35 Burst results for "Faculty Member"

University of Michigan paying $9.25M to abuse victims

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

University of Michigan paying $9.25M to abuse victims

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the university of Michigan will pay over nine million dollars to abuse victims the university of Michigan says it will pay nine point two five million dollars to eight woman who reported emotional or sexual abuse by former chief academic officer Martin filbert an investigation by a law firm hired by Michigan found filbert committed sexual misconduct during his career harassing graduate students and staff filbert spent twenty five years at Michigan rising from toxicology professor to dean of the school of public health and then provost in twenty seventeen filbert was fired in March and quit as a faculty member in June hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi University Of Michigan Martin Filbert Filbert Michigan School Of Public Health Mike Rossio
College? There Has Got to Be a Better Way

Company of One with Dale Callahan

04:43 min | 2 weeks ago

College? There Has Got to Be a Better Way

"Today. We're talking college. And i'm going to talk a little quieter today because well. I'm doing this early in the morning. Because i didn't get it done in time so this is one of those times it. I'm trying to adjust in. Or i can't be it's loud and obnoxious. Maybe as i usually am but today we want to explore is the option of paying for college. Now if you've listened to the company of one you know that what we do here. Is we try to help you. Look at yourself as a company a company of one because you're earning money in exchange for providing service. That's the economy that we live in and the earning money in exchange for service is the definition of business so every one of us were company. I was having a conversation yesterday with a potential client. And i was explaining to him. What you're doing is basically as a consultant inside of a large organization so you're consulting operation so when you start looking at yourself that way you start examining how you spend money you start examining the things that you are doing to move the needle i what. What is it that matters in so this issue of college comes up now transparency. If you don't know me. I t to a faculty member of electrical engineering faculty member at a major university. And i run an executive graduate program so i bring in professional people probably like yourselves and we do We help you. Move to the the needle to the next point so while i so i don't want to be in hip regret so if you're sitting here saying we're talking about college but you've got skin in the game. So yes i do. So but i do want to step back. This is the conversation. I often have inside the university with the college administrators at the people who are deans program chairs In try to understand what is it that we and i mean we as the public. What do we value. What do we want from the university. And so i'm going to take this apart from a parent's point of view from a parent. Who's about to send their children to college or the thinking through this because the the conversation that i'm often finding myself in is college. There's got to be a better way. I mean this what parents say to me and yet what are they going to do. They're going to do the same thing that all the rest of us do. They're going to just pay the bill. They're going to send kids to college. And to put this in context Many of us don't know you know we're thinking our kids can get these full tuition scholarships and things but the way colleges are working right now. Parents are basically paying seventeen thousand dollars a year. Give or take out of pocket when everything is paid for if everything isn't paid for then Well it gets worse so it can cost a lot of money even when your kids get great scholarships the colleges this money pit and it used to offer things right used to offer these great opportunities and we can argue that chosen. Will it still offers those Pub we also can look around and realized it doesn't always work for everyone so there's got to be a better way so let's just kind of dive in and think about. What are some of the things that when you go to college. What are some of the issues that we know of massive debt. Now every day in the wall street journal new york times or any other publication. Somebody is writing about the questioning college in the wall street journal just the other day. I'll try to put to link to the show notes. By the way the show notes her. Del kellyanne dot com slash two zero two episode. Two hundred two. Don't callahan dot com slash two hundred two. But every time they were talking about this in this article in the wall street journal was one of those. They're talking mostly about debt. And the article in the wall street journal had some lady that was a psychologist she had a phd gone through To get a phd in psychology making eighty ninety thousand dollars a year a great salary and but she had hundreds of thousands of dollars a debt. Her husband Had a labor job was making about the same amount in had zero debt. And

The Wall Street Journal Del Kellyanne New York Times Callahan
Onion Domestication and Improvement

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Onion Domestication and Improvement

"We're going to talk about domestication again of a unique vegetable and when you ask people what their favorite vegetable is very few people say the onion however it's hard to think of vegetable or plant item for that matter. That has a more ubiquitous place in our culinary universe. It's you know the powders. The the the the basic parts of onion are important flavor in many different things that we consume and i think about just about everything i cook starts chopping up and onion so i wanted to pursue. Where did it come from. How did we get it. Where is it going. And so we're speaking with dr mike heavy. He's a he works with the. Usda agricultural research service in madison wisconsin and also as a faculty member in a department of horticulture. So welcome to the podcast. dr heavy. thank you so much. This is really cool. I think i actually got to see you. Give a talk once. And i can't remember where it where it was but i think what did you ever give talk in savannah georgia at the national onion association meeting. Yes i did about four five years ago. We had a joint meeting between the national onion association and then all the research community. I think we met there. Yeah that's i seem to remember that. Yeah i think. I may have asked you at the time too. If you'd be a guest on the podcast and just takes time so. Let's talk about onions. Like i mentioned before it has such an important culinary value. Where did it come from end. Do natural populations still exist. So the onion like many of our grain and vegetable and fruit crops was domesticated in central asia specifically iran. Turkmenistan afghanistan that area and it spread from there around the world and is now consumed in produced on every continent except in artika. There are still the most closely related. Wild specie is called alien babalola by and that grows naturally still in the kopech. Dr region which forms the border between northern iran and southern turkmenistan. And so the wild relatives still exists. There probably was in prehistory was more widely distributed but We can still find alien. Below by inet area oval ovalles. That was a discovery or at least a characterization by vavilov the species is named after him. Allie taxonomy in the former soviet union named this wild species after nikolai. About by batalov. Okay i never remember seeing so much about his his expeditions into places like iran. Turkmenistan you that he was Know prolific in that area. So but that makes sense to when you talk about the species of wild onion. I know that even here in florida there are things that they haul a florida. Wild onion and in chicago is named by from indigenous peoples term for stinky onion. So are these related to the major culinary onions or are these some kind of distant relative first of all the alliens. The genus of onion is distributed around the northern hemisphere and here in north america. Most albums have a seven chromosomes whereas onion and garlic chai have a basic chromosome number of eight. So they're distant relatives and we can't cross them with onion but they do have unique flavors in many places there still collected in consumed but really are very distantly related to the onion that we know. Have there been any efforts that you're aware of to domesticate those regional varieties that are grown with the seven chromosome ones that are growing around. Say the native united states. Yes you do find him showing up. Sometimes farmers markets different species out west in the california in the rockies. There are numerous albums that can be collected in consumed but to my knowledge. There's no effort to really Breed them in and develop some unique flavors or production characteristics from them so the primarily just collected so when you talk about the actual album that was used that is the forefather of the modern onion. Who was really the first to domesticate that they would have been probably nomadic tribes in central asia most of the central asian republics of the former soviet union onion and many of its wild relatives naturally exist and probably these people's started collecting him in eating them initially and ultimately i feel Asexually propagated them. Much like you would. Shall it today break apart. The basal plate planet and then i think probably seed production at conscious breeding occurred later but it would have been nomadic tribes in central asia tens of thousands of years ago they mostly use it for food flavoring or were there other potential uses of onion now. That's an interesting question that has been quite a topic of debate. A couple of things may have played an important role in the domestication of onion. One of them is that Because it was an editorial form is a perennial grows every year. It sprouts very early in the spring and many of your listeners may grow chives and the green leaves of tribes. Come out very early in while alley. That's true as well. It's not a good source of vitamin c. But it does have vitamin cs. I think you could think about a nomadic tribes taking advantage of that early green growth of the leaves in the spring as a source of vitamin c and potentially other vitamins and flavorings but the taste is also has to have an effect. I think and. I wonder if maybe wasn't important to mask off. Flavors maybe for some ranson meets or different foods that may not have it have an off taste and that maybe the early domesticated is used that straw salt pungency flavor compounds in the album's to their benefit.

National Onion Association Turkmenistan Dr Mike Heavy Usda Agricultural Research Ser Dr Heavy Iran Artika Babalola Vavilov Batalov Soviet Union Savannah Madison Wisconsin Florida Nikolai Asia Allie Georgia
New York's Governor Cuomo allowing schools in hot spots to reopen, under testing protocol

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:11 sec | Last month

New York's Governor Cuomo allowing schools in hot spots to reopen, under testing protocol

"That were closed in orange and red zones will be allowed to reopen as soon as Monday. As long as they test all students and faculty members. New York

New York
Amy Coney Barrett's hearing kicks off with hypocrisy and healthcare

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:54 sec | Last month

Amy Coney Barrett's hearing kicks off with hypocrisy and healthcare

"Cockney barrettes. Every full time faculty member of Notre Dame Law supports her nomination for legal work and teaching have inspired hundreds of young lawyers, especially aspiring female lawyers. Delaware Democrat Chris Coons says With Barrett on the court conservatives could kill what's left of Obama care President Trump explicitly promised Anyone he nominated to the Supreme Court would do the right thing and be a vote to overturn the affordable care act. In just one week after the upcoming election, the Supreme Court will hear a case in which the Affordable Care act is that issues. CBS's Nancy Corden, There are Democrats who are furious that this hearing is taking place at all. They believe. That Cockney Barrett is being rushed on to the Supreme Court because Republicans want to get her in place before an election that the president could very well lose President Trump's due to campaign today in Florida now that his doctors say

Supreme Court President Trump Cockney Barrett Nancy Corden Notre Dame Law Chris Coons Faculty Member Barack Obama CBS Delaware Florida
Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:11 min | 2 months ago

Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

"Another day, another Nobel Prize for a Cal Berkeley faculty member. Today It's the Nobel Prize for chemistry and as KCBS is Mike Dewald reports. It's a huge win as well for women in science. For the first time, two women have been awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry together. UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Donna was awarded the prize this morning along with her colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier. Down as the first woman in UC Berkeley's history to win the prize. I'm over the moon. I'm in shock, and I couldn't be happier to be representing UC Berkeley. The two scientists earned the honor for their work on what's called crisper. It's a method that's been like into molecular scissors away to change the DNA of plants or animals, allowing researchers to precisely edit specific genes. The roof errors that lead to disease with an eye towards affordability, accessibility and sustainability that will make the technology go from a laboratory tool, too. A standard of care or someday in genetic disease. Prestigious award comes with it a gold medal over $1 million in prize money and possibly Justus important, a free parking spot on the UC Berkeley campus.

Nobel Prize Uc Berkeley Mike Dewald Emmanuelle Charpentier Gold Medal Faculty Member Jennifer Donna Justus
Connecting with Learners  Learner Centered Approaches

Mayo Clinic Educator's Central

04:21 min | 2 months ago

Connecting with Learners Learner Centered Approaches

"Heard. You talk before a bit about teachers centered and Learner centered and I was wondering if you could maybe definer just Kinda. Let us know what that means to you or so yes, you're right. I do have a an interest both from my work and research even personal work on to the topic of connecting with learners and it's one that's important to me I i. think it's important to talk about what we mean by connecting and connection because that could have so many meanings. From me, I like the definition that's used by John Maxwell they. Miss Author coach. Leadership. Coach. Leadership. Development. where he talks about that connecting is really the ability to be able to identify with people and to relate to them in a way that's able to increase your influence with them. So I think that you know teaching and learning is an ultimate form of influence right between individuals and so to begin with this concept of teacher centered verses, Learner centered, which is again something that I've talked about. Before I really think of both as sort of a spectrum and they're both methodologies right of teaching and learning what they represent is more of a paradigm shift in education Today in approaching learning, that's really more based on needs and styles of contemporary learners. So if we take these individually, we can talk about Teachers Center at first what does that mean? Well, typically, that's when we have become from the perspective that the teacher is the authority in the classroom. So this is typically seen more in approaches that utilize more of the lecture style. So the teacher is talking to the students and the students role is more passive that role is to listen and to learn through listening to the teacher. The goal here in the educational setting or environment is for the teacher to transfer or impart their knowledge. Right. The teacher is their knowledge is seen as the most valued source high in the learning exchange. So like that sage on the stage phenomenon, right? So that's what that's more commonly referred to siege on the stage in contrast if we come from a learner centered perspective. That's where as the teacher or the faculty member we really feel more of a personal responsibility to have ownership for an active learning environment. So in a learner centered environment, the learners are actually encouraged to interact to even some cases challenged the teacher's knowledge perspective. But most of all, they're really encouraged to co create and construct meaning around the material along with the teacher. The teacher is not the only authority, not the only source of expertise what learners bring from their own experiences potentially can help in this sort of co construction of meaning around the material and learners are really encouraged in a more of an independent problem solving approach around the material so that they're learning is live and. Just passive not just listening receiving, but contributing and even on critical analysis right. So in this sense, the teacher is the guide who's providing them with Kayak on the side. From sage on the stage guide and the side are some Particular ways that people kind of reference these little broaches I love that. So easy to remember to that sort of shift with those two phrases sage on the stage to guide on the sides I love a lot for me. I think that a key concept in the framework of Learner centered approach is that you're valuing and therefore being very intentional about connecting with the learner

John Maxwell Teachers Center Faculty Member
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 2 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Alexander of Hales

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 2 months ago

Alexander of Hales

"On this episode of five minutes in Church history, we are talking about Alexander of Hales a medieval theologian. The first question is, where is hails will hails is in the West Midlands of England. The word itself means a Nook or a remote valley in this was a place that was a remote valley at the time of Alexander. The population of this sleepy little Berg was south of five hundred people. So now that we know where hails is who is Alexander. Well, he was born in eleven eighty five actually we're not quite exactly sure when he was born dates range from eleven eighty to eleven eighty six but we seem to settle on the date eleven eighty five. There is very little else known about his childhood we assume that his family was wealthy because he was sent off to the University of Paris to study in that was not something that everyone did. So we assume that his family had some means an off he went to Paris. His time at Paris. He held a number of church positions and titles but largely, he was a teacher at the University of Paris. He did become Franciscan monk in twelve thirty six and he would die in Paris in twelve, forty five. So. What did he do? Well, he was significant and bringing aristotle into the discussion of theology. Now, when we talk about this, we talk about all of the as that are involved and that is the first letter of the names of all of these people seems to begin with an a or there's no himself. Of course. Then there's arrows he was the Muslim scholar who translated aristotle from the Greek into Latin for all these medieval lists to be able to read study. There's Alberta's Magnus Albert the great another Great Faculty member at the University of Paris and he was the teacher of the final a a coyness. Thomas. Aquinas. Well, into that bunch of as we must throw Alexander he actually preceded Albertus magnus and he was the first to. The lectures and the theological lectures in particular around to aristotle and to use aristotle and his method, and even some of Aristotle's Tom's. As an aide and as a help to teach algae was Alexander of Hales that we see as the founder of the father of scholasticism and one of his published works was his own Suma Taylor. Of course, we talk about Thomas Acquaintances Suma but Alexander had one to his sumo was not finished at the time of his death and many others added to it in fact about seven years after he died. His book was still being added to one person said of Alexander's Suma that it was as heavy as a horse. Now, I'm sure there are some hyperbole there, but it was a massive tome. So we have his big book in his use of Aristotle but the other thing that makes him interesting is that he participated in these public university wide debates and he participated in famous one that spanned over three days. Now. Presumably, let's hope that they would take breaks from time to time. But this was a debate that spanned three days and anyone students. Faculty citizens of Paris could ask any question of the master and the master would have to feel it. And Alexander of Hales withstood three long days of this debate. That's how you earned the Latin title Doctor, Irre- FRAG analysis which we translate as the air refutable teacher. So he was unable to be refuted during those three days of debates. He also earned the title Doctor Doc two-room, which translated means the teacher of teachers. So this is Alexander of Hales that small village and mid western England and he made it all the way to the University of Paris as the Medieval, theologian? Alexander of Hales.

Alexander University Of Paris Paris Aristotle Hales Thomas Acquaintances Suma West Midlands Of England Little Berg Suma Taylor Albertus Magnus Magnus Albert Western England Alberta Faculty Member Founder TOM
Jodie N. Mader, Thomas More University  The COVID-19 Pause

The Academic Minute

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Jodie N. Mader, Thomas More University The COVID-19 Pause

"While the virus sent a direct path to remote teaching. The unclear direction is a scholarly research. What happens to those who had planned sabbaticals in the fall or spring of the next academic year? Faculty who have been awarded the right to research for a half or full term may have to reconsider whether they're sabbatical is viable. Now given the restrictions on travel and social distancing. Moreover, faculty who had planned to apply for tenure and or promotion may have to contemplate whether they're scholarly pursuits should continue or wait. Faculty, who are working to finish a publication. Possibly central to their application will have to decide whether it can be paused. Therefore. What does research me to a faculty member in Twenty Twenty? How can sabbaticals be reimagined such as the format location in time? How can scholarly research be re conceptualized in terms of the future of academia? Can Higher Education be more flexible and innovative in how faculty balanced teaching and scholarship given the current pandemic world While there are many unknowns in higher education. The hope is that colleges and universities will consider how to be innovative in transparent with faculty. Who will be balancing much more in the upcoming year In the faculty to. Bring to the table new solutions on research and writing to continue this component of higher education that was Jodi and mater of Thomas. More, university.

Faculty Member Twenty Twenty Jodi Thomas
Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

The Academic Minute

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Johann Neem, Western Washington University: Higher Education Meta-Vocabularies

"Today on the academic minute Johan Neem professor in the Department of History at western Washington University discusses three men vocabularies and why the least dominant could be the most important. My research argues that our debates over higher education have three better vocabularies, the utilitarian, the pragmatic and the virtue ethical. The first two are dominant especially among citizens and policymakers too utilitarian colleges must satisfy the preference of higher education's consumers to pragmatists including many elected leaders. Institutions must consistently evolve to meet the changing needs of society and the economy. To Virtue. At this on the other hand, colleges have internal goods of their own such as the cultivation of knowledge and curiosity about the world and these internal birds require practices to sustain them including, valuing basic over applied research and teaching. To virtual emphasis, colleges must change the world rather than just adapt to fit it. That's how university is structured and what faculty members and students do while in college shaped the ultimate educational and scholarly outcomes. Many of today's most popular form seek to make higher education faster cheaper standardized but threatened the kinds of academic practices that cultivate intellectual virtues. By understanding these Meta vocabularies, we can make sense of the ways in which participants in the public conversation around higher education talk past each other. We can recover a shared language for Liberal Education I. Hope my research will help college students, their parents, voters, and policymakers. Makers understand the different perspectives that we can use to think about the purposes of college. Ultimately, in my research I wanted to understand why professors like me are uncomfortable with reforms that to many others seem to make common sense. By identifying these Meta vocabularies. I was able to see what was at stake for all who care about higher education's future that was Johann name of western Washington University.

Western Washington University Johan Neem Professor Johann Department Of History
Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

Secular Buddhism

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances.

Buddhist Meditation Dr Sarah Shah Dr. Sarah University Of Oxford Manchester University KIM Faculty Member Nicola Cindy Lecturer
Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

Software Engineering Daily

03:00 min | 3 months ago

Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

"We haven't done very many shows about military and the software used in the military. Could you explain how software is used in the military and give get as an example of a piece of code that is used in the military? My particular experience I am a signed as a faculty member at the Army Cyber School House. So my experience with using getting. As a software development tool is primarily focused on that environment. Instead of the rest of the army are organizations that use different tool suites get being one get lab, Atlassian different Damore positions across Dod's different toll sweets. But the army cyber school, we use get lab and get primarily as a way to manage our curriculum. into the way that came to be prior to me arriving at the school around two, thousand, fifteen and sixteen timeframe the school I was created until fifteen in. So there are there are kind of the The for students creating tells fourteen excuse me at first students two, thousand, fifteen into. So they're kind of acting like a never meant to start culture. So they had the flexibility because they had such a torch short timeframe to. Build their their courses for the first students, which usually the army gives you three years they had less than a year. So they had the flexibility more or less the political flexibility to do what works and get things done rather than to wait bureaucratic systems of what may be in the past. They had a lot of opportunity to innovate in a way that might not otherwise be possible in a more established institution within the army. So for them they were looking at how can we manage course where the army traditionally has a three year cycle that updates at a very slow pace it's all using binary data formats such as we're documents powerpoint to get stored in a Web interface where the upload the documents in download them when you need to instruct and so for us, we wanted to be able to have more flexibility where we could manage course where in applying agile software development principles, and then also be able update in manage the course, the corser without having to go through the tedious process of using these other outdated systems designed for more a static types of curriculum that don't change very often. was a natural choice for those of US coming into the school house over background experience offered engineering. So I am at your centimeters haven't worked in the army in a development role personally, but many have in that influences the decision to use Gab. So for US instead of using a word documents, we use markup languages to track our curriculum, and then we use the CI pipelines to build that curriculum same. Thing with infrastructure code, use a different four-match for us at t templates an open stack pipe last play. So for us, that's that's the the framework for how we chose to use primarily because it was available and we had the freedom to do so because the organization organizations just being stood up in the leadership was willing to assume risk by allow us to innovate in ways that might not otherwise be possible.

Army Army Cyber School Army Cyber School House United States Faculty Member DOD
Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

Software Engineering Daily

07:30 min | 3 months ago

Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

"We haven't done very many shows about military and the software used in the military. Could you explain how software is used in the military and give get as an example of a piece of code that is used in the military? My particular experience I am a signed as a faculty member at the Army Cyber Schoolhouse. So my experience with using getting. As a software development tool is primarily focused on that environment. Instead of the rest of the army are organizations that use different tool suites get being one get lab. Atlassian. Different Damore positions across Dod's different toll sweets. But the army cyber school, we use get lab and get primarily as a way to manage our curriculum. into the way that came to be prior to me arriving at the school around two, thousand, fifteen and sixteen timeframe the school I was created until fifteen in. So there are there are kind of the The for students creating tells fourteen excuse me at first students two, thousand, fifteen into. So they're kind of acting like a never to start culture. So they had the flexibility because they had such a torch short timeframe to build. Their their courses for the first students, which usually the army gives you three years they had less than a year. So they had the flexibility more or less the political flexibility to do what works and get things done rather than to wait bureaucratic systems of what may be in the past. They had a lot of opportunity to innovate in a way that might not otherwise be possible in a more established institution within the army. So for them they were looking at how can we manage course where the army traditionally has a three year cycle that updates at a very slow pace it's all using binary data formats such as we're documents powerpoint to get stored in a Web interface where the upload the documents in download them when you need to instruct and so for us, we wanted to be able to have more flexibility where we could manage course where in applying agile software development principles, and then also be able update and manage the course the corser without having to go through the tedious process of using these other outdated systems designed for more a static types of curriculum that don't change very often. was a natural choice for those of US coming into the school house over background experience offered engineering. So I am at your centimeters haven't worked in the army in a development role personally, but many have in that influences the decision to use Gab. So for US instead of using a word documents, we use markup languages to track our curriculum, and then we use the CI pipelines to build that curriculum same. Thing with infrastructure code use a different four-match for us at t templates an open stack pipe last play. So for us, that's that's the the framework for how we chose to use primarily because it was available and we had the freedom to do so because the organization organizations just being stood up in the leadership was willing to assume risk by allow us to innovate in ways that might not otherwise be possible. Core. Swear is a term that this conversation's going to focus on explain what the term course where means and how it applies to this conversation. Suddenly Army when they have curriculum development coursework can be affirmative. This way when you when you joined the army every, there's different specialties for different sexually you have armor would be people drive tanks. You've got infantry that people go and do the very stereotypical army infantry things. You've got field artillery they fire cannons have got aviators to fly helicopters and they've got things like signal or does communique shipment in the Cyber Branch Cyber Branch was created. Ciller Signal Corps signals more it. Cyber is more focused on using P centric art centric computing space to create offensive and defensive effects of. The army in the government department at large, and so what that really means for us at the school is we're developing courses to support soldiers coming into the army in the officers enlisted and warrant officers who need at the Technical Erie that supports all of the operational context. Racial context is all stuff that in the ranch they can't really talk about what they're doing or how they're applying the theory in some cases. But but for us, we are strictly worried about technical theory that underlying. All. Of the operational applications. So for us, it's Windows Fundamentals Lennox Demento is understanding operating systems in how they work. And then understanding networking, TCI than full stack of networking and understanding enough to apply it an insecurity concepts both from offensive and defensive perspective whether you're trying to defend offensive actor or you're on the offensive side, you need to understand all of that theory that goes behind exploitation out of defend attackers hide in so on and so for the school when they talk about course where they're talking about, for example, the cyber common technical core is a module. Every cohort whether the officers enlisted are required to attend ends up for them. This is the overview of operating systems networking insecurity into the course where is the facilitator guides that go to the instructors, the student guides that go to the students and then the. Is. Code that deploys interactive ranges for the students due to work on from the classrooms or in this case during in nineteen up from wherever they're working from a remote location of again. Okay. So you've mentioned course where you've mentioned get and you're talking about curriculum management technologies like powerpoint and Microsoft and PDF. These seem like separate worlds if you're talking about office management tools that's at a higher level than something that you would need to version control on. So what's the relationship between the version control stuff and the traditional office suite? Right so and the traditional army you would this is something if he's ever been to a government scores in the romantic government, you often new to course it's kind of the general stereotype is kind of have a pulse and you sit in class and you sit through powerpoint slides in answer some very canned questions at our checks learning. Then you move onto the next thing and nobody ever fails and it's not hard. You just exist you get through it and then you go to your unit you actually do your job Leonard, job your unit that's the stereotype of of how training is done in the army and that's Not always accurate of course is stereotype. So that's that's health in some cases it's Not, how the OSCE wants to involve improving but that's that's A. Character of of how could be in. So when people talk about office documents in the army, you'll death by powerpoint sometimes there's certain models that are designed such a way that the army says you are not alone about this and you sit in powerpoint and someone flipped through slides and you're done you do it for a certain length of time they briefed the sides you. In you're done to the school severance doesn't want to be slide driven. So instead of being slide driven in powerpoint, we instead are facilitation guides that are stored a markup. We can also do slides using or ask you doctor and revealed a technologies run through ask Dr, which is a tick, the markup language in spits out issue on the backside, and so we do sometimes use slides, but we're not trying to be centered on. powerpoint dead were trying to use this after vine principles to facilitate learning through hands on

Army Army Cyber Schoolhouse Army Cyber School Powerpoint Cyber Branch Cyber Branch United States Faculty Member Atlassian Osce DOD Ciller Signal Corps Leonard TCI Technical Erie Microsoft
Virginia Tech renames dorms honoring men with white supremacist ties

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Virginia Tech renames dorms honoring men with white supremacist ties

"Tech is renaming two buildings following student calls for the change. A A yearbook yearbook link link former former longtime longtime faculty faculty member member Claudius Claudius leader leader the the cake cake and and for for former former president president Paul Paul Barringer. Barringer. He He openly openly supported supported pro pro slavery slavery positions positions in in the the early early 19 19 hundreds. hundreds. Now, Now, the the executive executive committee of the VT. Board of Visitors has voted to remove the men's names from residence halls. School's current president, Tim San, says the names were inconsistent with rich heritage and increasingly diverse community at the school. The buildings will instead be named after William and Janey Hoga black couple who has the first African American students who are not allowed to live on school grounds, and also after James Leslie Whitehurst junior Was the first black student toe live on campus. Mike Murillo w. T. O P News, one of the

Paul Paul Barringer President Trump Claudius Claudius Faculty Member James Leslie Whitehurst Janey Hoga Mike Murillo W. T. O Executive Committee Executive Board Of Visitors Tim San William
Tom Daniel: Neuroscientist and bioengineer

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 4 months ago

Tom Daniel: Neuroscientist and bioengineer

"Because sometimes that can be a hard thing like we have. In Society sometimes in especially I, think in some of our institutions like we want to push people into like very specific directions. was there anything that helps you with this wonderful dilemma that you had a broad curiosity? Yeah, to assert have two responses. One is what helped me, but I think the world has. Since I was in an undergraduate. As an undergraduate I was I, remember distinctly taking an engineering class, and there was a professor, also sitting in on the class is very rare. At the time and he opted to sit next to me. And he was a biologist wanting to learn more engineering. And we got to talking in. Just found that fascinating that you could mixie's to. There was no such thing as a bioengineering department did not exist back in the time of no. But. His name was Orrin. Porter and he melded physics and biology in a very interesting mixture of heat, transfer and animals in different climates and I just found that fascinating. After a while, he said Hey, do you WanNa? Join my lab and be a Grad student and I didn't actually know what graduate school was. I said sure and. So that that got me going in this interface, a I think today we are really doing more and more to break those barriers, so there are bio engineering departments. And candidly the word bio comes in front of lots of worse bioengineering. biomethane matic's biophysics biochemistry so tell us a little bit about your research that you did as a graduate student. Yeah, I! Get two different things. I started a masters degree in Wisconsin and I got my PhD Duke at Wisconsin because I was really interested in fluid mechanics. That faculty member said you know, fish swim really fast. why is that and there were? There was this theory of building in the literature that there's something novel about the Polymer Coating Fish. Mucus. And nobody had really looked at it in any. Detailed Way and so. He got me into his lab. We started doing fluid dynamics experiments on what was called. Polymer drag reduction. And I ended up publishing as second year graduate student, a paper on polymer drag reduction of the novel. Chemistry physics of the slimy covering of fish. That's right began. And so like. Whenever I hear fluid dynamics like agan sort of visualize the Naria stokes, equations and and my my exposures to fluid dynamics has always been less about the analytical modeling more about computer simulation of these systems of where you doing computer simulations stuff in your graduate work. Not. Then so Kevin After. Remind you of era. This is the nineteen seventies. And yes I did computer simulations of flow in my undergraduate classes? It was Fortran and we had to write our own numerical solutions. To very very simple things okay? The project I worked on in my master's was much more of mixture of experimental fluid mechanics. An imaging flows okay interesting then. Ah Duke I moved on to looking at a couple of different flow problems in biology. We got very interested in the fluid mechanics of insect feeding like mosquitoes, blood, feeding, and things like that. What what is going on that allows the mosquito to feed on blood vs related to disease transfer like malaria. What are the relationships there and also locomotion influence movement influence so? So it was a variety of things like that, and again a mix of computational work, and then experimental

Graduate Student Porter Wisconsin Orrin Naria Stokes Kevin After Mixie Professor Faculty Member
SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey says “critical decisions” will be made later this month

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:23 min | 5 months ago

SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey says “critical decisions” will be made later this month

"Has been a much anticipated day. When it became known that the SEC was going to meet in person, in Birmingham, today it had been a regular scheduled meeting, but regardless it was extraordinary. It is now over the SEC has just released. A statement! Saying that no decisions were made today about the upcoming college football season. We hope to get more on that from the Commissioner of the southeastern. Conference Greg Sankey, commissioner? Thank you very much. I know it has been. A Very Long. Day Good afternoon. Has Been that and right from a meeting to the Finebaum show what could be a better way to cap a busy busy Monday. Well I, we've all we've I've I've read your statement about Hoping to gain more information or Waiting at least. To the end of the month and I'm curious based on what you have been saying. In terms of the prospects of the season and the concerns and the fact that things. You said the other day you, you're running out of time to correct things What are you looking for? And what are you? What is your conference looking for over these next two to three weeks? That will help you. Identify the proper decision to move forward. There are any number of. Opportunities to learn which is the way we've always viewed What was it play out, so we'll go back to April. One of the guiding points and I think I've shared with you this. This comment from one of our faculty members is take as long as you can to make major decisions because you will have better information. so my comments last week over the weekend on Mardian McGee or an indication that the trends. Are Not what we desired not what we had experienced a bit earlier in the summer very much in the wrong direction, and that that's problematic. That doesn't mean that's the finish line. Things will never change. We've seen the news around cove in nineteen. alter itself in different ways over a number of weeks. And so what we've identified, it is an opportunity in late July. foreign important check in the see what our public health reality, so that's one big picture element. We were told from the beginning. Take as much time as possible. You make better decisions we've also. Experienced since June eighth the ability to support our student athletes and a very healthy way, within our athletics, programs or other activities that are permitted today, more that could come for most program beginning, July twenty fourth, which NCAA is permitted third point, the autonomy, five conferences have been working diligently now for weeks and months to develop a common testing expectation. Expectation an isolation expectation. The NCAA after the Senate Commerce Committee hearing in which I participated in Washington DC has been engaging in developing similar standards for its entire membership, but his worked collaboratively over the last eight or nine days I think we're moving towards a destination for those protocols and I know that we as five conferences have been working diligently our. Our colleague conferences at the bowl subdivision. Or awaiting those other others in Division One are also waiting those expectations. The fourth is all it's happening. In the return of sports at the professional level over the next few weeks, so we saw major league soccer I watch more major league soccer last night than I. Ever have in my life, but I've read their protocols. Major League Baseball's active. That's A. First Pitch I think July twenty third where teams are going to be moving around. We've read their health protocols. A NASCAR race Wednesday, that is in a what was a football stadium several years ago in Bristol Tennessee with thirty thousand fans in attendance first time to see a larger crowd if that opportunity still exists so all of those are important learning opportunities, but the fundamental is my first point, which is we have to see? See a change in public health trend to build the comfort that will have an opportunity to compete this fall and plenty of people can say Oh, you shouldn't. It's not going to happen. Make predictions, and they go back to Governor Cuomo in June. WHO said I'm done with predictions. I'm done with models. We're GONNA. Look at the facts, and that's what we've been doing diligently for months now and we'll do over the next few weeks. Commissioner Greg Sankey with this commissioner. Last week we saw a one of your colleagues in the big ten. make his decision their decision about. Playing Only Conference Games to the PAC twelve followed suit I'm certain. That was discussed today, can you? Can you enlighten us on where the SEC is on all conference play? we are not at that destination in a number of our colleague. Conferences are not at that destination, so the big ten made its decision. We have no. common games with the big ten conference this year. Just one of those realities in our schedule, so the the impact of their decision is indirect,

Commissioner SEC Greg Sankey Ncaa Soccer Football PAC Finebaum Birmingham Mardian Mcgee Division One Baseball Governor Cuomo Washington Bristol Tennessee Nascar Senate Commerce Committee
Teachers at great risk of becoming seriously ill if infected with coronavirus

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Teachers at great risk of becoming seriously ill if infected with coronavirus

"As the White House says president trump wants to see kids back in school this fall despite the coronavirus pandemic, the president of the American Federation of Teachers Randi Weingarten is sharing thoughts, and saying that teachers are not going to take any risks with children or fellow faculty members, whatever the President says Crasnick, trying to ignore research and science or trying to pressure to CDC to change that science is now okay. Weingarten is speaking on NBC's Today Show

Randi Weingarten President Trump American Federation Of Teacher Crasnick White House Donald Trump NBC CDC
"faculty member" Discussed on SWU Soul Stories

SWU Soul Stories

03:35 min | 7 months ago

"faculty member" Discussed on SWU Soul Stories

"I was shocked and amazed. I can't believe that it was me but I'm so honored and appreciative of it I don't do anything for Lord that I'd do it because I simply love to do it and I feel like that when you are in. You're right seat on the bus. When you are weird God wants you to be in. You are in your purpose. That things were out For the best for you and so I can tell you that right now. I'm the happiest that I'm in in my career of domestic warded that I've ever been in. I come every day in a joke and say I would do this job for free to tell tell people take that out you know. I really love what I do honestly it for free. I enjoy encouraging. The Students Dylan those relationships with down Just seeing their success Them GET THROUGH. Those first lesson plans them get through their first unit plans and know just being there to be a source of encouragement Cheerleader for them That is reward enough just to see their grades over the four years that I sincerely appreciate this honor and extremely humbled by and just amazed at at the same time. I do love my job in our love being here before I let you go One last question You know we just had you know virtual graduation on Friday T. You know grades getting in this week but Kinda give us a peek of. What's what's next for us. You prepare for next semester for next semester. One of the things that Looking toward is taking a couple of my classes that are face to face classes but putting them into an online format is lay also have both versions of course face-to-face version in an online version Converting to online was not a big struggle for me because I had a lot of had everything in Kansas already. Made Mine was mainly just a matter of recording lessons or teaching lessons live but there are some activities in classroom things that you can't do in an online for man so I guess my next step is basically just looking at some of my classes in creating the online version that will be Just as workable as face-to-face urgent will that's great. What will certainly be praying for you over the summers you get ready again. Congratulations on being a faculty member of the year. She is Dr Kim. Jabiluka here Sister Professor Assistant Professor of Special Education. And you heard her say all the other great things she does your daughter Jessica Again thank you for joining us for the PODCAST and out to see in person very soon to go on campus in the fall in being able to be in the classroom with students because that truly is not happy places any day. I can comment teach deal with my students. It's a great day. You're this is my first time. You know being on staff year during the summer and like I'm just ready for everybody to get back. It's not the same all right. Well thank you very much. We'll see soon okay..

Dr Kim Sister Professor Assistant Pro Kansas faculty member Jessica
"faculty member" Discussed on SWU Soul Stories

SWU Soul Stories

09:40 min | 7 months ago

"faculty member" Discussed on SWU Soul Stories

"Everybody it's Heath Mulligan. Welcome to another edition of Slough soul stories. And we're honored to be joined today by Dr Kim Jessica. She is an assistant professor of special education here at southern West. And she is this year's faculty member of the year. Dr Jessica. Thank you so much for taking the time to be with me today I know you. Yeah so I know you are did an interview with The school website. But WanNa Kinda get more personal into your story and into this honor and so the first question I wanna ask you is How did you come to work at southern Wesleyan University? Well he kind of a long story. He definitely a guide. Moment in God's story in my life I had been A career educator at worked in the public schools as an elementary teacher especially a teacher had worked his assistant principal and principal and then Around two thousand seven. I need to work at the district office in the school district coming county instead a each of my career. I was gradually. I guess moving further and further away from teaching in more into leadership roles and so I had really enjoyed you know everything that I had done at school level and then I moved to work at the district level and I just thought that I would really love it. It turns out I didn't know how sometimes I try to seek God's will from a life in the direction that he would have me give and I think at this point in my life. I wasn't doing a very good job of listening and speaking that and I was moving further and further away from my true love teaching instead I Had An opportunity to work in human resources while I was there and I said Oh. I think that's one thing I've never done. I enjoy working with people. Think will do that. Well you know I was thinking about hiring teachers and all these exciting things but I did not think about the fact of employees discipline that I would be involved in that and so you know along with human resources comes the hiring in the exciting part working with induction teachers at heart. I actually love. But there was the part of when people didn't pass their teacher evaluations or there were other people that I work with on. I'll work with bus drivers custodians cafeteria workers teaching assistants and anyone who was a pretty much of the school district in clothing teachers in if something happens as for as a that needed a disciplinary measure. I had to meet with them and talk. That talk about that is the fit like that. My job was turning into something. I felt like that was more negative than positive. And I really just didn't enjoy it and I pray every day for God's opened the door I had on Finnish mad doctrine bit later in life. I've got it right before it turns sixty and I'm fifty five now and I just kept thinking about how much when I was working on my PhD. I love the opportunities to teach college students. Thought well maybe that's for me and so I just can't pray God please infinite. You're from some layer some way and says three of my job at coney that I was working I had met Susan Finley. Who worked here. Sutherland's Leeann as she was the feel place a coordinator for all the student teachers and our that Nakatani. She said. Well you know I think we might have a job at Slu. She sounds thinking that retiring in us will season. That's great but I wanNA teach in your job is more you know work field placements and she said yes that we have an professor position open enough. Thank you would be qualified for really As talking with her now I worked with Susan for nine years basically talking on the phone and I had met her and she helped teacher the year. But I didn't really know her. She never said anything to me. One day she said your last night. I have to ask you about it. She said she said where's your husband from. And he's from Delaware. Would it turn out that? My husband in Susan been next door. Neighbors is children. Indelibly market to provide North Carolina. Our neighbors there she had patriots of my husband is a child. My had heard me speaker Susan family but he said he means Foot and it was just the craziest thing that you would everything and says three. Her and a lot of prayer of that was what led me to southern Wesleyan and say Susan. Put Me in contact with Dr Matt. Showed me where the stuff was on sweet website to apply for the job In the risk is history. I have loved every minute of being southern Wesleyan Adolescent he's only Just love my job love students. It just loved she teaching in a in a just never really thought that guy would give me Such a heart for college students but he hands and I just love them so much and just such joy out of working with Amnesty Grove over the four years that they're here. So how long have you been at southern Wesleyan? Now this is the end of not fourth year. Wow and can you kinda get into you? Talk about instructing students. What are you know specifically you know some of the courses? You're teaching in some of the oversight. Is You give into the students. I teach always joke and say I'm a Jack of all trades. The My title is technically assistant. Professor Special Education and I teach the characteristics of emotional and behavioral disorders at methods of emotional and behavioral disorders. Also teach The methods and characteristics learning disabilities I teach two classes the foundations of education in cornerstone to education that all education Teachers all education majors take Such as Music Ed p. e. elementary especially gets meet. Everybody and I think those two courses are my favorites because even though a lot of people work with upperclassmen the incoming freshmen to me. It's fun to me and get to know all the incoming education majors. I'm not some reading classes as Lael and early childhood science so I teach a little bit of everything I also serve as Ketogenic Co Chair of the Faculty Development Committee And Right now. We're in the midst of our big faculty development Easily Day but we were doing virtually right right So it you know. It's kind of awards season before we talk about your award. How does it make you feel? I'm not especially this year. Maybe because I work here. Now but how many of our alumni just are so outstanding in the field of education and whether it's You know someone like Vicky Luther getting you know the governor. The governor's teaching fellow in Georgia. I've seen you know alumni getting principal year teacher of the year. How does that make you feel as an instructor To See our students out there just making such a difference at doing it with great excellence. I think it's very heartwarming. To See our students healthier in the field Winning those words it just confirms affirms everything we're doing in school of Education That we are teaching them how to be Great professionals not only with the masters of their content. But I always tell my students. You don't teach content. You teach students just to say them going out and be able to build this relationships with the students as well as their families In just really simplify that Christian ethic of care. I think that's awesome. We'll talk about your award. I have some comments from some of your peers that I want to read to You. And let's see what you think about the. So here's what some of your Peers wrote about you. Daughter deadly always has the best interests of our students at the forefront of her decision making she shares her educational expertise with neighboring school district's through professional development. And she's always prepared for our swim classes with student treats. She commits her time and expertise to face to face classes online classes. The E. D. D. Program and university committees and projects. Dr Dead Luca is loved by her students. She integrates prayer and devotion in her classes. And you're actually planning on going on a mission trip this spring. The that got canceled. Unfortunately I have seen how she interacts with students in. She's always so kind and encouraging she uses real life situations to integrate faith into the students roles as future educators What does it mean to you? I mean you've only been here for years an already just winning the admiration of your peers the love and appreciation of your students. What is all of that mean to you along with a being faculty member of the year and it means so much to me Extremely humbled and assist. I didn't know what to say..

Susan principal faculty member Dr Kim Jessica southern Wesleyan University southern Wesleyan professor assistant professor Faculty Development Committee Heath Mulligan Slough Susan family Dr Dead Luca Susan Finley school of Education North Carolina teaching fellow Dr Matt Slu Amnesty Grove
"faculty member" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:39 min | 7 months ago

"faculty member" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Well these athletes get free education they get a scholarship while the university makes millions coaches at these universities are typically the highest paid faculty member some of them with contracts in the millions as well while the students are prohibited from getting absolutely anything and god forbid they get injured during the course of play so now the NC double a has okayed a plan that would allow college students to get paid for that image they're like this they can promote products except around there are some rules that must be followed the rules are this the university cannot directly pay the athlete the student athlete the university cannot coordinate any deal broker any deal between the student and what they are endorsing the college student is able to use their name and the name of the college but not official locals this is not final this decision is a recommendation that division one division two and division three we'll have to adopt they are expected to do so so I'm looking at college players being able to start getting money in two thousand and twenty one a step in the right direction what say you four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three that gives you a conversation for zero four nine two two seven zero three I got a treat for you today remember we had verna Jones on the show verna Jones recently endorsed Donald Trump for president he's a Democrat out of the cab county he's the former decamp county C. E. O. he's a life long Democrat who bragged about voting for George W. bush but every time he has run for president excuse me every time he has run for office every time he has qualified he qualified as a Democrat Rafferty cabsi OO Democrats you have U. S. Senate qualified as a Democrat he ran for sheriff qualified as a Democrat he ran for U. S. cocking US house representatives qualified as a Democrat he ran for state house qualified as a Democrat now this guy is the epitome of lifelong politician okay life long politician but now he has said that the Democratic Party left him he has endorsed Donald Trump he came on my show could not answer questions decided to end the interview and ran away the interview went viral it went viral across this country he is still running in house district ninety one after my interview the agency did report that party Jones announced his resignation I talked about this also on CBS forty six and at the center of his announcing the resignation from political office was a residency challenge launched by Fay Caulfield who lives also in house district ninety one Vernon Jones within twenty four hours rescinded his resignation kind of now he said publicly that he rescinded his resignation but the internal documentation shows that he has informed the powers that be that he will not be seeking re election in other words he will serve out his term and not a qualified to run again house district ninety one is an extremely democratic district house district ninety one has never shown love a Donald Trump he is a representative of house district ninety one the citizens that live in house district ninety one elected him to be their mouthpiece and their champion under the state go down that's what the elected him for it's called representative politics this is how it works this is how the democracy is actually applied they elected him because they believed he stood for certain things and they believe he would advocate a certain way because they have a policy agenda like anyone else but since Vernon Jones has now echoed that he is actually a trump supporter and really a de facto Republican I know he's saying that he's still a Democrat not leaving the Democratic Party the Democratic Party left of that there's a bustle it's a bunch of bull okay it's really bowl he is a de facto Republican when he was on my show he talked about the Democratic Party being racist and then I say well are there members of the Republican Party who are racist he went out of his way to make sure he never said anything negative about the Republican Party because he's a de facto Republican now everybody in politics if you are a good politician I'm not saying a good public service but if you are a good politician you know one thing in politics you must have your own crew you got to have a group no matter where you go you must have a group he has not chosen a new crew he is on the ballot it will be interesting to see how the voters of house district ninety one show up what is sad not to show up for Vernon Jones murder Jones has a democratic opponent that democratic opponent will be on my show today that democratic opponent is an actual Democrats has been a Democrat has worked in democratic politics for years she will be on the program today to talk about her candidacy her opponent and our platform you don't want to miss it four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three you getting real the real as man already of the workshop which morning Joe ladies and gentlemen nana Clayton first I'm going to faint when I come back I'll have some effect because you know I'm just one of the biggest ones out here killing you I listen to you every opportunity I get close to four oh four eight nine two two seven oh three our news and talk thirteen eighty W. A. okay here's the latest from the WTO K. news center good morning Atlanta here's what's happening a lot in double ACP president Richard rose is among branch leaders calling on governor camp to extended George's stay at home order these is known to be played with this is not a political fight it is scheduled to expire at midnight tonight this is a very deadly disease this virus is airborne and can be spread by people who don't even have symptoms are not know they are carriers and can last for years of time all hard services a new university of Georgia survey shows that sixty two percent of Georgia voters disagree with the governor's partial roll back last week and restaurant owners and customers in the state are being cautious even though dining in is now re open open table a dining app that tracks data for restaurants revealed that the number of seated diners at Georgia restaurants was down ninety eight percent from last year tell Anthony with this is a barbecue and seafood says it's just too soon I just don't believe this time yet to let people sit next to each other put employees in that type of jeopardy it's just not worth it everyone provides food everyone provide take out service so you really got to have that product just go to that store and get it to go despite the governor's decision to allow died in service many establishments are continuing to offer only to go orders the latest information available indicates that Georgia has twenty five thousand seven hundred four confirmed code nineteen cases at eleven hundred debts according to the state department of public health the death rate of African American patients from cover nineteen a Georgia is nine percent higher than the state overall death rate of four percent according to the N. double ACP there could be hope on the horizon for treating corona virus patients the New York times reports that the FDA plans to fast track the drug room does severe for approval as a treatment for the virus it will be the first drug approved to treat covet nineteen a recent trial showed that patients who took the drug recovered quicker than those who didn't have it weather wise to day partly sunny with a high near sixty four with wind gusts as high as twenty miles an hour stay connected ATO ivory appointed for.

faculty member
"faculty member" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:46 min | 9 months ago

"faculty member" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Of medicine faculty member tested positive for covert nineteen some students say the university has done the right thing top of the road our house because of ours are reaching out on like how they can best comedy all about Stanford and rose about fifteen thousand undergrads and graduate students at Stanford Betsy Gephardt KCBS just ahead on KCBS health officials expressed growing concern about a potential corona virus outbreak among the bay area's homeless population will have more on that in just a moment right now seven oh eight traffic and weather together let's get back out to the road said here's Joe Hoskinson well we heard from John of the KCBS phone four three dot four one five three nine one KCBS let us know about some police activity on west eighty right near McBride the two right lanes are being held for this police action traffic is starting to slow down thank you John for that call you can also tweet us if you spot a traffic problem at KCBS A. M. F. M. traffic let's go to Fremont where we have this crash during up I actually a stalled car north eight eighty before Stevenson the right lane is still blocked traffic is still heavy from south Fremont Boulevard as a police on the scene wait for a tow truck also waiting also Caltrans crews shopping Hercules east eighties ramp to eastbound for a very large pot hole in the right lane at least four or five cars on the right shoulder with tire damage on in San Ramon we had an earlier crash on south six eighty Bollinger canyon road two crashes in fact it's no longer blocking traffic is moving well passing Bollinger canyon so there may be some activity but it will be on the right shoulder you next update at seven eighteen on the traffic leader case area forecast we have nice little bit of rain around the coast and for some valleys today ranging from the bay area up to Sacramento in parts of southern.

faculty member Joe Hoskinson John McBride Fremont Stevenson San Ramon Bollinger canyon Sacramento Stanford Betsy Gephardt KCBS A. M. F. M.
"faculty member" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:48 min | 10 months ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WTVN

"And white sold to the live line and is a publicized faculty member at Ohio northern fascinating in with what we've seen so far Iowa caucuses a New Hampshire and then you know we're get ready for a couple more states in the coming weeks but to any costar I mean I wasn't really one of those top echelon candidates at least not in the top five by most polling numbers will always said New Hampshire she bubbles up why do you think that that happened in New Hampshire yeah that was really surprising I think they recall the sars brand of pragmatism was very appealing to many voters I think she in many ways exemplifies minute about the Washington experience she's someone that works works across party lines you've gotten a lot dine and and so even though we have kind of a negative association with people who spend a lot of time in Washington she has shown that that's actually not necessarily a bad thing yeah and it is interesting I mean you can look at these candidates and you can ask questions based on them like you know Pete by the judge you know is is America ready for a gay president you know we had other top women contenders in the past so when you look at her and get her kind of moving up the charts do you think the United States is ready for a female candidate for president well I think I went twenty sixteen year with follow her claim can was the democratic nominee and is she was successful by every measure kicked up from back he didn't win the electoral college there she won more votes than Donald Trump so I think in some ways it was a new club as far as the candidate he kind of has that the poor that would have but she also doesn't have the baggage necessarily that Clinton would have and because you're from the Midwest you might also have a wider appeal I got you in in you know given that you know you you look at the democratic field all you have to include Michael Bloomberg you know whether he's included in polls are not whether he's spending so much money is absolutely a part of the conversation but you know you you've got to you know the billionaire I mean over billion eleven for just kind of the planet then you've got a couple of candidates that seemingly hate the billionaires you know your of your Bernie Sanders your Lizabeth warm and then you've got you know Joe Biden but a judge any close are any in it so it's almost like people not talking about you might be a better thing right now right yeah I think the thing of Bloomberg if he is spending so much money and expanding and states that other candidates haven't even gotten to yet yeah so that's gonna be a really interesting dynamic because if they can do that right now are primarily focus on about in South Carolina where a Bloomberg is looking to be super Tuesday states I and so he kind of laying low and then we'll see come March whether it was he went any state or you're so that big but yet people are talking about you that's not necessarily a bad thing yeah you you talked about you know like with Hillary Clinton there's so much baggage with that Clinton name you feel like you know with what's come in Nevada you know South Carolina that you feel like any closure is going to be a top three maybe a top two candidates in either of those states the only problem with clothes are in the upcoming states is that she doesn't have a lot of support among voters of color so I'm not sure what you gonna do in South Carolina and Nevada being a **** as it's gonna be weird so that's more likely to go towards Bernie I think because there's a lot of unions I work there and that kind of goes towards more progressive candidates typically but I think she may not win but I think so I have a strong showing yeah and and so when you look at that you know you you talk about the caucus type of it you know we you know voter presentation and those kinds of things it's just fascinating in this field is so wide open and it feels more wide open then the Republicans were last time around you almost wonder is are gonna be start to be some conversations among the candidates like Hey you know together we'd be pretty good so my dad be a conversation you know Pete and Amy get together or Elizabeth and Bernie get together or you know maybe someone reaches out to Bloomberg and says Hey you're doing great I've got some of this early you know good mo Jo going maybe we pair up and then become like the power couple you you see anything like that happening yeah I think it's kind of part of the problem right now at least for a more moderate candidate so by and then again close are that they're kind of winning votes and that's leading standard to try to win the state so if they weren't you as one of them when I dropped out of the race and like endorse the others or say like I'm gonna take quantities for my B. P. I think they have a better shot at beating standards I I think it's difficult with all of them still in the race and again with Bloomberg kind of lurking computer Tuesday for them to get enough votes to overcome standards so yeah I think building a coalition is not a bad idea at this point I'm not sure in white so our guests the political science faculty member at Ohio northern I'm curious to you know just I guess just gender wise Amy Colby shar Elizabeth Warren when they talk to they just necessarily resonate better with women is it that they talk more from kind of like a women's issue perspective when they're on the stump is that necessarily true so we all right in some instances especially like when Warren and clothes are talk about their backgrounds and how they got into politics so any clothes are talked about how when she gave birth she had to leave the hospital like after twenty four hours and how that kind of burned her interest in politics and like pushing for change in that respect spoke with worn similarly your talk about her experience like as a special education teacher and kind of how that you inspired her to bring about change they don't kind of explicitly bring it up in their speeches like I'm a woman both for me by kind of in their backgrounds they kind of his had these like gendered experiences that kind of pushed them forward did you see that in polling though like if you break down the polling in male versus female but to the female candidates tend to pull a little better with women voters versus men I don't really depend on hand at the age of the women the ideological bent of the women so and for like younger women and it's a certain kind of sixteen as well younger women are more likely to support a Bernie Sanders because it's more like an ideological thing and gender thing sure yeah okay that is fascinating you know in in in knowing what we know about coming up it's it's almost like everybody's really hold their breath until super Tuesday to really get a sense of where we are because if that's where Bloomberg is literally putting his bank well you don't really know what it's going to be like in April until we get to that day right I think they will have like forty percent of the dollar against something and and I know California super Tuesday and that's a huge state so yeah figuring out what happened on super Tuesday and were kind of dictated the rest of the race all right we'll try to hold our breath and wait for that day to come and so appreciate the conversation in the time this morning and white soul poli sci faculty member at Ohio's move northern this morning on news radio six ten WTVN.

faculty member Iowa New Hampshire Ohio
"faculty member" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"faculty member" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Story right down eleven thirty shocking crime at cal state Fullerton on this the first day of the fall term faculty member stabbed to death in his car in the campus parking lot the victim a man in his fifties who worked in the international student registration for completion spokesman lieutenant at John right is says they believe the faculty member was targeted by the suspect we do not believe that there is a random stabber at this point in the investigation running around in the city of Fullerton or placentas right next door which is the direction he was last seen we do not believe that there is an active stabber on the loose at this particular time the suspect had to be amenities twenty still on the loose both the suspect and the victim Asian but any possible connection between the two or a possible motive is still unknown police are looking into the possibility that the suspect may have been one of the victims students can extend seventies Pete Demetriou has arrived at the campus now Pete what else can you tell us you've also got the cal state Fullerton police department with the assistance of Orange County sheriff here they've set up a command post of Langsdorf drive this is near to where the stabbing actually took place they've got bloodhounds here they're going to be using them to go from the U. R. carve the where the body was found to an area surrounding the site of the parking lot and where the person might have gone they're also trying to campus the area for possible witnesses who may have seen the crime earlier this morning at about eight forty five AM that's again when the body was found inside that silver infinity the us a damn now how for those bloodhounds my gold with this man just stayed on the campus or went to a car got away we simply don't know at this point they still have a command post set up here and there making determinations on how they're going to try to proceed try to find the suspect reporting live Kelsey Fullerton I'm Pete Demetriou Kay and extend seventy newsradio it's eleven thirty two on KNX governor Newsome signing a bill at this hour that sets stricter guidelines for police across California do you deadly force it only allows them to use such force when it's actually a necessary to deal with the situation they're facing and not just reasonable which was the old standard during the signing sterile ceremony as several people spoke who suffered personal tragedies because of gunfire by police just over six months ago my younger brother was killed by six belay police officers who fired fifty five rounds at him in just three and a half seconds while he was sitting in a car sleep outside a Taco Bell drive thru the speaker who's the daughter of a schizophrenic woman who was killed by police said she thinks the new law being signed today might actually have prevented her mother's death eleven thirty three Los Angeles county fire crews now slowly getting a handle on that big fire we've been telling you about the commercial building in paramount the fire through of some big clouds of black smoke this morning a county fire captain Tony and Brenda telling Kay and I said this is on summer should Boulevard fire rock can forty one arbors units arrived pretty short order we when they had initiated a second alarm assignment got approximately a hundred firefighters on the scene right now defensive operation and toll will make a good progress on the fire he says there are no reports of any injuries latest video from the scene shows the roofers have been burned off but the smoke is now white in the fire is nearly out eleven thirty for your free weight check just about a minute away first another video is turned up showing Orange County high school students using **** symbolism this time it's some pacifica high school students from the **** salute singing and not see saw on the video was taken at an awards ceremony last year and involves members of pacifica high school's boys water polo team according to the daily beast the garden Grove unified school district told the paper that school administrators became aware of the video and addressed it but did not say whether anyone was disciplined a parent and student told the paper the issue was not discussed more broadly in the community he'd seen me is a sociology professor at Chapman university who has studied extremist groups and violence you much if we don't have the Sistine discussion and really start trying to further identify your what's the extent of the problem what's the nature of the problem why are these kids attracted to you will what what would possess them to want to do these **** salutes at their awards being going to play this music earlier this year some Newport harbor high students were seen on a video playing beer pong with cups set up in the shape of a swastika Margaret Carrero can extend seventy newsradio York city's.

Fullerton faculty member six months
"faculty member" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Five to six faculty member Stephan Davis. These are actual cases, that have been adjudicated each car represents that then figure case the students were tasked with digging up digging through the blown-up cars to develop reports on the origin and cause of the explosions. Governor Hogan's revamped budget team is in place. Eric Berman has the details. Hokum was promoted deputy budget director Zachary Jackson to director Jackson replaces, Jason dude, she resigned in March to become CFO of view Indy. The budget office is part of the office of management and budget, which also has a new director hokum name deputy chief of staff, Chris Johnston to that post last month. Eric Berman, Ninety-three WIBC mobile news. And now we have your forecast from the American standard cooling weather center, scattered showers and thunderstorms through the morning hours. Some potentially heavy rain at times high temperatures this afternoon. Tap out in the mid seventies, scattered showers and thunderstorms, some potentially strong to severe later on this afternoon on wish TV storm trek. Stephanie meet for ninety three WIBC. I'm Henry Davis on the level on a go on Twitter at ninety three WIBC and WIBC dot com. Visit a sprint store this Father's Day weekend. Make the switch to sprint and we'll cover your switching fees up to six hundred and fifty dollars per line with the prepaid MasterCard. That's right. Switch to sprint. We'll cover your switching fees up to six hundred fifty dollars per line. It's our way of giving you a clean slate. Stop by your local sprint store during sizzling sprint weekend, June fourteenth fifteenth and sixteenth. To learn more less required phone trading critic provided online registration phone activation amount based on termination.

Eric Berman Hokum director budget director Zachary Jackson Stephan Davis Governor Hogan deputy chief of staff faculty member Henry Davis Chris Johnston Twitter Stephanie CFO Jason dude six hundred fifty dollars fifty dollars
"faculty member" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"faculty member" Discussed on AFP: American Family Physician Podcast

"Podcast. Thank you to our Brazilian family medicine colleagues. Bill, you mentioned before that. You're a faculty member of a residency, that is true. What do you think makes a great teacher of family medicine? I think honestly being passionate about our profession and what we do. I think that you can be guru in evidence, based medicine, or you can be out there on the streets advocating being out there showing that you care about your patient population in providing great medicine to whomever. It might be an inspiring those young learners. I think supporting our students is they look forward into their future careers and helping them realize that primary care is truly the future of our, our country and family medicine is really at the heartbeat of that mission really paying attention to the learner for who they are. I'm super proud. That are graduates, always report, when they leave our program that we care about their development, not only his family physician, but also who they are as a person. And I think trying to connect as teacher with who your learner is, as a person is hugely important for them. You know, learning a ton and, and hooking onto that passion that you're talking about. I totally agree. I'm really inspired to teach family medicine because our country truly needs more family doctors. Yeah. Are specialties?.

family physician Bill faculty member
"faculty member" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Harvard faculty member who decided to represent Harvey Weinstein at his upcoming rape trial is losing his position as head of a student house at the college WBZ's Charlie Sherman says the decision came after some. Students and faculty were unhappy with the situation. Concerns about the climate at Winthrop house. Harvard college dean Rakesh Sharana said in a written statement that he would not renew the appointments of Ronald Sullivan and his wife. Stephanie Robinson schools first black faculty. Deans Sullivan lives at the house and supervisors students. There some students and faculty members of faulted Sullivan's decision to represent Weinstein and his response to the students concerns Girona called the situation regrettable and said efforts to improve the climate were ineffective in an Email. The couple said they were surprised and dismayed by the action. I'm Charlie Sherman. WBZ Boston's NewsRadio Julian Eshelman officially graduated from college yesterday. The patriots receiver got his diploma alongside more than five thousand other Kent state university graduates how you get there. You know, some people got to climb out and some people to swim through a river. And you know, I had to do what I do. And it's just good to be here. Eshelman left the school a decade ago to play for the NFL? During his two years at Kent state at Lamon played quarterback throwing for thirty touchdowns and almost five thousand yards for the golden flashes. Eshelman's degree is in integrative studies. Tom Brady poke fun at element on Twitter, saying congrats on fourteen years of college. That's gotta be another record. You set. It is a twelve and it's time to check sports, and here's WBZ's Joel stern. The Red Sox with the sweep the Mariners this afternoon at Fenway Hector Velazquez says Marco Gonzalez Boston comes on Saturdays nine five win. And they whether Rick Portillo's rocky first sitting where he gets tag for four runs manager, Alex Cora near one of the most aggressive teams in his own early in counts, and they made us pay up to that it made some adjustments. Command changing the game plan, and it was able to give us a six two thirds or solos helped by an eight run third highlighted by Cindy, leones, three run home. Rod elsewhere raise over the AKIs. Seven to White Sox beat the Blue Jays seven to NHL team. Oh Meyer scores twice on the second lifting the sharks a six three win of the blues in game one of the Western Conference Sadhil later today. The Bruins one game to none host the Carolina Hurricanes. Pair of game seven today. The NBA is tender host Portland had Philly visits Toronto. The Lakers will hire former Pacers matching coach Frank Vogel us their Knicks. Head coach mogul sat out last season. After two years sit with Orlando at Gillette stadium. The revolution. Be San Jose three one is their first win since April twentieth. I'm Joel stern WBZ bustles NewsRadio. Boston's.

Julian Eshelman Joel stern Charlie Sherman Ronald Sullivan Harvey Weinstein Boston Harvard college Winthrop house Rakesh Sharana faculty member Deans Sullivan Rick Portillo Kent Red Sox Mariners Gillette stadium Stephanie Robinson Tom Brady rape patriots
"faculty member" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Having here we're just love talking about hospitality hall my background is always been in hospitality started really working in kitchens when i was in high school worked in hotels after college eventually did a master's degree went back into the industry actually did a lot of work with taco bell so the chicken soft taco was one of the products we took from product development to product launch my favorite mexican restaurant yes it was an exciting time and individually went back earned my phd at cornell university and then came to unlv as a faculty member was here for nine years left for eight to go to university of houston when my wife did her phd at texas am and then came back in two thousand twelve as a faculty member and became dean in two thousand thirteen so a lot of industry experience and academics all intermingled that's great and michael tell us a little bit about yourself and what makes you green how'd you get to where you're at thank you again thanks for having me so my family moved here to las vegas in nineteen seventy nine so been here watched the city grow which is exciting change lots and say oh yeah so i i grew up here went to school here and actually stayed in went to you lv so this is it's quite an honor to be involved in the flagship program unlv the the college of hospitality to design their building so i went to school of architecture unlv very proud of that and our firm is been here in las vegas since one thousand nine hundred six great great well this is a town for hospitality education so this is a great offering you have for students tell us a little bit about the hall and let me point out that we are sponsored by green alliance of nevada and envy energy and anyone has questions for our guest today our phone number is seven zero two two five seven five three nine six that's seven zero two two five seven katie w n.

product development cornell university faculty member las vegas unlv nevada university of houston texas michael nine years
"faculty member" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"No i wasn't who i can't really talk about it i don't know what the statute of limitations has passed but it wasn't in cahoots now i wanna hear somebody fired ooh who an employee of the universe first and last name and job title it was an employee of the university and like the plan will listen named the dean i think the plan was like kinda my plan now it was both of our plans but it backfired but like didn't backfire on me it backfired on him how are you going to get this faculty member basically with somebody who was my boss and this guy like some of the ouray no no wasn't an ra person okay and you not want to talk about this a little bit but sickly he realized like oh my employees your boss we both don't like for like the same reasons or not even like like it was was making both of our jobs this is the most boring scheme i've ever heard well i thought being in cahoots with the dean would be well was it so boiler they were dumping their body in the potomac boring is not how i would describe it disposing of a body would probably be pretty boring because you have to yet to be oh i think it'd be nerve wracking it'd be nerve wracking and it's also like after a while it's like dealer white my fingerprint off this thing to this is so boring.

faculty member dean
"faculty member" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is the larry o'connor shell boys and girls this is the principle speaking i have an announcement to make it's now time for everyone to get up from their desks and orderly form a single file line so we can get out of the school and start marching for the march for life to protect the unborn and to oppose the rove e wade supreme court decision that legalized the murder of a babies in the womb everyone please join together and follow your teacher follow any faculty member uc the lead you in the march for life is something that you would never hear in a public school by the way nor should you but apparently we heard the opposite today in our local schools when it came to the infringements on your second amendment rights nia in fairfax nia you are on wwl hi nia what happened in your school today so i didn't walk out well other kids wanted to and the kids in my class decided to not go and one of the girls asked him if he was going or not and he said no and i i agree with that and and she got really she got like really mad at him and she didn't want to be friends with him anymore just because just opinion is different than hers great and and so now what was it like for you to sit back and not join everybody else how many how many other kids stayed back in the first workout.

murder faculty member rove fairfax
"faculty member" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

WGSO 990AM

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WGSO 990AM

"Faculty member was accused of sexual abuse by more than one hundred m thirty women he was sentenced to six years in prison last month because of child pornography and he's waiting additional sentencing after having pled guilty to one set of molestation charges which would be a life sentence i mean you know it's sick about it the medalist we're talking about alley reisman gaby douglas kayla maroni simone vials they won four gold medals at the 2016 rio olympics including in the all around event and hear this was going on i mean it's just you know it's heartbreaking is what it is that's what it is because usa gymnastics where were you i mean i love what they say now we were unwavering in our support for athletes who are courageous soon were advocates don't even use the word advocates were advocates will continue to listen to our athletes and beaver let relentless summer athletes safety they weren't relentless then and look good just crazy and you know what's interesting is is simone vials was protective of her teammates when they revealed their out of view she stood by alley reisman because there's a little bit of controversy where douglas seem to criticize victims before apologizing in the adding her name to the list i mean here's the thing people i think people are just have stunned by this they're just dont then it's too bad here's the worst part of this as in anything in any kind of abuse decade's worth of allegations decades and he should have been knocked down sooner that's it i mean the that's the bottom line that should not have gone on as long as it did and whatever was going on with investigations or whatever was happening there that's the shame of the whole thing that it couldn't have been stopped sooner stop this sucker sooner before he continues to get away with the get away with getaway getaway going away get away get away and that's that's the deal he kept getting away with it and he kept abusing innocent gallagher pearl's who just wanted to go the olympics get medals parents sacrificed they now but now they of course have figured it out they didn't know what these young young ages that's for sure all right let's move to verts email this one is from chad and.

Faculty member child pornography rio olympics alley reisman douglas the deal pearl usa one hundred m six years
"faculty member" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"I like hillsdale is recently retired faculty member with assisted i grew up around the university in its is far who a that's parker wiseman he's the mirrors darko he spin his whole life in stark bill except for the two years he spent in chapel hill north carolina where he got his masters in public administration in the three years he spent bring a law degree in oxford at the university non the state and the football clubs is ole miss i met him in his office within the aging city hall around the corner a shop sells pool hall supplies and behind the building a new speakeasy is competing than established a bar in grill the thriving young part of town is a stone's throw away but city hall his old it's inner layers of creaking would are still encased in a cold municipal shell of nononsense squares from another era setting it apart from the just slightly more ornate first baptist church on the other side of the road in stark vilm the separation between church and state is literally a passed over stretch of grey asphalt cut lamp can street i wanted to meet wiseman in person because he had just concluded a long difficult battle to bring social change to start fill one that had made national headlines in january of two thousand thirteen under his leadership the stark ville board of autumn and proposed a two hundred in aid word resolutions supporting equality it stated the city would henceforth make it public policy to prevent discrimination in stark fell and the text specifically mentioned gender identity and expression as well as sexual orientation which until then had not been a part of any official policy the idea actually originated with our sheets military loss his name is taylor adams and at his previous job at mississippi state years earlier ms you had established a nearly identical statement of inclusion for its campus like many other universities had adopted in the early 2000s.

hillsdale faculty member law degree first baptist church wiseman taylor adams darko chapel hill north carolina football official mississippi three years two years
"faculty member" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Avid ends that dan helps people to overcome ride their resistance or the obstacle that comes from st compassion you know it's nice but it's not significant it doesn't really matter so that's one way is to give people evidence that matters i guess i would say my one way and that we all the bell at a pre deeply held professional script as we come into our own went her profession written and that professional scripts dictates a lot of what we think is legitimate to do in our work and many times are professional script does incorporate caring for other people noticing other people humanity extending compassionate empathy as part of what it means to be at my best as a professional and so going back to jane's faculty member example when being a faculty member and my professional script incorporates having empathy unconcerned for the people around me on doing my bash to be compassionate toward the people that i meet as i'm doing my research as i'm doing my teaching that shift in what it means to be a professional can overcome huge obstacles in organizations that are otherwise we're current holding at bay lots of our capacity to notice than feel with people around us of really well said those were yo cool she to remove the barriers to wording feeling noticing acting that makes a lot of sense and you're doing a great service with this did you guys want to end on a did you wanna give like one more example of how a concrete thing and organization could do you know 'cause you might have be having some companies i guess there's no such thing as a company is a purse like you might have stolen from a company listening to this podcast and is eager to like you know have another take away or feel free to say by the book you know like a totally feel free to answer that he'll be one right now but i wanna give you a chance to leave on something you each leave our money all yeah that'd be great candidates so i think one thing to take home is a true passion is actually everywhere i mean that's been one of our findings says that sometimes visible bits on it because it's so deeply human it's in most places at safa times underneath the surface and people are doing it.

dan jane faculty member
"faculty member" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Also it just fell into my inbox again apologies for all this penis talk just can't help it i got the you know every once in a while and i think may be happens to philosophy professor's i don't know you get emails where people just find your name because your you know in a psychology department then you'll get like the blanket emails of people proposing their theories about whatever alvin get it like a theory of unified theory of the meaning of life herbs schizophrenia is often from like a schizophrenic this one just was an email dear cornell university psychology faculty member so i take it that all my colleagues gutted having talked i am the in the title was the psychological impact of circumcision upon men so right up our alley slow some jewish stuff pena stuff so this isn't the extended pena says this is more like the abridged penis abridgement is an attempt to thwart the extent i'm writing to send you information about the psychological and physical impact of circumcision upon male children and upon the men they become this subject is not often discussed in american society in recent years several articles have shed light upon how circumcision can adversely affect so many below is the list of links for articles the discuss how this is so more and more men are beginning to speak out about what was done to them is infants and how this has affected them throughout their lives cycle psychologist need to become aware of decision to help those affected tragically two young men in california became so depressed that they committed suicide because they were circumcised is infants.

professor faculty member pena california
"faculty member" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:32 min | 4 years ago

"faculty member" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Compilation you didn't that are all professional and they are in their living by playing music quarter of cleveland paul another played well many of them were and i know how do we have a few people from the cleveland playing there well we have graduates faculty member erste patiently for new year's he's students wouldn't go home for the winter break okay and the now the big question what kind of jacket are you wearing oh top you known did it into one this other beautiful green jacket which i want to ready twice for opening night the journey spahn concert is close to hold a program enough for twenty seventh and it will continue to be used in a five masters tell or just just compete and we have a wonderful arranged with ten like at a fat do its new jacket every year and if missed just if you make some you know that there is that you have absolutely a master taylor so old look at what color girl where an interview played well i really haven't father buddy yet but i will be playing eighty let's see how badly which calls for additional i'm a and i look forward to playing that and for life so you don't show what growth planet of the using haven't got enough for on the learned that you have well we have red light blue green and three but i kind of cena eats work learned that so i guess so there's up eight planet here like lose lose and they just was three i can't play any of them but i am three get hurt so you know it's on this too good times of so i this is phone call to get times for three to tell i will changes to three to touch okay well list this is i have all three of me or not not was due to you know but all three of her one little probably olivier you are carle i don't know how old blood it can he could power and the bitter out for me many many years over your whole level i know we look forward you years old telling what they can get after the you know after the content you have coffee yes history coffee and you can purchase some snaps okay older.

cleveland taylor faculty member