18 Burst results for "Fannie Lou Hamer"

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Just like the civil rights movement. We wanted to make sure that minorities had the same rights as everyone else, that they weren't being targeted or discriminated against. We want to apply that same civil right inside the womb. He draws a parallel between his law and the work of civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, who in the sixties fought for voting rights for black Americans. Is this America? The land of the free and the home of the brain. Alive be threatened daily. Because we want to live if Ethan human beings in American when this bill came up, you talked about Fannie Lou Hamer. Can you walk me through that? Why bring her into the conversation of this bill? Well, because family murder is one of our civil rights activists in Mississippi history, and she actually was the victim of a forced sterilization back in 1961. So what you had back in the sixties were instances where black women when they went to the doctor to receive needful operations or surgeries without being told Many African American women were just paralyzed by the physicians, of course, who were white at the time. And, of course, she spoke out about that, in terms of civil rights, you know that bike women Obviously we would never be treated that way. But African American women in Mississippi were treated that way. What you're talking about with Fannie Lou is really different from abortion. Like what? Happen to Fannie Lou Hamer was horrible. It was a forced sterilization that was done without her consent. What's happening in Mississippi with black women going to get abortions? Is that they are opting to do this surgery that they have. Full agency to make the decision of their bodies. And so it's like two completely different things that you're wrapping into one and I would also say that Fanny is revered because she fought for the right for black people in Mississippi throughout the country to be able to vote. And no. If you think about voting is really about choice. I don't want to put words in to Fannie. Lou Hamer is mouth, but I would say that someone who works as an advocate to give people choice. I find it unlikely that she would be for a bill that was about taking choice away from a black woman. Well, I guess it depends on which black woman you're talking about is that the mother that seeking the abortion is of the black, unborn child that is being aborted. For Michelle. Twisting civil rights history into Joey's law is a part of a wider strategy to broaden the anti abortion movement. So it's inconvenient play because it's never played, But that's like we apologize. Let's have a truth and reckoning. Look at what we did. We are so sorry in what we did to you. It's never that, but instead it is then this rhetoric around abortion, she says. This rhetoric and the laws that inspires have been key in limiting access to abortion. Because the anti abortion movement is one that while we've seen the efforts to do way as a whole, for the most part to play book has been To chip chip chip chip away such that Roe v. Wade doesn't need to be overturned. Instead, there will be the million blows and strikes where the right essentially becomes meaningless for the majority of Americans who don't live in New York or California, or can't get onto a plane to go to Mexico or Canada. Abortion opponents don't just want to chip away at Roe. They hope that is these laws get challenged. One of them will go all the way up to the nation's highest court. So the U. S Supreme Court had a chance to hear a case about this from Indiana. But they let a ruling stand that tossed out the ban on abortion based on race. Do you hope the Supreme Court will have another go with this? I would love that. But we've been arguing for all along There's in the pro life community is that this ought to be a state State decision. We're not claiming that all abortion should be banned out, right? We're just simply saying that the Roe v. Wade put a one size fits all across the whole country, not to be the case. The argument you just made was that this is like, basically states rights, and whenever I hear state's rights, it sets off an alarm bell to me because You know, I mean, at the root of the state right question comes slavery. The idea that, like different states can put different values on different lives, and that with the federal government is supposed to do is maintain a fair balance for everybody. I understand the argument and you're going to continue having that I think until and unless the Supreme Court says, Look back in 1973 we overstepped. This is really an issue better reserved to the state to Maria. Let 50 states determining the territories determined how they want to handle this particular issue of When life begins and to the rights of the mother outweigh the rights of the unborn or vice versa. And it's a very sticky issue, and I certainly don't envy the judges or justices that will be hearing these cases. That's state. Senator Joey filling gain from Mississippi Way also spoke with U C. Irvine law professor Michele Goodwin. Our story was produced by the roly price. This idea of whose rights matter more. The mothers or the fetuses isn't just about abortion, and as courts weigh in on it, there could be big consequences for pregnant people. So we have cases of women.

Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Fannie Lou Supreme Court Roe Senator Joey Wade America U. S Supreme Court Michelle murder Ethan federal government Fanny Indiana Michele Goodwin California professor
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on KPCC

"I have been advised him through and you in the 9th 1963. I had a pendant, a voter registration workshop. Was returning by the Mississippi. Can a dog was found by the custom metal tray away, Buck. When we got the one on the Mississippi, which is among them, recounted. For the people that you the washroom. And two other people used to rush around. Who other people wanted to use the wife room. Four people that had gone in to use the restaurant. Without a doubt. During the time I was on the bus. And when I looked through, the woman found they had run out. I got off the bus to see what had happened. And one of the latest dead. It was a fake highway patrolman. And our people police out of the shower. I got back on the bus and one of the person who abused wife room got back on the bus. As soon as I was seated on the bus. I saw when they began to get the five people in a highway patrol car. I stepped out for the bus to see what was happening. And somebody screams from the cars. That's the fireworks of who's in and said, Get back one day. And what I Went to get in the car when the man told me I was on the address. Tick tick. I was carried to the county jail. And put in the book and rooms. Fannie Lou Hamer had seen it all in her drive for liberation. She was no stranger to the workings of the Jim Crow south and the harsh measures used to enforce the nationwide caste system. 19th Amendment states, The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. I was ratified on August 18th 1920. On paper, it gives the right to vote toe women while making no mentions of race as if the complexities of the day never existed. Voting in the south. Voting anywhere in the United States, as a black person was rife with trials. The poll taxes the literacy testament to shame black people into believing we had no right or access to the ballot box. Weren't there by mistake. They were simply by design. Fannie Lou Hamer knew this and attended to rectify it after she learned just how far white people would go to prevent black folks from exercising our right to vote. Our right to be heard recognized and scene. I was placed in a cell with the young woman called Missy best symptoms. That was placed in the cell. I began to hear sounds of liquor. And scream. I could hear the sounds of liquor and harbor screams. Not that there's somebody say. Can you say yes. Can you say? Yes, on they would say other Harbour Lane. She would say Yes, I can say yes. A while back, and she said, I don't know you well enough. They beat. I don't know how long And after a while, she began to pray. And as God have mercy on those, and it wasn't too long. The whole three wife man came to my field. One of these men would state Highway Patrol. He asked me why I was from And I told him rules. He said. We have guards to check. They left my cell in one too long before they came back. He said. You removed it all right, and he used a curse Word. Leave that we've got to make you wish you was dead. I will carry it out of that fail into another sale, where they had Two big row crew. State highway patrolman out of the first Negro to take the black gangs. First big growth out of me by artists from the state highway for program for me to lay down on above bad on my face. I laid it on my face. The first Negro began to be And I will be by the first Negro until he was exalted. I was holding my hands behind the back time on the left side because I suffer from polio when I was six years old. After the first big Bro had beat him till he was exhausted. State highway patrolman out of the second Negro to take the black Jack. Effectively growth again to beat and I began to work. And the State Highway Patrol in out of the first Negro head beat the settlement. Keep it working. I began to scream and one white man got up. And began to beat in my head and child meant to hook. All of this is on account of we won't register. To become first class. I question America. The land of the free and the home of the brain. Well, we have a lead. Without telephones. Because I live.

Fannie Lou Hamer United States State Highway Patrol Highway Patrol Mississippi Buck polio Harbour Lane America Jim Crow
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:08 min | 9 months ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Uniting America Tonight is all about leadership. This unprecedented moment calls for leadership, steady, inclusive leadership, driven by people who understand that our democracy is based on the value of each and every one of us being treated. With dignity and respect leaders who respond to the needs of hardworking Americans who, right this minute are unable to pay rent, put food on the table and keep their loved ones safe. As a black woman. I find myself at a crucial intersection in American politics. For far too long, black female leadership in this country has been utilised without being acknowledged, or valued, but We are turning the tide. Hello, Kamilla. Her nomination is historic for anyone who believes in we, the people like Senator Harris and many we saw in the keynote, Today's leaders emerge from communities that have long been underrepresented there charting new paths in the spirit of Shirley Chisholm, Charlotta Bass, Fannie Lou Hamer and John Lewis. They get in good, trouble necessary trouble. They call things out otherwise ignored, elevating our nation and changing the course of our lives for the better With every vote we cast for forward thinking, honest leaders we chip away at in green Systems of inequity, and we've been the arc of justice. True leaders make sure that policy is informed by all of us. West, Bridging our burden passed to a safe, equitable and even joyful future. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are that bridge heating voices from within the movement for racial justice, listening to the people and acting with empathy and compassion to reflect our shared humanity. Tonight, we'll hear from a number of American leaders, including former acting U. S. Attorney general. Sally Yates, who refused to defend an unconstitutional travel ban and paid for it with her job threat to this nation for our democracy is really clear his prison watch the president for years. Look what he's doing, instilling fear, not joking, Silly fear so individual stroking racial division. 100 cutting every institution was designed to check the abuse of power. Are the president or anyone else. All this? For what reason all this in order to solidify his face and his power Good.

Senator Harris president Fannie Lou Hamer America Joe Biden Shirley Chisholm Sally Yates John Lewis Charlotta Bass Attorney U. S.
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"When when I talk about politics folks often start from a standpoint standpoint of deficit and what freedom looks like is what we have and I'm challenging folks to think about freedom in terms of what we want it to look like an abundance and what is our agenda and so I'm not saying well we need to solve mass incarceration mess cards reasons a problem? I'm saying what is select have a world with no prisons. What is it like to have a world where free WIFI everywhere? Was it like to have a world where education is free not just. Let's solve student in debt but like what about free education and if we don't have a an abundance agenda. We don't think about freedom as a proactive right frame of reference. Then we're going to continue to burn ourselves what we know. We need to fight against Yup and not what we need to fight for. Yeah and so my students were like I was like what is freedom to you guys and they were like. Oh you know white supremacy in house. Okay what does the freedom to you guys and like. Oh no student debt what is what is freedom. And they're like Oh we why We want access to. We're going to do with their own bodies and I'm like yeah. Those are the things that we're fighting against that we don't have. What are the things that we want? No and that agenda people women of color I think have always been at the forefront of determining what that agenda is not just for our own communities but for this entire planet. So let's let's not lose sight of what that is So it's a marathon race and digest. Think about sit with breath and remind yourself to stay grounded in this work. What is freedom to you I love that. That's perfect and Asia. Tiffany emily thank you for joining Ashton getting our listeners. Ready for twenty twenty. I appreciate you all right. Thank you everyone for coming the live studio audience. Thank you to emily. Tiffany initia- for sending the states for twenty twenty they make sure you stay tuned to the BG on our website www dot to be g guide DOT COM and on facebook instagram and twitter at the the BG guide to find out more on the world of color playing in twenty twenty. I hope you've enjoyed this season brown girls. I want to thank all of our Brown girl en nombre wor listeners. For continuing with us on this journey we started this season with the BG listeners. Telling US what they love most about the podcast and we wanted to the season with some of your favorite moments. I believe that we all have a moral responsibility to pay it forward. What would Fannie Lou Hamer do? What was Shirley Chisholm? Do what with Dr King Do. What would anyone anyone in my position? Do our pastor at the time used to say. I can't tell you who to vote for but I can tell you in that. This is the person who showed up. Issues of racism cannot simply be issues for black and Brown government works well when it reflects the population. It's extract present. There's this misconception that to be a donor you have to give large sums of money when in fact asked most of the donation drive a lot of these progressive candidates and national organizations. Are these rash roots small dollar donations. I do remember when I started getting to the point. where my pros and cons when I look at the cons not reasons not to run? They all fear based a reason as opposed to the pro side which were all faith based reasons. I hate this phrase. It says if you don't vote you don't count. I mean I think that's ridiculous to say I acumen via the ferry that you are human being that in fact you have value you count. It is not the folk that brings you out. Thank you wonder network for for producing another wonderful season of this podcast until next time brown girls..

US twenty twenty Fannie Lou Hamer brown Shirley Chisholm Tiffany initia Dr King Asia Ashton DOT COM twitter facebook instagram
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Would be to read a quote from his daughter his baby daughter Dr Bernice king and she is on Twitter a few days ago and I want you to let this marinate with you Iowa she said the night before he was assassinated made many ways Happy Birthday she put that in quotes to a man today that they would have heeded the almost somebody we all comprehensive keen makes for an easy and privileged on he is hello somebody never forget he's not here to here Happy Birthday because he was murdered now doctor Bernice king focus that we don't like the deal which in this country but I am going to elaborate on her truth when she said that what her father's for me how war on easy and privileged on teens and here we find ourselves in the year of twenty twenty battling some of the same challenges that the Reverend doctor Martin Luther king junior's through it again the challenges in the people that he's for a there is like a little break here and Fannie Lou Hamer and the freedom fighters.

Dr Bernice king Twitter Iowa Fannie Lou Hamer Martin Luther
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Was wondering on doing a voter education and I guess I'm going to freedom summer like out of local Mississippians are responding over comic terrorism and their fears of us to work with folks like almost so you had it's a great so when you say it so you mean how did African Americans in Mississippi got especially if we see like Liz Allen and like hurriedly Fannie Lou Hamer out of Mississippi been reading right yes okay good Fannie Lou Hamer says when you get sick and tired of being sick and tired you know there comes that moment where you just won't take it so not everybody stood up but you have enough folks in Mississippi you had like Vera piggy down in Clarksdale Mississippi who was using her independent business she was a hairdresser she was using that as the spot where people were organizing and because she did black women's hair and she only her shop she wasn't dependent upon anyone else for her financial well being that economic independence allowed her now wasn't like she didn't get harassed her daughter didn't get harassed but she was just yes you have folks who just we're sick and tired of being sick and tired and we're ready to put it on the line for a better future and I and I'm in when you think about it that's what we keep talking about it in the movement we don't have everybody standing up we have enough people standing up okay thank you okay yes Alex what was Bobby Kennedy up to well order education it just wasn't happening in Mississippi it's a great question I'm not quite sure except I know that they weren't getting the protection that Bobby had promised and that lack of protection that he had promised was then sending Moses into a direction that Bobby really didn't think this thing was going to go to backfire yeah okay thank you lecture in American history from late October from Emory University professor Carol Anderson talking about the nineteen sixties efforts of African Americans in Mississippi.

Mississippians Mississippi Liz Allen Fannie Lou Hamer Alex Bobby Kennedy Moses Carol Anderson Clarksdale Emory University professor
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pot a show about the past rediscovered. She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special thanks to Deneen Brown who reported this story for The Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history visit Washington Post. Dot Com slash retro pod.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Mississippi Mike Rosen Freedom Democratic Party Mississippi Delta Jamie L whitten Freedom Party Congress Martin Luther King Stop Dr Martin Luther Author King J US Time magazine Deneen Brown
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Post Reports

"It's important to understand this in a Christian framework because both Amazon branch. John and his parents are all outspoken about their the Christian faith. There's a long tradition of black Christians because of their faith extending forgiveness to white people who who have committed grievous injustices that is a noble act and it is certainly part of the Christian tradition but it should never ever be cheapened by people who think that is just what black people do as as a matter of course and that is what black people ought to do you period. Christianity does not say be a doormat Christianity does not say to who will in the face of wrongdoing but to stand up against injustice and to speak truth to power and it's the same Christian faith that motivates someone like brand John to four of his brother's killer also motivate someone like Martin Luther King Fannie Lou Hamer and I'd have been wells to work for justice hostas so it is very telling if people want to applaud this act of forgiveness as an expression of Christianity but they don't also applaud the protests in the marching and the writing that speaks out against injustice Jomar Tisby is the author of the color of compromise the truth about the American churches complicity in racism.

Martin Luther King Fannie Lou John Amazon Jomar Tisby
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I don't I won't use it. I talked kindergarten. Girl. I turned it on one worker. I use my basketball voice. So I want to start by saying thank you and the spirit of my forget most of what we say. So I'm going to get the most important thing out of the way, which is to say thank you national action network for always being engaged. What I know is that anti blackness and white supremacy still exist, but also know that black people have always resisted as showed up as shown out in spite of the challenges that we faced was the conversation that Tiffany and were having which is that too often. When people talk about us, they don't tell the whole story. Right. And so if you pejorative white media is that we didn't do enough, right? The not of the election. The messages were still in spite of the fact that black women do which I'll do always show up and show out even when we don't support. All right that we weren't doing enough. It was that young people didn't show up enough. And if they had things will be different the reality is that the numbers for young people that turned out of this most recent election were four hundred times greater than the previous election. That's inspired people telling them that you shouldn't go. To this of people closing poems. All of the voter suppression stuff, we've talked about we also even talked about the fact that there's still white supremacist showing up in places where people are trying to vote. Now, we talked about these policies that exist, but we're not talking about the practices in Florida. The problem is right now in Broward County, where people are protesting asking for every ballots to be counted why they're there to intimidate to go home to be afraid to not claim the space that we are awesome. Because our people are the founders of this country, we built this for free. And so I say that because again when you say to people time and time again you haven't done enough. You are not enough. They will start to believe it. And we have to talk to our babies about being proud of what they're doing in spite of the shit that they face excuse got, no Revlon. There are three things that I want to talk about related to all of this and one is that we have to be not distracted by everything that's going on. This is the most diverse congress. There are more than one hundred women who will be in that office. But as Rhonda said, unless we hold them accountable nothing will change period in one space. I want encourage you all to think about leading an unusual at at and maybe some novel ways to think about one is that most of our power on as black people in this country is concentrated within the Democratic Party. We should be clear that the man that occupants over hop it office. I'm not gonna call him president because my President Barack Obama's not president. But that man took on both political parties and destroy the Democratic Party and the Republican party Republicans like to act as we don't remember that and act like they're line and that they're working together. But we have an opportunity to go into these Republican offices as well to influence their agenda. Why does that matter matters because there are more than seventy five? Republican members who are in positions of leadership in authority who are not coming back period. There are fifty of them who retired acquit. There are twenty five of them in the house. Who's jobs we took and they were real shook about it. And twenty nine of those people are thirty nine of those people had chairmanships of committees are subcommittees and the reality. Now, what Rhonda was talking about his gospel, you encounter, staff members who know more about these institutions than the members that we have now elected. And so we have to go into spaces where we are not normally welcomed to remind people that you work for us because we live where y'all are too and ask them to do the job of making sure that every member of our community is free. So this is where something get real uncomfortable. I'm a remind you where Fannie Lou Hamer said, which is that none of us a friend to all of us are free, but too often in black spaces we forget members of our community. So while we were talking about voting rights and enfranchisement and celebrating the victory of having a million families in Florida who can now vote and we'll change things for the foreseeable future. We also have to remember that black lesbian, gay bisexual transgender people live in the south with other black people. We don't have the privilege of moving away spaces with that. Part of our identity becomes the thing that we draw power from we live in states where it is legal to discriminate against us. With their laws that make it impossible to pass laws to.

Democratic Party president Rhonda Florida Fannie Lou Hamer basketball Broward County Tiffany Barack Obama congress
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Year, there's a surge of women running for office and within that, we're also seeing a high number of black women running for federal office. Forty one black women are running for the house. Thirty. Five of whom are Democrats. That's the most in recent years according to the center for American women in politics at Rutgers University, these women are trying to close a big representation gap, but that heightened visibility comes with a different set of challenges in late August, Kaya Morris. The only black woman in Vermont's legislature dropped out of her reelection race because of racist online threats and harassment black women also face extra hurdles when campaigning gathering funding and national endorsements, Kimberly peeler. Alan is here to talk about these issues and she's the co, founder of higher heights for America in organization working to elect black women for public office, Kimberly, thanks for joining us. It is a pleasure to be here. What an interesting topic this is. Let's talk a little bit about motivation, right? What we're hearing this is the year of the. Woman and everybody wants to run for office, but there's what is particularly driving women of color more specifically black women to run for office. Well, I think it is, you know, this confluence of events that we are that we find ourselves in a blog. Women have been running and doing the work behind the scenes for generations. You know, thinking back to like Fannie Lou Hamer and Barbara Jordan, women have been in black women have been in the trenches, and now there is this new sense of urgency were seeing the attempts and in many cases, the actual reality of the rollbacks of the last fifty years of progress, and we're seeing that black women are saying, I can't let this happen to my community, so I'm going to step up and run, and it is that combined with the electorate, realizing that you know over eighty percent of our elected officials across this country are white and male. And that is, you know, by no means represents the diversity in this nation. The electorate is saying, you know, we need to have some different voices around the table and these black women are speaking to my issues. Regardless of you know, the fact that they're black, they can appeal to everybody, and it has really been a great catalyst for all of these women to run such strong primaries. And you know, we really looking forward to some great pickups on November six. So let's talk a little bit about that because there are some challenges specifically and we know politics is is like any other industry right there challenges as we mentioned to funding and getting support here yesterday in the show we talked about how important black women are to the Democratic Party. They've been called the backbone of the Democratic Party ninety percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen, and yet they still lack representation in the party's leadership..

Kimberly peeler Democratic Party Fannie Lou Hamer Rutgers University Hillary Clinton Kaya Morris Vermont harassment Barbara Jordan Alan founder America eighty percent ninety percent fifty years
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"That's been kicked down the road for number of years. And so now you know, it's upon us and so early on, we have to figure out how we get beyond that mountain of debt. That's in front of, I don't know much about the demographics in Jackson. I don't know much about tax base, but where where do you when you look out at the? I presume if you're dealing with that type of debt, that's been kicked down the road cut either way. I mean, you could have had plenty of resources and people just didn't want to deal with it or there could be a lack of resources and people in hindsight is twenty twenty share, and and you know, some of the decisions, you know, I may have felt were bad decisions at the time, some of the decisions. We've learned that that they have not been as helpful to us as we may. Have hope. But Jackson's demographic is an eighty. Five percent African American city. The state of Mississippi is forty per cent, African Americans, and so we've seen divestment and so you've seen people leave one of the higher. Demographics are one of the greater demographics that we're losing at a rapid pace in the city of Jackson and the state of Mississippi for that matter are Molyneux's. And so Jackson really has an opportunity unique to most cities to audition to millennials, but we're not taking advantage of it. Jackson is a college town. Really. You have forty thousand college students in Jackson, you have seven institutions, and so we need to identify what are the quality of life things that young people enjoy. So that's that's one of the things that we're taking a strategic approach to. But how do we, you know implement these kind so that we build the future of Jackson day, how do you retain those people coming in four years at a time and and have them start to build businesses and be a part of the community? Well, you create an environment which is conducive to their success, promote opportunities for them to to explore new business opportunities as as the rest of the country is in this arms race. For Amazon, we should be Bill. Building the next, you know, small business that can you know operate in a way that they're able to grow in developing and ideal. You know, kind of the next Amazon, right? Whether you want. Know I'm not really speaking right to that. So that's one but two one thing that we've embarked on his mayor in the millennials council so that we talked to millennials about what are the quality of life things that they they look for in. So in why they have not found a place like Jackson to be desirable to them, we find that millennials like urban spaces. They like walkable cities, which Jackson is not. How do we make our city more walkable. They enjoy things like public art. You have a new generation that doesn't care for a car as much as previous generations, bike share programs, all of these things that that are important to present them with. But you know, also focusing on on what are the opportunities that are stabbed there. And so that's why I talk about, you know, the the development and the importance of small businesses, but the importance of cooperative businesses, businesses, any business, a small business, even black business in a in a cap. A-List, environment is a business that is about exploiting markets. And so once it is taken off from the market that it is currently end and it will eventually leave for what it sees as a better market, right? So Jackson is not a city that has a problem producing well is a city that has a problem maintaining well. And so we need businesses which part of their mission is not only bringing in profit but serving the community having that reciprocal relationship where within its its mission values is to promote uplift the community at the same time as as pulling in. Pulling in well in cooperatives necessarily do that because you have buy in from far greater scope of people, and it's not necessarily at original idea in Mississippi. If you look at the history of people like Fannie Lou Hamer, who organized poor black farmers in the Mississippi delta, you know, I think that the the, the thing that is somewhat knew is expanding our understanding of what a cooperative business can be. Cooperative business can be essentially anything. And as we talk about this socialist gnome notion that people get sometimes fearful, you really take a snapshot of where our country is.

Jackson Mississippi Amazon Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi delta Molyneux Five percent four years
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Guy okay you have sixty seconds to sell me on moving to the south here i am a born and bred new englander so pretend you want me to move will tell me why should move why do you love the south i mean you obviously do you know i love this place because place which came where i was born i love this place because it's it's complicated is any region a might imagine living in a feel like i can never exhaust my curiosity about this place and i feel like the the problems of this region are clearer than they are in other places like we recognize that the horrors of our past and the best of us are working to address them and when you have that charge when you have that burden on your shoulder you can do better work you know your purpose and that drives me you know i work at the university of mississippi you can see if i lean out my window i can see looking left and right where two people died on this campus integrating this university a come from trouble place that shows great promise and a place of great trial to you know the horrors of a moment like that and scribe on our campus are balanced are redeemed by the beauty of someone like fannie lou hamer the video max act fist an agricultural activists i come from a place of beauty in redemption come on down.

fannie lou hamer university of mississippi sixty seconds
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"You know this is a place where fannie lou hamer this civil rights activist was arrested at a bus station taken to jail and nearly beaten to death and that's a story that a lot of people in town in known no about it's not something that is commemorated anyway in the town but there are certain memories and lived experiences in the town that really do play a role in how people view law enforcement today how they've you what is happening in the curtis flowers case want to return to the white people within the tone hud reactions to you i'm thinking about this in terms of there is this real in rural white communities i grew up in one like there's this real suspicion of the media and a lot of ways and you've now done two seasons in white law in rural communities that have large white population so let's say season one was much more heavily skewed in that direction so like what is that reaction to like here comes the media to like overturn some of these rocks like what are those reactions like you know it's interesting because as a reporter i have seen that somewhat but i also think that not as much as you might think i mean i think that a lot of there's a lot of reporting on politics but when you go and you report on something other than politics and you show up in a town and you're there for a really long period of time and it's clear that what you're trying to do is actually find something out that you're sort of doing your work as a reporter to build trust with people and so you get to a point where you're not you know a generic reporter that stands for all reporters that they think have done something wrong but you're like this reporter who's being careful who's talking to people whose talked to some of your friends and they felt like that reporter was fair you know is spending the time moved onto one ona for the better part of the year tell me we'll bit about about making that decision in like getting people to trust you like getting them to know yes we're going to be a part of the community for this this point in time in like building those relationships yeah i mean for us it was we couldn't have done the story if we hadn't moved there i mean the story was too complicated iroquois too much reporting so it required a year plus of reporting but a year you know solid of of being there so that was just kind of a basic level thing it's like if we're gonna do the story we're gonna move there in terms of building relationships i think it's like anything else you know sometimes we're forced into situations where we just show up and we ask questions of perfect strangers and we hope that they respond but when you have long longer periods of time like this you can do things that you know allow people to get to know you i trust you i for example in winona you know we were invited to people's churches we are invited to like all kinds of different community events we are invited into people's homes i mean people many people were very very welcoming to us and got to know us i mean we got to know them they got to know us over this course of of such a longtime of reporting and i think that that has allowed us to better understand the town in ways that i don't think we would have been able to if we even had been there for you know only a few months so look give me a sense of what it's like to like drive into i know like it's a small town obviously but there are lots of different kinds of small towns so like what's it like to be in wino share so it is right off the freeway so it's right off a fifty five which is like the north south freeway mississippi so if you're going like memphis south you're going to hit the onoda exit you turn off the freeway and as you drive when you see this this very large white cross that is eliminated at night that's next to a.

fannie lou hamer
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The front of perimeter mall failing a health inspection surprise because they're like a couple of weeks ago sushi burger bar with a score of forty eight dropping fifty points from its great score of ninety eight last year that's terrible violations include a hair in the crab dip a dead bug in the ice machine and water leaking from the ceiling that's disgusting robert orlinsky wsb wsb news time twelve oh to traffic and weather coming up next what does that what us meteorologist kirk mellish mean to you he's accurate because one of the things you could depend on another wsb advantage atlanta longtime he knows what's coming he knows how to tell the the forecast of what's going to hit atlanta depend on news ninety five five am seven fifty wsb depend on mellish fifteen thousand years ago the people who called mississippi home paddle hundreds of miles in dugout canoes like this one you can see one for yourself at the museum of mississippi history you'll also meet european settlers traveled the parallel snack just brakes bringing with the winds of jake then meet the people behind the cotton boom in the war that ended slavery and account of artists authors musicians who overcame hardship with creative but hold on because we're just getting started next door at the mississippi civil rights museum follow the freedom riders to mississippi ground zero for the civil rights movement nationwide discover the people who devoted their lives to the struggle for rights people like fannie lou hamer meadow wiley evers vernon damer and many others with courage shines onto this day start your journey to the mississippi civil rights museum and the museum of mississippi history now open in jackson mississippi great news everybody thanks to advances in medicine you may live longer than you think.

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"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Four hour traffic center the downtown atlanta area is still really nafta the rolling closures on seventy five eighty associated with the police memorial drive bride that just should be about wrapping up soon but every direction into or out of downtown is jammed as well as five near jonesboro road so please be patient the dot's working on the perimeter and the two right lanes to five southbound at south cobb drive meanwhile it's two left lanes i seventy five northbound near windy hill margaret mckenna wsb fifteen thousand years ago the people who called mississippi home paddle hundreds of miles in dugout canoes like this one you can see one for yourself at the museum of mississippi history you'll also meet european settlers from traveled the perilous naturalist freight's bringing with the winds of jake then meet the people behind the cotton boom in the war that ended slavery and account of artists authors musicians overcame hardship with creative but hold on because we're just getting started next door at the mississippi civil rights museum follow the freedom riders to mississippi ground zero for the civil rights movement nationwide discover the people who devoted their lives to the struggle for rights people like fannie lou hamer mega wiley evers hernan damer and many others with courage shines onto this day start your journey to the mississippi civil rights museum and the museum of mississippi history now open in jackson mississippi did you know that there's a hidden time bomb in your portfolio it's they're waiting to diminish the value of everything that you work so hard to save to leave you.

mississippi jake civil rights museum fannie lou hamer jackson mississippi atlanta margaret mckenna museum of mississippi hernan damer fifteen thousand years Four hour
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Country where everybody is paid for their work or is supposed to be but what's been historically an issue is that black women have been at the forefront of every single black revolutionary movement and all of these black women that you know ella baker fannie lou hamer died destitute this work is not a game you're supposed to do this work that puts your life on the line that prevents you from from getting other work that has you in scenarios where white supremacists are doc seeing putting your family's information online and we just don't believe that the solution to problems that arose out of slavery is doing another form of slavery so let's just say in an imaginary world i'm a white person i see somebody acting really racist towards another person of color and i feel like i need to do something and maybe i don't do anything in my regular life to change anything but but this thing like really makes me uncomfortable and feel like i need to step up and do something what would you say to that person well i would say the the core goal i hope in that is to ensure the safety of whoever's being harmed in the situation and part of how you want to do that is to deescalate the situation you can go tim it'd be like your the seahawks had a horrible game or did you watch that super bowl or you know what did you think of this movie there's always different ways that you can you know tried to distract this person right that will accomplish the same goal it felt like in the previous conversation that you were saying that people should not get involved in those situations unless they understand specifically how to be a good ally i think when people say oh i got to do something it's not necessarily driven by their actual capabilities to help deescalate the situation is driven by their discomfort of being faced face to face with this person being belligerent and racist the thing is about being a quit right i'm always gonna hope that before you jump out of a plane that you've had some training on how to release your parachute right the safety pin is supposed to signal that.

seahawks ella baker fannie lou hamer tim
"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Reveal

"Form of reparations and a way to monetize white guilt we live in a country where everybody is paid for their work or is supposed to be but what's been historically an issue is that black women have been the forefront of every single black revolutionary movement and all of these black women that you know ella baker fannie lou hamer died destitute this work is not a game you're supposed to do this work that puts your life on the line that prevents you from from getting other work that has you in scenarios were white supremacists are doc seeing and putting your family's information online and we just don't believe that the solution to problems that arose out of slavery is doing another form of slavery so let's just say in an imaginary world i'm a white person i see somebody acting really racist towards another person of color and i feel like i need to do something and maybe i don't do anything in my regular life to change anything but but this thing like really makes me uncomfortable in feel like i need to step up and do something what would you say to that person while i would say the the core goal i hope in that is to ensure the safety of whoever's being harmed in the situation and part of how you'd wanna do that as to deescalate the situation you can go up to him and be like y'all the seahawks had a horrible game or did you watch that super bowl or you know what did you think of this movie there's always different ways that you can you know try to distract this person right that will ccomplish the same goal it's felt like in the previous conversation that you were saying that people should not get involved in those situations unless they understand specifically how to be a good ally i think when people say oh i got to do something it's not necessarily driven by their actual capabilities to help deescalate the situation it's driven by their discomfort of being faced face to face with this person being belligerent racist.

seahawks ella baker fannie lou hamer