21 Burst results for "Fallujah"

Atlanta mayor makes emotional plea to protesters: This is chaos

Charlie Brennan

02:09 min | 8 months ago

Atlanta mayor makes emotional plea to protesters: This is chaos

"This is Kevin killing a police source tells KMOX news that over the weekend after dark in downtown it looks like a scene from Fallujah downtown people were cruising cruising in cars hanging out of windows and shooting guns at buildings the Hilton at the ballpark was struck with gunfire so on staying on the seventeenth floor calling police to report that a window had been shattered the KPMG building at ten south Broadway also shot up near the tenth floor no shooting or any action taken against any official buildings such as the city hall courts but someone did spray paint black lives matter on the arch around midnight Saturday night Kevin cooling solutions news radio came

Kevin Kmox Fallujah Kpmg Official
"fallujah" Discussed on First Person

First Person

12:01 min | 9 months ago

"fallujah" Discussed on First Person

"Any poorly? I think it put it in more of a context. You know the one thing that I you know that am a father that I look back on. I really look back on kind of with all is I think about my time in the Marines and I think about my friends in the Marines I served with the Afghans and others I served with and I think about the guys. I knew who at the time I knew this had families and kids and were going out on night raids or fighting and footage doing it as parents now as a parent myself. It boggles my mind that they were able to do that. And I understand now that they were functioning with a level of emotional complexity that frankly. I just wasn't having to deal with you. Know as a twenty four year old lieutenant or as twenty nine year. Old Captain And it really gives me a kind of a sense of all about what they were able to do but it is it part of the reason why you end up not redeploying. I think it is. I think it gave me a sense that it was time. Can't life has it? Seasons in this season was passing and there were other things I needed to attend to like my family and at the same time. You don't ever really leave the war in some respects. You're constantly kind of returning. What is that propulsion? I think you know I. I left the military started working as writer and started traveling to southern Turkey where I want up. You know covering a variety of subjects to include the civil war in Syria the Islamic state's spread onto our rock and politics in Turkey as I was writing about these subjects. Kind of what kept coming back to me was the American experience in these parts of the world and how they were also intertwined into everything that was going on. And so you know. It's not so much that I keep coming back to them as much as like it's not over you know what would starter there for us. At least in two thousand one. Two thousand three is still not over so I wanted to write about that and just try to show the connections between Faluji in two thousand four and the Islamic state in two thousand fifteen in the same city and how there is a narrative arc connects these things both But politically you know. But also there's an emotional arc in the wars. Have an emotional topography to them. And I very much wanted to map that emotional topography and show the contours of what it feels like to to go to war. You see that emotional topography on both sides at various points in the book I do. I believe it exists on both sides in I believe in these wars for me in the Americans. I know her of my generation of thought of them. They were generation defining and in the book. I sit down with a former member al-Qaeda and Iraq who fought on Lombard provinces places. I fought and I talked to him he would. He tells me you know the war's regeneration redefining to him you know. And then I sit across from a Syrian activist of who participated in the protests. In Two thousand eleven. Two Thousand Twelve and he says it tells me the same thing that the conflict in that those protests in the conflict that led from those protests were defining to him and the fact that we've all been defined by these conflicts in the region. I see as something that connects us. emotionally connects us and is a point from which we can begin to understand one another even as radically different as we may be. Syrian activist American Marine and a former member of al Qaeda and Iraq. You know I'm an optimist. I believe that with everything I I've seen. I believe that people have more in common than they have different and to acknowledge. Those commonalities is a way to have deeper understanding and more empathy for one another. Do you feel like you have greater moral clarity on the American role in Iraq. At this point I think you can look at the war politically and then you can look at the war personally and for me. There's always been you know two separate things you know. I know I joined the military on the neck and sometimes people ask me like you know. Do you regret the fact that you serve based on political developments on the ground based on fact of Islam estates swept back into parts of bar province And I don't regret it because the nature of my service. The reason I was there wasn't necessarily to implement a specific policy in my mind. The reason was that I was there was that I again. I want to have a job or whether I was good at my job. Outta my job mattered. I can look back at decisions. I made that I feel proud because because I was there and we were able to make this decision in our platoon wound up getting through a pretty tough situation in in a better state guys and they get hurt so for me when I think about that. Those aren't really political issues as much if he asked about the politics of the Iraq War. The politics were terrible and we never should have invaded. Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out by. I think inflating the two is for me. Doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you recommended and received a Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury in in the book and I don't want to give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way well originally actually the That chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with. It said they're very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and said listen. Elliott you know I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. Know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book if you figure out a way to talk about him and I took that on board and I knew that I had this summary of action to serve an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action With a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into or included in official awards documents you. That's what I wound up doing. But you know wards are complex. GonNa quit Ryan. Shane said you not the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Brad. My greatest failure. Which is he didn't get lawn. The out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards. It's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan. They don't wind up handing out those awards. So you're often being honored for in. Some respects is sort of the worst day of your life. Why are you go back to Philadelphia as a journalist? What brought you back. I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects because you know like like Mallory said of Everett's because it was there you know I wanted to go back I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself I was living in Istanbul. The time and a good friend of mine was the New York Times Istanbul slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know he would help me. Get down there I really I jumped at. The opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity on your experience thereby returning? I didn't feel as though it was some type of catharsis per se. You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know. The veteran returned to the old battlefield. Whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice paddies or the you know the World War. Two veterans walking across the beaches It wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to Volusia was sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me. The most was how how little things had changed. You mentioned in the book that you try to imagine fluid differently when you return not as a battlefield right but as a community of homes and businesses and Volusia is not defined by creation but by destruction when I return to fluid I mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed standing there and looking at the city. You know when you go to other cities let's say old cities like I Dunno Rome or an Istanbul. You know you have sometimes these layered cities where you can see how one group of people have built on what another belt would another belt and it's how you wonder what kind of these this layering in certain cities and those cities. I think we're kind of oftentimes defined by that layer in these very old cities When I was back influenza it was almost like viewing that process in reverse is you would walk around the city. You would see destruction on you talk about you know that building. That building was destroyed in two thousand fourteen by ISIS. This building was destroyed in two thousand five. By the Marines. You know as the city that was defined by the layers of destruction that had come there And that jumped out at me You know hopefully flu jewel rebuild this at this moment that was perceived it. It's an interesting juxtaposition between a moment in the middle of a quarrier and Berlin with a former colleague. Conrad and he points out that a hill in the city is actually not a hill at all man-made and it's covering up it's almost archaeological dig of all the destruction the tanks armored the bodies that were left at the end of World War Two but Berlin is now this breathing living modern peaceful city and villages still a battleground in a different way. Yeah I mean it's it's food is a work in progress like I. I hope in like twenty years. You know and it's the city of Moscow. Those mosques will be standing like beautifully restored and you know and it will be a vibrant city and I can take my children there and you know. Walk Around and point to places with them. I think like most veterans. I know they dream of being able to do that. In Iraq or Afghanistan is just. That's not where either country is at this moment. You know. They're still active wars going there. Which is one of the things I think. They kind of have made these war surreal. Is that you know the equivalent passage of time. Let's say I'd fought in waste city so way city. Nineteen sixty eight. It's two thousand. Nineteen fifteen years so you know it would be nineteen eighty three right now. You know Vietnam was very very different place in nineteen eighty three obviously than it was in nineteen sixty eight in that passage of time whereas you know Iraq is a different place but the war is still percolating. There and were were not. There's not an in game. It's still a work in progress. What do you think the legacy of flu is for us now? I think the legacy is to be determined. I don't know what is you. Don't think enough time has passed you. Do you feel you've let it go this point or is it still of you? It's always a part of me. You know sometimes people ask me Elliott in like. How did the war change you? And I've never known how to answer that question because the war made me. I mean I you know I have a good friend who I go running within the morning. And he's you know he still works in special operation has been deployed in the war zones. More than than anybody. I know He's going in and out since two thousand three and so at one point we were running and we were just talking about the war and then that idea how to change us how it made us and he looked at me at one point he said you know Elliot said the melancholy of it all is that we grew up there and I feel that way I grew up there so asking me how the war changed me. It's like asking someone. How did your parents change you? Your parents don't change you. They make you thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me.

Iraq flu Istanbul Elliott Vietnam Volusia al-Qaeda Turkey Syria Faluji writer New York Times us. Berlin Elliot American Marine editor Shane
"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

10:41 min | 9 months ago

"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"I perceived to be my greatest failure which I wasn't actually able to get Lonnie out of the street that day And lonny wells wound bleeding to death the other thing that he said He says you know I'm looking out and who's going to be award in front of me Marines. Who'd been there? He said you know a lot of people. Ask me about that day. But something one's really asked me about. Was you know who went and got me? You know at that point lonny wells and Ryan. She had been shot in the middle of the road and wound up. Happening was to younger. Marines have run out into that same street and pulled them both to safety. You know so. There's also when we talk about the stories that could told and war and valor. You know. There's a lot of stuff that is overlooked and Ryan made that point as well. You also lost the weapons artillery officer who controlled air strikes and artillery for your company. And He'd been playing chess with him not long before he was killed. Yep so that was a friend of mine. Dan Malcolm and we were lieutenants together and he was the guy who would call in artillery and Wanted Happiness on the first day of the battle Our platoon had wound up pretty far forwards and artillery started landing all around us And it was actually friendly artillery. We didn't know what we didn't know where it was coming from and There was a high building the highest building around us in Dan. My company commander had been up on that building earlier in the morning but the the volume of fire that was coming on that building and so bad they'd had to get off this rooftop and later on as these artillery impacts are hitting around our platoon. I mean so close. It's like a steal wave Hitting a beach break in. I started yelling at Dan. Like who's shooting at? Us and Dan ran up to the rooftops to try to figure out where the artillery rounds were coming from and he was able to call those artillery rounds off of us and then as he was running down off the roof a sniper shot him and the impact right under his armpit went through his heart killed them almost instantly. You carry a story like that. How do you go on after that? You know you you recognize. I think that you know we all knew we were signing up for You now I think about the things that people did for me and you try to live a life with meaning that honors the people who who dedicate a comeback and and have the longevity that you've had Guys like Dan and Lonny Wells and Ryan Shane. I mean you remember them and Doug Zan Beck I mean all these guys. You just remember them. I think that's the best thing if you do after a few years as an you moved over to special operations and you actually weren't commanded marines anymore but foreign soldiers and there's a story you tell about a fateful decision made in that context to you know most of my career. I actually I worked in special operations and worked as an advisor to foreign troops along with maybe a handful of Americans who are also advisors. I in so That context on my war buddies. You know weren't other Americans. They were by large Afghans Who I fought alongside and you know. We did all of the things that people do in wartime fought alongside one another blood alongside another and I think that's Pacific story is Two OF THE PLATOON COMMANDERS. In a unit. I advised named Mortaza and severe Were we were returning one day from mission. We were in southeastern Afghanistan and severe lived all the way up in the Northeast on the pike. The famous Panshir Valley and he would hardly ever get home to see his family and he had a chance one night to get on an early helicopter flight out and so he basically wound up taking a shortcut To get him home and because we took that shortcut we wound up hitting an I. E. D. in which One of his best friends was killed. He had a child already. By then you. I did and so That firefight in that incident was one of the first ones. I had been in As a father I think when you have I've always felt I never really understood war until I had a child because I think you can't understand the scope of loss. People can experience in war. And Tell You yourself have a child and can imagine losing that child and how there's nothing in the world that can ever make that loss whole. Did it make you WANNA walk away from more at that point any poorly? I think it put it in more of a context. You know the one thing that I you know that am a father that I look back on. I really look back on kind of with all is I think about my time in the Marines and I think about my friends in the Marines I served with the Afghans and others I served with and I think about the guys. I knew who at the time I knew this had families and kids and were going out on night raids or fighting and footage doing it as parents now as a parent myself. It boggles my mind that they were able to do that. And I understand now that they were functioning with a level of emotional complexity that frankly. I just wasn't having to deal with you. Know as a twenty four year old lieutenant or as twenty nine year. Old Captain And it really gives me a kind of a sense of all about what they were able to do but it is it part of the reason why you end up not redeploying. I think it is. I think it gave me a sense that it was time. Can't life has it? Seasons in this season was passing and there were other things I needed to attend to like my family and at the same time. You don't ever really leave the war in some respects. You're constantly kind of returning. What is that propulsion? I think you know I. I left the military started working as writer and started traveling to southern Turkey where I want up. You know covering a variety of subjects to include the civil war in Syria the Islamic state's spread onto our rock and politics in Turkey as I was writing about these subjects. Kind of what kept coming back to me was the American experience in these parts of the world and how they were also intertwined into everything that was going on. And so you know. It's not so much that I keep coming back to them as much as like it's not over you know what would starter there for us. At least in two thousand one. Two thousand three is still not over so I wanted to write about that and just try to show the connections between Faluji in two thousand four and the Islamic state in two thousand fifteen in the same city and how there is a narrative arc connects these things both But politically you know. But also there's an emotional arc in the wars. Have an emotional topography to them. And I very much wanted to map that emotional topography and show the contours of what it feels like to to go to war. You see that emotional topography on both sides at various points in the book I do. I believe it exists on both sides in I believe in these wars for me in the Americans. I know her of my generation of thought of them. They were generation defining and in the book. I sit down with a former member al-Qaeda and Iraq who fought on Lombard provinces places. I fought and I talked to him he would. He tells me you know the war's regeneration redefining to him you know. And then I sit across from a Syrian activist of who participated in the protests. In Two thousand eleven. Two Thousand Twelve and he says it tells me the same thing that the conflict in that those protests in the conflict that led from those protests were defining to him and the fact that we've all been defined by these conflicts in the region. I see as something that connects us. emotionally connects us and is a point from which we can begin to understand one another even as radically different as we may be. Syrian activist American Marine and a former member of al Qaeda and Iraq. You know I'm an optimist. I believe that with everything I I've seen. I believe that people have more in common than they have different and to acknowledge. Those commonalities is a way to have deeper understanding and more empathy for one another. Do you feel like you have greater moral clarity on the American role in Iraq. At this point I think you can look at the war politically and then you can look at the war personally and for me. There's always been you know two separate things you know. I know I joined the military on the neck and sometimes people ask me like you know. Do you regret the fact that you serve based on political developments on the ground based on fact of Islam estates swept back into parts of bar province And I don't regret it because the nature of my service. The reason I was there wasn't necessarily to implement a specific policy in my mind. The reason was that I was there was that I again. I want to have a job or whether I was good at my job. Outta my job mattered. I can look back at decisions. I made that I feel proud because because I was there and we were able to make this decision in our platoon wound up getting through a pretty tough situation in in a better state guys and they get hurt so for me when I think about that. Those aren't really political issues as much if he asked about the politics of the Iraq War. The politics were terrible and we never should have invaded. Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out by. I think inflating the two is for me. Doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you recommended and received a Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury in in the book and I don't want to give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way well originally actually the That chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with. It said they're very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and said listen. Elliott you know I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. Know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book if you figure out a way to talk about him and I took that on board and I knew that I had this summary of action to serve an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt.

Iraq Dan Malcolm lonny wells Ryan Shane Lonnie advisor Afghanistan Doug Zan Beck Panshir Valley officer commander al-Qaeda Mortaza Faluji Elliott Northeast Turkey editor Syria
"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

10:37 min | 9 months ago

"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it Bellawood. In the first World War Guadalcanal Andy Wajima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city in Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know. There's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And I want you to explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know why you're going in? What was the mission? The mission was to flu. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand and four in which You know you may or may not remember. It began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed and their bodies hung from the bridge influenza. An led to a sort of aborted battle With Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faluji itself became a no-go area for coalition forces. And what really wanted to happening was between that March November It became a real safe haven for members of kite on Iraq and people like Zarqa. We were operating out of flu. And so it became this sort of seeping wound In whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Iraq at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Falluja the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrived in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February. Two thousand five and so We also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going and clearing out flu which is what came to pass So you know. Our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote tactical mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there you know. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy it's doing right by the Marines who become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires people to go the extra distance in those situations. But you knew going. In at the casualty count could be enormous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in? I think that the number you gave him the book was that you are expected. Potentially to lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in. When my same company commander my platoon had been tasked within our company which is three platoons about forty marines. Each our platoon was tasked as with all the main effort. So we were going to be the lead platoon going in. And you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty breaks for the lead platoon usually very very high. And I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine. Decide who is the commander of the platoons in saying? Hey you two need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled. Because I don't expect you guys to be combat effective by the end of the first day combat effective basically means. Don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore see us so that's pretty sobering But on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer. You know I was seventeen years old when I decided I wanted to go into the marines. I worked very hard my senior year of high school to get in on an ROTC scholarship. I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry so you know about seven years of my life. I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives. They look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled. You know you you've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready for it and have to accept. It's one thing to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you where your comrades and you tell a story about how. What rainy nights remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ryan? Shane and Sergeant Lonny Wells. What happened? Well lonny wells Was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company and you know most marines. Who fought him food? You can tell you where they were. When they crossed highway. Ten highway ten was a six lane highway. The bisected the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so lonny wells went across highway. Ten in as they were crossing He was machine gun in the street shot through his moral artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the road. Ryan Shane at the time. Was that you know real strapping. I mean you know six foot two two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery Sergeant who enlisted the age of seventeen whole life. He wanted to be marine Solani get shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie. grabbed him. Pull them in once. Pull them twice. And then the same machine gunshot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road In there was a very iconic set of photographs taken on sequence of Ryan running out into the road to lawn and About two years later I was in camp. Lejeune and Ryan. Shane was awarded a Bronze Star for valor. So metal for trying to get Lonnie that day and that day it was raining. Those the first day it had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bet about when it would finally rain racks at Hunter Rain. Once the whole summer we'd been there And so in Ryan is getting his award. He said two things you know that really stuck with me. The first was he some finding it really hard An old by tobacco by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps He wasn't able to serve anymore. Which was pretty heartbreaking for him mandate time. He's getting this award. You know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct. I mean been shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his awarding. Said you know I'm finding it really hard To accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what?.

Marine Corps Marines Sergeant Ryan influenza Iraq Ryan Shane commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc Commander Marine Gunnery Sergeant lonny wells assault Marine infantry Korea Dc Vietnam Chosin Reservoir Amtrak Andy Wajima
"fallujah" Discussed on First Person

First Person

08:25 min | 9 months ago

"fallujah" Discussed on First Person

"It's been sixteen years since the United States went into Iraq nearly nine years since president. Barack Obama formerly ended. Us combat missions there and yet the impact of the decision to fight is still being felt today in the early years of the Iraq War. One battle particularly stands out for ferocity from early November through mid December two thousand four US Iraqi and British forces moved into the city of volusia fighting operation. Phantom fury a joined effort to fight the insurgency afford trained well led and ready the operation deliberate the people who've lose it and begin the reconstruction of the city and the restoration mobilized more than eighty. American soldiers died in that operation. The heavier weapons fire a barrel of the insurgents. They caught it. Suppressive Fire and marine has been injured and his colleagues need to administer first aid and get him out earlier that year. Four American contractors were killed in Florida. Their bodies were burned and dragged through the streets. Everyone who comes to Faluji he warned will meet this fate. Phantom Schori was an effort to retake the city from a safer rooftop. We filmed tank moving along the street. Ready to fire a round into each house where they might still be resistance. Elliot Ackerman is a marine veteran. Deserve five towards up Ghanistan the Rock and was awarded the Silver Star the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart. He led a battalion of soldiers for that month of two thousand four in his new book. Pleases Names on war. Revolution and returning Ackerman describes what it was like to be involved in that critical battle and how it felt to return years later not as a soldier but as a journalist. He's our guest this week. Elliot so they actually want to start at what feels to me the heart of the book. Which is Florida two thousand four and I wonder if you can take us back to November tenth and begin their well. On November tenth. I was serving as a marine rifle platoon. Commander in Volusia on the assault of the city hadn't yet begun begun for us on that day. And I think that is kind of in some respects the center of the book because that was one of the earliest and most intense combat experiences that I had had a lot of what else occurs in. The book is kind of orbiting around that central. Experience lead you join the military? To begin with. I joined for a variety of reasons. I grew up overseas grew up in the UK. And I think kind of always being a little bit of an outsider to America. Made me want to give something back and kind of perhaps give me a different perspective on what it means to be an American. I was someone who when I graduated from college. I wanted the job that I had whether I was good at my job or bad at that job to really matter onto feel like I was going to have an impact and have real responsibility in the corps offered me that on finally like I was the kid who never stopped playing with his Gi. Joes I guess. I always had an innate fascination in the military and I think the confluence of probably all three of those things. What led me into the Marine Corps and I joined a before nine eleven did ROTC and college to become an officer in the nine eleven. While I was at school and so the Marine Corps than you know went from being kind of a you know more abstract thing in terms of what I would be doing when I served to something. That was much more tangible as there was a war. Going on there's a an Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual Afri- Doug back he says. Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go to college. They joined the Marines to be a part of a legacy. That was true for you absolutely. I mean the Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it. Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and he will Jima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and Waste City and Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanting bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And wait explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know.

Marine Corps Marines Iraq Elliot Ackerman Volusia Florida United States Commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc assault Barack Obama Phantom Schori Los Angeles Times UK president Purple Heart Faluji ROTC America
"fallujah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"fallujah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the surveillance because essentially you know in this in this culture if if if a kid's fell is not just that first off are you today and and so good so parents do do you take on the kids successor ferries and not naturally leads to a more control of Fallujah parenting and there's a lot of dates to support that is on the rise that said there are ways in which you can do that that don't necessarily emphasize and perfectionist tendencies okay so I I want to hear them what do you think parents should do trying not to focus on the outcome so when kids have done attached after the metric or school it's important we need to there's much we can downplay school particularly where at in terms of where it sits relative to others I'm asking you kids more about what happened what did you learn right I'm really trying to hone in on the actual purpose of education and what is this topic on this the source of learning itself and then the second one just just quickly I think is is how we deal with value not being afraid the fat is really really important I and and in particular making sure that when we do encounter setbacks that wave at compression on ourselves how would you talk to a friend for instance he came with the same issues you'd rationalise within me them before is with them you know sensually tried to show them that you know it's not the end of the world we don't apply the same rules to ourselves and say talking to kids in those terms you know how to treat other people if they if they came in hi am with upgrade would you say you'd be very different to your friends you will be T. itself as it is release of compassion I think it is really really important and teaching them there is there is some issue in value in the summers during infection in it we're not we're not built to be tough if you will be very books I I wonder how much you think vulnerability and and being able to laugh at ourselves matters.

Fallujah
Coronavirus Vaccine Dreams

America's Truckin' Network

04:04 min | 10 months ago

Coronavirus Vaccine Dreams

"Is because far as being prepared for any future of pandemic means of some of the summer saying that we we should have been prepared for this one that had we proceeded to actually develop a vaccine for the the sars virus or the merge Middle East respiratory syndrome of that those would have been right they're pretty darn close to have worked with this which is being referred to as far as to but that's not the case dot late last week they they told us for those hoping for a vaccine the reality is not the best news there has been no vaccine available for sars or murders of those past respiratory viruses so according to this medical journal they're trying to say of a vaccine for coalbed nineteen is a pipe dream efforts have been made to develop vaccines against human coronavirus infections such as Mars armors rather in sars for the past ten years or decades to date no licensed antiviral treatment or vaccine exists for either this coronavirus is a sister to both sars and murders which is why this novel coronavirus declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization many efforts have been directed to develop vaccines against human C. O. V. infections in recent decades but a limiting factor is the degree of cross protection rendered by these vaccines due to their extensive sequence diversity according to the doctor right in this now also because sars and murders have been rapid outbreaks with generally less impact on humanity in future years the pharmaceutical companies just really didn't devote a lot of time or money or resources to develop backings yeah basically those two just kind of came and went a major reason for the lack of approval and commercially available vaccines or therapeutic agents against the CEO vis might be and the lack of interest among the pharmaceutical companies according to the doctor yeah these are outbreak scenarios the demand for drugs or vaccines last for a period while the outbreak last of the number of affected people would be a small proportion of the global drug and vaccine market so by the time a new drug vaccines developed there might not be any patients for clinical drivers and didn't really not a meaning for Martin market for newly discovered drugs according to the World Health Organization guidelines infected patients receive supportive care yeah oxygen therapy fluid therapy antibiotics for treating secondary bacterial infections I guess that's where the whole pneumonia thing comes into play you get to Fallujah start building up in the lungs because of the viral infection then you get the bacterial infection that sets in in the longs in many times of they can't kill that that's that's fatal pneumonia but I I mean who knows we're being told by all the medical authorities that everyone everyone across the board all yeah public private sector pharmaceutical companies are all working hand in hand supposedly sharing information sharing potential

Pneumonia Middle East World Health Organization CEO Martin Fallujah
Italy: 6 inmates protesting virus restrictions die after breaking into prison infirmary, overdosing on methadone

BBC Newshour

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

Italy: 6 inmates protesting virus restrictions die after breaking into prison infirmary, overdosing on methadone

"Prison authorities in Italy say protests a broken nineteen twenty seven jails against restrictions imposed to tackle the corona virus and break the trouble began in Montana in the north after inmates were told visits will being suspended media reported six deaths that around twenty prisoners have escaped from a prison in Fallujah in southern Italy in Milan inmates climbed onto the roof at St Victoria

Italy Montana Fallujah St Victoria Milan
"fallujah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fighting is in that famous phrase has to have some process with two with you on the doorstep trying to break in the dole if the people inside they could hear you in there awaiting sees what's going up and it's pitch darkness inside and you've just got to move because the light behind you your directly at target in some cases they placed explosive devices and the whole way but most of the time they would let us get a little bit in the way the whole way before opening finance so you would try to press you sell for a hard against the side of the the whole way and then when shooting started it was in the best way to describe is just absolute pandemonium I mean if you can imagine it is the bullets would just rupture the walls and that would be clouds and clouds of dust so whatever like you had was instantly blocked out and we could see was muzzle flashes and and people yelling and you can tell you know who was friendly was the enemy I didn't have a what training you had it's a very prime what's a very primitive situation on may I have the vehicle miles out of situation in Fallujah is very critical street fighting is raging and there were casualties everywhere I'm not scared for my life for my family kid from my city it's like an inferno if I could go out I would go and join the militant the war in Iraq it was read that you saw the enemy the thing about flew to was you were very close to him and there were there were incidents where they would yell at us to once to twice before entering a house we could hear charting inside date mostly kind of religious chanting Allah Allah Akbar and I don't know if it was to raise desperate so it was to reduce our maral I don't know they don't know then they hit them there was one incident that still stays with me.

Fallujah Iraq Akbar
"fallujah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Then they hit the there was one incident that still stays with me and we kicked open the door and though to insurgents inside the room they had weapons but the weapons from the table and they had all the stuff on the table like grenades and and what looked like explosives but they made no attempt to shoot this right and they just looked at us maybe fifteen twenty seconds those a strange point where we were we were pointing a weapon set them and they were just looking at us and we knew we should have shot them they were still afraid there were explosives have some reason we didn't then we started yelling put your hands up in the hands of but they wouldn't they want absolutely insouciant there wasn't a trace of the FIA on their faces there wasn't even animosity they would just looking at us prepared for whatever was to come with it will be to be killed and at that moment our interpreter who was a veteran of the Iranian Iraqi war and I so I never know why he did this he stepped in front of us and between us and the insurgents and just started talking to them in a in a very calm voice and they raise their hands away from Fallujah the refugee camps tens of thousands of people living in tents or sheltering in nearby villages while some help is reaching them the Iraqi red crescent is increasingly concern for civilians still trapped in the city honestly it was read that you saw civilians and and actually that that was a huge relief for all of us who five have marathons playing for hours okay cool resistance by the end of the battle when you've probably seen pictures.

FIA Fallujah
"fallujah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The fighting is in that famous phrase house to house close with two with you on the doorstep trying to break in the dole if the people inside they could hear you and they'll waiting sees what's going up and it's pitched honest inside and you've just got to move because the light behind you you're you're a clear target in some cases they placed explosive devices and the whole way but most of the time they would let us get a little bit in the way the whole way before opening fire so you would try to press you sell for a hard against the side of the the whole way and then when shooting started it was and the best way to describe is just absolute pandemonium I mean if you can imagine it is the bullets for destruction the walls and that would be clouds and conserve das so whatever like you had was instantly blocked out and we could see was muzzle flashes and and people yelling and that you can tell you know who was friendly was the enemy I didn't have a what training you had it's a very prime what's a very primitive situation alarm may I have the vehicle miles out of situation in Fallujah is very critical street fighting is raging and there are casualties everywhere I'm not scared for my life for my family paid for my city it's like an inferno if I could go out I would go and join the militants the war in Iraq it was read that you saw the enemy the thing about flew to was you were very close to him and there were there were incidents where they would yell at us to once to twice before entering a house we could hear charting inside they mostly conversely just chanting Allah Akbar and I don't know if it was to raise desperate so what was to reduce our maral I don't know then they hear the there was one incident that still stays with me.

Fallujah Iraq Akbar
"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Get hurt so for me when I think about that those aren't really political issues as much if you ask them about the politics of the record the politics for terrible and we never should have invaded Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out but I think inflating the two is for me doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you you are recommended and received Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury and in the book and I don't WanNa give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way? Well originally actually the <hes> that chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with it said they were very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and he said listen Elliott. I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. You know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book. If you figure out a way to talk about it and <hes> I took that onboard and I knew that I I had this summary of action to sort of an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action <hes> with a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into are included in official awards documents and that's what I wound up doing but you know awards are complex GonNa like what it Ryan. Shane said the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Bradtha my greatest failure which is he didn't get lawn the out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards it's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan and they don't wind up handing out those awards so you're often you know being honored for what in some respects is sort of the worst day your life. Why are you go back to flu jazz journalist? What brought you back? I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects X. because you know like like mallory set of ever because it was there you know I wanted to go back. I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city. Every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself <hes> I was living in Istanbul the time in a good friend of mine was is the <hes> New York Times stumbled slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know and he would help me get down there. I really jumped at the opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity already on your experience thereby returning. I didn't feel as though it was some type of Catharsis per. Se You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know the veteran returning to the old battlefield whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice patties or the you know the World War Two veterans walking across the beaches <hes> it wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to fluids sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me the most was how how little things changed you mentioned in the book thought you try to imagine flew to differently when you return not as a battlefield you right but as a community of homes and businesses and that villages not defined by creation the destruction when I returned to flu John mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed you know standing there and looking at the city you know when you go to other cities..

Ryan Shane Iraq flu editor Istanbul Elliott Bradtha New York Times Vietnam official bureau chief Baghdad John twelve years
"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"In and clearing out flu which is what came to pass us <hes> so our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote Tactical Nicole Mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy. It's doing right by the Marines who've become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires aspires people to go the extra distance in those situations but you knew going in at the casualty count could be nervous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in I think that the number you gave in the book because you are expected potentially lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in when my same company commander my platoon had been tasked with an our company which is three platoons about forty marines H.. R. Platoon was passed as with the call the main effort so we were going to be the lead platoon going in and you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty rates for the Filippo Turner usually very very high and I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine decide who is the commander of Neo platoons in saying. Hey you to need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled because I don't expect you guys to be combat-effective by the end of the first day combat effect of basically means. I don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore soon that's pretty sobering <hes> but on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer you know I was seventeen years old. When I decided I wanted to go into the marines I worked very hard hard my senior year of Highschool to get in on R._O._T._C. Scholarship? I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree in a master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry sorry so you know about seven years of my life I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives they look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled you. You've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready afford to accept a it's to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you or your comrades and you tell a story about how what rainy nights let's remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ranch chain and Sergeant Lonnie Wells what happened well Lonnie Wells. <hes> was a squad.

commander R. Platoon Sergeant Lonnie Wells Elliot Elliot flu Marine infantry Gunnery Sergeant Ranch Moore Filippo Turner Highway Tan Lonnie Wells. officer seventeen years seventy percent seven years five years one day
"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"fallujah" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"There's a in Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual reference Doug's I back. He says Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go go to college. They joined the Marines to be part of a legacy. Being that was true for you. Absolutely I mean you. The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture and I listen. I think thank everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons but one thing you do opt into when you join is this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and Faludji I remember three days before the battle. The <hes> Math Marine expeditionary for sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted Marine Alva rat came and talked to all of the assault battalions and you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go. Do is just like what the Marines did Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and Iwojima and the Second World War Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city and Vietnam this battle is going to become part of the marine cores legacy. That's only one component opponent what that battle net and with that experience mad but from an organizational perspective certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps curate that your company commander told you two two weeks into the battle that you are both the luckiest and unluckiest to be going into that battle so soon into your service why was that I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan so I think what my company commander who when he said those words to me was you know all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five <hes> what he meant was is that you know right out at the gate would when I came into the Marine Corps my experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would <hes> live up to that and that was why I was unlucky in that Vike coppee perceived in somebody who truth the rest of my time in the Organization would be a letdown compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words prove true in the duality behind those words also proved true in that experience is one that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret I lost a lot of friends influenza. I wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines and explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle <hes> well yes so talking about the culture November. Tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday so as they say November tenth seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these things and <hes> one of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon or at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington D._C.. Wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there in deployed halfway around the world going to a battle is you <hes> you read lead the cosmonauts message but the current cosmonauts message and the General Jonny Lee Jun who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday and you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth two thousand four all loaded up both <hes> in about a dozen with a call Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning really come almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into flu Asia and <hes> you know where we were handing out these little bits of birthday..

Marine Corps Math Marine expeditionary Marine Alva Doug Los Angeles Times Bellawood commander Chosin Reservoir Jonny Lee Pentagon Washington assault Korea flu Asia Vietnam Iwojima Vike Iraq
Marine Veteran Finds Common Ground with Former Enemy in New Memoir

Steve Dahl

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Marine Veteran Finds Common Ground with Former Enemy in New Memoir

"If are we have to point with this never ending a deployment to Iraq Kanata rex specifically but Afghanistan and a number of other places around the world Syria at this time if in order to get everybody's skin in the game everybody involved everybody has to pay a price is a time for some sort of version of national service well look at I look a kind of slightly different we've had these forever wars that you mentioned going on the courses are so how do we end and if you look at every war America is far from the civil war all the way up to the president is always been a construct around the war how we're going to organize ourselves as a society to fight at the civil war first income tax first draft come out of the American Civil War second World War war bonds nationalization Vietnam War characterized by very unpopular Trask these wars have been funded through deficit spending so we borrowed most of the money from the Chinese so nobody gets taxed on them and they've been a resource by an all volunteer military to our society has been and that's the ties to the war we don't feel it unless you want to this man you a bad person if you don't care about the war in all of us having to relive in our lives in dealing with the issues we have to deal with every day and this one's taken off the table for you you're not gonna engage and so now we sit on two thousand nineteen we scratch your head and say wow how is it that we have fought in Afghanistan for eighteen years in this because there's been no incentive to end the war say just kind of gone on and on this year two thousand nineteen marks a historic milestone in our country this is the first year in the history of our nation if someone can walk into a military recruiters office and list to go fight in a war that is older than they are it's never happened before my my nephew as much into his office on his way to college but ROTC and you went to tufts and then of course two of the Fletcher school and then you won't up in the marine corps that's a weird subject re isn't let's see only selling trajectory I know I I started in the military in ROTC in nineteen ninety eight and then while I was at school obviously September eleventh happened so the military I was going into became very different the military that I wound up in which was wartime marine corps on a wartime footing and when you were deployed to Iraq where did you serve there I served in all Anbar province which is to the west and specifically I served and Fallujah and the second battle that was fought in the fall of two thousand four and how many total deployments I had total of five deployments between Iraq and Afghanistan and then when you came back you throw yourself into the writing career you're terrifically talented at that you come from a family mothers writer and this book a new book places the names on war revolution a returning what was it like to go back and face some of the same guys you fought by primarily write novels for us to do a lot of work as a journalist and so for number of years I lived in Turkey and I was reporting on the Syrian civil war and saremo minister in front of my came up to me and he to Matt someone in a refugee camp in southern Turkey basic Anderson you know alley at there's a guy I met his okay who's the guys like wall used to fight for a cut on a rock racing the two of you would really get along and so me and this guy seems obvious are right about him a lot of the book no we basically sat down to veterans of the Iraq war so if we fight on opposite sides and we had a Cup of tea I understand did you ever did you have do you two guys are figure out if you actually faced each other in a particular battle I had a certain moment in our conversation my friend bad one of translating for us because I'm not a fluent Arabic speaker an obvious are didn't speak English and he laughed at a certain moment my friend OB and laughed and we couldn't talk with one another one of happening was so with a piece of paper in front of the two sitting between us and we sketch the math and he was writing down place name and a date and I was handing the times when I was running a day or kind of our hands were chasing each other on the map try to figure out if any of our dates lined up in the Dennis yeah it's a I guess is good for two it is for that particular moment right you know I I guess said a lot of veterans go back and relive some of those days but it's not generally as soon as you did I think people asking going back is for Thursday and you know I can imagine that it would be cathartic if the wars for over but the the book really gets and tell you not only a memoir of my experiences in Iraq but also a reflection of what's going on in Iraq and Turkey and Syria right now and understanding some of what's going on there right now by being informed of you know what happened there before the American

Afghanistan Iraq Eighteen Years
"fallujah" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Is it you served as you as we talked about three tours you put in eight years of your life you gave to us and thank you for that for in the marines how hard is it to train up a brother and to lose somebody that you've trained up that that's pretty tough you know the the way it worked out for me is i deployed with my junior guys for a short deployment of small you know no big deal deployment and then i transitioned to another another unit after we came back and you know so i spent i i i guess did everything i could to make sure that my guys were ready you know and then whenever transition to another unit they ended up getting called back and deployed again and they went to fallujah and you know that's where i lost a lot of those guys so for one i wasn't with them i wasn't there too i guess protect them you know the way you know this is the way i feel i mean they they protect yourself i'm either frigging marines or manual they know they know how to do everything but you know this is you know my my guilt is i wasn't there for him i you know i went onto to other units and did other things and you know they deployed shortly after i left and you know so that's that's hard to swallow to you know to know that you know i i feel guilty about leaving felt like i let them down at that point but you know i didn't know they were getting the point i didn't know but you know it is what it is they they gave their life protecting their brothers and doing what they knew best have already they understand to you said and i'm trying to.

fallujah eight years
"fallujah" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on KOIL

"For more information in a dealer near you take it away gunzle thank you bernie will begin with some scores from last night now the cleveland cavaliers have update down all season lebrun most likely leaving may be heading to the lakers or clippers at the end of this season last night however it was a tie game hundred and thirty eight a piece in overtime bridging the cavs and the minnesota minnesota timberwolves my buddy right enrico went to fallujah with them areas with the game winning call franck warriors will garage the the big cities doing of come on that that is a way of education right there is a regular season game but before the it wale our radio on brick and lyon roof grow i love the got a chill in hobart low but hey we get excited he's a fan he's a fan of the game that's why we level so our but or you gotta picky spots but i love ryan sold he's our body of is one of my best reds absolutely are at least he's good of what he does yes we continue on saint john's yes say john bass a former other it is there you go other than that it happened after the bromate the shot that's what he does cleveland once that is what i call your south right speaking of shots this debate a lot last night st john's they are upset number four duke on saturday last night huge upset defeating and upsetting a number one villanova so st john's a two last games have been absolutely awesome for that continuing odd the fourtime pro bowler seattle seahawks quarterback russell wilson yes this is not a typo this is a real story russell wilson hanging up his football threats that would have been from you the pebble was like one more well it's all good this is true we fail is enough fake news guns speak this is truth yes absolutely the future radio here comes.

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"fallujah" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"A wet you know people i'm talking again guys there is a very specifically a desire to you know be hyper sexually and enter to be desired already social media and it's across the board yeah but this a mike how did you find a way i get it fitness you can do it right but to its december and not here posting pictures literally you're like i can't see your pupils and you're on the beach and you're just singer doing it because you missed some products to fucking this summer we all miss some are more or some of us don't i don't care about summer but i don't need you to put just say that you just do what you're doing there you go just do what you can you don't need to a positioned around the fucking season and that's one minute that i'll tell you this i'm going to hate summer i miss summer exactly i love a coal i love fall on winter fallujah is my sleep so lateran kbio follow i have a couple of whole couple of game autos because they like follow me and i have gone in and it is truly yellow point of your feet offence chairman just like i don't yeah there's no point of it and i but elliott's tottenham at this phenomenon of it's not even just the missing summer thing it's like just cloaking psalm and encouraged trapped under other the guys of summer the thing of just like uh i mean that could have a buck you're talking about that for hours i'm just talking very specifically about the seeing this hashtag i miss summer bris summering summer back i'm rita literate just say like look at my ass looking my your ambassador at the aren't as dire as i understand i am when he pitted china all my i thought my guys on people you're showing oster astle now i am.

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"fallujah" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

Jim Beaver's Project Action

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

"Uh and i'm assuming we'll do people hey why don't you fall me back and i'll be like the guy it's weird you know like you'd i like i look at our how many people we follow you know some of celebrities fall like ten people right like i follow like fifteen one hundred seventeen 100 people on instagram so obviously i'm not picky but like you know it's people follow me if you interact with me if you like a lot of my things and i'm not like saying spam like obviously just like ten photos expect but if i look like the past six months you've liked a lot of pictures and you've commented and you've interact you've asked me questions like i'll probably give you follow because i'm mike are you care about what i'm doing right yours so i'm not picky you know like i don't after personally no you if you like a cool person you post cool stuff you're not poston pictures are you do in drugs or party and all the time or you know just stupid crap like i might follow he of your council wack that i'm not going to you but like interact with me be a real person and you know a probably fallujah like i love following young check thing i have a couple of people i know followed years ago and i like to see their progress i i like to watch them find themselves than you know working towards their goals the next cooler because i get to watch their journey too and like i genuinely enjoy you know following other people's lives to is no they're posting motivational stuff and no they message me or you don't ask for some advice and like i follow you i want to make sure that you were slain your goals to and both in cool content but after being like i like the fall people who also posed you know positive stopping motivational stuff you because i looked at at other times like i scroll through instagram and you know i use other people's life journeys and this stuff that day post two helped motivate me to like i'm just human as well so i mean i don't like when people puts themselves on such a pedestal where you know they don't want to follow somebody who's not you know a professional or.

instagram mike fallujah six months
"fallujah" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Save radio's jason work has more a new report says highschool dropouts among hispanics is falling significantly a new pew research study says it went for more than thirty percent in 1999 to just ten percent last year the study also found the amount of hispanic students enrolling college has reached a record high almost half all hispanic highschool graduates are now moving on to some form of higher education andreessen word former president jimmy carter turns ninety three today and folks in his south georgia home who planes have made some plans mark wolsey with details jill stuck he is a longtime friend and fellow church member at merrin epa baptist church in planes she says that carter's friends and family have cake and a special piano concert planned for him but she says the birthday hoopla award prevent him from fulfilling a regular sunday morning roll not peaking sunday school and so he wouldn't let a little thing like at ninety character fallujah stopping keiichi struck you says they're already planning the president's one hundredth birthday so early games of the nfl today the atlanta falcons host the bills while as the battle for bragging rights still hiault when the oon 3 bengals repeal would three brown's the rams meet doubtless minnesota host detroit and carolina and new england's square off this is usa radio news i'm rod william stole you became a nurse for a lot of reason you care about people and you love taking care of them being a nurses who you are for today many medical facilities require nursing candidates to have bachelor's degrees stig you're probably going to want to have that agreement that you work you may they have a family how can you possibly.

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"fallujah" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"fallujah" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Post trump election protests that go on there's really no point to them other than they just kurt they just it's like a roar shack test whatever you're angry about today throw it in there you can join us put on a have but a pig had on you can protest you we do have people protesting wings and never even habit right now for everything craft beer line and left and we're going to resist what are you gonna resist everything that's bad okay why don't you do that last week because i bad stuff just got born when during the election all rally it was like a pans like the gateway to hell opened up in all the demons came out point i dunno olivia a guy or it it's fairly fat it here it just shows a level of uncollected in our country on well who feel a little too hot political power and a former political callec louis thank you for your call in and the other thing too is a view every with these role models and this that meeting you play sports do not a role model i mean really can we get past that crap to you switch you could roma what you're through model appear sometime a role models most important role model and you could live his you that's it now you wanted to be around people that a positive you want people around the elevate them as opposed to degrade them you want you know he does the people you want what are you gonna be your own hero well this could could kicker poeple rule fallujah here that's where begins and ends do is a chance he could be a good guy a good person wonderful but there's a chance you might not be going to look at into just 'cause he kicked a football but he some kind of our automatic role model spacek for the game watch watches athletic prowess enjoy it pull you finish football budget a little things people don't enjoy it said that's all romano think drives me crazy have never understood that but because a guy can throw football real far you admire him.

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