomes quite difficult to imagine anybody else doing that job. I mean it. It's a weird thing to think that there will be conservative. Still gave. They'll be German voters Next time out to can barely remember a chancellor who is an Angolan miracle it is there a way of negotiating any succession from a long serving leader. That doesn't involve kind of identity. The crisis all nervous breakdown. Yes usually doesn't happen. I mean I'm going to give you. The football analogy please Manchester. Just the united rules the roost. For Best Part of twenty years wins everything in sight so the next person comes in pretty much. The same team stadium is the same. I'm this still a full house etcetera etcetera but you have to go through three or four managers before six if you include the latest one before you can find the new Messiah and sometimes political parties like that and labor in our country if not come back from Tony Blair absolute. Boris Johnson Maybe ebb the new Thatcher dragging it back to Germany. I mean th ring yet is so such a such an emblematic place. It's in East Germany. Ebony it was the first place that voted for the Nazi party in the Nineteen Thirties. And so it's so symbolic an incomes the AFDC which other vague inheritors there's a quite a distance between most of the Party members and not not all of them not as big a distance as one might professional professional with a guy that was standing in this and what happened was is that the CD you talk about. He actually seems to be connived to former government with a FD. Where is the rule? Is You do not deal with these people. But this is the new reality. And then it goes to Roberts said I I worry the the better parts of liberalism have peaked in the Western world and that we are now seeing the tide receding. And I'm not sure AK. Perhaps he wasn't up for the fight. I think Merckel in early days would have had the energy to be up for the phone. She's always stood against this and I always remember what Helmet Kohl said. When he left the Chancellorship do not forget? I am the last chancellor the lived and experienced the Second World War and the memories are fading so whoever comes in is got to try and hold that line. How do you hold that line of not dealing with the right if the population is moving to the right and you need to keep your votes to keep liberalism alive she has tried to tack to the right somewhat? It still isn't working in the. This is the challenge for whoever leads not just Germany many of the European countries okay. What finally on today's news panel? Let's take a look at the UK and too big infrastructure stories which dominating the current news cycle one at least more or less exists in verifiable. Double Reality This is a chess to the rail line which for an outlay of one hundred billion quit will make it half an hour quicker to get between London and Birmingham. It would probably be cheaper. Repos London or Birmingham but the government has confirmed that. HFS To will go ahead the other which appears to be some weird fever dream of prime minister. Boris Johnson is a bridge between Scotland and Northern Ireland. An idea which by the time it is completed may well linked to countries no longer members of the United Kingdom Robert First of all the Boris Johnson does have form for a fondness for big eye-catching project. Some of which happens some of which didn't he's time As mayor we think of the jury airport which didn't happen The Garden Bridge which didn't happen at considerable cost and the cable car which did happen but which nobody actually uses What is it about Boris Johnson and big projects? I think Something must have happened in his childhood. When I'm probably would have been a nanny nine Boris but they snatched away the leg? The negatives sat all the McConnell really showing my age but Boris is a bit younger than me at an impressionable stage. He does like these things and I tell you what on the reasons I suspect and coming up because it's displacement for getting involved in an ideological argument he doesn't like ideology he doesn't whatever he is reported misreport into have said about climate change. He doesn't like the climate change argument because he doesn't like the polemics of it he is. He's a pragmatist and he has said he's only had one conviction in his life it was only like conviction for driving infringement. He's all about Boris. I'm barris built since Boris the builder and we have to get it out of the way I don't think bridge will happen at his more in a bridge. Too far he does these things but h s to this railway project which you caricatured beautifully. It's there's no tom in that Is a conundrum for him. Because he wants to build infrastructure for the north and the way he is conceived the subsidy enormous us Public expenditure for the early stages of this line which will go. As far as Birmingham will take jobs out of the north and bring them into the south So he's in a bit of A. He's in a bit of a muddle and the thing that Boris is absolutely dependent on not having an eye for detail. He's got have have good deputies he's good at got have good executive commanders and if he doesn't get this one right and if a lot of other things in two or three things we could immediately point to go badly wrong within the next two years then he may just be a one term prime minister to these big infrastructure projects to people like Komo. They are the winners by inlaws. Love them you like them. Clearly you excited about a bridge in Ireland Scotland Perpetual Movement. Big The ideas fantastic storm stores can get this country moving. That's that's my impression sorry listeners unfortunately ultimately the visual aspect of that around roughly around say big look when he got on the road to being elected elite up in similar like a doncaster market as big northern town in Yorkshire where they don't you know no nonsense and he barrels through the market. Yes yes we're GONNA save the fishermen. We're going to do this and it's energy. This country has been rather flat for twenty years and certainly self obsessed with three years of her brexit in he comes he needs perpetual energy and color is not a color and a big yellow hard hat. As you cut the big red ribbon and you say you see. I'm getting this country back. And he allegedly prime minister alone time to cut the big red ribbon on the Northern Ireland. Scotland Bridge cut the idea. Say I say this is where we might do it now. Cut The ribbon. I don't think I want is going to happen as well. But now it's this it's this I- This concept of Perpetual Movement and Energy and big projects and good icon type. Oh yes and I'm assuming you will then go onto the sort of great grand ones of of the past history. Where people are you remember them? Full these great projects. Excuse not if they fail to quickly have a particular favorite white elephant. Oh the aircraft carriers which hey senior. Civil Servant said I'll main objective. One of the main objectives of defense review is to ensure the they become the most expensive of a floating conference centers in the world to but one isn't the white elephant. The white elephant is the Ryugyong Hotel in North Korea. Three thousand rooms. It's never been opened. It's been years and years and years because they don't get that many Torres but going back to why some of them do them the EGO. I was a correspondent in Paris when meter all came up with the idea of that massive glass pyramid outside the loop. ooh Well that is a monument. When I think of matron you know two or three things down the line of what I think about him? I remember he's the guy the I mean. He didn't build a pyramid but in my mind he bill the Louvre Pyramid. And that's what some of them are after Robert Folks and Tim Marshall. Thank you both for joining us. In a moment we'll hear a bit more about two major upsets opposites in European politics. You're listening to Molecules House view. Stay tuned this is Molecules House view. I'm Andrew Mullahs over the past week. A of major upsets in Europe may have put paid to the idea that the populist insurgency which began in the first year of two thousand sixteen gene has ended Monaco's Christian MC has more to European political earthquakes this week. The emergence of the nationalist Shin Fain as Ireland's strongest longest party and the resignation in Germany of Angola medicals presumed successor Annika Com combat. Both have one key question in common. Should the political political extremes be allowed to hand in governing. Let's start with Ireland. Where chicanes surprising but narrow victory in parliamentary elections has plunged the country three into uncertainty as the two establishment parties? Fianna fail and Finnegan will have refused to enter into any coalition with them. Even though neither of those parties would seem to be able to govern on their own should these centrists rethink their stance next considered Germany and scandal in the eastern state of Tarini. Where a a hung parliament led miracles Christian? Democrats and the far-right alternative for Germany to back the same candidates lead the state though not a formal coalition in mark. The the first time that centrists said even tacitly cooperated with the AFC at any level of government that sent shockwaves through the German political establishment forcing the National National Party to intervene and Khan Bala on Monday to resign as an Ireland. One question will continue to split Germany's conservatives. Is there ever. We're at time to partner with the far right and alternative tactic that has worked. Surprisingly well. Comes from my home country of Austria where twice Austria's conservatives controversially agreed to partner with the far right Freedom Party twice. The Freedom Party collapsed in a scandal before the next election. Perhaps there's a lesson here for other countries. He's to consider exclude national parties governing at your own risk. Sometimes it's better to let them try and fail at governing with a chaperone before were they gain enough popularity to take the reins all by themselves that was Christian and that he's all for today's show Monaco's house view was produced by Augustine. Much Larry and research which by Nick Toomey Estudios manages steph Chungu and Christie Evans. Coming up at twenty hundred brand new edition of on Design Monaco's House v Returns Eighteen hundred London time tomorrow. Imagine mullet. Thanks for listening.

Tim Marshall Iran Germany Boris Johnson Ireland Robert Fox London Iraq Hezbollah chancellor Syria Europe Andrew Mullah Monaco Iran United Kingdom partner Angela Merkel Beijing Andrew NATO
Tuesday 12 November

Monocle 24: Midori House

26:55 min | 1 year ago

Tuesday 12 November

"You're listening to Molecules House view first broadcast on the twelfth of November two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four. This is molecules house few coming up today. A brexit party will not contest the three hundred and seventeen seats the conservatives one of the last election what we will do is concentrate our title effort into old of the seats that are held by the Labour policy the BREXIT party scales down. It's great crusade. Does Nigel farage even want Brexit to happen my Mary Digest Key. Alex Fontana and we'll discuss that and the days of news including Donald Trump and wretched. tyrod ones we bromance leaders in exile and our affairs editor. Christopher termite gives us a crash course in creative coalition building. I'm Andrew Mullah Mongols House view you starts now welcome to the show and joined by Mary. Digest ski contributed to the Independent Independent and the Guardian and Alex Von Tons Amon historian author and screenwriter. We will start he in the UK where not for the first time in his career. There has been something of a a discrepancy between the vainglorious promises made by Brexit party leader. Nigel farage and the delivery there of yesterday garage announced that the Brexit party which had been. I'm going to contest every seat. In next month's election would contest rather fewer standing down in all three hundred and seventeen constituencies won by the conservatives in two thousand thousand seventeen. This has come as something of a shock to many brexit party candidates who had already spent considerable sums on their campaigns and may now have to solicit loans from that terrifically polite bloke who emailed them about Emperor Bokassa Gold. Merry Nacho Farraj has never really wanted to win. As he doesn't actually want brexit happened happened he would therefore have to find new gripped and or get a job. Well I've always been in favour of Nigel farage being given a peerage because it seemed to me that if that had happened in two thousand sixteen when it was first mooted Actually we might not be here today. but I'm not sure. Oh about that theory that I didn't want to win because when you looked at him presenting his six hundred plus candidates and then just a few days later Sir saying well actually No we're not going to contest all those seats in fact we're going to contest barely half of them He did look to me. As though somebody a- a- as though something of the sort of lifeblood had gone out of him he looked he looked really diminished character. So you know everybody is denying any sort of deal been done between him and Boris Johnson. But it's hard to believe that there's been something going on behind the scenes Alex Wong shamelessly inserting my pet theories into this. It's conversation do you have any time for my belief of what's going on here is that farrage has read the applications of Brexit party candidates and knows that their chances chances of coming up with six hundred candidates who would not prove within a matter of hours to be certified building. Bats was while slender. Well I mean. Let's face this Labor the Tories and the Lib Dem's having enough trouble with there is nothing I would not give to read that file of Brexit Party candidate. Ah Stations I think it's probably quite special but I think you know the kind of question here then is going to be who benefits from this from them. Send down the Tory seats. Beats and of course you know. There was all sorts of speculation yesterday on on twitter and people kind of doing their pet theories about who benefits but actually sort of despite the fact that standing Tori seats of course. The crucial remembers. The Tories aren't just looking to defend a majority that majority needed win new seats and is quite possible that if they do continue we'll see if they do or not to stand in Labour Lib dem's seats that actually in a way the brexit party by splitting the Tory vote will actually fail to. You mean. They can't win those seats which they need to get a majority so I wouldn't be a tool surprised if we see the rest of these candidates also disappear? They told according to Some conservative journalists on twitter. They've been told not to pay their deposits until Wednesday as the last possible day. Say so I think I think we'll wait and see whether this is going to happen on north. This would all be terrifically amusing of course if it wasn't happening to an actual country in which real actually live Mary. Who Do you think if anybody move helps? Because as Alex correctly points out you can make the case that it helps the conservatives by not competing in the seats which they won lost time but you can also make kate's that it doesn't really disadvantage delay because it just splits the Tory votes in the seats where they're running. Yes well I think in a way that sort of says it was at all because yes it it takes away some of the disadvantage that the might of been had brexit candidate stood dude in safe. Tory constituencies But I think I think there's another aspect to this. which is that some of the response to the BREXIT party stepping being down in all these constituencies yesterday was fury On the part of some brexit supporters who said they'd now got no one to vote for because they he regard. The Tory party is not brexit pro brexit enough and they follow the mantra that what Boris Johnson is proposing his deal with Brussels. World's this is not brexit So nothing ever will be Brexit for that tendency you could. You could literally all off the English Channel and they would still say this Susan for no. I absolutely agree. But they thought that they got somewhere that their vote could usefully go according to their lights and now they have a question as to what to do and it may very well be that. Rather than voting for the Conservatives they simply won't vote tour nevermind. Alex men member Mary. Mary mentioned earlier. The thought of Lord Farraj of of wherever it would be Brussels. Possibly that's where he has spent most of his time. Ah Yes he has recently floated again. This idea that he was offered appearance by the Conservatives are we. Are we buying that. We have so so far. Only nargile for Asia's word for that unders as many disgruntled Brexit party candidates would be willing to confirm that may not be worth all that much. Now I mean I think I read his little announcement that he's you know and he said Oh I can't be bought So you know what she Is is news to dose of US. I suspect he's floating that because he wants one I think that's a hint. He's dropping Whether or not he's been promised one who knows I wouldn't put it past Osborne Johnson to do so but I think certainly what the The from people that I know Boris. Boris Person Say That actually personally. He detests Nigel. Farraj so I think very very easy to yes it is and I think that can only be one and I think the chance of Johnston offering him the kind of position where he could perhaps serve and a conservative administration which has also been talked about. You know packed is very unlikely. Because don't want for us on a on a table with him So actually perhaps it is feasible feasible in terms of its way to shunt him off. Give him you know a bauble But actually remove him really for many many active role. I think this is serious. Reason also also Why Nigel farage? Maybe not exactly deserves a period but might might be a good thing. He has probably single Hundley. Done the most to change the face of British politics and even the course of the United Kingdom When he set up the the UK party the and campaigned so forcefully for the UK to leave the European Union? And I think that his the problem for him him in a way and for the whole country was that our electoral system is such that you keep and now the brexit party. It's very difficult for them to win. Seats it's in the House of Commons to make it genuinely representative. And so they were carving out a slice of the electorate without having any reward for any representation having to take any responsibility by actually getting elected to thank him. We've seen people from in the past from fringe. Parties be elected for instance the British National Party Two local councils generally they managed to serve out maybe one term very very few of them were reelected elected because then you had that clash between accountability and the platform they were elected on. The two. Things weren't reconcilable so I sort of think that There has to be a place for this strand of opinion somewhere in British politics. And I think for Ferrari to be given the peerage that might be the place for it to be married to Jesse and Alex von thank you for joining us. We will have more from you both in just a moment but first here is Monica. macos Hippie with some of the other stories. We're following today thank you Andrew. Emergency services in Australia have been battling more than three hundred fire severe weather yeah. The fueled catastrophic conditions across the state of New South Wales Bushfires reached within the sensor of Sydney prompting an airdrop of fire WII retardant over parts of the city cooler weather. It's moving across much of the affected area today. Though there fear the strong winds may find some of the dozens. The fires are still burning. Many schools and universities in Hong Kong remained closed on Tuesday after protesters called for day of traffic disruption. Much of the city's public transport has been suspended or delayed earlier. Harare's police into several universities. Firing teargas is in one to disperse the students and she and so. Our government is considering ending Japan tax break on wining and dining experiences that large companies by the end of this fiscal year. The tax bypass was seem to do a temporary measure to soften the blow off a consumption tax rise in two thousand fourteen. Not In and it's been renewed twice already large companies have already cut back on blowout dinners which some say makes the tax break unnecessary instead. Tax Relief is expected to continue for at least another two years in small companies. Those that lines now back to enter. Thank you Marcus. This is molecules house view. I'm Andrew still with me are married to Jesse and Alex Fontana well. Let's look now at Bolivia more specifically at the peregrinations of its recently defenestrate president. Evo Morales Morales has accepted an offer of asylum in Mexico and as such joins that melancholy crew of exiled former leaders those overthrown overthrown potentates. who find themselves not merely out of office but out of country it is not necessarily a career ending setback some have made reasonably successful comebacks comebacks others however have been compelled to Sulk and or wonder for the rest of the Natural Alex which of those outcome seems? More likely for Morales Lalas. Oh it's very early to know. He's going to Mexico which is a very popular place for excellence. Specially for leftists America the covering we've had of course Trotsky they're younger Auburn's from Guatemala. Didn't go well for at least one of those new Fidel Castro. was there Furlan where he met. Che Guevara was in a house posse Mexico City over large polar spaghetti and even the shower of Iran. was there for all sorts of people have been Now can he from there. Go back I think it's a lot's going range depend on what developments. Go Down in Bolivia From here on which at the moment is cool very hard to predict because it really is just happening as we speak. So we'll see I mean they're all uh of course leaders who have gone into exile and he has said he will return with with force and strength so So we'll see whether he can muster any of that. Go back with Mary. We do you like his chances. Because in many respects it's easier now Modern Technology and communications being what it is for the exiled leader to continue to have an influence loans at home. He doesn't have to rely any more. On sort of shortwave radio broadcasts and Seimas that pamphlets he he can address his constituency. Whoever whoever that may still be directly can still have an influence? Well I think you probably can't The question is how much of a constituency does he have. And how how much of a constituency currency is he going to retain in Bolivia and that's very hard to hard to gauge because even though the election which shoe which was then was decreed to have been manipulated the re-election as it were he didn't eat he only just. I managed to win that despite what was called an also manipulation. So does he have the constituency back home that he can actually used to come back and I think that is. That's may be the biggest question. It's a weird business. Alex the the exiled leader. Do you have a particular favorite with your historians hat Well I'm not sure how favorites at the moment STOORIKHEL historically I mean even the British monarchy has has been exiled at points. I mean I. It's Peter Cohen thing to be and I mean you personally had some countries like Pakistan of had leaders that have been leaders than being an exile. Then come back and be leaders again. So I remember interviewing Benazir Bhutto who in London during her period of exile and she says and he would probably run one of the best ones if he were doing A table of those who've been there back a few times Encumber conventionally ended badly. ardley forever. It did I mean nursery. WHO's been the latest effort Last Russian also not looking good for him either I mean so you know I. It's the DOJ business. Going and going back I do remember how rather wonderful Book at home with Pictures. It's a photo book from years ago and I've given it his presidency. He's at school dictators. James and it's got pictures of the kind of houses they believe it is yes a regular presence here twenty four but I mean I I need as you know all I can say is that I do. Exiled leader sometimes apart from apparently by Lhasa furnishings in Golden Leopard Skin. My answer to this question. My answer to most post questions frankly is King Zog Albania's who who's journey into exile was it was a thing of many splendors reputedly. I'm not sure how true it is. That when he and his retinue arrived at the Savoy in London and the porters made to lift trunk they remarked upon how heavy it was a nasty what was in it. And he replied gold He had travelled by Triton across your with with off the contents of Albania's treasury. Well I think maybe my favorite exile well one of them would certainly be Trotsky who has already been mentioned Who fetched up in Mexico Not to a happy end But also I think we sometimes forget. Shaw Shaw go was in London and has as many exiled leaders have been as many exiled leaders have been but the goal apparently made himself a complete applete pain for the successive governments in London and through the war were. They felt that he was sort of acting beyond his beyond beyond his remit that he was making very difficult for the alliance and then of course He rides back in splendid triumph often. Often Liberation of France So this but I think there's something else about exile which is that? I mean it's interesting. How smoothly in a way? Ah Morales and how quickly his flight into exile was organized and executed. Because I think it's in some ways it's an underused solution for these sorts of situations and I think that Exile rather than say house arrest life imprisonment Mun trial even execution. We're approaching the the anniversary of the execution of the Ceausescu's Romania. I think exile is actually a young most civilized solution in a way. The trouble is Alex. We've exile as a solution and Mary is right in many respects. It's a preferable outcome certainly for the the overthrown leader. But you've got to find somewhere willing to take them which isn't always an option. Is it no. And some people have social going around around with with their bags trying to end somewhere I mean Certainly in the Caribbean win but these fled Cuba. He turned up in the Dominican Republic for her to hear who was completely horrified. Loyd this kind of women who had left and immediately so tried to have him killed So it can be frying pan into the fire is definitely a danger. I don't think that's going to happen to Morales Mexico. The seams of being offered and arranged. I think he's probably will keep an eye out for an ice pick. Ninety boredom would be a problem. I think though Mary relatively Wli speaking because you go from this life extraordinary power and excitement and then it's that question I'm I'm reminded years ago. The New York Times correspondent set himself the task of trying to get hold the VCR means phone number in Jeddah and find out as much as he could about the the post you know tyranny life video men and apparently he just wasn't doing very much which sort of like from from health club to restaurant. I think boredom is obviously a problem. If you've been in power but for the ones who are aspiring into power in a way it gives them an opportunity to plot their return and to enter campaign. I mean when you when you looked in quite recent times. Boris Berezovsky was exiled in an aspiring Russian leader and he was in London. He made life a complete pain. Um In four successive governments in London reached the point where he was actually warned by Jack Straw when he was foreign secretary that if he carried on This high profile anti he Putin campaigning That he'd have his asylum withdrawn which is almost unheard of penalty But he made very high profile and in fact very influential use of his exile. Well let's move finally along on today's news panel at an imminent meeting between two as yet on exiled leaders specifically US President Donald Trump and his Turkish counterpart Richard Type Odwan the former will host the letter at the White House tomorrow and it seems seems reasonable to expect an amount of the edginess phoning from trump altogether at odds with the actual state of relations between the two countries while trump clearly regards Dewan. They deeply creepy mix of or and envied. One has not recently appeared altogether interested in Turkey's alleged general alliance with the West membership of NATO and so forth. Alex Alex. How much are you looking forward to the joint press conference well? I think it's sort of fascinating to watch because I mean this is one of those cases where really I mean you know. US Turkey relationships. Ah Relationship is in a terrible state and the only thing that sort of working is that trump's got a soft spot for further leader for on He loves in big mound. Lost a tough guy but he of course. Also trump has no concept all of strategy and he can't distinguish between his own interests and preferences and those of the United States so when he's kind of operating a mean towards woods other on he he can't use that relationship in a way that perhaps be useful if something comes out of this that's positive for the. US that will be. I think chance not actually designed me were beyond seems to be having a wonderful time playing trump a cheap tin whistle In the way that you can I mean he sort of came out with this statement before he flew to Washington Washington And where he said. We've made significant progress on several issues despite bureaucratic and political sabotage attempts by some remnants of the previous administration. Now wait a flat. A trump is insult obama and of course to kind of imply a conspiracy. Theory trump loves those from his stupid. He's capricious he's playing Bryant of last last week he loves people to install his enemies and of course overwhelmingly. He's very vain and auto and certainly seasonal that Mary further to that trump does clearly really hold a doin in some regard. Is that do you think trump's just the usual thing we've got used to now which is he's he's creepy simpering fondness us towards authoritarians generally or. Is there something in particular about Doin' he likes. I think there's something in particular about auto on and it's the same thing that he he saw initially in Vladimir Putin as well which is he sees a national leader who in trump's view represent does his best to represent and defend the interests of his country And I think that's maybe I would say perhaps one of the pluses of of Donald Trump is that he does to an extent put himself in the place of other people's leaders he understands what what they're therefore and what makes them tick just as he obviously sees his own position in in the United States. This is his philosophy sophy to the extent that he has one that all countries should place themselves. I the the balance of competing interests will somehow work itself out. Yes I think when so you know when so many of us are we say will trump his America first and this is sort of Exclusive to of everybody else's interest. That's not quite true. I I think he regards every country as as having an obligation to put itself I and he doesn't he doesn't have jet for instance you know He. He would expect expect Putin to put Russia I and Edwin Turkey. I and I think maybe some of his misgivings shall we say and his clear awkwardness us in dealing with Theresa May when she was British leader was the fact that maybe he saw a leader and a country. That sort of wasn't putting itself itself. I that was talking about the special relationship putting up I rather than what trump would see as putting national interests first Alec says as you delineated. Take the suspect correctly. Rather has the measure of trump. An you don't need an advanced understanding human psychology. I think at this point to understand and what gets a result from trumpeting it is it is it is flattery it is paying out on his enemies. It is conspiracy and so forth. What does the one actually won't from trump at this point? I think that's quite an interesting question. I mean there are various kind of technical military support. Various things that's going on the he wants but in the more broad sense it's an interesting question because there is a kind of power balance going on a rebalancing with the EU With Europe with an international sphere and with Russia and Turkey has to think hard about where it sits in that In many many of those big power banks have you know represent some interest for them And I mean it's kind of a question of whether he can position himself advantageously sleeve regarding all of that but I think he's certainly noticed the weaknesses supplication does not work with trump. That's actually this show. Strength Does and I think Mary's right. The trump does sort salon to stand that but the problem. I think that trump has that he only understands that he doesn't understand any leader. That has a different mindset nor can he understand what he's being played electrons on I and Mary Digest Key. Thank you both in a moment. Why now is the time for creative? Coalition's you're listening to Molecules House view. Do Stay tuned. This is Monaco's house view. I'm Andrew Miller and finally today Monaco's affairs editor. Christopher chairman offers a crash course in creative you've coalition building theater. It'll be what is up with the global the electric. It seems everywhere. You turn these days. There's another hung. Parliamentary election. Citizens pulled in so many different ideological directions. Parties have no idea Who Partner with as their coalition bedfellows? The latest example comes from Spain where a Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez Center left. Party won a plurality over the weekend but hardly a majority the ideological stances of other parties make Sanchez's options in forming a coalition government. Next to impossible it used to be. The Belgium was the only in Western nations stuck with the tag of being ungovernable. Although it still holds the record for spending the longest time without a government now we can add Spain to a long list of uneasy easy coalitions minority governments or stalled parliament's ranging from Israel Italy candidate Britain in many of these cases parties are not up to the complex challenge orange instead they're going back to the electorate and seeking a new vote. That could provide some clarity spoiler alert. Fresh elections rarely do if you're looking for some optimism. I'd draw your attention to my home country of Austria on Sunday. The Greens voted unanimously to enter into formal coalition talks with Sebastian Kucera's conservative. People's Booze. Party whose partner in the previous government was the far right Freedom Party such a left right. Coalition would be first in Australia's history if and it's a big. If if the two sides can set aside their differences and form a government. They might be bedfellows but this is the hand that politicians are dealt these days. They better find a way to plant. Land knock it off. He's looking at the monocle affairs editor Christian. And that's all for today's show. Molecules House fee was produced by Marco sippy and research by yelling gofundme. Jacker Mohawk Manages Zoe kilborn and Kenya scarlet coming up at twenty twenty hundred London. Time a brand new edition of Monaco on Design Monaco's house view returns. Same time tomorrow. Eighteen hundred London Imagine Moolah. Thanks for listening Matt

Mary Alex Alex brexit party Donald Trump London Nigel farage US Brexit Boris Johnson editor Alex Fontana Nacho Farraj Bolivia Mexico Alex Wong Australia Vladimir Putin Christopher termite Brexit Molecules House
Inside Europe 04.10.2019

Inside Europe

54:52 min | 1 year ago

Inside Europe 04.10.2019

"DWI inside here with Keith Walker. How coming up on today's program the brexit gridlock seems to have eased slightly as Britain makes concessions? There is a mood for a compromise people want to get this done. The question is whether the EU is going to be prepared to compromise because if they weren't compromise then we will leave anywhere on the thirty first of October. I've no owed the brexit view. Northern Ireland coming up also France begins testing new customs measures at French ports and we'll meet some of the world's best rock climbers climbers getting ready for the Tokyo Olympics for me. The Olympics is something that I've seen since being five or six years old and always wanted to go do it wasn't till I was it's twenty eight twenty nine that climbing Olympics these stories and more coming up Britain seems eternally gridlock blocked over brexit but on the other side of the channel France is taking no chances officials there are testing new customs measures to avoid possible roadblocks flux under both hard and soft brexit scenarios at key French ports where local residents speculate about the future Lisa Bryant has more from the French reports of color from the ferry steaming out to open water to the British flags dotting the Scruffy town centre center. It's easy to see where Kelly's priorities lie. Dover is about forty kilometers across the channel. London is nearer by Eurostar a train then Paris this port city has long been a major hub for goods and people passing by rail and ferry between France and Britain goalies please across the city French city tour Glenn. We have a lot of traffic route of human and change and also business challenge. Hosoi cost we live. La Is Chamber of Commerce President for Francis Northern Coastal region British marquette for no France is deferred bucket or no explicit Cheddi phone automobile market and food market if we have some program with English market maybe the bad consequence for no of friends. That's a scenario. France wants to avoid as much as possible. The government has hired hundreds more customs officers and introduced new procedures cheers testing them in pre brexit dress rehearsals in Kelly and elsewhere your total from Brazil Promotion Komo News anybody then each superbug. France is ready budget ministers. Jihad Dharma now says although he added last month he was a bit worried about how the British are preparing hiring but some local businesses are skeptical that France is truly really brexit ready on the outskirts of Calais. The Family Owned Cup Monte trucking company is making its own operations transporting goods to and from Britain accounts for twenty percent of its Business Room Casanova. Do all the tests on on expo. The authorities are doing tests and ensue. Are we for our imports and exports to see if people working at ferry internal terminals are really ready but the real test will be reality after brexit. adequate is volunteers transport director. He says some panicked. Customers are also stocking up earlier this year. His company saw an uptick of goods is to transport on both sides of the channel the new I'm Lexie to Bob Coaching with whether it's a hard or soft brexit. We'll oh keep transporting goods to Britain because we're looking at Calais port and we can't live without Britain so we'll adapt. Kelly history is closely tied to Britain but that's not always been positive in the fourteenth century it survived a nearly year-long English siege the six down burgers who volunteered themselves as hostages ostriches in exchange for a lifting it are captured in a famous Podesta sculpture which today sits in front of City Hall more recently Colle- has is captured headlines for the many migrants hoping to reach Britain by train truck and boat a recent chamber of Commerce study about Brexit's impact act on Calais and the surrounding coastal region finds potential winners and losers to a no deal scenario british-based car manufacturers may may shift their business here. The fish and tourism industries may suffer forest. It's very difficult to understand the brexit for us. It's a big BIS distinct to to Brexit the Chamber of Commerce. lavollay says Brexit seems like cutting Europe apart. We prefer eating stay in Europe. Arab another another new let some Kelly residency a bright side to Brexit a taxi driver. Van Penn is one of them offered. New Business is going to any on a here in color. We don't have many many English taken the ferry anymore. Most take the Eurostar but we think with the heart Brexit we'd have duty-free again and people will come back to buy alcohol and cigarettes in France Chamber of Commerce had love. La says he hopes Britain will change its mind about brexit but if not he says this French region will be prepared to profit from it. Lisa Bryant d-w Calais France and I'm Keith Walker in bomb. This is inside side Europe. We bring you the stories you need to hear from Europe. The latest European news politics and culture delivered to hear every week. We're on your favorite podcast. Provider signed clad apple podcasts stitcher spotify war subscribe to a podcast while the fold is fresh in your mind and thanks for listening this is inside Europe British Prime Minister Barabara Johnson has delivered the UK's final proposal for Brexit deal to the EU it includes plans to replace the Irish backstop. Now you remember we've spoken about the Irish backstop between it's been a major sticking point in getting a deal through the UK parliament with the details on the new proposal. David Hunter News editor at Q radio in Belfast is Northern Ireland's this proposal would create to borders for four years David Yeah so in some ways case but it's very complex in these plans and basically it would see Northern Ireland remained part of the e U Single Market for goods for a bite four years but essentially we leave the customs union at that would probably Lee mean some checks allure told they'll be done away from the border. There will be no border infrastructure on the island of Ireland so for example things will be checked over at warehouses. They'll be trusted trusted trader schemes. We've heard about those before as well and technology but again. There's a bit of a question mark over that one because we're about four weeks away from when would you to leave and we don't know what that technology actually yet looks like am then there would be a regulatory sea-border so that will be between the rest of the UK the and Northern Ireland and and a bit of customs borders well nigh. It's kind of a change in tune in some ways but it does create a very complex set of circumstances here here as well yeah it it it does sound complicated until the details of being irons is now the British government's. Northern Irish allies the DUP Democratic Unionist Party. They've welcomed the plan. This is arlene foster. What it does is it is just to leave the European Union Customs Union allies us to leave the signal mark and then we opt in if we're not in a position to put him alternative arrangements about time so therefore we consent to whatever is coming forward as a DP leader on infra. She's changed her tune. Yes she seems to soften debate because before and I any difference between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK okay would have been a red line for Party remember Arlene foster and the DP they are hard line unionists so they won't Northern Ireland and all of the UK to be treated. You did exactly the same neither willing to accept some changes and this pet is crucial. It has to be signed off by Stormont are devolved government which just justice with issues in Northern Ireland not set beside by Westminster and but that government hasn't sat thousand days so Northern Ireland is a deeply lee politically diverse place. We already have our problems. We have very troubled history and now we're being devices over things like brexit. Not Government hasn't sat Jonathan Days and Boris's lays plan. He said they have to sign off on these changes and not just that but they'll have to do it every four years so this this isn't just a one off issue that will be deeply divisive and then we'll go away. This is every single four year term. The party's here are going to have to agree on in this and crucially as well at has to gain cross party support so it's not just a majority wins it has to be the nationalist and the Unionist Representation Tation in Northern Ireland has to Barclays plans and they have to back them every four years so it's creating a lot of uncertainty for example business groups are saying they can't even make a five year plan because every four years things could change and from that point of view makes things in Northern Ireland very very difficult. I don't see the EU by an yeah. I mean it it it. It's seems to me that this is the starting point and as the leading Brexit here Sir John Sir Bernard Jenkin said just just a couple days ago he's a member by the way of the hardline European Research Group he told the BBC that there was a readiness to back the deal there there is a mood for compromise. People want to get this done. I would say there's a very strong grounds for optimism. The question is where the EU is going to be prepared to compromise because if they were compromise then we will leave anywhere on the thirty first of October. I've noticed about that so that goes back to the the British government's wh what I see is on a Goshi hitting position dishes we will leave come what may dealer no deal on October thirty first I would I mean that's all very well and good for them to say that but remember the the British parliament itself voted that no data is not an option and that you know Boris Johnson has to go back to the EU and request an extension now. He said he doesn't want to do that but by law. That's the law says now. You have to remember as well next week. Boris Johnson is GonNa Pirogue parliament again so he's going to suspend parliament McQueen speech on and as I say we're less than four weeks from the thirty first of October. The brags date and nobody really seems to know what's going on. I've seen birthdays planned better than the at this point and I mean Boris Johnson. He Sandal these things. It's a lot of rhetoric and a lot of bravado. Try and say we're getting a daily and we're going to the hi it's GonNa do. That's the question that he's been unable to answer so far this paper. He's trying to outline it but to be honest. The mood vibes here in Northern Ireland spos- oppose in the in the republic and across the as Boris Johnson has put forward a plan that he knows isn't going to be accepted David. Thank you very much for your time there with the details on on the proposed deal okay no problem. David Hunter News editor at Q radio in Northern Ireland's speaking to me from Belfast we we got to Australia in just a moment case Walker in Bonn. You're listening to inside Europe elections in Australia. Last weekend resulted in a clear victory for the conservative People's Party the country's coalition government had collapsed in May after its junior partner the far-right Freedom Party wasn't corruption scandal known as Beatha Gate that led to the resignation of its leader Heinz Christians and the Freedom Party pay the price of the ballot box though scandals but the the victorious People's Party which is led by the young and charismatic Sebastian Kurz will again have to enter into coalition talks that is expected to be a lengthy in free and difficult process as naturally carney reports from Vienna it was no surprise that thirty-three-year-old Sebastian courts and his right of center enter People's Party or if a pay would score big in Sunday's election for months is reformed conservative party had been pulling safely above thirty percent despite losing a vote of confidence in parliament back in May the young chancellor's former coalition partners the far-right Freedom Party or F- was caught up in a number of corruption option scandals that many thought would hurt coach himself. They were wrong. His party claimed over thirty eight percent of the preliminary votes and we're very thankful and more than happy. The results are better than we expected. It's a big responsibility and and we will pay tribute to that. We exceeded our election target. I'm speechless and they have to digest these results do not also unsurprising was how much the FBI who would be hurt by these scandals losing nearly ten percent of the votes. They got back in two thousand seventeen. The party's new chairman Norbert Hoofer said they'd prefer to focus on the opposition and reforming themselves rather than joining any possible new government coalition talks allocate Miss Cain. I believe leaving the election. Result is not a mandate to enter into coalition talks. We're preparing for being the opposition even if they're very very difficult and lengthy government negotiations. I think the reason for this was a little bit related to the turn out of voters Yulia Person Mueller at the Center for Electoral Research says the far right audiology of the FBI is still there but faith in the party has been lost. People who are critical of immigration they are still there. They have not changed yeah mind to have not become more pro immigration but they did not feel so encouraged to turn out and this particular election many voters to to watch the camp of non voters the Social Democrats who have run Austria with the NFL pay in eight Grand Coalition for a total of forty. Four years also suffered setbacks. They still managed to cling on to second place but brought in the lowest number of votes in the Party's history with twenty two percent the issue of climate change proves strong long held put Australia's Green Party back into parliament with fourteen percent and the relatively new liberal neal's managed to clinch a few more parliamentary seats but which one will become part of Australia's next government. Most likely coalition seems to be coalition of over pay and yet the two parties are ideologically very different. Ain't negotiations will be tough economically. The AU pair is liberal. They want to cut taxes. The Greens follow one to gather a new Texas like a carbon tax culturally especially the overpay under courts has been taking a very critical stance towards immigration. The Greens are the party who's most positive towards recreation. It will not be easy to find compromise green leader. Verner Google has also said that they would need to see radical change from any right wing policies of the Earth Ou- pay to pursue any coalition talks with them will not be returned to a grand coalition with the Social Democrats is also unlikely Kley says Paul Runzheimer who has written a biography on Sebastian Kunz looking back in two thousand seventeen incudes came also into power because he promised to change approach after so many years of a collision so for him it would be very difficult to explain to voters why he would go back to the Social Democrats yet cool. It's it's might not be left with many options. PERTH EMU ladder as negotiations with the Greens might very difficult and seems to go the two opposite it might be not a coalition of love but of convenience to go back to your old partner surely a a bitter pill to swallow for many court supporters but if no coalition can be negotiated Australians could find themselves yet again back at the polls for the third time in as many years Natalie Carney for dwi in Vienna Austria now and I'm Keith Walker in Bonn Germany. You're listening two inside Europe as well as providing some top notch competition this week's World Athletics Championships is a reminder that the Tokyo Olympics are getting closer and there'll be five new sports for spectators to enjoy one of them is sport climbing which will see the world's best rock climbers proving proving. They've got what it takes to live up to. The motto of the Olympics faster higher stronger and one of the smaller sporting nations has high hopes of a metal bonanza Slovenia has the world's best female climber Jagna Garden Brett at the latest in a long line of champions from this nation of just two who million guide Alana went to find out more as a World Cup competition in the Slovenian city of Cram by this chalk dust and excitement in the air at this World Cup sport climbing event in trend. Many of the world's best climbers are here looking for qualifying points for Tokyu Twenty twenty when sport climbing will make its debut at the Olympic Games despite did will be interesting because I something completely new completely different from Tom from the other sport. It is the only activity which move in the vertical will be a a big big surprise. Marcus Kalari is the president isn't the International Federation of Sport Climbing is a unique possibility to bring to the world unique sport making a better world through climbing timing is the vision of the FICA by division also of the IFC today there are sports that are closer to the youth the youth need a one two we have new things and if this new sports not only are others can be accepted in the sport community at large then it will become the bridge between the the Super New sport in a traditional spoke. The team kits on display here demonstrate that this is an important international event. There's the blue of Japan Ukraine's yellow and red read the Polish team but the local climates in the green white and Blue Vigna will be among the main medal contenders here and in Tokyo you ready all being Olympics was a dream off every athlete and solvers mine and I'm really happy that I think two thousand sixteen climbing became part of the Olympic family. I hear a lot of expectations from other people but it for myself. I don't put any pressure on myself. Jagna Gombrich is just twenty years old but she's already won multiple world championships and World Cups Olympic gold would complete the set first camp. I was fifteen hours. I was second at European in at the same time in the World Cup. I was second and Yeah I think the sport must evolve me on climbers must come and to challenge older competitors so I think it's really good for the people have not been initiated into it before the three elements so elite climbing as the one who climbs the highest wins and and then we'll drink you have four or five boulders and four or five minutes for each problem and speed climbing the name says it all the one climbs the fast as the same route with the same hold so as a spectator sport. It's going to work then yeah. Of course it's going to work but it's not the only Slovenian Indian climber with metal hopes the two other women currently ranked in the world's top ten and two men in the top twenty. Perhaps it's just as well that each country can have a maximum axiom of just two representatives in the Olympics. Thomas Chessen is the organizer of the World Cup Event and Karan and coach two generations of Slovenian climates. This is the advantage we have because we are very small and the national team always trained together always which is probably not the case in bigger country. I I was seven years. National team. Coach always wanted that. We worked together as a team. It's good that you are competitive but you have to cooperate between each other because nobody is so good that he can still learn something from from the each other. Obviously this is the kind of formula Slovenian might be really good at this game but others on too shabby either candidate's. She'll McCall is a former world champion combined climbing and he's already secured his his place in Tokyo. He says that will be the culmination of decades in the spoiled. You could have almost given me any format at the Olympics Viet my weakest disciplined which is speed gleaming and I probably still would have tried to go for the Olympics for me. The Olympic represents kind of the epitome of sport even though some people prioritize me with their World Cup. Stop the world championships over it for me. The Olympics is something that I've seen since being five or six years old and always wanted to do it wasn't until I was twenty eight twenty nine signed that climbing got accepted into the Olympics Virginia so it'll be well worth looking up if you're heading Tokyo next year or even just watching TV after all as gone but puts it in what other sport can see someone hanging by two fingers fifteen meters take off the ground guide along D-W cran inside Europe gives you the big stories from Europe every week news politics culture sports and more you can also subscribe to inside Europe on your favorite podcast APP up and if you'd like to contact the show we would love to hear from you. Our email address is Europe. Ask D. W. dot com. This is inside Europe and I'm Keith Walker and bomb uh-huh Yeah mm-hmm. This is inside Europe and I'm Keith Walker in Bonn Germany in the next half an hour. Portugal votes votes in a general election and notably absent from the ballot papers are far right and populist parties refined why in a moment plus one man's how rowing search for the last traces of his grandmother before her murder and the Holocaust sometime in late nine hundred forty two my grandmother mother Marta moved from her Rotterdam hideout Frau Nader loss house and slay dragons. She should have stayed put at the certain moment someone in the neighborhood mentioned into the germs replete from there's something wrong in that house at a moment's they were betrayed. Did they would take it away also coming up. It's exactly one year since the death breath of Saudi journalists Jamal Khashoggi the latest from Turkey on the murder investigation these stories and more on the way from the studios news of Germany's international broadcaster d-w this as inside Europe Portugal is holding a general election this weekend but not surprises are expected after several years of intervention by the way you and I am. F- as the euro zone crisis hits the country a leftist government has has guided Portugal to relative stability since two thousand fifteen. It's been led by Prime Minister Antonio Costa but the success of the country's centre-left as not the only the thing that makes Portugal unusual in a European context guy head coach reports from Lisbon the Socialist Party members John Les Support for Prime Minister. Tonio Costa is he arrives at a campaign rally early in Santorum near Lisbon. The Socialists election campaign has been based on their achievements in government over the last four years you Antonio Costa is now inside addressing a row socialist audience the success the Socialist Party here in Portugal however contrasts with the problems that center-left parties have been having elsewhere in Europe which makes the country quite unusual usual but there's another thing that makes Portugal difference to other European countries and the fact that has no far right or populist Dallas party to speak up in the political arena. The ability of this government to govern successfully is of course related related with the lack of success of the far-right and the two of them are also tied to the fact that pro European sentiment is on the rise in Portugal. They are the three phenomena are rebutted. I would say usual. Columba is a socialist member of parliament and a junior minister. While the political opposition warns uh-huh that Portugal's economy remains vulnerable Calamba says its growth in the wake of the euro zone crisis this both won over voters and restored their faith ace in the European project. We've increased job significantly. We've increased minimum wage. The average wage wages in general arising. We were able to to do this while reducing the deficit and ended up so we we sort of manage something that many considered impossible. I think that is one of the one of the reasons uh-huh why we we differentiate ourselves from other socialist parties in Europe waiting to catch one of Lisbon's famous yellow trams the one of the measures introduced by this leftist government has been to make public transport cheaper but the social and economic achievements of this government and not the only reason why populism and the fall right to having so little impact on Portuguese politics political scientist Maureen Costello says that immigration so often a major issue for populist movements has had relatively little impact in Portugal Portugal. Were there have been fewer arrivals than in many other. EU countries identity immigration is not really discussed in the Portuguese political ICAL system anti immigrant attitudes existing portable they they are not a minority view anti elite attitudes exist exist but these people they either abstain so they simply do not participate in the system or vote on extremely devote for the community. We just saw the left block the extreme right parties that tried to exploit these feelings have not really been successful the mainstream rights it has refrained completely from these kinds of issues and the left mostly emphasized socioeconomic issues. Vilamoura mood fair now four zero five years since the Portuguese peacefully ended four decades right wing dictatorship the ship the carnation revolution this folks on Granola Bela Morena was the soundtrack to those momentus times in one thousand nine hundred seventy four you see the many poaching believes that historical memory is playing a role in keeping the far right away from the mainstream pedophilia. Swedish is a member of parliament for the Left Block which is supported. Mr Costa's government over the last four years. The memories of the Fascist time are not good memories for our people and that memory still exists there was people starving in Portugal. There was a big unemployment rate so people remember that when we lived under dictatorship things were wrong doc and that consciousness. I think that is still the president nowadays not everyone agrees that the country is somehow immune to the rise of the hard right or to populism populism in general but right now so many nations wrestle with polarization and instability there is a feeling that Portugal is different. Go ahead Chicago. Dwi Lisbon and I'm Keith Walker in Bonn this is inside Europe Wednesday marked the first anniversary the death of Saudi journalist Jamaica Sergey Turkey says Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by -ociety hit squad inside the consulate has caused international outrage and a year on it continues to remain internationally contentious with Turkish president reg type one pledging to find all those responsible for the killing. Dwi Turkey correspondent Brian Jones has been following the investigation for inside Europe. Hello Dorian memorial took place on Wednesday outside the Saudi consulate and you were there. Yeah that's right. It was a very moving fair considering that it was held just a few meters eaters from the Saudi concert where Jamal Khashoggi exactly a year ago was killed by a hit team and his body dismembered inside inside the building in fact Kashogi visiting the building to get documents for his plan forthcoming wedding and his fiancee was waiting outside the building when he was killed field now. Hoti J. J. Fiance led the commemoration she gave a very moving speech saying she remained proud and committed to holding account everyone responsible countable for car show. Jeez murder and that was a message that was echoed by international human rights groups United Nations Rep on tour Agnes Calamar to carry out an investigation into the killing and also the owner of Amazon's Jeff Bezos. He was also. They're given the fact that he owns Washington Post. Which Khashoggi was writing for canoes paper he uses a platform to launch very strong attacks on the Saudi regime and in particular Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman the prince actually really you probably heard that he was on US media I and he was talking. Let let's have a listen to the audio clip but he decided he took full responsibility as as a leader in Saudi Arabia here is the crime print speaking on sixty minutes on CBS with news anchor Norah O'Donnell. Did you order the murder Jamal Kashogi absolutely not this was a heinous crime and I take full responsibility as a leader in Saudi Arabia especially since it was committed by individuals working for the Saudi government what's their reaction to that interview in Turkey in well in credulity I mean I spoke doc with international human rights groups and they just said this denial was absolute rubbish. This was also he's a view that has expressed by United Nations in their investigation saying basically Wrigley with inconceivable that such a murder of such a high profile person in a diplomatic building belonging to the Saudi Arabia could be carried out without the knowledge of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman given the fact that he's effectively the rule of the country on rules with an iron grip and this is really the views of many observers and experts. It's on Saudi Arabia. They just say that this kind of high level murder would not have been carried out by these individuals unless they got to go ahead from senior officials and most likely the crown prince now the crown. I'm Princeton is this but even to this point in particular led by the Turkish President of Typos one is calling for all to be held to account and that is seen as including the crown prince uh-huh well claiming that he's determined to hold all those responsible for the killing and they're helping people charged. I mean what's the latest with the investigation. Well that's right. There is at least eleven people. The Saudi prosecutors have charged with the murder Kershaw G. and five of them are facing the death penalty but it has to be said that observes the said that these is are probably the people that actually cared out the killing they were in fact the hitting were caught on Turkey security cameras arriving in Turkey the day before Khashoggi's murder. They were all clearly identified identified but the key question here is who gave the order. It's not believe that these people acted alone and that is why the attention still focused on the crown. Prince Saudi was eh very outspoken critic over the Saudi Arabia Prince and Amazon has he. He's taking a very strong position but I gotTA ASK YOU DORIAN Roy zone record journalist freedom as a little bit suspect given that Turkey is often labelled as the world's worst jailor OV- reporters so why is the Turkish president taking this stance well prisoner one did no Khashoggi they were believed to be quite close but beyond that this this really is providing the Turkish president a rare opportunity to take them international moral high ground as you said that he's been hammered in the last few years for his record on journalists freedom. I'm inside Turkey. Turkey's retuned labeled as the worst jailer of journalists as well over one hundred in jail possibly a lot more on this crackdown continues to this very day but one has taken the Kaji case and has pushed very hard to keep it in the international agenda and I think key factor here is to that one is arrival. All of the Crown Prince Salman in the region. These two countries Turkey and Saudi Arabia are battling it out for control of the Sunni Arab world a battle that is increasingly need dividing the region and this is seen by an opportunity to weaken the crown prince Thaddeus. What is continuing on this battle to try and keep a crown prince held to accounts okay? Thank you very much. You'll walk. Dwi Turkey correspondent Brian Jones speaking there from Istanbul from Germany's international broadcaster DWP. This is inside Europe. She was the grandmother mother he never knew martyr. Goldstein Cottam Berg was born in Krefeld Germany married to Dutchman murdered at SOBIBOR death camp in Nazi occupied Poland in April nine hundred and forty-three until now Canadian documentary maker David Katzenberg has had few tangible memories rays of his grandmother's life and death some black and white photos and a small plaque on Mount Zion in Jerusalem next week. Marta will be commemorated in the Dutch town of sleet direct twelve brass plaques will be placed in a sidewalk fair engraved with the names of Dutch Jews arrested at that very spot by Nazi police among them martyr this past summer. David traveled to sleep direct to learn more about his grandmother's fate. I'm on a train from Rotterdam headings of the village sleep direct a forty minute trip up the Rhine River. I'm going to visit the spot where my grandmother hid from the Nazis along with nine other Dutch Jews back back in the darkest days of the German occupation of the Netherlands on March third nineteen forty three dodge. Police arrested did them five weeks later. My Grandmother Marto would be marched out of a cattle car and into a gas chamber of SOBIBOR death camp in Nazi the occupying Poland this coming October seventh a commemorative stone will be weighed down with my grandmother's name on on us at the empty. Lot were hiding place stood. I can't be there that day today I can. The commemoration of my grandmother's life and death is being organized by a group of Sleet direct resonance. None of them are Jewish Garrett. Venice is one of them. Hey Garrett Jerod hello you. You took the right train. I took the right train. Look it was not difficult easy. Yeah Okay Garrett and I head to the local synagogue to meet other members of his group and talk about their commemoration project on the way he tells me how their project began in response to anti Semitic graffiti around town. I'll Hitler Z. Kyle and that kind of thing and at that moment yeah I thought Oh this was current. Recent Anti Semitic stuff made me show that still needed to be remembered Garrett and his group wanted to response to the hateful graffiti but how a project by German artist Guenter Damn Nick came came to mind. Damn Nick has been laying down stole per Stein across Europe stumbling stones small brass plates engraved with the names of Hitler's victims in front of the places where these people lived Garrett and his group decided to take up demings project. They identified four. He jus either arrested here in sleep direct or who fled and got arrested elsewhere. One of these was my grandmother. Garrett and I arrive at the synagogue. It's the only synagogue here and sleep direct. The only one in the world built on a dyke makes us pick so is the only synagogue in the world built on a dyke days lenders evidence against we will say approach so please don't look it up. Ronald Kits Helps Ronald local foundation that looks after the one hundred and seventy five year old synagogue slay dragons. Jewish community goes back to the eighteenth century. No more than a half dozen families ever lived here a total of thirty three people nine hundred thirty of these Hitler murdered. All the five kids shows me the names of the victims on a display board hanging on the wall aw these other Jews who lift in cigarettes when they were taken away by the German these people who were born Stephen Act. It's taken away from another place and these are the people who have a been highlighted in St at one of them. Was Your grandmother there. You're in the middle of the list is my grandmother. Marta Goldstein Katzenberg above and below Martha's sister in law and best friend Esther Hattiesburg Battenberg and Esther's sister Antoinette turning away from the names of Jews arrested and sleep draft during the war Ronald shows me the sacred secred belongings of sleet draft Jews from years past that used to belong to Jewish people live a few generations ago instantly uh that it makes us very special for US Jewish prayer book we step over a Mikva a Jewish ritual bath now covered in glass into the synagogues conference room there around a table. I hear about the house where my grandmother. Hid here in sleep direct act between one thousand nine hundred forty two nineteen forty three in a big house owned by a woman named Elaine Tornado off. This House is the House Way Grandmother Lived Garrett describes what life was like at Frau Nater lofts Hideout Saxon boxes. Fox's of potatoes to eat and coal for heating arrest was always imminent turning Jews worth seven and a half guilders sleep correct mayor had provided names common practice. Ronald tells me also did in our Fitch here well. They're use awesome. They gain with them important them out and these were these were Dutch police. Yes Sir yes yeah by the German but they were there. It was a lot of indifference. It seems that they don't care fearing their time. HAD COME SON tried to flee. One of these was Jack Van Heller and in the summer of nineteen forty two drives to move across river but but but it went wrong the bolt old she used sank on the river and they were picked up by the by the police and they were brought away to west Balkan from reservoir to outreach sometime in late nineteen forty two my grandmother Marta moved from her Rotterdam hideouts used to frown eight or lofthouse sleep direct. She should have stayed put at a certain moment someone in the neighborhood mentioned mentioned into the germs or to deplete from there's something wrong in that that house at a moment's they were betrayed. Yup and then they were taken away. Garrett and his friends take me to the spot where frown lofthouse stood on the way we stopped to see some of the commemorative stones have already been weighed down bearing during the names of murdered. Jews everyone peers down at the brass plaques and your founders star translates the engravings this is for the family declined climber who lived in this house father mother and the folk pitts says airlift and then the name born in eight hundred sixty nine arrested on the fourth of September nine hundred forty two murders in cyberspace thirty first of March forty-three. You show these to school children to people twice a year. We invited the kids from the schools to to clean them up with each other. How do they react to this. How do the children respond they are very interested. They've lost with some children older stones and they do as a job of honor to do that yeah and listen to the stories he's so they know that in this house that we're living children just like they are and they were taken away by the Germans and they never come back next. Stop Stats. He owns there the moment I've been waiting for talking about. My grandmother a`mother even thinking about her makes me cry. Instead a moment of levity a photographer from local news station approaches us from across the street St Camera in hand a brief story about my visit the sleep direct and snapshot will appear this evening at the website of Snee- drek twenty ninety four twenty four hour news every day. This is a new story here in Cedric. The major grant mother who left in nineteen forty two now has gone of course gone indeed all that's it's left of my grandmother's final home disheveled forest of grasses and flowers in front of a parking lot and the Strip mall. This place was the front door of the house. Where you know we we know because that's because off off to police reports that were then people hiding an eight of them among the rebel with them were picked up by the police and managed to escape and they flew that way the direction of of the dyke and they escaped along the dyke and we're caught? Yes I think the eight managed to get to the show so I think eight. It just stopped and put their hands up gates. It's dominant well. Maybe maybe they hoped that they would get away in that way got. It didn't happen on October fifth or sixth. This cobblestone sidewalk in front of the spot were stats Jones number thirty two who stood will undergo minor excavation a dozen wooden blocks will be inserted on October seventh German artists. Damn Nick will replace these with a dozen brass top stopper Stein one four froude ancient lawf- who perished at Buchenwald three months before its liberation three four the Jewish family who lived here at the start of the war and were deported eight for those who ran end for their lives on Wednesday march third nineteen forty-three towards the sleep direct dike but were caught among these my grandmother Marta my aunt Esther and Esther's sister Antoinette a place to come visit to remember or the grandmother. I never knew bless her soul. In Heaven Tears will flow David Katzenberg doc he w sleepy drafts and I'm Keith Walker in Bonn. You're listening to inside Europe. Uh environmental activists are becoming increasingly vocal about our overheating world and they're putting further pressure on governments and industry to take action action. Many of them are also learning new tactics at so called climate camps at one such calm recently in eastern France over a thousand people attended attended. John Lawrenson has more militant practice going all floppy as they're carried away by police once they put you down. You can usually just walk back and lie down again. The instructor says good tactics were looking roads access to buildings new prime minister's etc among them twenty-seven-year-old public speaking trainer Raffaelle Mukta and twenty-three-year-old. It student June leukemia explains their motivation for actually. I didn't want to go to this camp. I just didn't have choice. I would like to spend my days in my garden just just relaxing not worrying about climate crisis and the social environmental impacts that are happening every day but we all living in the system. That doesn't much my values anymore. I feel alone may feel so perot less and that's why we we need to unite and we need to organize and that's what this is about. I always loved nature and I always cared about the environment don't but this year was very percents with the resignation of our minister of the Environment Nikola and then all the protests over march for climate. It's made me realize how serious the situation is and that it was not a new climate crisis but first and then -mergency because some of the students at the banner making workshop unfurl large one announcing a spoof international climate summit the center of Giant Direct Action Exercise. That is the climate camps Grand Finale June tells me about the way he's changed changed his consumption habits to match his environmentalist principles. I reduced meat consumption. I stopped flying except when necessary at an individual's I just also realized that you cannot change the system and that actually the system that is because the system is extractive. EST relies on the district of our resources it creates value and the district of the Earth. It's not sustainable system. That is not sustainable will collapse one day or another this day is it's pretty close now. A group of ministers diverse the attention of a unit of fake police kitted out with Kabul food shields Kabul batons put flood water sprayers fatiha gas so that's another group from clamber over the security barriers before blocking the entrance to the summit with lion and finally storming the building where militants disguised as security eighty guards with dark glasses and earpieces lead away to others playing donald trump and Emmanuel macron. It isn't that easy to disrupt an international summits out the real world but protest believes is our only hoping the first thing that they hope is that if we cannot cannot stop climate chant we can limit it as much as possible because every point one degree means min something and is important and is worth fighting for another thing that they hope I hope for more solidarity around the world and especially especially regarding the world's and the conflicts that cremate change risks to create and the subject of climate refugees. This winter is starting to be an issue John Nelson d-w kings of France and I show for today inside Europe gives you the big choice from Europe every week news politics culture and more. It's produced withheld from Helen Seaney. The technician is get Georgi and I'm Keith Walker. You can also subscribe to inside Europe on your usual podcast. APP inside Europe comes to you from Germany's international broadcaster D. W. in Bonn Yeah take the.

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Tuesday 28 May

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:50 min | 1 year ago

Tuesday 28 May

"You're listening to the briefing I cost on the twenty eighth of may two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four. Hello. And a wool Markham to the briefing coming to you live from studio. One hit at Midori has in London. I'm Emma Nelson coming up on today's program, a would be leader of the conservative party warns against a no deal Brexit. That's why I think what we need to do is have a new negotiating team in that team needs to be not just the government. But the DP the I think you should have someone from Scotland and Wales. So that's the union side of these issues is properly thought through ask if this will help Jeremy hunt win the race for number ten. And if Brussels will pay any attention also coming up the Austrian chancellor, loses the confidence of his government in various speeches, and interviews, his presented himself as a victim, second stances, true, patriot, who was only friends with the foul ride out of necessity. A man in Vienna will Documenta rapid downfall and look ahead to who might replace him. Plus, we get the latest business news and we go through. Cheesed as papers to all that right here in the briefing. With me Emma Nelson. You're listening to the briefing, very warm, welcome to today's program and the race for number ten Downing Street is getting noisy so far. We've had candidates for no deal candidates keeping that Qods close to their chest and candidates, you clearly have no clue. Well, the latest conservative politician vying to be the next British Prime minister to speak out is the current foreign secretary Jeremy hunt. He's warned if the dangers of a no deal Brexit, and has also advocated the rewriting of the deal to resume agreed last November with Brussels. We'll pull Osborne is a regular voice on monocle twenty four and takes some might see as an unhealthy strong interest in politics. But we are grateful for that full welcome bites monocle twenty four. What is Jeremy hunt said Germany home is one of ten conservative candidates to so far emerge the party's leadership. It is already a very crowded field, you'd think he'd be in a strong position as foreign secretary though, he is not a full on no deal. Brexit tier and that certainly. He seems to be the mood of the conservative party of the activists who make the decision on who the next party leader is going to be now what he is warning today is that even if you wanted to know deal Brexit, because you think that's the way to save the conservative party after the electric kicking they had in the European elections. He thinks it would actually be political suicide now as complicated reason why he says, if the next conservative, prime Minister, Abe committed to taking Britain out of the e at the end of October without a deal. The only way MP's could stop that from happening will be to have a confidence vote in the government, if they managed to bring down that government and some conservatives would have to vote to bring down a Tory government, but it's entirely possible if that happened that could trigger a general election Jeremy hunt's view is if you look at the results of the European elections of the local council elections a few weeks before it is blinding the obvious of the conservative party would not win general election. So the danger would be. He would see it of say the labor party being elected. Jeremy Corbyn becoming prime minister and it being Jeremy Corbyn who got to decide what happened next on Brexit. So his warning to the Tory party was a no DO Brexit may sound very romantic and exciting and exactly what appeals to you personally, but it doesn't appeal to the rest of the country. And we've already seen the capacity that voters have to take this out on the Tory party. Hang on. Hang on this seems to be a concentration entirely on the survival of the British Conservative Party. And dare I say it takes very little account of what might actually happen to Britain next to no account of what might actually happen to Britain because the people who will decide on the next prime minister, they are officially deciding on the Tory either. But they will effectively decided the next prime minister is the rank and file members of the conservative party. There are around about one hundred sixty thousand of them. Now that is about North Point three percent of the UK population. They are the only people who get us say and survey after survey of to survey has shown they are passionately, pro Brexit, and not just in favor of leaving the EU there in favor of leaving the European Union without a deal. Not even attempting to renegotiate the deal just leaving. And so if you want to be Tory lead the constituents, you have to talk to is not the millions of people who deserted the conservative party in the European elections. It's the one hundred. Sixty thousand hob Brexit, supporting Tory activists predominantly over the age of sixty predominantly, male predominantly with the very set view of the world. They are the people who will determine who the next prime minister, as so this campaign is all about them. Likely to react, stole this, especially recr- a request to reopen the talks. Well, this was the other thing, Jeremy hunter, said today's that if he was chosen as Tory lead if he became prime minister, he would go back to Brussels and want to renegotiate the entire thing. Now, look, the EU has been very specific that it is not going to reopen the withdrawal agreement, and indeed, the prime minister's spokesman saying in the last hour that the legal tax that has been agreed with the EU is that the UK would not seek to reopen the withdrawal agreement. So we would we would be in breach of our existing agreements with the European Union. If we went down that route aside from the fact that the EU has been pretty clear, so far, that it's not interested in reopening negotiations, which issue to say, well, all we looking at a no deal Brexit off to the European elections. It looks increasingly likely the Downing Street saying this morning, they are continuing to prepare for no deal. It remains. The legal default if no actual deities in place by the time we got to that deadline at the end of October. The prime minister is Julian Brussels later today for meeting if he you lead us to assess the implications of the election results across Europe shot Theresa May's ju to meet Donald tusk in Brussels later to update him on the statement that she gave on Friday, when she now cheaper resigning. Mentioning Donald tests. K was the one who wound in March, the United Kingdom had Betty use the time, it has between now on the thirty first of Tober, Why's -ly is there any sense of anyone would would agree with Donald tusk is saying, well, I'm sure there's lots of people would have sympathy and think that, that was an eminently sensible thing to say that the, the, the problem is, is the process we ju- to leave at the end of October deal or no deal. We are now in the position with a lame duck prime minister, who will be in place, probably until the tail end of July, which means that the new prime. Minister wants this leadership process has been worked through, we'll not really have their feet under the table until the beginning of August by which time parliament is already due to have broken up for the summer now. It's also pointing out the EU institutions pretty much shut down for the summer as well, British politicians returned to Westminster at the start of September, but any for few days, because then break up for that autumn party conferences, and that takes another month. So they don't really get back down to serious business in Westminster until the beginning of October. So you're talking about several weeks before that Brexit deadline. That's without thinking about the idea of a new prime minister wanting to renegotiate the whole deal or start from scratch in some other way or just announced that we're going to leave without a DO. So the amount of time that is available before that deadline is very, very tight. Now, a lot of people, including conservative commentators at the weekend in newspapers in the UK was saying, we need to. Except right now that it is not possible, particularly if you want to try and renegotiate, it is not possible to do this by the thirty first of October you need another extension. You might as well ask for it now. And it probably needs to be quite a lengthy one another year or something now with the EU agree to that maybe not because they're new commissioners, take office at the Stafford November. That's why they wanted this wrapped up by the end of October. But also the mood music in the Tory party remember, those one hundred sixty thousand hard Brexit supporting activists who make the decision. You try running to be leader of the conservative party, and the first thing you're going to do is trying to lay Brexit by another year. You might as well not bother to fill in the paperwork. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the briefing with multiple twenty four. It's thirteen nine in Brussels, which is where we had now because e you lead is a gathering to pick over the results of this weekend's elections, and to be in the torturous process of considering candidates for the e u top jobs. It's tusk expected to last month's Iran. Heath is a political editor for politics. Politico in Brussels. And I'm delighted to say he joins us on monocle twenty four. Now Ryan, a very warm, welcome back at just explain to us. They're a five big beasts in need of replacement by the end of the year. That's exactly right. So that is three presidencies of the European Parliament Council commission, plus the European Central Bank presidency clus, the foreign High Representative and some people may also consider the commission secretary general post, the top civil service position is now one of the big jobs that needs to be factored in here. And so I interviewed the man who holds that post now mountain. So my, he's considered the most powerful bureau bureaucrat in the world by many people, and he thinks it's going to take. Several meetings possibly several summits before we can come up with a package that takes account of really interested before big crow EU groups that are going to be in the European parliament and that fact is in some kind of mix of their policy concerns as well, because we are dealing with no just an enormous number of very important jobs that need to be considered. But the complicated, I think someone described as a rubik's cube. You have a need to have leaders from both north south east west Europe men, women left, right? The balance is almost impossible to strike, isn't it? That's exactly right. And you can run a coalition through a number of different arrangements, mathematically, it's possible to do it with several different three party combinations. But if you want to make sure that it sticks in the system, doesn't come up later on. It makes more sense to include four parties at the same time, they don't want to invite many Euro-sceptics into the tent to disrupt things people like Victor or abandoned. His Fidesz party, a one of those line Bohl Kohl's when it comes to do you have them in the tent or outside of the ten but you want to show Europeans that you've somehow listen to the result of the election which did send more populous than nationalists to Brussels. So this is just going to go on and on and on. It's not going to be sorted out of this summit. This afternoon. How about beginning though, because we already know that Angola Michael, and Emmanuel Macron art odds over who should replace Sean called Lou Yonker, as president of the European Commission angle Mackel wants the German, EMMY p mantra vaber. Emmanuel Macron, doesn't exactly. So I think that for German, domestic reasons, Anglo Muko is going to have to go in and defend Manfried vaber today, even if it's very possible that she ditches him at a second or third meeting, because he's just finally got relations back on track with the Bavarian Christian Social Union, wave abors from and ditching him today is not a very good look. But Emmanuel Macron loves to dig his heels in, and he has said from the very beginning, he doesn't support the spits in candidate system, which put Veba Frans, Timmermans, and some other people forward and he is much more interested to get someone like Margaret Avesta the competition Commissioner into the job. And then, of course, you have shadowed candidates like Michele Bundy, who everyone respects but isn't officially on any sort of debate stage or anything like that. And so it's, it's really going to take a long time to, to have that sort of first round of candidates, either has this short getting the job or having them knocked out for some of those sort of cancelling outreach? Season because they just can't get the support of more than two or three party groups you mentioned, the idea of the bits and candidates system. What is it? And what is it that causes so much problem just accelerating the first? The first problem. So that is a process, whereby European putty groups uh supposed to nominate one person that they would like to see as European Commission president. And though they don't appear on a ballot paper. Anyway, the idea is they were supposed to go in campaign across Europe during these last six weeks, so that people have some idea of who could be the European Commission, president, now the liberals put forward seven people as a way to kind of sort of poke a stick at the system, the greens put forward two candidates because they won't always gender balance, the eurosceptic potties, didn't put forward any candidate and the European People's Party who are the main beneficiaries of the system because they got the most seats in parliament. They put forward this guy Manfred, Vevey, who's virtually unknown outside of Bavaria. Tell us a little bit more about what is likely to be resolved tonight, then I mean, you said that the, the beginning of a long process. But we'll, we is that likely to be any kind of outcome after tonight's dinner. I think that they more likely to give some policy framework guideline. Rather than candidate guidelines. So, for example, it was a very clear message in the election, that a climate needed to be treated more seriously that you were paying level. So I think you might see some gestures in that direction, of course, migration attacks of being issues that have been bubbling up a love as well. So if you want to keep issues that kind of touch on different parts of the political spectrum, you might make a, a longer list of policy statements tonight. And then what they might do is give a timeline of when they're aiming to resolve it by either at the June summit or some of the dates which hopefully would before everyone goes off on this summer holidays. And finally am Ryan tennis little bit more about what will be discussed with regards to the European parliamentary elections a weekend, which saw Europe's politics, fragmented and lots of European is finding that position slightly shaken and not only shaken but potentially out of office. So this might be the final meeting that Sebastian cooks, the Austrian chancellor, attends the same goes for. Texas super says the same goes for rest Molson in Denmark, and shrug Michelle is probably going to lose his job in Belgium, but it might take several summits for him to actually be kicked out the door, given how slow things what can Belgium? So I think they will actually be a touch of sadness in and say a wills as well as a debate about who was elected as an EMMY P mine. He thank you very much indeed. Joining us on the line from Brussels. He with multiple twenty four. It's time now for the latest business news, I'm joined now by you and puts from Bloomberg. Welcome back you and we were in Europe moments ago, and let's stay with Europe and the European Commission after Italy now. Yes. This is a Bloomberg screen with European Commission is considering proposing a disciplinary procedure for Italy. It's all over its failure to rein in its debt and it could pave the way for three and a half billion euro penalty now the recommendation from the commission. We're going to be one step in a long convoluted processors requires e governments to Wayne several times, and finance ministers would need to sign off on the so-called excessive deficit procedure recommendation, but as you wanted margin, this has not gone down very well in Italy. Matteo Matteo Salvini, the country's deputy prime minister says, I'm waiting through a letter from the EU, but the commission should acknowledge the people voted for change and growth. And it's clear that taxes won't be raised. And a VAT increase is not going to happen now. The e u is never find a country over its budget so far, but there have been that rumblings about trouble Italy for some time. Now, you remember the rules for the euro-zone require that deficit should be below free percents of GDP and debt on the sixty percents. GDP and obviously doesn't have big problems with the first of those things. But it's the second one that's the problem Italy's debt pile of the amount of debt that the government has accumulated over many years is not sixty percent in Italy. It's one hundred thirty two percent of GDP. So it is a long long way in excess of the targets and the European Commission wants to see Italy and other countries with high debts, reduce deficits gradually reduce that's debt load, but subway and he said in a TV interview today. That's do you think the in an historic moment with youth unemployment, fifty percent in some Italian regions when we have to rush, the high doctors, and nurses because otherwise the hospitals will be empty? Somebody in Brussels should in the name of the rules of the past our sister, pay a fine so Salvini who incidentally, very well in the elections over the weekend is not taking this lying down. Give me for saying making generalizations about is silly. But they have foam on this and says e you finds itself in a very difficult position because it also has to uphold the principle of making sure that each country keeps to its budgets. Yeah. It's tricky for the commission because, of course, you know, these are sovereign countries, and although they've agreed to sign up to the rules, Italy is not the first country to breach, the rules, but as you say, they do have form this, and they are a long way outside the rules. You know, then it's not sort of seventy eight percent of GDP. It's one hundred thirty two percents of GDP, but the way so Vini sees it. He has been elected to boost the Italian economy to spend more on certain things and not to raise taxes, so he sees. He has a clear mandate from the Italian people. And he's going to stand up against what Brussels say, let's move onto Amazon. They are threatening to remove the small businesses from that platform, expanded a little more interesting. This two months ago dot com. Holte too. Not to orders from thousands of supplies with no explanation panic ensued until the orders a quietly resumed weeks later. Amazon said this is just part of a campaign to weed outs. Counterfeit products now. It seems going to Bloomberg's sources are more permanent purge is coming going to really upend the relationship between the world's biggest online retailer and many of its vendors. The idea is I wasn't a costs and focuses wholesale purchasing on big brands like Procter and gamble, Sony, and LEGO, the plan is that generally speaking vendors setting less than ten million dollars in products each year to Amazon will no longer get wholesale orders from the web John's. So they will have to sell their products directly to customers on what's called Amazon marketplace. If you go onto Amazon, you'll see a lot of independent sellers will sell directly to you via the via the Amazon platform. The is here is these smaller centers will have to go through that rather than sending this stuff to Amazon soupy. Sold directly through the main parts of the site. And this does take place. It will be one of the biggest shifts and e commerce strategy since it's a I opened up the site independent Saleh's almost twenty years ago, it will cause a lot of concern to so-called mom and pop operations in the US and elsewhere in the world if this does happen, I'm saying that moment to any speculation of a large, scoured option of vendors is incorrect. So benching see whether this actually happens just reminded him of how big Amazon is in the US represents fifty two percent of all online sales, and US shoppers will probably spend about three hundred and fifteen billion dollars on Amazon this year even parts in the Bloomberg newsroom. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on monocle twenty full. You're listening to the briefing in a moment. We get the latest on the downfall of the Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz, but I the time twelve twenty here in London. Here's a summary of the latest world news headlines. An eleven year old girl is among three people who've died in an attack on a group of school. Children in Japan. A man holding knives in both hands attacked the children, as they waited for a bus in the city of Kawasaki. At least eighteen people have been injured. Europe's leaders are heading to Brussels to discuss the candidates for the e u top jobs, the haggling over posts including a replacement for the president of the e u commission. John Claude Janka is expected to take several months. So group will also discuss the results of the e u parliamentary elections, which are fragmented. European politics, an Israel could be heading back to the polls following Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's failure to form a government. The country's political parties have been in deadlock since last month's national ballot is that legislators could vote tomorrow on whether another election should now take place and those your headlines. The newspaper review in just a moment. But first, the Austrian chances Sebastian cuts, and his cabinet have been removed from office in the vote of no confidence. The vote was cooled by the social Democrats, and it came in the wake of a video sting scandal that brought down Mr. Kurtz is coalition with the far-right Freedom Party with all the Freedom Party ministers now, gone, Mr. Kurtz announced a cat, take a government, which he hoped to use as a springboard for his reelection in September. But those hopes were shattered by the opposition social Democrats and the Freedom Party when they insisted that cuts must share the blame for the turmoil and out he went. So what is next for Australia, while Monaco's Alexi Corey off is in Vienna? Forgotten just financier to Balint side. I his head also flood side, Filippo, brick. Foodie Politiken summit. It's been a busy few days for Sebastian. Course. In various speeches, and interviews his presented himself as a victim of circumstances. A true patriot who was only friends with the foul right out of necessity. Here's insisted that he's the only one with the now's skills to get Austria back on track. But they'll shrimp parliament wasn't buying any of this yesterday. Shaam Loza as he's been on for like. Denver here saying. I'm characteristically rowdy parliamentary session, you'll make his accused coulds of trying to concentrate all power in his own hands. The Freedom Party, quotas bedfellows, until just recently said he was too faced and the opposition social Democrats that the chancellor had abused their trust by failing to consult them at any point during this crisis. To his credit cords kept his cool and insisted that it was only trying to make things better. But this wasn't enough to save him. That means that could looked virtually on a salable just ten days ago, became the first leader in postwar train history to lose a confidence vote. He's also the shortest serving one appropriately enough courts means short and German. This is this. I don't on vote for us on the filter is to have Keppel's. Emotional speech following his removal coats called on his supporters to accept the decision with good grace. Besides he said, I'm still here. He made you. If dave. So where does that leave us? Well, PSA bust cuts may have lost his job, but he has lost. None of his popularity his conservative People's Party did extremely well in the European elections on Sunday. And that means that is likely to become chancellor, again after the snap elections in September until then though, Australia will be led by provisional chancellor. And it is now for president Alexander funded Belen to nominate one while he couldn't see a reach us coulds again given the current situation that person is likely to be a respected elder statesman like fundaments predescessor Heinz Fischer the president said we should know by the end of the week. Torino to break. It's given various the half and Teesta McLeish cat in all of us and focus for now. The job goes to finance minister Harvick logo and on conservative ministers will remain in their posts until solution is found for monocle in Vienna. I'm Alexi corridor. I like say thank you very much indeed. You're listening to the briefing on monocle twenty full. Let's have a look at the day's newspapers. Joining me in this tedious Monaco's. Call us rubella. Welcome caller. What's right. Well, let's start with this story are on the guardian. The newspapers international news pages here now the headline reads Mexican minister forced to resign after delaying domestic flight. The story is about Mexico's environment minister Jose Gonzalez blonde Blanco who was due to fly from Mexico City to Mexicali, a city on near the US border, and it hasn't been exactly confirmed. The reason for her delayed, but she made this plane delayed for by thirty eight minutes after calling someone part of the executive over the country's flagship carrier to ask for them to hold a plane for her. The plane was ready to set and to the part, how to get back to the gate, the pilot announcing that it was under pressure. Potential orders. Now, this might not seem like the end of the world and the reason for a minister to be forced to leave the government, but it's very much in direct contradiction to over doors, huge campaign promises of, you know, helping to clean up Mexico's politics and to help it fight corruption. And for it to be more transparent. So when this, this information came out, mainly through social media passengers that saw her boarding, the plane, and that she was the reason for the delay the it completely went viral. And she was forced to abandon the post. Well, this is it the trouble is, if you can, if you want to behave like that, make sure no one sees it and puts his on the internet. Let's move onto the financial times. Yes, the United Kingdom's broadcast is IT in BBC. Basically wanted to take on the likes of net flicks and they haven't incredib-. Good back catalogue? Outstanding drama, someone can understand why however, the falling out, they are. And I don't know how unexpected it actually is. I mean, we're talking here about a private broadcaster, public funded one that being IT end to BBC this is all about breadbox, which we've discussed when it was first announced here on monocle twenty four and this is their joint effort to go against Netflix net flicks have their own shows there. It's already brick boxes already available in the United States and advertisers, are, obviously, watching that market very closely more than how familiar subscribers in the US alone to some of their content. Now, the problem during these negotiations between the two seems to be defunct that currently BBC on the I player, the shows are available thirty days after the first broadcast and they want to increase that to twelve months, which means that if your program airs. Today, only in a year will would go and transfer over to breadbox, which is not the case with IT because their own player is not successful as the player, so they want the programs to be available more quickly than the deadline. Finally, let's move to the times. Not Don traders suffered tourists slump. No, great surprise. No great surprise there. But what was surprising to me reading the story is the fact that there, of course, in the talks with the government, particularly with the economy minister Puna Lemaire about this seventy percent drop in, in earnings for most of these local businesses, they are in talks about maybe allowing them to delay tax payments, and the does even the possibility of the government covers covering some of their losses. This is, of course, following the tragedy and the fire at Notre Dame cathedral now. It's basically construction site. So. So tourists that go there, they will go. They will take a photo and they will leave. They don't want to hang out in these taffy, as at have an amazing view over the cathedral because all you can see scaffolding and fences around it, because it is essentially being rebuilt. I wonder if some people are saying that it will take much longer than the five years at president, micro has, has, has, has given to rebuild Notre Dame, but I suspect, actually, the prisons will find a way to preserve the industry around that I didn't worry too much about that colossal Ravelli. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the program. That's all we have time for today's edition of the briefing. It was produced by Daniel Bateson research, biting, gopher, and Neelam Nietzsche student manager was Bill Lucci. The briefing returns tomorrow at the same time midday, in London. Seven AM? If you're listening in Toronto, I'm Emma Nelson. Thank you for listening give right?

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Monday 20 May

Monocle 24: The Briefing

33:49 min | 1 year ago

Monday 20 May

"You're listening to the briefing, first broadcast on the twentieth of may twenty nine teen on monocle twenty four. Live from London. This is the briefing on, Monaco, twenty four coming up tonight is not about me. It's not a bath. Even the liberal party tonight is about every single Australian who depends on the government to put them. Australia's prime minister clings to power against all expectations. We'll ask how Scott Morrison managed to pull it off. Also ahead, the UK's government is attempting to pass its beleaguered Briggs at deal for a full time, but has any of the detail in it, actually changed. Plus, the latest on a corruption scandal that has enveloped Austria's government and will have a Eurasian bonanza to all that ahead on the briefing live from London. Luster Elliot's conservative coalition as clung to power following a shock election victory at the weekend, Scott Morrison's, liberal party began Saturday night as the underdog with polls, pointing to a labour majority. But by the evenings end Morrison was declaring a miracle as the opposition leader Bill shorten offered his resignation. Let's get more on this. Now with John Huston who led astray lease liberal party between nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety four join the prime minister called his victory a miracle we use surprised by Saturday's result. Well, according to the polls, it wasn't Mary Coolum in the polls actually hitting the numbers, right? To forty eight that the wrong way round. They had toddy winning in the loopholes coming distinct second, and it turned out to be exactly the other way round. So that puts polling into question. But in those two were certainly miracle I don't think the expectation in the government was that they could win although. I think the prime minister Renai fairly effective negative campaign against the short dated. The said you know, your voice your vote is on them for me or for Bill show very, very you get Levi for short, you get short shortens always made unpopular in polling negative net satisfaction writing and the government said that he was really focused on that to hold him accountable for what you draw wanted wanted to draw and do and on the back of that. They're in a series of scare campaigns about the tie to retirees income and negative gearing on residential properties and so on which resonated, really in key elements of the electric, it was interesting to hear Scott Morrison's wording, they're really pointing to himself as the central thing to vote for, if you're going to vote for the liberal national coalition because he was, of course, put into the role after our sting, Malcolm Turnbull, the prevail. Ailing wisdom seemed to be that the liberal party simply wouldn't recover from the messy removal of Turnbull. But of course, if we look back in history, we know that Julia Gillard managed to survive her first election after Alston, Kevin Rudd tumble, one in twenty-six off to ousting, Abbott as well, and now Morrison's victory, could it be that voters, simply don't care about leadership spills, the way that we might assume? Well known earlier occasions where the spills were an issue in violations and state elections, certainly the times, the electrodes taken the baseball that to them, but it didn't carry through to this election. I think I looked at Morrison only on his merits. And as you said, he just ran a campaign boy, himself, essentially a number of the senior members of the government had retired and he didn't use to many of the others, the, the reminding members of the government, he basically ran the campaign himself everyday, and just focused on might at a contest between himself and Bill, shorten and then try to risings Audie and concern and fear. If you like about what sort of government, shorten would run. What sort of policies he would implement and a lot of it was a scam campaign though, short and, for example was going to take a decision on franking credits, which mart of. Impacted on a full to say, the Atari is that soon became an attack on retirement incomes, with the possibility of a will of a wealth, tax or a, a dance Judy. A massive scare campaign which was without any foundation. Good. I it resonated with the retirement community and that demographic the age demographic about sixty actually moved in response to this sort of scare campaign. We had lots of people calling this, the unloseable election for labour, which, of course, is quite a comfortable word to put it in their retrospectively. It must be said. But that's of course how lots of people describes the election that you'd fought against Paul Keating back in nineteen Ninety-three. Is it always too simplistic to call an election, unloseable though? I mean, certainly in this case, the polls were quite tied when they I'm happy to pass that tag over the short, and there's no problem about that after twenty five thirty years I've ever to defend it. But basically on lose -able is not no elections on Louisville. Mean there are expectations built, and sometimes as a result of poll, sometimes it's more broadly, in the vote, a community is. To who will win or should win. And there's sometimes no delegates in that sense. They've become on lose evil. But, you know, I think the, the focus of the device, has really been how much detail should you be prepared to give the elected in terms of trying to win government? It's always when there is a simple rule in Strayer basically that all positions don't we'd government government's lose them. But, you know, my package in early nineties, which was at a time of significant recession of the recession. We didn't need to have in our country abroad, vice reform agenda, almost every year, public policies and sounds of pages policy detail, which is now being seen as long as political suicide note in history. But short only focused on two or three tax concessions and that was enough though, to the as I said, the basis of escape campaign by the government against shorten and not, not only against him personally, but the sort of government, he would Li. Lead short and try to make it a issue really a class issue said he was going to text the top into town to the benefit of the average wage. Earner not quite true and retirees didn't see themselves as a top into town middle. Middle income families who had a rental property didn't see themselves as a top into ten. So he's Richard didn't help him and the public- to ov- electric policy. Dato certainly might easy for the government runs gave him. Well, as you say, John labor was quite remarkably upfront about many of its ambitious policy plans going into this election there. Now, lots of people saying that after this loss. No party will go into an election with such a clear agenda ever again. Now looking at that. I mean that might suggest a rather cynical future politics. What do you make of it? Well, politics in this country has become incredibly short term, and opportunistic mostly negative sort of daily guy is to school points on the other side or shift, climb to the other side. And, and I said, say him stances the two major parties have lost the law of electoral support back in the late non forties accounted for about ninety five percent of the vote now Sabet seventy percent as minor parties independence, so gradually pulled approaches foetal seniors are making his involved, which they might be able to bring forces on government for better government. I think that they misread the elected, the elected is, is really annoyed by the fact that they do feel, disenfranchised and ethnic. No, what the Bisi problems like the cost of living example, is a show to issue are ignored so Nita saw offing solution. Don't adding affordability or on energy prices which has rocketed through the roof. And you know, not really Salou. Here's chalk care and insurance. And so on the impact on the day-to-day cost of living of most families at the time we, why is the flat did sued record levels savings, oh exhausted and house prices a falling. So they wanted to see solutions. I don't wanna see, you know, continuation of the point scoring game in terms of longer term challenges. There's a very significant movement reflected in the number of Casey. It's about the inadequacy of the spawns response by both saw on the issue of change. They want to see proper transition strategy and, and comic plan. If you like that really looks at the transition to a low-carbon society over the next two and I didn't get that from other saw the so a lot of voter disenchantment and disenfranchisement with the major political parties that are not seem to actually being governing in their interests. A lot of civil absorbed behind him as you mentioned. Before china. Lasers scoring points on each other rather than solving problems. So the major issues are just kicked down the road. So I think the future it'd be unwise to try and go to an election without a policy started. You know, do you think if you we're prepared to sit out a medium-term agenda and Cavada enough detail consistent with that agenda? They chances agreeing reelected or elected would be much higher than my today. It'll be certainly interesting to see how both parties managed to handle things as we go into the next election, three years from now John Houston. Thanks very much for joining us here on the breathing. That was John Houston. The former leader of Australia's liberal body. Onto the business news. Now, I'm joined on the line by Sebastian Selleck from Bloomberg to best big news coming out about while way today, tell us what's happening. So this is the band that comes into force. It comes from President Trump, and he's is preventing all US companies from supplying to while actually this is hitting chipmakers in a big way Intel Qualcomm, as aliens broadcom Olivos, they've told their employees they're not going to supply while we're until further notice this is, according to Bloomberg sources Google as well, but hardware and subsurface our services, they going to cut off because, of course, Trump accusing wa of aiding Beijing in espionage. But this is also being felt outside the US and Asia here in Europe, we had Germany's Infineon falling in early trading after a report from nikei that it had hoped halted shipments to away following the ban. ST microelectronics and AM. AMS also had these some other chipmakers alway is coming out and saying it's going to continue providing security. Updates and sale services to customers using Google Google's Android. So if you have a Wally phone running Android, don't worry, you're still going to get support from then this really could disrupt the businesses of chip giants and prevent the rollout of critical five G wireless technology worldwide including in China, and that could hurt US companies that are increasing reliance on China for growth. So the impact here is really, really snowballing. Absolutely lots more snowballing to come at Saint L. Let's move along because there's more trouble at the travel company, Thomas Cook. Oh, they've had a terrible time. A three day drop of sixty percents on the markets that Baden's today tumbling to a record low. They have debt issues big time. They can't pay back this money that they, they need a lifeline loan. But in order to do that they have to set off their airline. I said the story today is about these Bonk's Ghani's reporting a payment intermediary is withholding money from Thomas Cook, this is obviously concerning. If you are a customer, if you're going on holiday, if you've books, you'll. Trip with this company, and they go under there's a likelihood humane. Okay. Your money back. There's a struggle likelihood you may not get gone whole day this summer. So it's a very potentially very dramatic outcome from this very tough business environment for European travel and airline companies because they've got so much capacity, they've called stuttering economic growth in the region, and high fuel prices. And this is creating a perfect storm that we're really seeing the effect of in Thomas creek. Particularly but does lifting of hands, for example, freezing expansion at a discount, Ryan edges this morning warning that prophet may fall. More this fiscal year. So is not alone in terms of the suffering that we're seeing here. There's a Pentti others getting affected here and the suggestion from some analysts CITIC group being one of them. Is it Thomas Cook undertakes a debt for equity swap which means that they'd have to pay the interest on the debt? But just the other day we saw them writing down the value of this saying that they see these shares being essential. Worthless, which is very damning to hear. If you're Thomas Cook shareholder, very bad news. Indeed Sebastian Selleck we'll have to leave it there. I'm afraid Sebastian and lake from Bloomberg. You're listening to the briefing. It's thirty minutes past twelve year in London. Lee, British Prime Minister Theresa may says that she will present a bold offer to the country's parliamentarians in order to get them to back her Brexit deal in what will be her fourth. Yes, you heard right fourth attempt. But has anything really changed will, I'm joined in the studio by the political journalist, and Westminster watcher, Terry St. Anthony, welcome back to the program, tearing I'm tempted to ask why. And this is being brought back yet again, it seems like the obvious question is it simply because may has run out of anything else to do. I think they've, they feel that they've got to have another ten what's going to be slightly different this time is that MP's will be asked to vote on an actual Bill. So we'll have an actual withdrawal agreement Bill that trees my hopes to introduce the parliament, and she sort of hope. Against hope, if you like this fourth time of asking that she can get MP's to agree with it. We've had lots of cabinet ministers going on there on a over the weekend. And saying this is kind of a last chance that we are straining every sinew to get this agreement through suggesting that it can be amended in the in later stages. So, you know, vote for it. Now, if you like, and we can change it later and to reasonably as talking she wrote an article of the weekend about talking about this bold new offer that, she says, as you mentioned, she's, she's going to produce but we don't know what that is yet. She's discussing that with the cabinet talks with the opposition labor party have pretty much come to nothing. Although to resume in this article was saying that she's managed to find some common ground with the labor party. But, you know, one or two resumes catchphrases, if you like over the last few years has been nothing has changed. And it's very hard to see, particularly as she's promised that she is going to leave office really quite soon. In what holds she has what new there is that she can offer actually is going to change any MP's minds. I mean it doesn't sound like the most tactical or strategic attempt to simply hope for the best. What happens if it fails well, one of the things that we know is very likely to happen, if it fails is firstly that Theresa May has said that she is going to stand down to make way for a new conservative leader. And we're already seeing over the last few days effectively. There is a conservative leadership contest in progress. I mean, I think we're up to something like twenty at least twenty conservative MP's, who have said they are possibly in the running or considering being in the running for next leader. So you've got to look at everything now really through the prism of who might lead the conservative party next, again, if it, if it doesn't pass, we are still talking about the possibility of no deal, which is now being pushed back until October, whether there will be any further extension granted, we don't know. No. All people again, talking about the possibility of revoking article fifty and going back to square one and starting over now there are various things that resume contrite offer. Both people on her own side, and people in the opposition, one of those is some kind of shift in to offering alternative arrangements over the Northern Irish board. Now again that's been tried already. It's been it's been proposed on under said they're very reluctant to reopen that whole question again. She can talk to the labor party. When she's sounds likely not to be offering more to the labor party in terms of workers rights, and environmental, protection, and so forth. Again, it seems very unlikely that many labor MP's will switch their vote because we've only had a very, very few a handful of labor MP's voting with the government in this, and she still has hasn't solved the question of Ireland and she has, as you say she has very little hold over her own party, because she said that. She's going to go. There's not much else that she can offer. She can often them her head on a plate. She can offer them something about Northern Ireland and we're not even seeing MP's who were persuaded to vote for the, the agreement last time turnaround, saying that everybody see any pointing that anymore. I mean, look, looking at this from the political perspective. However, I mean Brexit keeps getting kicked down the road as as we now but aside from being I mean, as you suggest this is leadership contest taking place, and it's, it's unofficial at the moment, but we can we're hearing lots of people saying, yes, I would like to be prime minister, basically without using those words. I mean aside from that being deeply disrespectful to the prime minister right now. What do you think that actually says about the state of British politics when the party that is supposed to be driving? One of the most consequential legislative changes in generations seems to be more interested in talking about itself right now. I think that's been certainly even the case about the conservative party for quite a while. And I think one of the divisions that comes out here is the people who think we must consider the future of the conservative party is a whole. And what does it take in order for the conservative party to, to get through this? And I think you know, if you're a conservative MP now you'd be really, really. Worried about the future of your party. We've just had the local elections where they lost upwards of a thousand seats and every one of those it's not just a seat. It's a person who goes out and knocks on doors for you and hands leaflets for you and goes to fundraising dinners for you. And you've got a lot of very disgruntled people there. The labor party is equally in disarray. I think most the major parties, one of the things we're seeing at the moment is that they can't rely on commanding the loyalty of their party members who've been with them, you know in many cases for decades. And obviously, we got the European elections coming up this week, and I think that's gonna show even more. The old two party system is not in functioning in the way that we have expected it to for the last, you know, very, many years. And I think it still remains to be seen, according to what happens next where where that goes, and, you know, whether these old parties survive in the, in the form, that we need them certainly feels that there's something's got to give at some point. We'll have to wait and see. When Terry Terry is always a pleasure to have you with us. Here's what else is making news today. The tech giant, Google has barred. The world's second biggest smartphone maker while away from some updates to the Android operating system. It's a major blow to the Chinese company and new designs of always phones are expected to lose access to some Google apps new figures suggest that Japan's economy grew unexpectedly in the three months to March the latest daughter shrugs off forecasts of contraction in the world's third largest economy. It's thought that the surprise expansion in Japan's gross domestic product was fueled by imports falling faster than exports and the miracle minute reports on Chicago's new mail, Lori Lightfoot she'll be sworn in today after winning last month's runoff vote Lightfoot is not only Chicago's first black female mayor. But he's the first openly gay leader to, to find out more about her head over to Monaco dot com and sign up to the monocle minute. This is the briefing. Twenty one minutes past the hour here on the briefing, Australia will hold an early election in September after secret video footage emerged v countries. Far-right vice chancellor offering government contracts to an alleged Russian investor in exchange for political support Monaco's Alexei Corey law reports from Vienna. In the stampede. John. Fifties inertly here for gay rights, and most field also helpful of Phillies in calcium from happen. But that's Austrian chancellor Sebastian could speaking on Saturday evening is now going to put up with Heinz Christian star anymore. This is the last straw because of what happened his calling a snap election enough is enough. We can Alec certain can. Outside the challenge, three thousands of people have been waiting all day for courses decision. And when news of the snap election came through their rutted in celebration. It all began on Friday, when two German publications, the news magazine, Der Spiegel and the dailies Deutsche site. Released secretly filmed footage showing Austrian vice-chancellor Heinz Christian struck hand, one of his deputies talking to a Russian woman. The woman claims to be the niece of a powerful Russian oligarch looking for investment opportunities in Australia for the meeting took place at Avila on the Spanish island of beatha in the summer of two thousand seventeen shortly before the general election that swept and his far-right Freedom Party to power in Australia in the footage. The woman offers to buy fifty percent of the popular Australian, tabloid Cornyn site on and switch. It said, to'real position to support his Freedom Party as a thank you talk. It would make sure that the woman would get lucrative construction contracts from the Australian government. The scandal quickly became known as a beatha on Australian session media. The public's verdict was clear start and his party Moscow stock had his resignation the next day. But for the time being the Freedom Party is still part of the government, it's ministers are under increasing pressure. That went other resignations could well follow, but there is a bigger problem here. He beat the gate has damaged not just the freedom policy. It has damaged all stream politicians such a case, of course, is damaging the trust into the political system and stemming the political system at the whole Stephens angle is an Australian political analyst, and he's been watching the developments closely so we will see how this is going to transform the discussion in Australian, especially about party financing about transparency. At think that in this field it will be necessary. Come up with fundamental changes that rebuilt the trust of the people. Just a week to go before the European elections. This couldn't have come at worse. Time for the Freedom Party. It's safe to say that won't do well in the snap elections either. But the next few months, again, be difficult for all policies Stephens angle, again, all parties, especially opposition parties. Of course, are now a little bit surprised by the velocity of this development and the artists themselves did not calculate that they need additional money for another campaign in this year if we are going to vote at the beginning of September. It means that the campaigns have beheld mainly in the summertime where a lot of people are in holidays, and so on so tight and hard time to compaign actually, but at the end, it will be far more difficult. Even if in the short term quits is able to gain some from the upcoming elections. It will be far more difficult for him to. Maintain the agenda, he maintained in the last one and a half years for now, though, chancellor, coaches priority is damaged confirm his own job is now in doubt, and questions will be asked of his involvement with the Freedom Party and the depth of his knowledge of its shady affairs. The extent of Russia's influence in Australia will also be major point of discussion. But most importantly, Australia time, political system will now be put on the scrutiny will there be an emotional revelations time will tell. For Monaco in Vienna. I'm Alexa coral. Thank you, Alexei. Not more to come from that story. We'll continue following as things transpire in Australia. You're listening to the briefing on, Monaco twenty four. Finally today. Miracles coacher correspondent, and I will say, at Eurovision correspondent, Fernando Pacheco has just returned from Tel Aviv. He's fresh off the plane. In fact, he was reporting on this big song contest, Financiero, still wiping, the gooder of your face. And then I must say, I mean, it was amazing weather in Tel Aviv was kind of twenty five twenty six quite semi, which makes for change, because in recent years, things have start covering. It went really cold and rainy countries like Sweden Ukraine. For much, much luck with a change on, on that horizon, given the one who took away the crown this year. We'll get that person saying, let's start off with some of your highlights though. Maybe just first up. Tell me broadly speaking, what were the main takeaways for you this year? Well, the main takeaway thing is routed, a great job in the arena was quite sleek. Technology cO in the us lot of former Eurovision winners on stage. I think it was quite an ambitious and perhaps one of the best revisions as an event in recent years as well. And of course, we had the bake control rec- as well tonight, the performance of Madonna, which in fact, who have short clip that we're gonna play it for, you know. Containment. I mean, I was watching from home, the comfort of my home. And I've got to say part of the reason I think that Madonna's performance didn't go down. So well is because it really came a little bit too late and very much in the lull of the show. I mean that gap from the final performance right up until we find out who's one. That's a really long time. And they didn't even get to Madonna that quickly. It wasn't as if they just said. All right. Don while you wait. Here's madonna. It was a bit of a way. You're right. Ben and actually was one of the longest revisions from Kim remembers bit more than four hours. It's usually around three hours and forty minutes. So perhaps there was testing a little bit a patient's, but, you know, I spoke to the director, general of the EU when I was there in Tel Aviv, and he said that he wants to take the song contest to the US for neurone two thousand twenty one and I wonder if you have people like Madonna just in Timberlake, two years ago, it's kind of the opening for that, because if he most Americans do know exactly what's revisionists. Okay, time I write an article. Once every two years or something like that. But I think the average American don't know. But, but as I said overall the show was pretty good. I had a few favorites as well. Tell me I got my favorites. But I come on, I, okay, I have to say this is no way was amazing. And when they come the votes on the jury vote, they're quite low, but they're number one on the telephone meeting that was amazing. I mean just listened to that song and tell me if you don't like this Ben, let's hear it. This only lie. It's beautiful. A highlight. Yes, I just kept thinking that bold, man reminded me of the boatman from Akwa yet. Well there he's from the nearby country. The Denmark, so perhaps they're related somehow country. He's bowled. He has a strange sounding singing voice. It's very European and that's another interesting thing about the difference between the jury and the telephoto which I actually quite like this spans because the I count, you know, the jury votes and only at the end the include the, you know, the televising and I'm glad because they're CHU forces, the jury tend to go for acts. They're more kind of I wouldn't say, boring, but, you know, they just have a beautiful voice and the performances, quite is not as kind of a foreign as the public likes, so then in the end, the winner is the one that managed to mix both of those things. In a way, I think it's absolutely essential. We've got to a point in history now where I think we can safely say that the general public cannot be trusted and we need. We need the comment of Eurasian experts to make sure everything turns out the way we would hope it turns out, although it must be said, we're going to the winner now I was deeply hoping for Kate Miller, Heike representing Australia. She was. Performance was, and I have to say, I think people when you're watching from the television, you saw those amazing visuals. And she was right on this on this poll, and of. And terrifying. Bendy sticks was terrified any will look amazing on the arena's, while sort of in terms of the effects. It was one of the best songs that she even did a little bit of your lane. You know that I'm a big fan and I've mentioned his on air before. And then you had the talian guys on my mood, a mood with Saudi what an excellent song, and quite oven guard. You know, when it comes to revision, and there's a funny fact ban to tell the winner has been announced it's been the most streamed song on Spotify from new revision every single day, only after the winner changed people are more interested. So clearly people liked that. So many almost one was a close a second. It was not like Neta, which one you know very ill. I mean just quickly before we listened to the do you think that the success of Mahmoud, and the fact that he has his whole story in him as a person has really transcended Eurovision into much more of a mainstream story, does that suggest that he might have some sort of mainstream musical success ahead of him? I think so from from what I understand his quite a big name, ready. Neatly. And is interesting few look at all. Those charts on I tunes at the moment he's doing very well as well. And so, is cane spirit in the sky, which which I'm very glad as well. All right. We need to have listen to who took away the night Fernanda, who was a it's the madeleine's. This is quite a beautiful ballot. Let's hear it from Dunkin Lawrence, arcade. Winner of Eurovision Fernando, you'll be looking forward to next year's is you. Absolutely. One thing I can say the Dutch fans they're always one of the loudest from what I've been. That's a good thing. They're really supporters even in the streets of Tel Aviv. Laura people the Dutch flags flags, so you'll be attending next year's performance. Then is you with a set of abbots probably. It could be to them. Rotterdam the Hague. We don't know, yet will be certainly looking forward to it for goes to check. Always a pleasure to get your insights from Eurovision. I'm not sure there's any news on whether a stray will be competing next year. But I can tell you right now that if one more personnel, xxx me, why straighter is still in Eurovision. I will be referring, you to the trillion prime minister, which is a fate. I would wish on no one that's all today's edition of the briefing. It was produced by Reese, James and researched by your linga thrown out. Studio manager was Kenya scarlet the briefing is back at the very same time to marina do join Juliette foster for today's edition of the Dory house, as going live at eighteen hundred here in London. Thirteen hundred. If you're listening in New York, I'm Ben Ryan. OB jetting off to the Cannes film, festival for the remainder of this week's do. Stay tuned to monocle twenty four. For more coverage for only world's most prestigious film festival. It all wraps up this coming Sunday, L hope, to be there to watch as the palm door is handed out to one lucky film makeup. But for now that's the briefing. I'm ben. Ryland. Bye-bye.

Australia prime minister Ben Ryan London Tel Aviv labor party Sebastian Selleck Eurovision Scott Morrison Google US Thomas Cook MP Bill shorten Monaco Freedom Party chancellor baseball Theresa May
Can We Inoculate Democracy From Populism?

The Tel Aviv Review

39:03 min | 7 months ago

Can We Inoculate Democracy From Populism?

"This is. One. The Tel Aviv review. Hello and welcome to the review I, am. You'll Husky not happen and I'm your host just Dahlia shuttling every week. We bring you conversations with authors about the books and research and other things that we like if you like us considered becoming a patron supporter by going to a home page. That's one daughter FEM slash. Tel Aviv review. Scroll down to the bottom and click a big red button, says Patriots and support us. We are counting on you. This episode is part of a series sponsored by the Israel Office of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation where we examine democracy, populism, authoritarian trends in the region and around the world and we're very happy to. To welcome to the show, one of the world's authorities on this topic, Professor Yan Verner Moore is a professor of politics at Princeton University. He studied at the Free University of Berlin University College London Saint Anthony's college and Oxford and Princeton University. He is the author and editor of eight books widely translated including. What is populism, but we're going to try to do today is touch on a number of his research. Themes because they'll take us well past the introductory aspect of populism, and you're speaking to us from Princeton as our listeners know, we've gone global in these remote days and younger Mueller. Thank you and welcome to the show. Thanks very much. Thanks for having me pleasure. So we don't want to. necessarily review all the introductory aspects of populism, but rather we want to use it as a jumping off point to go more deeply into some of the problems with democracy today, but I'd like you to just start if you can buy characterizing what you think is the specific difference that we see in the current populous trends over the last decade or two decades that distinguishes it from other populist movements in history. So, maybe it's worth clarifying for just a second what we mean when we talk about populism, it's conventional wisdom to say that anybody who, as the phrase goes, criticize, leads or angry with the establishment is therefore automatically a populist and is often implied somehow dangerous for democracy. Now it's true that populists especially when they're in opposition, criticize sitting governments and other parties, but above all they do something else. They say that they and only way represents what populous often call. The real people are also the silent majority. So what matters about populism in my view is not anti elitism. Some all of us can criticize the powerful. That's not in itself. Something Dangerous for democracy in fact can be quite the opposite. What is dangerous and in a sense, also specific populism is a certain type of exclusionary anti pluralism, which in the case of right wing, populace usually just means that they claim that certain minority is usually already vulnerable enormities. Really belong to the people, and that's in some cases as we see for instance today in India that you know it's a free for all as far as in safety, inciting hatred against minorities is concerned now actually don't think this is different from what we've seen in the past. Necessarily, it's a similar playbook, but it certainly seems to be spreading, because some of these actors are observing each other, and they're seeing that some of these countries are working out very well and they're copying each other. Is it because the foundations of democracy have eroded as it got any, you know structural aspect to it that this rise of populism. It certainly has some structural aspects at the same time. I think it's kind of ironic that you know. People often say oh. OCULUS had the great simplifier as you know, the world is so complex, but let's be honest. We would love it. If somebody could give us in two hundred characters or less, you know. The one macro calls the one globally relevant problem that explains all these developments everywhere I know. This sounds in Kirby pedantic, but that's probably what you get if you invite professors on the show to stay. National contacts still matter a great deal, so the reasons for the rise of let's Asia Marie Lapenne Franz or your cutter in Australia or trump in the US, or in Hungary dare I say Netanyahu Israel these all totally identical such that we only found you know low one 'cause and kind of address that then we would have it all. All solved. Of course, many observers have said yes, it matters that inequality has been on the rise. Yes, it matters that questions about borders and belonging or more in play than they may have been. In public debate a couple of decades ago, but I think more most of that is still not specific, enough and two of the things that I would highlight that people don't I think talk about enough is that it certainly helps halt journalists, opulence booklet entrepreneurs if you lied if you already have some kind of sense of an ongoing cultural, or if you already have cleavages on conflicts in a society such, they can use that that they can kinda work with that. That to basically tell people here's the real people and these others don't truly belong so victorious didn't have to invent from scratch, some kind of sense that okay. Here's the real hungry which has rural, and you know very religious, and here is Budapest, which is cosmopolitan liberal, and of course you know this as no works very well by bringing up certain old anti Semitic leashes as well so he didn't have to invent. That was already there and in the same way. In many other countries, it's been helping. It's been helpful to have a certain kind of conflict already in play now. That doesn't mean that these outcomes were predetermined. It's still very clever book, Norris and other structural problems such as reisman equality to make this populist playbook work, but it. Certainly it certainly helps. US. If I may. If the other I would simply out, simply bring in. Is that rather than this? All being structured determined is that it still depends on actual decisions by individuals which could have gone another way to. Simplify a very very complicated story. I think it's true that up until today nowhere in western Europe or North America have right-wing populous come to power without the support, or I would even say collaboration and I use. That were consciously with all his historical overtones without the collaboration of various tablets, conservative elites, and these actress could have made different decisions. The Republican Party could have made a different decision. The US German Christian Democrats could have decided not to support big to on and yet they made a certain. Certain a certain a certain shorts and I think that's awesome. Left out in the sort of macro structural accounts, which off make us believe that some of these developments, and they'll simply inevitable right and on on that note. We want to talk a lot about that, but I want to clarify one more thing. It sounds like all the examples you've raised so far have related more towards right wing, nationalist and conservative politics and I want to know if in your understanding of populism. Is it something that is? Or associated more by the right than the left, or would you fall out on a sort of understanding of populous tactics that define the loyal people versus everybody else, and it could belong to, either, but in our historic circumstances were seeing more associated with the right. I would agree with your your letter points so in theory. Populism can go either right or left in the case of left wing. Communism we have a pretty obvious example nowaday in Venezuela clearly there the point at which it was impossible to have anything like a legitimate form of disagreement with Shabbat, so the content can come from different parts of the ideological spectrum, but what is indeed specific to our era is a certain radicalization of the right. What is also specific is what some of my colleagues think have have correctly didn't fight as a tendency to mainstream the far right the borders between foul. Foul rights and what used to be seen as normal quote, unquote, conservative parties Christian Democratic parties, and Salon is becoming a lot more blurred, and the radicalization of rights is also something that we of course clearly see in government. We see with figures like Maude. obviously see it in the case of somebody like like trump I think it's haunted tonight at this is the most distinctive characteristic off the early twentieth century, the interesting thing also about you know contemporary populism. Is that These movements aspire to gain political power. Embracing the political culture of the establishment while resisting in any way as you said, this is really the tenant of all populism, it's not just the the established powers that embraced them, but it's a two way street in a way, and that brings me to a ask you whether you think that labelling This current stage in our political moment has illiberal democracy. Do you think it's appropriate? You believe in Arbonne. I would say two things so. Illiberal democracy, as it is now promoted by the likes of. is a former false advertising and those observers, even though they claim to be neutral, even though they claim to use this concept as it were account of social scientific designations that everybody can recognize in a sense of doing the Orban's of this world a big favor. Why because what Orb is instance trying to suggest is that you know the Hungary and comparable countries like. Turkey and Poland. are still perfect bodies. They've just rejected liberalism, and what this leaves out is the fact that democracy is not just elections. It's also writes basic rights fundamental constituents for democracy itself. Things like free speech, free assembly just to mention the obvious ones, and yes, of course all these countries still have elections, but these fundamental rights have been seriously seriously weakened, so if we kind of concede that, yeah, these are still democracies just now it's the illiberal variety. We don't want and on a more strategic level from. Put it that way. We are doing during a big favor because they don't want to be liberals anyway, so if you know well meaning people in Brussels the European Commission said. You know you'll are no longer a good liberal or has great. Thank you for certifying me as an anti liberal because that's what I want to be anyway, but if one were to serious and say look, you don't just week an. Liberalism which most of these actress and of rebrand as all it's all about same sex. Marriage is all about social issues, lifestyle, choices and Swan. If one made serious case, one should that no, it's democracy itself, which is being weakened in some cases being abolished, these actors will have would have a much bigger problem because their citizens. They don't want. Live in dictatorship. Live in. A A situation where they feel okay. The one thing that many of us for heart is being is being taken away by in the case for many others, basically it kleptocratic elite. But what do you think it says about You know good, old fashioned conservatism I mean. Is it really depleting it in a way because conservatives? Really what they they have been trying to do on an Israeli to. Harmonize of liberal values with some sort of you know traditionalism that. Auburn is also trying to do, but in a very different way. How does that? How how how do the two clash in your view? Think there is something really interesting going olen shifting in our in our era. It's so conventional wisdom that you know the big problem. Today is for Social Democrats because know they're declining everywhere, but at least on intellectual level. I think most people still have a rough sense of what social democracy is actually supposed to stand for which are the central values and ideas. On the center right among conservatives I think it's become a lot more uncertain. And we see a lot of interesting intellectual shifts in a whole variety of variety of countries, and we see for instance and attempt by a certain type of conservative to dissociates usually installed herself from libertarianism. This has become very strong us. We see at the same time attendance at tendency among religious conservatives special Catholic ones to go in a much more radical direction and to almost trying to. To jump back to era where the second second council had happened yet so I think a lot of conservative intellectual themselves think that's something isn't isn't quite right with what the factual across the West had become so settlement between. Let's say traditional slash religious mall precepts on the one hand and free market precepts on the other now having said that I think what the effectively very on can happens. Is that some of these actress going back to Orbach for a second. Now all of sudden have discovered these fantastic interview, fantastic anti liberal experiments in eastern Europe Poland. Hungary etcetera where it seems finally, governments are serious about. Let's say true natural law precepts, no abortion for for anybody that sort of stuff, as opposed to what in the eyes of these of these of these conservative intellectual, is sort of wishy washy Christian democracy in all think of the fact that even Makul's. It seems nowadays live with same sex, marriage and swamp. And, if I'm put it very. These sorts of conservative intellectuals are basically be useful idiots of these regimes. They're not that different from. Intellectuals who went to the Soviet Union in the twenties and thirties, and said look. It's great round here. I didn't see any camps. Everybody seems to be happy because they don't want to. See is that they're Selah bear? They're sort of enforcement. All supposedly non-negotiable Natural Law resets goes in hand with erosion of democracy goes in hand with all apocalypse now maybe some of them see that, and that's sort of the really maybe Newfoundland. Maybe some of them even see them. And Lie Conservative Intellectual Twenties and Thirties. They say it's an acceptable price. Democracy is secondary for us. What matters above above all for us all these Mon, negotiable religious precepts well, I WANNA ask you since you've raised this question about the challenge of sort of assimilating a modern form of Christian or Catholic values to the current state of democracy, I mean what is the gap between the theory of Christian democracy and the way it has manifested itself in party politics. Politics, you've written about this in an important article from twenty thirteen and I want to understand that gap, because it seems to me that you were positing that the theory of Christian democracy might actually be a means a kind of bridge to bringing the two sides together in a way that coops, these more conservative forces to harmonize with democracy, but that in reality well I'd be curious to hear how you describe what happened in the party manifestation of that. So I think in many ways traditional. Christian Democrats lost their way over the loss twenty years, and this is partly to do with indeed larger structural challenges, so Christian democracy was so strong, so hegemony in countries like Italy and Germany that puzzle period, because these were the quintessentially anticommunist anti-totalitarian but not. Far right not nationalist sorts of parties, and with the end of the Cold War with decline of a particular class coalition that back then which incidentally also backed the early phases of European integration so middle. Business and peasants a lot of these restrictions background conditions disappeared. At the same time. On a more intellectual level, a lot of the party, leaders and thinkers of had a hard time finding ways of making some of their specific ideals, such as Pearl Ism subsidiarity, basic human rights, but under student of very communitarian fashion. They found it difficult to kind of update us for a forgive the rather cliches away putting this a more individualistic sort of sort of sort of age, so I think. Think! They do have agenda problem. It's sounds like old Zolt, just a question of off, failing in terms of in terms of strategy, but what has additional pressure on them? Is that now far-right populous all present themselves as the real Christian Democrats again. This is very typical of Orban's says. Look in obvious these west being grisha Democrats They're not the real deal anymore. What we're doing here is. Is the real thin, and that again is for a false advertising, because the original Christian democracy was very anti nationalist, was very anti sovereignty, even as an idea because they were very skeptical about the notion, the of the nation state that's probably why the founders of European integration were basically all all Christian Democrats, and most important of all for these foreign populous, like all or like Salvini was often. Often, read tried very hard to to crop rotation for his program. Basically believed doesn't matter what you actually do. As religious I is completely irrelevant. It's purely about collective identity and belonging, and that's just another way of saying that it's all about demarcating a border with those who don't really belong or pose a threat which indicates of these actors very obviously is Muslims above above all right and was. Yuck, would it be correct to characterize one of your conclusions that religion itself can have a place even in in a democracy, and even the political system of democracy, as long as it's submit to the Authority of Democratic, institutions Is that the key to kind of co-opting? The political forces of religion. So I'm not in the sense in the business of telling these actress won't. They should or shouldn't do about about religion. There's nothing prima facie wrong with claiming to represent. Let's say the religious parts of your population. That's not in of itself threat to democracy. or or problem in itself, the problem starts to appear. If you use that to basically incites hatred against others issue basically started, deny the standing of other citizens and start to say things like only a Christian member. Let's say of our policy is a true. Take your pig, Hungarian German. Whatever than we know we get it? We get into into into difficulties. Norman civilians and and politically beyond that personally I think I think in many cases it's perfectly acceptable to do. What of courses often down in the US There's always a popular. In Europe namely the idea that yes, it can be completely okay. In the name of antidiscrimination along discrimination to give relate your religious actors certain exemptions, but that's a very separate issue from the question of how does religion get mobilized poker actress and gets gets translated into actual power in party systems, but what about the you know the place of religion in the? Tablet, did self. Where does Christianity and democracy? Where do they clash? If at all you know in in Israel, the constitution of the state of Israel as democracy is replete with with problems a where? He means the Basic Law. And and you know. Let, let's go that but I'm just interested to hear you know where if the any policy think with Christian democracy? While I think the problem. Consistent situations where state essentially says we endorse a form of religion, and if you as a citizen, don't you are at best second rate I think this is the core normative challenge in terms of in terms of how religion might get translated into politics in the wrong kind of way. And one of the, if you like achievements, all these Christian Democratic parties was that they eventually let go of this notion that you should stand straight religious truth in politics and basically use collective life to realize your religious volumes, and as a side effect of unintended, but certainly something's also intended exclude certain parts of the population. That's why I think it's problematic. If you basically have state telling its citizens, there was only one correct way of understanding our national national identity, and it comes with a heavy dose of religion. It comes with a heavy dose of a highly particularly understood form of cultural identity. Democracy is unthinkable without pluralism, which is not to say that all the more diversity necessarily, the better that's all up. Cora's necessarily stands for it stands for the basic nutrition that. That in a heterogeneous society. We gotta find ways of living together on fair terms, and that means we're going to have to accept people whose ideas of the good lives was ideas of religion, sometimes radically differ from ours, but we can find ways of living together with him in the fairway, telling them that unless you conform to our officially prescribed notion of what it means to be a good citizen I think is an unfair way of doing. One of your interesting themes I found is the idea that democracies have sometimes tried to build safeguards against the very sorts of threats. You're talking about internal actors who would try to stamp out that pluralism or destroy the capacity for pluralism and I'm referring to your writing about militant or fighting democracy. Can you explain what that is? Why did it emerge? and. What is the paradox that it creates? So Milton democracy refers to the notion that sometimes the basic. Fundamental Democratic Rights of certain actors have to be restricted for the sake of preserving democracy. This idea came out of the experience of the Weimar Republic where many observers concluded that, if only if only the Nazi party had been banned in time, or maybe also, if they were if the rights of a Communist Party happened restricted in certain ways than the republic would have been saved. For some observers, this is deep paradoxical, because they say look you know you are basically trying to save democracy by in effect, damaging, or maybe even Albright Destroying Democracy, because once you start restricting rights, you are actually the agent all at least damaging at damaging democracy and remember that all this is in the context where all actors are not doing things which are already covered by the criminal laws. We're not talking about terrorism. We're not talking about things which are illegal. Anyway we are talking about things like forming a party engaging in certain kinds of speeches, which you know from one libertarian of you could be read as perfectly acceptable, not as illegal in democracy. Flourished in the possible period in particular, only in West Germany where the Communist Party and the de facto successor party of the Nazis were banned in the course of energy victories. They've been more recent attempts to ban yet again. A party which is off its off. It's of course it's certainly comes close to being the detector meal. Nazi party on the on the on the ground. Now, the problem is that in many ways. This looks like a sort of very twentieth century. kind of kind of instruments, because many of the real threats to democracy today come from actress who say but look we are. Real Democrats we as we don't always called dealers ver- saw matchy. Do you know we are the ones who actually you know? Stand up for the people against the elites won't doing anything necessarily necessarily undemocratic, and in many of these cases. It might be very hard to prove conclusively that Yes. They are really systematically. Trying to undermine mean becomes a question of which actor is actually destroying democracy. Democracy I mean one of the things we've seen in. The more populous discourse in Israel is the sense that the people the majority must be the sovereign and so anything that that is constrained for example by the Supreme Court, and this is a similar problem that we have in in Hungary and Poland gets accused of of being a dictatorship, the voice of the true people so. Is this a moral equivalency is to determine which is the real threat to democracy. Democracy does not mean majority can do whatever the hell it wants. The majority must preserve the conditions all the minority at some on becoming majority. And what does the Georgia doesn't agree with that? Well then. You may have a different conception of politics should be about and one that is not entirely covered by the notion of democracy. Democracy is an ongoing game, and if somebody says look just because we won this round, we're gonNA. Make it impossible for anybody else ever to win this game again. Maybe that's not a proper understanding of how the game should be should be should be played so this both ways. Those I mean this is this is this is I mean Of course, the the major worried today very often is about a kind of unbridled majoritarianism, but. But you can also have the opposite problem where you know a party that lost an election fields like look. We're going to exert power anyway. Just think back to how Mitch McConnell. You know the great grave digger of American Democracy said I'm going to obstruct Obama in whatever way I can, and then followed through on this promise, it perfectly perfectly perfectly fine that a majority he gets it way often opposition has had its say, but always in circumstances where the conditions of a minority one day becoming majority again if people changed their minds as they after all. Very often do in in democracies are preserved so one way of putting this very succinctly and are following the inside of a of a Polish born American Americans call comparative. Politics is simply to say. Democracy is a system where parties lose. Elections is consulting Kirby Banal, but it's actually a profound insight, if h, if there is no longer a real chance of turn over power. That's a pretty strong indication. That's what we're dealing with. It's no longer democracy and that if members of a certain type, if citizens over is still democracy, because I'm always getting my way, that's not good enough as an argument to make the claim that democracy store real. Having considered all this that you say about the essence of democracy and going back to what you said about Christian democracy earlier. Do, you think you know taking perhaps their historical perspective that Chris Christianity is an essential part of the genealogy off democracy I mean. Is it just a coincidence? That modern democracy merged out of Christendom think. I don't think this is a essential component off of democracy. All that there is some some kind of determinism about you had to have that particular religion in place. Otherwise otherwise you couldn't possibly have. You couldn't possibly have democracy the world's largest democracy right now, even though a democracy that clearly is under. Threat From It's from. It's from its leader. US somehow seems to have worked for a long time as a very perot. Listrik no-doubt in many ways, also you know. problematic, but still highly parole Listrik. policy for a very long time so I I don't i. don't see that I don't see that I. don't see genealogy just to be clear. You're talking about India's crackers I'm talking about India, but also I think we tend to forget that. Remember all these all these debates that we've had over the last couple of years where you learned scholars, comments say all but. You know is couldn't possibly ever be ever become democratic. Because look, you know. Christians did Catholic, but that's because they have. They have thing called the Vatican, where at one point pope told everybody in a binding way that now democracy was the way to go the you know these poor. These poor benighted Muslims don't have that. They don't have a church, so they're to get democracy. People tend to forget. Forget that all these things that's nowadays tend to get. They tend to tend to be said about Islam were said about Catholicism for many decades could have learned scholars at prestigious American institutions up until nineteen fifty. Someone's the nineteen sixties basically explains you in great detail, why beer in peninsula and while Latin? America were never really going to be democratic because they were afflicted with Catholicism but the same. The same about President Kennedy before he became president. The President of the! I'm not saying that we should equate these religions. These differences don't matter of course not, but these sort of macro, chazal condemnations of certain religions as basically being hopeless. I think they don't go together with fact. That's that's I mean in there after all of course also contains two million Muslims Indonesia again, it's providence seems to be working reasonably well as as a as a democracy so I mean these sort of casual macro diagnoses are not helping our capacity for poor judgment with all due respect. I WanNa talk about one of the very interesting and very modern I would see postwar mechanisms out there for trying to help democracies. Stay that way and this is I. Really think one of the most interesting discussions to be had. The European Union what can be done about members who are fallen backsliding from their democratic commitments, and you know if the EU decides that it has a role. Does it simply risk a backlash and the accusation of meddling into internal affairs? If you tries to take action against a country that is going in an illiberal direction or prototype direction? Has Been, said many times in recent years with regard to what has been happening in Hungary and Poland. In particular I think it's misguided for two reasons. one is a more at point about what the European Union is really about. It really is about states coming together and trusting each other's institutions, so yes, it's a market of course. Yes, you know it has all kinds of operations to a certain type of of global power as well, but ultimately it's about saying that citizens of country a should accept decisions by court in Country Country B because we all mutually recognize each other as functioning liberal democracies as having the rule of law and Swan if that is undermined and And this might not always be obvious is not as you know. Spectacular, as let's say the euro currency, collapsing or anything like that, but if that goes then the heart of the all of the whole enterprise is debt, and that's exactly what's happening at the moment, so I think the leaders of that you should recognize that, even though it's not always visible, it always make headlines. It really destroys the institutional structure itself, and it's interesting. Yes, sorry. Just just in the bachelor. This man said in terms of all, if you now to go to talk with Budapest to with also and so. You got to have an outbreak of nationalism, but look these leaders Kosinski in Oregon. They are engaged in nationalist mobilization. Anyway, it's not like Russell's pussyfooting around has prevented or bond. Know spending huge amounts of taxpayer money on having anti-brussels campaigns with posters, etc everywhere, so it's happening anyway and to the extent that we have surveys about these countries which be trusted. The you is incredibly popular in Hungary and Poland if you actually sort of put the put these people on the spot and said yeah, if you're serious, you don't like this whole this whole club. If you don't remember anymore, you can leave. Anybody is free to leave of course article fifty of the treaty they will be horrified, and their citizens would be horrified, so I think this is something that that unfortunately Brussels. Leaders have bought in as an idea. They've been convinced, said yes. We got to go easy on these people. When in fact, the opposite is the case, and by so often doing nothing what you actually end up doing is letting down although citizens off, let's say Hungary and Poland who in two thousand four? When these countries joined the, you thought okay, thank God there's no path back average autocracy with safe now in this clip democracies and we have sown sorely disappointed and let down all these people. I think that's a fascinating point and I also think that one of your other explanations for the justification for you're trying to safeguard this liberal approach is that you use the term moral quarantine, two thousand fifteen article well before corona, but I think it makes an interesting point that it's not just about whether. The EU is intervening in an individual state, but about the something like contagion. Is that what you meant that? In other words? This is problematic for the other states the EU. What I meant. Was that the specific article? That the European Union in has in the treaty to kind of basically do something about a member state that has no lorraine compliance with so-called fundamental values such as democracy and human rights. This article this whole development was majorly was majorly impacted by an episode. You will remember from the very beginning of the century Austria, in two thousand, the rise of your hydro and his far-right Freedom Party the inclusion of that party and the government in Vienna in those days. Basically that prompted a lot of thinking about what can be. Be Done in situation in which Jewish law this, but interestingly it wasn't really about intervening in the country. It doesn't actually allow the change, government and Algebra. You might say well, that's that's a good thing, too, because you know. Why should Brussels have a sort of blankets blanket authorisation to do that? But at the same time it's real meaning is we basically suspend the influence of that country in the EU as a whole, because a government that is no longer in compliance with these fundamental values cannot make decisions about. About you regulations, directives and Swan, so it's basically a way of saying we don't want them to have anything to do with I mean I hesitate to use his medical metaphors because I think dangerous, but for the sake of argument we don't want to be infected with the contagion of whatever politics is happening in that in that country, but not the riverside of this in theory, it also means that a government in a country maps you know is going down. A An authoritarian path could say we don't care as long. Long as we in the club, and as long as we get the subsidies for agricultural. Let's say we're very happy. They actually are leaving us alone. Sorry, we can't own up at these summits anymore. You know wine and dine with the hooping commissioned, but we don't care so in a sense, it wants to a very deep structural problem, namely the fact that you cannot actually legally eject a country from the at all so in theory. Even if tomorrow you know somewhere to the army says it's time for a cool. It's not obvious what you do legally other than simply saying we're gonNA isolate the country. We're going to insulate ourselves from that country, but you can't actually force an exit exit as always at this point gonNA be voluntary. Right Professor Young. professor of politics at Princeton University thank you very much for joining us today. Pleasure thank you for having me on the program and many things to retire in Georgia Foscarini our producers, and once again to these red office of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation for sponsoring this series. And we've got a request. Many most real. Listen to us on the apple podcast APP and we would like to ask you to please consider review. We accept all sorts. You can support us by going to a website and subscribing onto a patron compaign. Check out our archive. It has more than five hundred interviews to keep you entertained and hopefully annoyed. If you're one, would you here? You can also like us on facebook. 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Hungary US Israel European Union professor Brussels Princeton University India Tel Aviv Orban Konrad Adenauer Foundation Budapest Europe Communist Party Poland Kirby Banal Swan Poland.