23 Burst results for "Fabien"

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

01:44 min | Last month

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Tv. It has all of that information where our channels are all that stuff we stream to twitch like we said at the top do consider joining that on nation. It's fun it is fun. There's lots of really cool perks. Four quarter. I'm going gonna pitch it this way for once just like it's such a good time the nation and the not the special discord you get to be a part of like. It's a blast to blast. You're missing out if you're not there to be honest with you that's what it is. You're just you're not getting the full experience and and the perks all these stuff but the people people that for this show just one shot or quarters baby four quarters and then also you get some one on one conversation just at us and be like hey i wanna talk to you about something starbuck. That's like hard of like. It's we tell you guys thing you get to know you get to be in the of check it out check. We're going to pitch it. That's exactly So yeah thank you so much for listening if you wanna listen some more. The show is available everywhere. Podcast heard apple podcasts. Spotify iheart everywhere. And if we're not there let me know. I hope i will. I will find. I the exit stat. That's it there isn't any more. Thank you so much for listening or watching. You guys are dope. Take care of yourselves. You know the drill as always indian broadcast..

starbuck apple
"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

04:30 min | Last month

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"And you're watching this. It's just it just turns so many different things on its ear. Even paul paul rudd. It's such a great job. He was he was. He was the corporate stooge that you thought was on her side. Thought the he on okay. Guy for a corporate stooge and then they wanna just turn the way that you know you talk me. What are the good ones. And he did such a good job of weasel man. I was gonna say. I don't know if anyone wanted to share their a little small baby initial impressions before we aside. I mean just. I mean for me. It's it's one of those i. I worked at a video store for several years. Hollywood video r.i.p. I when i started working. When i first started working there i i was very very uninitiated. Uncultured and a friend of mine was not. He was seen so many movies. And this was one of those movies where it was just like when you. You're doing your research doing your homework rowing as a movie view. Yeah growing as a movie. Viewer i i. I have so friends. That aliens is their favorite movie. Even just in bike. I remember watching them all like just back to back and it's just like this always stands out to me. The spirit thriller take action to the camera fat. Because that's what happens. Terminator to her horror and then transaction but then it does in a weird way for a dude it kind of has a female forward to it where it doesn't feel like it's checking a box but it really makes it like you know be ripley and sarah connor like one of the icons of like you know female a female. So ripley planted that seed with alien..

paul paul rudd Hollywood rowing ripley sarah connor
"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

05:16 min | Last month

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"I mean pat. I i was reading. Go ahead go ahead. I was reading it and all respect to stephen king. He deserves all the respect in the world. But i'm going through three pages of a room description and and that is not going to appear again in the book because it doesn't it's one of the houses in the midwest and you're like only crap. Why am i reading this every. I don't need to know the details of room the bus year. Yes i mean. I feel the same way i love lord of the rings and i'll read it every once in a while but god damn yes. Writing changed a little bit i. I'm afraid of rereading the token stuff. Because i don't. I don't want i don't want to change your original thinking of change. The do now can describe iraq for days. That rock. By the end of your. Do you feel almost like you know. We like to introduce a name. But i know what it looks like we are. We are at a point where we can go to our. The next works right. Yeah so we're gonna we're gonna violently switch to the second part shiner behind me. Have one please where we're going to go to others. We're we're going to talk about Something you can get your nerd on about Which was a film that you suggested. And what film was that josh. We're doing aliens. yeah talk a little bit about aliens. we always like to be the second yes not the original alien. Not the fincher one. Yes no not that on. We always like to with our guest. If anybody's joining us. That is new to nerd on the podcast. Any time we have a guest on the show we like to. We don't want to just be an interview. We want to have them get their nerd on and talk about something that they're a fan of. And when i when we were talking with the person that was booking this interview they were like sydney sydney listed some movies and we all went aliens. Talk about alien so one of the things that we start these conversations with is what were your first impressions like when you first saw like well. The the first impression is partly colored by the sheer joy and spun of the day in which we went to see it We were at marvel at the time and we had half day fridays which publishing us to have a lot back then and we often went to go see a movie. Friday afternoon month's work let out And about midday was released back then. You didn't have thursday night previews i think. The movie came out. The friday We we about twenty or more of us together. Right after some of it was osmosis..

stephen king pat midwest shiner iraq sydney josh
"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:15 min | Last month

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"The only the only part of it that even touched on the comics of it was being responsible for the manufacturing of the marvel press posters back. Then they used to do for four posters. A quarter really gorgeous twenty to thirty two a poster. Some of them were some of the better covers. Others were original pieces of art done for the press. you remember the classic might zek punisher number one painted cover where the guns firing away. We did that. That was a twenty to thirty two press host since so that was the only tangent i hadn't oriels and or months into the job. I found out that the guy who originally got hired in eighty three instead of me for the promotions job was looking to hire an assist and his name is steve sample and i interviewed with him and he hired me so i moved over from the poor woman environment. Stand during the back. Thank you get hired and four months later you'll leave. That's real pretty skin keeping her. But i also but here's the deal. I also took eight to take that job. I actually found out a year later. That people notice that higher up in the company they actually noticed that head of accounting shirts. They realized that i had done that. That made a difference for me a year later because they started they thought of me decides my goofy name that that choice that i made automatic well fabian these out in the middle of your someone who is dedicated rather just paycheck right. Yes exactly. that actually helped me down the road. And i didn't realize it at at time i was doing. I just wanted to work in promotion publicity. I gotta chance to start doing advertising for marvel comics. Which is what. I went to college due to So in that regard is a great entry level into into the company and into the field..

steve sample fabian marvel comics
"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

05:25 min | Last month

"fabien" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Writing about six or seven monthly books with a fulltime job. Which is crazy yet. I didn't i never once said they were good books out and that included x. men x. four stable New warriors nova night thrasher. No i have my whole ends. Yeah i also wrote the deadpool limited series. The first one at that time called the circle chase. I was writing a bunch of annuals also at the same time so all of that that concentrated insanity was roughly between ninety and ninety five. And then you really all. I really pulled back and stale. Allot because i i. I wasn't suffering a an an emotional breakdown but i was certainly suffering from exhaustion. I sound sustainable long. I just started to quit one book. After another. I got fire. I only got fired. Also one which was nice Nomad mansell that. I quit night cable. I put night threats equipment ovalles new warriors. I got fired off x force. And i quit x. Men so there's your seventeen and all of that happened like a couple of your span..

thrasher
Is Eating Local Really More Sustainable?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Is Eating Local Really More Sustainable?

"Researchers alexander stein and fabien. Santini just published a fascinating paper on the sustainability of local food systems in the political discussion. They write the promotion of local food. Systems and short supply. Chains is sometimes presented as a means to increase the resilience of the food system. And it's also suggested as a means to improve the environmental footprint of the food system and quote so in their paper. They've reviewed scientific literature on the environmental social and the economic aspects of sustainability and. They reached some surprising conclusions. First off is eating local actually easier on the environment. When consumers tried to eat local they often focus on how far their food has to travel from its source to their plates. You might remember a popular book called the hundred mile diet which exemplified this approach. Barbara kings hovers bestselling animal vegetable. Miracle is another example and one assumption behind this trend is that eating locally will lower the carbon footprint of our diets however this is not necessarily the case for one thing shipping large quantities foods in cargo ships or trains may actually burn less fossil fuel than transporting the same amount of food across much shorter distances in hundreds of small trucks and now just consider thousands of consumers driving two farms one by one in their cars to pick up their local food. This thinking also assumes that transporting food is the only or even the primary factor in how much carbon is emitted in the production of that food but in fact food production can produce a lot of greenhouse gases prior to this final leg of the journey in fact stein in santini conclude that the carbon footprint of diet depends a lot more on what types of foods you choose then. It doesn't how many miles they travel to reach your plate.

Alexander Stein Fabien Santini Barbara Kings Stein
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:49 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Dad. I've learned art direction. Because i think it was an art. Director would have been filmmaker. I would be in film you know so. I realized that all the mediums are very much their own thing. And is you point of view. Mixing was that medium that creates something exceptional that it is magazine building house painting. Sculptors filmmaking thaw goofy. i think it's all the same. I think what what you have to say is important part and out is also important power and the medium in which you communicate this thoughts. It's just that medium. it has its own vocabulary. That's its own language so it's a little bit like you know like let's say magazine is french. Film is english. Sutherland is like learning another language but basically what you have to say is the same you know like most big artists. They just be themselves at the lock to be able to play with different mediums and to pass from one medium to the other from magazines into books into fragrance into furniture and into film has done film for about twenty five years now Lot of commercials started doing commercials. One of my first commercial was for. Joe manny and dan on for calvin klein like i did many many many for calvin klein and on and on and on it just like love film. What you did for among ally. The way was extraordinary. Thank you if you can. I tried to raid a little explanation in anticipation of asking you some questions about it but i. I decided that it might be easier for you to just share with my listeners. What you actually did for montclair and that magnificent film in the icebergs actually. The iceberg thing was was a project that i had made for longtime i went to was part of my see pitchers and i was always always intrigued by ice and i burbs in these amazing landscapes that felt like there were another planet and so i went to greenland once and took my camera and my special technique. When when a do pitches. I do very long exposures and then when i went to very long special sometimes three four minutes and i took my big camera time like it was by ten camera and went slipped it all the way to greenland and realize when a stand on land and the iceberg a moving and i get my pitches back from a trip in greenland and you barely see by was the i you see. The little is moving back but the big things you think that things not moving right but then you get the pitch about a little blur. Your everything is a bit blurry. Oh my god like ns been you know. I love this up out. Kinetic a picture of a nice burke that is not something that looks like an amazing pictures from national geographic. That feels like my picture. And that as that amazingness likes something special and the only thing think about is that you need to lead the whole thing. You need to lead it. A theater stage like you would lead like the street or something because his big eight but there are no electrical outlets in the arctic. Yes so oh. My god that's complicated. That's required big production that the and then you know so years pass by and Ramo calls me like i love. You pitchers love pictures of the c. Is there something you what. What would you do if if i would ask you to do something for me. What would you do. And i go. Oh you know. I know exactly what specially given the warm i would do icebergs. I would go to greenland and should is berg's but that would lead everything at night. And he said okay. Let's do it and basically allowed that dream to hats. Amazing though was the most amazing journey and the most amazing job i was ever ever assigned. I love that job me. The fashion guy being lost in greenland minus twenty degrees you know my camera and my yields strobes like massive stoves that were on boats on other boats and trying to take these bitches of icebergs. Like i wasn't heaven i mean like thank you remove this. It was really extraordinary experience. It was really great. Is there anyone in the fashion of publishing business that you haven't worked for. That could cajole you to work for them. What a to be entirely honest. I think like you know like we were talking about film. We're talking about you. Know what i've learned through the years working magazines. You learn to build a story you learn to make stories you learn how to become a narrator. Then as i worked in film and doing commercial you learn that same spirit of narrative. But you deal visuals. You deal with art direction. You deals air makeup. Do deal with sound you deal with special effects. You deal with collar you deal with movement. You deal with action in deal with so many other layers. I've find the film. The most complete method of expression that to me is relevant for what i want to say that. So i've put to be honest. Most of my friends towards that lately you know and i do a lot of films. I do about twenty different films by year that direct and i'm about to launching into a feature film and like the works with that so this is something that's going to happen and that's what is next for me to be honest that is by had been replaced. Ethnic is going to replace the magazines. It's the same thing but it's just bigger bigger is a bolder and more you know it's in the narratives bigger and like the expression is bigger. And there's like i'm someone was ultimate control in everything i do and what i love about film is that you spend months and months trying to put something together that is in total control. But the minute you say action and the film is rolling you totally las old control and all the magic starts to happen so all these things that you put together really calculating everything disconnect and disconnect cities. That's going to be said you're going to say that word can be like this. The going to be like that. That you say action is an. It's like you'd like the child in front of an image and something's happening in front of you that. Wow it's magic and that i think he's to me is the maximum so like i think that's where i'm going to focus the rest of my life into doing that. And my talk affi work and hopefully exhibits and things like that of my work that have collecting for the past thirty five years doing an exhibit without doing any prince like an archive. That is huge. And that i'm putting together installing printing in like someone start exhibit hassle to thinning. And it really. That's where i wanna go congratulations. It sounds magnificent. So it's great. I'm i'm really happy about that. It took me a long time. Yes it seems to get. That sorta seems to be the way it goes. I i do my last question. Has your father feel about your career. Well my father passed away a couple of years ago about seven years eight years ago and it was very pleased. It was very pleased. Of course we were like yes. I can tell face how happy were very very very very close. And i think like i think for dad you know for someone like him that really fought always life to get where it was and it was in a great place when he died. I think it was very at first threatening. I was threatening and then i think he impressed me and then he really liked you know supported me and very much. Like a totally embraced. What i was doing and was very proud. Yes oh he passed away and and the do to can infuse his work and yours into your four wonderful children. This i do thank you. Thank you thank you so much for making the world. More provocative and elegant place today design matters.

Joe manny dan today ten camera english Ramo about twenty five years three four minutes One four wonderful children couple of years ago first commercial about seven years eight years french about twenty different films minus twenty degrees one medium past thirty five once calvin klein
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:13 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And i'll look at it online from time to time but i don't miss it. I don't know if it's because grace coddington left. I don't know but it's just not the same i think it's it's different time I think what we were doing at the time in the nineties that was relevant. It felt like it was something it felt like. It was a connection when dominique browning was editor of housing garden. I the first thing. I would editorial the last magazine for me to go is harper's bazaar is the talent of all this like i think people are just hanging on. The branches like desperately tried to steal hang on the mat. Like i don't know i'm not into it. It's funny like i. I think. I think to do something that that makes it needs to be relevant in needs to be a medium that is relevant. I'm where more intrigued into like. I mean it was all my clients. We don't talk about the page that's going to involve we talk about like instagram. Post to say this And even though i'm not it's a shame that it is instagram post. But it's what it's about so my question put to myself now. It's like. I'm gonna make that instagram post much better than all the other post. I make this relevant only make this work. And i'm gonna make this important and that's what i'm trying to do do you. Intimate as much is different too. It's it's it's a different says it's a different exercise and do enjoy as much. I don't know. I don't even ask myself the question because i think like you learn you know working. I've been working so much you've realized that most of what you do is problem solving problem solving you know that. It is on the page on his screen on the billboard on in a book or like on the as a moving image. It's problem solving. And i became a problem solver. N- baby and i don't think so. I think that you became a problem maker for other people because your work with so much better. And that's what. I think we designers to when you're trying to make an instagram post. That's better than anybody else that has never been done before a europe problem maker for everybody else. That can't well. I don't know about that. But i know that's what i do all day long. You know i'm being put like in front of a problem by client. And i'm trying to resolve the issues that and tried to make the best solution out of it and it's listen. There's nothing wrong with that. I now enjoy that. It's kind of like you know like great math problem. It's also interesting but it's true like the things have shifted. it's not. It's not a bad magazine. Is it about book it. He could still be about the magazine that treated a little bit more. like an object. Something that is less through right. I'm talking about like maybe the bi annual magazines visionary Purple like all this you know. Are you aware of stack magazines. It's a subscription service out of the uk and they curate sending indie magazines. Once a month. Really really really well done. And i love getting them. They're never large circulation magazines. But it's really interesting to see what some people are doing sort. I'll send you a link. It stack magazines. They pick the magazine. You get what they pick. Once a month you get a magazine. Interesting really great. And then you sort of stay on top of the dogs checked to get the subject the yeah the actual magazine and there are some extraordinary made these days. They're small but they're really really good this. I'm sure i'm sure. I mean i think you know. I'm talking about magazine as a large large like the vote. The best that level of magazine like ultimately like you. We love the small independent magazines because they have a voice in nabet point of view. And they have you know something they want to say but at the time to do it with no money and the lead to stop. I run with the ball. And you know they they undermine themselves before you know just to get certain people inside the magazine so it's a little bit of free fall and then on the other hand. The very commercial magazine is the opposite. You have to do exactly what they want as if you were doing. Advertising and you. Voice as a collaborator is is not appreciated. Or like you here to get in the gap you know so It's one of the other i think. I don't think there's any place where you feel like. The collaboration and the point of view from the team inside the magazine is forward. In a way that is you know like meaningful at. I don't know a magazine today. The one magazine. I still really enjoy reading. Both online and in hand is the new yorker. Still think that they're doing well. Those were very smart the way they did it through like a subscriptions they decided like the. It's not a the housing is about like the quality of the product and the and you know foot that quality. You're going to pay certain amount of money to get the magazine and it paid off for them. He's the one magazine that successful. Good in your monograph. You state that while you've devoted most of your life to becoming a good art director. You now want to dedicate the rest of what time you have left to film and photography. Tell me why. Well i think like i said it goes all the way back to my.

grace coddington uk europe new yorker Both instagram dominique browning today one magazine Once a month one nineties bazaar first thing bi annual harper
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:59 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"If you see what. I mean like right Even though you have like some shield sanders and people like that like you know that embraced that that profession but in general. It's it's a world that is is not subtle bizarre. We try to stay somewhere. Classic therefore understandable yet. I mean we pushed it quite far in some of the ideas that were kind of like extreme so it was extreme yet it was classic so there was always that balance and elegance was always part of the game that he needed to be absolutely beautiful. Like we felt like you. Could you could package any idea as long even if it was art concept of something difficult to understand if it was packaging beautiful way people would understand it better. It would be closer to them. The be more acceptable. So maybe that's what i call. Minimum maximalism minimized maximally. Liz tilberis very tragically died of cancer. You left shortly thereafter. Because you're so heartbroken glenda bailey took over and it was recently announced that she would be leaving. After many decades a new editor has just been announced. I read that you were in the consideration for the editor in chief position. Is that true too. But i never got it from both so i think it's not at all these different rumors. Go around to be. Honest does not yeah. I figured weeding sort of some of your more recent thoughts which we'll get to about the magazine business at. That didn't seem likely that you'd want to do it. But back to the nineties. One of my other favorite projects that you work done around that time and when that i also own the french version is madonna's sex book steven meisel was photographing the book. And both he and madonna wanted you to direct it and in your twenty nine thousand nine monograph you talk about how one of the objectives was to give it the right kind of quote unquote crazy tabloid elegance You couldn't make it to wild looking without making it look cheap and you if you made it look too crazy the crazy you had to ensure that the crazy was not going to be sort of ridiculous. How crazy was it to work on that job. And what did you think of the ensuing hysteria over. Not a great time fabulous. Great time working with her. She was unbelievable. She was so i mean wishy naked. Most of the time she was thinking yeah most of the time some of the time. She was definitely naked. Yeah i didn't bother me. It didn't bother me at all. I yeah i would think the opposite. I'm right but there was a lot of nudity. Mutiti everywhere did it ever sort of get lurid nano don't think so. I think that you know we kid as a job. Yeah it was like you know was working on the film or something like that. Like i think like when you onset and you have all these people i mean the nudity is not something. That is intriguing sir. Really to be honest. It's a job so you look at it as a job you don't look at. Oh my god. She's naked this. You know we didn't care. We were here to do something and being sad. Like you know doesn't allow other thoughts you know i mean so no didn't bother me one bit there was a lot of robert mapplethorpe influenced sem dsm. There were the yeah. I mean like she. She wanted to cover a little bit of everything they wanted to have that that bid and embiid. She wanted the weirdness. She wanted the underground she wanted to overtly pop culture. She wanted like the all the different aspects of sex. She wanted to cover everything. I mean to be honest. I found was he was treated like a journal. Like a thoughts thought process and visuals. Were like some of them very sophisticated. Some of them very trashy some of them very pop. Some of them very cartoonish. Some of them very hard. Some of them like there was everything in it. It was like a like a collage of all these different visions done and packaged again by. Descend people like dog. Refer nor director and a writer lynn. O'brien myself and stephen mozelle and you know like these different expressions of the subject matter. I mean the ended up being the package was like together in a good way it l. Together nicely yet voice. The whole thing had voice and a point of view and visually really and really and really fund in many ways scandal. Oh find life. I was finally able to get the french copy. That could not get an english copy. I got a french still have. I was so enthralled with that book. Fabian that at that time you know the internet and email and all of that was first taking off user. Names is the name of data as my username. Name is data. I use that name. I just remembered that talking. I was so in the world it really is. It was in his controversial as it was in looking back on it now. It doesn't seem that way but then it was. Every single photograph is beautiful. Every single loaded graph is beautiful in that book. Well stephen mozelle in your monograph published by fading. It's a four hundred plus page stunning exploration of thirty years of your own work and one thing that surprised me in reading. It is your statement that when you were younger you really loved being controversial and you were never afraid and today you find yourself to be more careful and wondering what is behind that change. I would if you see what's going on politically. Don't think you have to be careful. Okay okay. I i'm creative risks or being less maybe politically correct or. I don't think he's a good moment for that. I don't think it's the climate doesn't allow controversy. I think controversy is not read. as controversy. controversy is bred as something extremely offensive in actually can put your carrier down today so you have to really twice about before you said something before you do something or somewhere before you certain visuals you have to think about everything everything is can become you know like a weapon against you so you have to be very careful. I think it's somewhere it's good in many ways it's good and it's necessary in other ways it's less good. It takes up a lot of the critics factor. Does it. i mean is never innocent like when you do something. But there's a certain innocence in in creation that doesn't put automatically things that you say or do in context of political or chief sociology coal environment of a certain time. And i find you know like certain artists. Don't leave in the time yet to get george per the environment in the context in which they work and that could really endanger division. This kind of you know like Restrictions in self restrictions. One one that's to put on themselves to certain degree so being controversial today. Dad no is very ski. There's that and the other reason is i guess you learn. I think you when you're younger you. You want to check the tree. You want to bother the people that older you want to create your own little revolution and then you become wiser and you don't want to treat. You actually want to protect the tree. You want to make sure it's trained properly. You wanna make sure it gets water. You wanna make sure this all the other things you want. You wanna care you know and you want maybe pass along the knowledge that you've amassed three years and you want to pass that along to someone else so you be. Your mental behavior is shifting and changing. So that's the second part of this. Yeah you've stated that the era of the fashion magazine has come to an end. Why do you feel that way. It feels way because you see magazines. I mean like two people. Look at magazines still to people by magazine. Do we feel in the edge of technology and the edge of you know portable phone tablets. You know anything like digital. Do you feel that time of magazine is something relevant for today or is it better to swipe but do you think i think it's about swiping. It's not about turning pages of a magazine to be honest. Do you think that you may turn the page of a book. But do you think of a magazine. I find magazine nut relevant in my in my mind. I don't find them. You know even though. I missed a do miss putting a magazine together. I miss working with thug refers on editorial authorities. But i don't feel it's relevant. I don't i don't feel it's the proper tool to communicate fashion to do. You still subscribe to a lot of magazines. Though which wednesday still subscribe to. Can you share. No no no i. I don't subscribe. No i am for for eighteen years like i just paid for it. And there was a glitch with the with the payment and then it had repaid and then all of a sudden i'd been born. A petit took over from housing garden. So i got the balanced put on vogue. I headed for eighteen years and then it stopped. And i don't miss it is i. I still think about it..

Liz tilberis eighteen years steven meisel three years stephen mozelle Fabian thirty years glenda bailey today second part One both wednesday two people twice first twenty nine thousand nine mono four hundred plus page robert mapplethorpe english
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:32 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Ideas. I didn't feel where applicable for magazines in the same way shedding approach was. Not something. I was understanding. It was not my cup of tea by you know in in a way but still it was interesting because you know like graphically and the way the magazine looked was interesting so i was fine with that but i guess she didn't think it was fine. I guess we didn't get along. I wouldn't fight but did she didn't understand what was about. And i don't think i really appreciated what she was about either. At the time we cut to each other better after she was stealing interview was a bizarre by them. And you know like. I grew to respect her and she grew to respect me as well. We have different point of views. And that's fine and that's why it's important like to go back to the point of view for good magazine. One point of view you cannot have different points of view. That's when the mexican becomes so frenetic and understandable for people and i guess when i interview a day even know like i really liked but it looked like it didn't make sense for what it was for what she wanted to do so i think it was better. We didn't continue together. Was that the first time you've ever been fired. Yeah it was. It was a strange feeling. I was upset at first. But then i'm bones of whatever let grad move on. And that's why right away like you know like i started my company fight like the day left interview started my company because i was doing a lot of freelance anyway so at clients. I was thinking bonnie's volcano advertising. Some many advertising admit all these designers in italy and i was like doing freelance for them and all the other things that felt like. Let me start my company like you know. Maybe i don't wanna work for magazines magazines complicated. They really take everything under you feet. They really like grab all that. They require a tremendous amount of work. And the not that good so like i was really disappointed was magazine is certain way so i said like i'm not going to work for magazine again. I'm going to stop my company. I started my company sinful right away. Which was good and i'd moved on. I moved on to quite rapidly. And you know. I remember going to the shows and singing agreed and i was fine. I know ingred. How are you blah blah. And we didn't all the grandch- you know like i was. I was fine. I'd moved on. And that's when i got the phone call for disposal. Yeah i've to a year after. I left interview. Something like that right before before we get to bizarre. I want to talk to you just a few projects that you did back at the beginning of barron and barron one of your first jobs was with issey miyake. And you designed his first fragrance. And you've said that fragrances of the strangest accounts to work on that. They're the most abstract form of advertising that. There is an wondering if you took a little bit about why you feel that way when other time you know when you say cold. I know that he said love what i was doing at time for. He said it was like really like impressed. In the where. I was putting the magazine together. Instead we gotta find a way to work together. Sure lovely. That be great then. I started my company. Then i get a phone call from him. I said thank you have you. Have you know like we should work together. If you ever done a fragrance bottle. I said no. I never done that but that must be so interesting. I love to do it. I love i love fragrance. i love the i. Look the object by itself is really. It's the item that most people are a lot of people get access to i find it a very democratic. You know like it's one of the first things you can buy from a designer brand. Is the fragrances lipstick or makeup or beauty item nfl. I was really interesting to participate into the vision of a designer and into creating this object that if success fool can become quite called right And generational i mean. I was thinking at the time like chanel number five. Oh my god. What did he do for chanel like. It's unbelievable so i was. I was really really intrigued by the question of the bottle. So you know like you said. Can you come to paris as he sure i can come to. Paris put me on the plane. And i was in paris and basically like we talked and went onto design the ball. Which is one of the most successful and long running designs and fragrances of our time. And you've since designed over forty different bottles for forty different fragrances. And have stated that one of the problems with developing a new fragrance is the name and of jokingly stated that all. That's left her. Name's lake fief memory. Jealousy and pirate actually run out of names. It's it's incredible like to name. A fragrance is interesting gypsies mahbub. Maybe i'm sure but you know what i'm sure that name is is someone owns that every single word in the dictionary is taken its case. Either you go to whomever owns it and buy back or you know you kind of like put words together up tim. Jealousy shades of jealousy shave a jealous. But it's naming is very is. It's a nightmare and i've i've named a few and it's a nightmare it's really it's really naming any names some pharmaceuticals and it's a nightmare like the words taken. Where's we're taking in. You know like that's something visual like you can do something. New can invent a word even though like the car. That's what they do. Best wad some industries. They have to invent words that don't exist that lets easiest way now to create a name is to just make something that has never been uttered a oftentimes though. That's hard because it ends up sounding so far in that nobody really has any attachment to it. Yes and like the you know. The problem with the fragrance is like in needs to strike on an emotional level immediately. So and so. That's the tricky part like any emotion in the dictionary is they can for short fifteen times around fifteen brands. You also have calvin klein lunch. Because i also didn't know at the time that his fragrance had launched to very little fanfare. You helped him relaunch. Ck one and then went on to help shape. Everything for calvin for several decades. Fabian is a treat. You introduced calvin to kate moss..

paris italy issey miyake fifteen times first fragrance first jobs forty different fragrances first time Paris over forty different bottles one fifteen brands chanel One point first single word calvin Fabian a year after first things
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:56 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Your photography so much that he ended up buying threes dollars worth of photography of the brooklyn bridge during that meeting. Also like you know. They were older work. I've done in france in magazine but there was also like to pictures taken maino myself and some of them in new york and so this brooklyn bridge pitchers and they were doing an article in house and garden on the brooklyn bridge and i think it was for the sentinel or something like that at the time. I don't know exactly. I got to be for that. But i remember like this. Oh you gotta go see rochelle adele. She works at our garden. Let me give her a ring and you got to go to see her and show those pitches. So i went to see rochelle. She was at house and garden and she looked at the pictures and to say. Oh these are lovely. We can we keep them for the bit. Then it took like four or five pitches and then you. I get a phone call from saying like oh actually like the the pictures that they're going to be running a really. Yeah and they paid like three thousand dollars speaking. I couldn't believe so basically. That was my first experience as a photographer working for publication in america. And then when you went to self you also worked with richelieu dell. Is that correct. She also worked for the magazine. She became a little bit. Like a miniature alex lieberman. She was working. I think she had self magazine. I think she was also up at mademoiselle. She was kind of like like alex. Lieberman's right task and she would come in and look over all the pages and then liberman would come in and look at the pages and we have to make sure that everything was well organized like each picture was supposed to be from this side which was very small to a double page side. And then you would play. Was things had a really like my time. Magazine g. q. Working was mayor shanahan's director and matama self magazine really like couldn't wait for these moments. Where would show up and michelle would show up kind of like shuffling everything around some part of it probably just to shovel and part of it to make more sense of the stories to learn so much about like what you can do. It was a story like are you can was editing. Sizing was putting things one when and other. Why would that be better and that to me. Like tidied up so nicely. Was all the things that i learned from my dad about the journalistic side of our. You put something together. So it's complete so it makes sense so there's a logic to it but there's also an artist about it when i was there itself and you know it's not that self was fantastic magazine. That's when i really like said while. I'm really liking this this i can. I was eating it up like there was no tomorrow and i loved it. I loved it. And like when i ll expert. Come you know like some designers will put patriots together was smaller guy in the corner and i would think like. I wonder how lieberman's going to change that. Maybe he's going to do this but he's going to do that. Maybe he's gonna. It was really intriguing to seem calm and change everything around but in education. The boasts intriguing. Part was that every time it was right. It was right people were so you have no idea designers. Were like crying over like the not crying literally like you like so upset that the layouts change and everything i was thinking but he's right and we had arguments argument some of the staff. I remember but much better in makes sense. Now it makes sense the stories better and people get like really like attached to their own work. I guess yeah. What a magnificent thing to be able to witness and to learn and be part of alex g. q. And you mentioned that you worked with our director. Mary shanahan and i read that she. You've said that she helped you clearly. Understand how an image can function. And i'm wondering if we talk a little bit about what that means and what she taught. Well i think she was the one who appeared on top of the i by saying like pushing this idea of the point of view that everything comes down to point of view everything comes down to vision and to a to express that vision in a very simple manner and i think that i learned that from her and she was very a definite about that. I think like really felt like oh complete. The circle here like the understanding of like to pass information the proper way in a practical way for my father and being a journalist understood the artistry and shuffling. And what you can do as an image and now you can say something in this way if you make the image decides on this way if you make the mich this is a little bit like the complete approach to the build up of a magazine but then a learn from mary that oh this is great but what is it. That is inside image. And what is that point of view and now to pass on that information as an art director into the dog refer so that point of view is palatable relevant and on point and that i felt like ooh i can't be an auditor straits and then the left i know i know and then and then lieberman was really pissed so after a year and a half g q betty carter. The former editor of esquire and the newly minted editor of a brand new magazine called new york woman. Invited you to become the founding art director. And i remember when the magazine i came out i actually had a friend who worked there as a copy editor and there was so much excitement about the launch. And i read that. You had many epic battles over the tone of the magazine you wanted to be cool and clean and they wanted it to be warm and cozy which seemed very odd for a new york woman type magazine. How did you manage looking back on it. How would you describe that time. Well well yes. I remember you mentioning that. Yes that's true. Add a couple of Battles with some of the stuff but not was betsy really. Because i think betsy understood at you know like it was late. Eighty s late eighties. S new york. City come on like the time. The city was the coolest was the place was the center of the world. I mean if anything and anything that was happening was happening in new york. So of course. I wanted to best photographers. Of course i wanted you know like the thing to be the coolest thing possible. Yes there was. It was american express was doing the magazine. Show is big. Let's say and but we we went against that. I think ni- yes. We different wanted the magazine to be cool to be like you know quite fashiony. At the time i remember. If that's the first i worked. Peter lindbergh was that new york woman. And that's the first time actually. Peter lindbergh Worked in america and then other talk. I like patrick. Demarchelier work there. Like spiel mccall package you know cast for at the time that were working for forecasts at sani. They were working in europe. More actually european stock strangely enough because also like mr lebron was not up left communist. He had he said he had plans for me..

america Peter lindbergh new york Mary shanahan lebron europe Lieberman new york woman patrick richelieu dell michelle rochelle four france three thousand dollars each picture rochelle adele first experience five pitches Eighty s late eighties
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"City screw was living was living in new york. Something you'd always hoped to do or was this a spontaneous decision after falling in love the where group in france i mean actually the way most kids my age in france. There were quite americanized in many ways. Like you know. The music was coming from the states and from london. The movies were coming from america. The culture was very much in american culture and anything that was new was coming from there. So i felt i was not not not in in the courtyard with the other kids playing. I felt i was in the courtyard. You know basically are getting the scraps of from courtyard with it. So i'd say no that feeling. Well i thought it was much better to just check it out in the. Us especially new york there was like this aura around it around the new york at that time like in the eighties. That was that was really amazing. I just wanted to go there yeah. I'm a native new yorker. But i didn't move to manhattan until nineteen eighty-three so we know exactly what you're talking about him about a year or so behind you and new york at that point seems to be sort of this mystical magical place aside from your girlfriend you knew. Only one person in new york the great very unique fiene. She's also been on the show. The art director at the time from women's wear daily. How did she help you. did she help you. Sort of get settled in the magazine community What what happened is actually i was freelancing in this magazine in france is fashion magazine in france and very nick via an was asked to come and redesign the magazine and when she came she. Had you know graphic formula and you know right away. I kind of like you know. Attacked her in like you like worked with her really rapidly and tried to showed show masculine next she. She was really impressed. That would understand so quickly what she wanted to do. We got on on the right foot but rapidly. I told her you know like. I really wanna continue. I really wanna come to. Can i come to new york. And so a bugged dirt to come to new york and she basically invited me. I'm chad choice. I was like relentless. Like what a surprise so invited me even though she was about to move to california and she bided me and stead with her. And i've worked boomers where daily. And i was kind of like nintendo aaron instead two months and then i went back to france in the mid time during my time in new york. Made these this girl that you mentioning and a year later. She should up in paris. And that's when. I decided i decided. Oh let's let's go back to new york and check it out. And i wind back and then i just knew her and her partner at the time called him hoped at three hundred dollars. I called him up. And you know very near. Vienna was already in san francisco so she was not part of of this but like e basically organize a meeting for me a couple of people in new york but one of the meetings was actually. Was alex liberman. So which was like a great pitching and i knew we was. I was impressed by he was and i not the meeting. And when when i came seem At the time it was the on the vogue floor yet an officer you know like we met any spoke french right away he said. Let's on pensee hoppy. I knew was why because my english at the time. Let me tell you. What's not that good. So we spoke in french and he was very fond of french. People and very funding my work because up showed in my portfolio at the time. And he said what you wanna do said i would like to be become an automatic would like to inaugurated i'd love to work at conde nast and and he said Well have you heard of. This magazine was starting to magazine. It's cold vanity fair. I like it would be very nice. If you want to meet was the art director and cbs' you guys get along so you send me to. At the time the art director was lloyds. If and i met with him. And we talked and e like me very much and logically at the job. But then i got a phone call from alex. Lieberman said well lloyd's if he's not going to stay with us any longer so divinity fair gig is not going to happen. Don't disappear. I'm going to find you. You've got to stick around here. I'm gonna find you something else in the meantime and then you put me on self magazine. Yeah so i. I graduated college in nineteen eighty three and in nineteen eighty-two vanity fair had been relaunched and i thought it was the most glorious magazine in recent history just the idea that this was a beautiful arts and literary magazine that david. Hockney socks and feet. Were put on the cover of philip. Roth was on the cover. I desperately wanted to work in vanity fair as well and being a very young designer coming from a state school in new york. I knew the chances were very slim. But i set my portfolio into candy as well. This is nineteen eighty-three so the year later. After you and i got a call back from charles church ward who was then the art director. Those does koreans. I didn't meet with trump. Who i met with human resources. The human resource woman did not like me. So i didn't get the job but the idea that the art director at the time thought there was something in my portfolio. Really really bullied me for quite a long time. So it's so funny. How life has its circuitous. Turns one thing. I didn't know about you at all and had no idea fabian. I read that your first job in new york was actually johnson. Johnson working design for their internal magazine. I was shocked. But i also had it. That's true my friend Him hope to get that job to me. He said oh. I heard like giovanni joined to an internal magazine and they need the design. And did you know like the zero for them and it was great was like painting cash. Nice speaking of being paid in cash after looking at your portfolio didn't alexander lieberman love.

london san francisco new york america Lieberman alex liberman california trump france manhattan johnson Johnson giovanni paris Roth new yorker three hundred dollars eighties two months Vienna
"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:40 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"He's created singular groundbreaking looks for harper's bazaar toga italia and interview vanity fair once called him the most sought after creative director in the world. And indeed he is today. He joins me on zoom from paris france. Fabien baron. Welcome to design matters polls show you have such a lovely voice thank you. Thank you for being the photographer. Glen latchford has insisted that you are the elvis presley of graphic design. Oh my gods and wondering if you know why he stated that no. I don't know i'm sorry. I don t know that he even said no. Glenn quite well from those days the baghdad in operas bizarre and i deem to to work on the magazine into some stories and was one story. Actually that did that. I really liked they did. Was moss going around the city and forty second street and just like taking very report type of pictures. That were like really amazing. That's how glen. Yeah maybe it's the breakthrough groundbreaking part that he was referring to being. Your father. mark barron was a legendary art director. in paris. he worked mainly with two publications. He was the founding art director of the left-wing daily liberation and the sports daily liquid. Is it true that you were a newspaper delivery boy for the not very boy but You know. I've worked on my father. So i was really the go-to guy to do anything. In at the magazine it would be doing at the time. Like photostats which were like you know the the pictures and blow them up different sizes. Didn't okay i used to do that. And they used to do like make any calls like kind of like you know like putting the mechanics of the mechanical part of the magazine pages. You know and i was doing a lot of electro sets. I don't know if you remember that. Still i'd just is just for fun. I used to be really good at it. I used to be really good because you had to pick the size. He couldn't be like at two hundred percent so used to be really good at it could type something like exactly to the links won't in the size of by just guessing so it was fun game knowing that about you now. I could see how that training helped in the creation of some of your typographic constructions. You know there is a sort of puzzling to them and placing them all together in a way that. If i don't think he knew how to do that by hand you wouldn't be able to do it on the computer. Yes actually the first time. I did this kind of graphics i did. It was xerox machine. So a Vogue at the time like everything will have computers or anything so we had to work everything kind of like manually. So i used to take the phones and used as your machine and blow them up on your machine and collage the pc's by cutting them out. Basically you said that your father was super bright super smart and very educated. But i also understand that he was quite hard on you in your early days as a designer in what way i guess he wanted me to learn and learn the proper weber also learned the hard way because he wanted to make sure this is something. I was going to do something. I was going to to love in new like And when it's hard and you still in love that means it sticks right so i guess it was really tough in the way that we will use to work. I was responsible for everything everything every time there was a mistake. It was me even though it was not me so just wanted me to be responsible for everything so it was quite like not very gentle. Let's say i guess at the time you know like it was not like it is now like now. It's you have to be extremely gentle with people and you have to be extremely polite through proper. It was not like that with me. At least i read that your father felt that the objective of graphic design was to get the reader involved with the editorial content of the publication. And you talk about this quite a lot. But at the time you were also reading francine crescents. French vogue and you were enthralled by the photography of helmet. Newton guy bourdin. Did you feel that that was in conflict with what your dad was teaching. you know. actually. I didn't feel i was in conflict. I figures good like a proper balance. I think like is teaching was quite journalistic. It was quite like classic journalism and decem time of felt like having access to magazine like fringe folk. And you know like an all. This dog refers in looking at those visuals. I was really intrigued. How you would create such visuals so it was something that i was really like very like looking after like almost like you know like those magazines when they shopping house because they were like the visuals were exceptional and i really had no idea you would put this type of visuals together. Would create them. I mean the photography part and after like how you would come up with those idea those concepts and everything so it was like really like i was looking at that in extremely intrigued at the same time what was important that the time especially newspapers to past information the proper way and you know like to make sure like the reader woods understand what you're trying to say after a gigantic fight. I understand you left home and his supervision and you moved into your own apartment at that point you stated that he was still your hero and you still looked up to him but it took years before you were both fully reconciled. What did you fight about. I don't remember. I don't remember what the fight was about. But i know that i left that day. I really i don't recall at all. I mean this isn't the case most of the time you don't remember what the fight is about what you remember like did i didn't i did. I definitely left and it was a wide before like not that long either. Because i like tim in the like me. I was quite upset. I was not so happy about it to be honest. It's not a good memory that part but it was time for me to go. I mean some kids live their parents nicely and some don't leave. The parents nicely ultimately said that the relationship with your father gave you a sensitive how to treat people. What do you feel that. He most you in that regard. I think what we re give me a good sense of what this job was about a good sense of being a deep down you have to remain journalist to certain degree in anything into you have to make. It's gotta make sense. It's going to be understood and you've got to be clear. But also i think he gave me a discipline and a work ethic that i don't think i would have gotten if he was not through him. The level of discipline in which i work is quite surprising for some people. I've heard it. I'm very keen and it's a search to perfection to kind of like trying to really find that place which is difficult to find that really. I think perfection is quite good word even though you have understood that you can obtain perfection but you can come close to it but any of these because he can obtain that you continue to search for it but you know like that puts you into a certain category of people that you understand that this becomes life and that you're going to be professional about it a little bit like an athlete. I do anything to make it right. Basically just like an athlete with wake up at four o'clock in the morning if they won't need to train so i'm very similar i. I'm ready to do anything to make this right. So part of why i get result is because of that discipline. I think if i would have the discipline i wouldn't have done that. Many things i would have been is eaten into trying new mediums and i think it stat but also that need that search to perfection. That allowed me to experiment and try new medium quite easily without hesitation..

mark barron Glen latchford Fabien baron paris four o'clock Glenn two hundred percent today two publications one story paris france both Vogue first time glen forty second street xerox Newton French tim
"fabien" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:59 min | 3 months ago

"fabien" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Rick Steves. I'm Fabien from Germany, and that was German. For I travel with Rick Steves. It's been far beyond US Deutschland Rising. Take Steve's We're exploring the hidden world of urban design that surrounds you Today in any modern city. Our guest Roman Mars is joining us on travel with Rick Steves from his home studio in Berkeley, California Hey, Roman. A lot of this stuff is little and intimate. And if you blink, you miss it. A lot of it is big. I mean, you write that a skyscraper is a machine that is designed to turn land into money. Or you quote somebody who said that I I love looking at skyscrapers and having a little appreciation of what they're doing there. And there are engineering innovations that make skyscrapers possible that a lot of people don't appreciate for sure. I mean, in addition to the fact that just putting metal inside of a skyscraper was its own innovation, I mean, if you imagine that the weight of a skyscraper is dependent on the new materials at the base, and for a long time masonry have these limitations as to how tall skyscraper can be. And if you made it taller and taller. You had to make the walls on the bottom, thicker and thicker until someone finally figured out, you know. The steel reinforcement. And then all of a sudden the walls of a building weren't the thing they're holding it up anymore. The walls were just kind of a curtain to keep the weather out. And what was keeping the building up? Is the structure underneath it to have skeleton. All of a sudden, I love those solving engineering problems with that you can have different races just to be the tallest in. It's kind of fun to know that this great script was built in the other skyscrapers built and they put an antenna on top. It's it would be three yards taller than her. Exactly. Yeah. Or in the skylines. Give the city its personality. I mean, you look at London you look at Singapore. They put a lot of local pride into their skylines. Yeah, absolutely. It's a huge part of what makes the city a city. I mean, it's not. It's not always the most important part. I think one of the things that I like I love being pedestrian honestly, like I like I'm a walker and I think that often when we look at the city and we see the skyline, you know that's kind of how we often picture cities was from far away. But really, the way you encounter cities in those first couple stories, you know, And so, um, we love paying attention to both, you know, like I I love a good tall building a dramatic building. But I also think it I love the first floor and the just the bodegas and speaking of first floor as you write about, there's a couple of cases and I know about where there happens to be a church that own The property right? And and it's a skyscraper now, and the church is on the first couple of floors, and they're renting out 20 floors above and that church is pretty well set up financially. Yeah, the example from that is the the Citicorp Tower and Midtown Manhattan. And that actually caused a huge problem. There was a church on the corner, and so the building had to be built above it. And they put the supports rather than at the corners of the building. They were sort of in the midline of the building. So it's kind of a skyscraper on on stilts. Yeah, and they discovered late in the process after it was already a building that was occupied for many years that it had some danger of falling over in the wind. If it hit on the corner of the building, and they they fixed it secretly the night Oh, my goodness, because otherwise there was a fear that it would fall over and Really destroyed midtown Manhattan Prayer could only do so much, and it's just fun to know the little back story about this guy scripts. But let's get small again Right now. I mean, a lot of small urban features are designed actually to shape human behavior. These can be a little bit harsh, but sometimes it's got to be done. What are some examples of Little urban designs that have a motive. Yeah, well, there's a class of architecture that's often called, like hostile architecture or hostile design and and things that might seem innocuous. Um, they have an influencing intent, so the ones that are kind of obvious that feel kind of harsh are You'll. Sometimes he spikes on the ground to stop people from sleeping rough in cities. There's ones are less obvious. They're kind of like on the edges of things that will have decorative knobs or something that are this bird sitting, even though they're they're decoration, but they really are there to stop you from staying. Probably more sort of an innocuous but do sort of seeing the purposes. Arm rests on benches, which are there to help your arms and they serve a good purpose like it's nice to have an arm rest when you're on a bench, but they are also there to stop you from lying down and getting comfortable, and you might not feel that the same way in a park. But you definitely have felt the ill effects of this if you've ever had a really long way over in an airport. You're like, Why can't I just lay down and there is not a place There's always armrests. I have spent so much time trying to figure out how to be comfortable with two armrests in my six ft of body leg, and it's not easy to do, is it? It's that way by design, and I've I've been in many subways in Europe where I want to sit down. I'm tired, and the benches are just designed at an angle, You know, so you can't really get exactly you can lean on it a little bit, but you're not going to sit there and Settle in. That's for sure. Seattle puts bike racks in places that might otherwise be a homeless camp. Yeah, there was a case of that in Seattle and and the part of it, that's you know, it wasn't really a good functional like no one needed a bike rack there. It was really just used to stop tents from being put there. But the thing about sort of hostile design is that You know, Sometimes it has good intent, and sometimes it's overreaching. And it's not so much that it's necessarily bad or good. But it's really case by case and what's nice to know when you explore these things, the design intent Just going in with eyes open and decided. Does that reflect your values? You know, this is your city, too. And and just sort of have a say in it. And, you know, arm rests are perfectly fine in some instances, and sometimes they're really, you know, restrictive and other instances and just know it. You don't want skateboarders keeping up late at night, So they stick spike some places that are great for skateboarding, You know, certainly do. And if you're if you're a pigeon, you get just really frustrated by all those little wires stick on the windowsill. Uh, And when I'm acting like a little juvenile, and I want to slide down a bit Minister at some ancient site in Europe. They've got spikes there that would make it a very painful exercise. Absolutely. Absolutely. I was I was in the city in Switzerland. Where was I was Lucerne and I went into the public toilet and it had blue lights. Have you ever encountered that? Yeah, that's pretty common. The U. K two and those are meant to to stop intravenous drug use inside public restrooms and so that you can't really see your blue veins like through your skin with blue lights. And so it's meant to discourage that. I don't know like 100% how effective that really is, But that was definitely the intent. When it was put in. You know, I've heard that and I've gone to places where for whatever reason, there's more hard drug addicts in many countries. They're not in jail. They're out just struggling and trying to get their lives on back and You need a place to get out of the rain and shoot up and in areas where there's people struggling, you find blue lights in the public access bathrooms, and it must be what that's for. That's what it makes sense to me..

Rick Steves Germany Switzerland Europe 20 floors Steve US Fabien Singapore six ft first floor London 100% three yards Today two armrests Berkeley, California Lucerne Midtown Manhattan both
German Christmas Markets

Travel with Rick Steves

03:28 min | 9 months ago

German Christmas Markets

"Let's start with the festive atmosphere. You'll normally find at the outdoor christmas markets in germany berliners. Iris andre and abby and reiger. Join us now. So having fabio. What is unique about a german christmas market. They're they're so popular with american travelers. These days i think is the spirit of german community code. Usually communicate is associated with the with the bar or but germans feel very smoothly on christmas market. Imagine you can do your christmas shopping without the stress because you will walk over the christmas market in between shops and you get a hot spicy wine standing next to your neighbors who've just doing the same thing you have a little chat and then you just keep on doing what you're doing and it sounds by the way referring to this is not a touristy thing i mean it's to make it a popular but it's also enjoyed by the local people iris. Fob and just talked about communicate. What is community. Could say a unique service word. It's stands for coziness coziness. Yes warms quietness time off with your friends. So there's a conviviality and as fabulous said this hot spiced wine might add a little bit. It's a time where it's hard time to leave and go home because you don't want to leave that atmosphere and you find that at christmas market. When are the christmas. I'm not celebrated at christmas time. But how early do they start in the season. And when do they close down for most parts of. There should be starting on the first weekend of advent for sundays before. Christmas for sunday's before christmas exactly but also some chris markets. Now they're start towards the end of november because they want to have more of a season stretch the shopping season. Yes the united states is a big kind of discussion. Should we be decorating for christmas before. Thanksgiving same dynamic germany fabien. There's christmas markets everywhere in germany. These days in austria switzerland also in other countries The most famous i think in germany is in nurnberg wise. The nurnberg christmas market so beloved. There are several things that come together to make the number christmas market special festival because he in the heart of the really ancient city. Beautiful costlo at the center. You feel like you're in a medieval city. They take great pride in that christmas market. So the lighting. Is i very special. And then there are a few christmas. Sort of sweet specialties. That are typical for number like particularly on the gingerbread gingerbread which is an essential part of christmas to me. It's so essential. That no matter where i am on earth at any moment around christmas time i need have german gingerbread for christmas or it's not christmas for me. Whoa what other sort of this special traditions would you find. When you go to nurnberg their Which are small gingerbread river. Literally it means pepper cookies pancakes. I know those. Those are delightful delightful. Iris in nurnberg. There's this delightful kris kin. Can you described krisztian. The chris is a young girl or young woman who was dressed up almost angel looking like and she stands above the christmas market and she gives a christmas market opening speech to the crowd. And it's a big event for the number christmas market which they wanna see. So she's like the queen of christmas kicks off the festival. She has said drop for two years and then moved on to another young lady and they take big prides to be the cou- skinned

Iris Andre Reiger Germany Berliners Chris Markets Fabio Abby Austria Switzerland United States Kris Kin Krisztian Iris Chris
"fabien" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"fabien" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"The communication template for modern luxury will on a recent episode of B. O. F. Live, Fabian said that everything with regards to communication and fashion is going to change with everything else in the context of the corona virus pandemic. Here's Fabien Baron inside fashion. Hello everybody welcome to be Oh F- live. outguessed is ferry barrel very exciting conversations me because. I feel I'm. A bit older in savvy, but I feel, I have grown up with him because he's A. Shape the visuals that really shaped our world and fashion. It's a wonderful. Chance to talk to him even though the circumstances a slightly. Bizarre. Where are you I am the Hamptons I'm so lucky to be in the Hamptons. It's because you. Have a garden. I've been gardens, so it's nice to be able to walk outside and not being confined three all the time in the apartment. Just the idea to be able to walk outside anytime you want. Is a privilege that you know a feel very privileged to be here to be on. How people think of the Hamptons is being sort of rich man's playground with huge big mansions and things. There was a community there. Isn't they ABS-? Yes, absolutely, I mean after small little house. It's Vevey old house. It's from seventeen eighty three. So it was built I it's mold farm. It's small. and I renovated in its. EXC The floor is like moving around nothing straight. It's it's. It's very nice charming. It's not it's far from being mentioned, and I'm glad I don't ever mention actually. And what are you doing? Now that you wouldn't be doing in your previous existence. What a spending a lotta time cleaning out the house actually. Cook like I'm sure everyone. Is You know like apart from trying to minimize the amount of time you go to the grocery stores? You spend your time cleaning out. You know like washing the floors. You know even repented. The Wall and Powell watched the facade. You know so do became like a.

Fabien Baron B. O. F. Live Fabian Powell
How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

Travel with Rick Steves

03:59 min | 1 year ago

How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

"Berlin has become the high tech and cultural powerhouse of today's dynamic German economy but there are still plenty of Berliners who can tell you about the difficulties. They faced back in the twentieth century as a divided city and stories of life under the Nazis during World War Two. We're joined now by German tour guides older Timur and Fabien Muga. Look at some of the most impressive monuments and memorials. You can visit to remember the lessons from Berlin past gentlemen. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having to live in Berlin as a tourist. You just come and go to live there. You're surrounded by all of this history and all of these memorials when you walk down the streets. Does it become just background and you just see through it or are you constantly aware of this happened there? This happened there and so on holger is part of everyday life. Yes but it's not like you kind of oversee it because it is there it is right in your face. I've seen most of the memorials like many countless times. As a berliner as tour guide here but they still are some of them are really haunting especially when it comes to divided city to the wall or to the time of the National Socialist period and in the case of Germany. With your complicated history. The memorials are almost there to not go away to be in your face. I mean there's even something called stumble stones right Fabio yes. There are a memorial stones to victims of the Holocaust who had deported from particular houses. And if you have a friend or relative was deported from that house you can donate some money to this foundation and they will put stumbling stone into the pavement Princeton pavement. Like you need to trip on this to never forget the horrible thing that happened right there when you think about Germany. A lot of our fixated on World War Two in the whole fastest thing but of course there's many layers of the city that was the leading city of of the PRUSSIAN empire and so on Fabio. And when you think about memorials of the horns period and Prussia what is there in Germany to look at our Berlin. I think the most visible that everybody know will know. Is The victory column. That's in the center of the main park often. The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building and was not looking quite some one mental there today. Six major streets of lead straight towards the listen to that part of a big access isn't it? I mean Hoeger. The whole city is built on this axis which lined by memorials. The East and west access really is this fascinating thing. You look up. And you see Golden Angel Hair and you think. Wow that's wonderful. Then you close in you. See while this is all candidates made cannons French cannons French cannons. Like as a AS A TO Z. Boy To as spoils of war multiple. Yeah so it is weird thing. If you you would think that's nice to call between can look at it that it has a little jab at the French. It's a big Jab at Big Jab at the French or the Germans the French and of course I in the next century. We've got the whole Hitler situation and a lot of memorials relating to the nightmare of Berlin being the capital of Nazism. What are some of the memorials that you'll see when you go to Berlin that way what I found very haunting as the memorial to the burning of the books right near onto the Lyndon right near the State Opera House? And it's basically a memorial that you wouldn't really see because it's underground and you would just maybe pastas Query Newton. We have no idea what it is but quite often you see consumerist groups looking at nothing really and then you look there and it basically is a hole in the ground. It's a glass plate in the ground and he looked down and there is an empty library like five by five five meters containing empty shelves for twenty thousand books. Symbolizing was happening in the tenth of May Nineteen thirty three. When the Nazis took all the books and literature that they hated that it didn't understand they didn't like and were putting them in a big pile and burning him openly for people to see and that's now empty. Shelves are very haunting memorial to that.

Berlin Germany Timur Fabien Muga Fabio Holger Prussia Hoeger Princeton State Opera House Hitler Lyndon
Another European Christmas

Travel with Rick Steves

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Another European Christmas

"A lot of the essential components of our Christmas celebrations originated in Germany. They gave us the Christmas tree. And MM Silent Knight. Let's start the hour to see how our friends Fabian. Reuter Caroliina Marburger. An hoeger Zimmer are enjoying the season in Germany Fabien Caroliina holder. Thanks so much for sharing your Christmas with us. Thanks for having knocking. Yeah so when you think about Germany Americans think about Oh Tanenbaum. That's German German. Isn't it a Christmas tree. Let's think about back when you were children. What are the memories? Carolin- tell me about the Christmas tree and how you decorated my favorite thing. Actually is that we always back in the day to day. It's just our family but back in the day all our friends come to our house and we went out to cut the treats and we still do cut the trees ourselves back. The old tradition is actually because I come from a region where the forest is owned by the Duke and so the tradition actually is surprisingly. It was the proper thing to do. You stole it. That was what was expected. So no no you have to see the dentist proper Christmas tree steal the tree from the Duke. Yes and then we bring it home and it would take a full day and everyone's efforts to to decorate it and of because natural candles. Of course that's natural candle holder. We still lex. You also cut the Christmas to L. together with my little daughter's with that solution to go out it and of course now we buy it. Did you not there anymore but I remember back to my childhood lot of secrecy is involved. Someone got the tree. Put it up. But we can't couldn't see that because it was kind of hitting it was like levintv similar like the living room would turn into the Christmas Room. Two doors is locked. The door is not there so living was actually no go zone zone so basically whatever goes on in terms of you know putting the Nativity scene or you know decorating at creating the tree. Getting all the stuff on there into candles. Dennis done behind closed doors so only then when like maybe after coming from Church then you were allowed a little bell rings acting thinking and Daniel would come in and everything was there like the cans were late and that was like the first time we kids and still. That's what we do still under that you've of creative. The parents create this wonder for the children's and that's all I see that's still in the eyes of my little daughter she comes. Dan knocked out. What happened it? Tree is decorated his presence. The Kendall's the real candles on the tree. We've Kennel sedate at something. Where the fire extinguisher nearby bucket of water? Water Fabio near Childhood Memories. Have the tree the candles. The Real Campbell's very important but for me the the Christmas season really always began with December six with the morning of Saint Nicholas Day. Oh Yeah because that is the day that Santa Claus drops by for the first time to tell you whether you have been good this year. Not Give you little inkling a little hint and so the evening you would put your shoes out and then go to bed and the next morning i the Santa Claus or his assistant have given you hint. If you've been good child. Santa Claus is left possibly chocolate or even little gift in your shoes. If you've been bad there's a lump of coal but do you have time then to make good before Christmas this come between December. Because I'm a very good child. Important about that is not only put up when you have to shine to shows I you gotta work for that. uh-huh yes otherwise. No no failing and then did you normally have some good news or bad news and six personally Always made sure would have good news so I tried to be have before December six. This is one thing that transcends borders the kids are being extorted and frightened being the good kid. So you're not you're nice and what about music or movies or TV specials In America we have certain you know cherished specials In Germany as a child or your kids today well of course it is the Christmas songs that we expect to sing in church the silent knight that everyone else things of course in any language but in its original form. And it's the most common Christmas movie that we watched one of my cherished films. That is a check East German production of nineteen seventy-three offer Cinderella Three Cinderella from Reno and it is one of the most feisty Cinderella's there isn't a thing in the world and wait a minute the most charming three that's for sure and this is produced by communist East Germany and the Socialists wanted to check you. How could this be that? The Communist governments would partner and producer a Christmas. Everyone needs fairytales. Yeah they they produce wonderful ones did have an agenda or was it just a political agenda. It's just it's a very we've very strong Cinderella and like some of the more Vegas silent ones when it comes to traditions also music like for us. It is important that we sing together. Like it's not just like report on a tape and there's like bing crosby going on now it's like the old traditional songs that we used to sing and we like to sing and when we come home from church differ thing we do is on Christmas Eve. We get together and sit in one room just candles in a hand and we sing as a family together the Christmas song and if we really want to do it might kid wants. Do We dance around the Christmas tree. It's kind of weird but it's still lives on. These traditions are still there. This is great to know that it lives on. I've been in Nurnberg on a very cold night with a group going from square to square and into the Church courtyard and Kendall it and singing these songs with Gusto. And it's just beautiful to hear the Christmas carols that I grew up with in German. The Silent Knight was originally in German. I mean Americans probably think it was written in English but no that's a translation steal enough right

Germany Christmas Room Reuter Caroliina Marburger Fabian Fabien Caroliina Zimmer Duke Nurnberg East Germany Carolin Bing Crosby Kendall Reno Vegas DAN Dennis
Uganda, World Health Organization And Congo discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Uganda, World Health Organization And Congo discussed on Morning Edition

"The World Health Organization is calling an urgent meeting tomorrow. It's in response to the spread of Ebola from Democratic Republic of the Congo to Uganda. With virus has claimed its first two victims NPR's Fabien, Quist arcton has more Uganda's health ministry says a five year old boy, and now his grandmother have died from Bala. They traveled to Uganda from eastern Congo with other family members Uganda's, health minister Jane Ruth, Jiang, says they've long been on the alert for cross-border Bala cases hopping in the country is not come in vegetate night, Muslim footing. Hundred people have died of bona in combo ten months into the outbreak of the virus, which has now crossed into

Uganda World Health Organization Congo Bala Ebola Jane Ruth Quist Arcton Jiang NPR Ten Months Five Year
Delays, frustrations mark Congo's presidential election

Hidden Brain

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Delays, frustrations mark Congo's presidential election

"Snyder voters and Democratic Republic of Congo going to the polls today for a long delayed presidential election. The vote has been repeatedly postponed over the past couple of years NPR, so Fabien Quist arcton does Incan Chasa. She'd reports nearly forty million people are eligible to vote to volt in. What could Mark Congo's first democratic transfer of power the build up to these much-anticipated elections has been somewhat fought with violence in some incidents, especially in eastern Congo opposition candidates, saying that their supporters came under attack from the security forces and in three areas of Congo in Benny and group Tembo at the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak, and they have been communal clashes in in the west voting has been delayed until much opposition candidates say this is absolutely out of order disenfranchising more. Than a

Democratic Republic Of Congo Mark Congo Fabien Quist Incan Chasa Snyder NPR Ebola Tembo Benny
"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Now onto our final game lightning fill in the blank ivar players have sixty seconds to answer as many film blink questions as here she can't each correct answer now worth two points bill can you give us a school kuala and tom each have to negi has three okay we have lift a coin and thomas elected to go first the clock will start going to be in your first question fill in the blank on wednesday the house voted down to gop backed blank bill voting rights bill known immigration bill this time on thursday internet pharmacy pill pack was purchased by online retail giant blank for one billion dollars walmart no amazon this week i always andro cossio cortez won a house seat him blank ousting longtime representative joseph crowley new york yes police in ohio had no trouble tracking down a bank robber after he blanked during the heist went to an atm no gave the teller his driver's license this week oklahoma became the thirty th state to approve blank hot served in cotton candy no medical marijuana on tuesday a judge in the uk granted ride sharing athem blanca licensed operate in london bouba right this week a drunk driver in michigan was busted after police caught him blanking at an intersection eating cotton candy hot when they went up to the car stopped in the middle of the intersection they found him trying to make a sandwich for his dog saying that this guy might be drunk because it was right there in the middle intersection ben told officers parked there because he was making a sandwich for his dog demands credit the sandwich was really quite good and he had paired it with a nice chianti bill tom got points for creativity two four right six points and this will surprise you you're in the lead hey tom tom do enjoy that yeah baby you're up next ball fill in the blank on wednesday the white house announced they had set a date for the summit between president trump and blank putin right on monday president recep to one claimed victory following a snap election in blank turkey right this week it was revealed that trump's former campaign manager blank had received a ten million dollar loan from a russian oligarch manafort this week wall street journal reported that trump's chief of staff blank was planning to step down before the end of the year kelly right police in tennessee suspected a man of cocaine possession after he blanked after he talked quickly for a long time after he sprinkled cocaine over a police officer's head the first time in the tournament's history germany was knocked out of the group stage of the blank world cup right this week a british woman realized you may have had a bit too much to drink when she woke up and found blank i know i g she had kidnapped a neighbor's dog our second story featuring drunk people in dogs tony robinson was enjoying a night out what you came across the dog on the street thinking that it was her friends dog she picked it up brought it home it wasn't until she sobered up that she realized her mistake and return to the dog the next day this is the third time robinson is actually kidnapped to dog while drunk but to her credit she made each dog a sandwich you you five right ten more points total of twelve you do slip into the lead all right so the next graph today how many does mcgeen need to win five win here we go again this is for the game fill in the blank this week satellite images revealed that despite promises to the contrary blank has continued updating their nuclear research center tuesday's states sued the trump administration in an attempt to force the government to reunite blanks family migra families a new bipartisan bill introduced this week calls for blank to be granted stated by twenty twenty one point eight on sunday the saudi arabia formerly ended their ban on blank women dr ace week houston astros star alex bregman became the first player in major league baseball history to blank the hit a lot of home runs no he's the first player ever do shave his moustache in the middle of a game and wednesday joe jackson the father and manager of blank passed away at the.

one billion dollars ten million dollar sixty seconds
"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Look you fact check we read that that's how you started scuba diving your father threw you into the water with a tank on your back at the age of four is that right my fourth birthday i it's slightly different i actually went to the bottom of the pool with a family friend who is reading the newspaper while i was buddy breathing with them so buddy breathing is when you're sort of sharing one respirator back and forth right that is correct and he's reading a newspaper at the bottom of pool yeah yeah i guess he was bored there's not much to see at the bottom of the pool we didn't throw any fish in there i understand but did you always want to go into what i guess is the family business in the costa family i actually never pressured to be in the family business i was always encouraged to forge my own path but at the path always ended up turning back towards what we do as a family that's funny i'm just going to say this because i grew up watching your grandfather's tv show the cousteau and i mean to me what i remember as much as the film of the fish in the calypso is your fathers grandfathers excuse me amazing french accent but go yeah why the problem i mean literally i'm talking to you and i can tell that if you do not speak in a really elaborate frenchaccent i will not take you seriously no made stole it one time when i was seven now your specialty is sharks right and we were told that became interested in sharks because of the movie jaws yeah you know as a kid growing up and going scuba diving opportunity to see them in the wild and growing up a kid of the of the seventies jaaz was definitely on the forefront of everyone's mind up until this day so it always puzzled me why where we're making them look so different on on screen than we are out in the wild and wondering why eight boats and scuba divers and bubis and everything else in its path but i i saw fill the weight so that wasn't accurate reality is you have over four hundred and sixty on someone species of sharks out there very few of ever eaten a boat so to be clear you're saying the shark in the movie was acting of course from our perspective jaws is a horror movie essentially about a monster but from sharks perspective it's the greatest movie ever made kind of a downer of an ending that it's great i saw a film of you diving with sharks inside well i don't know how to describe it it's a big artificial shark you hide in short shape subversive all yes i'd always wanted to approach great white sharks in different ways than the ugly bubbling creatures in the cage throwing chum at these wild animals the the best way to go and learn a little bit more about them is to become a shark so that became reality in in two thousand six two thousand seven where i built a shark shape submersible little that i know that doing such a thing was more challenging and i ended up on the bottom more than i did with the sharks really so it would just like you'd go down there and you'd be like hello fellow sharks and you just continue to sink right down.

"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"fabien" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Your voicemail are you ready to play diane all right for your first quote here is the president of the united states paying tribute to a man who announced his retirement this week justice anthony well you know who i'm talking about that man was pretty important even if the president could not quite remember his name can you anthony kennedy yes justice anthony kennedy just when we thought you're all going to have a quiet relaxing summer talking about babies in cages now it's going to be stressful justice kennedy announced his retirement giving president trump another supreme court seat to fill along with justice gorsuch it'll give the republicans very solid five to four advantage which means somewhere mitch mcconnell just googled the phrase how does one smile i had totally so many things have happened since then there's been such a you know sort of relentless you you know yeah we know it was sort of like my cats i started territorial peeing in my house you know the first couple times it happened i was upset and then after that it just you know you just new to not go anywhere without a damp cloth and you also know that this week kennedy said goodbye to the court with the decision upholding president trump's travel ban the liberals in the court of course we're outraged sonia sotomayor your read her descent in the travel ban case from the bench and was so angry that nina totenberg had to spend most of wednesday learning how to curse in spanish say as the muslim on the panel who i'm sure is threatening all of your securities right now why why do you assume that i'm just totally actually just like casually enriching uranium behind the.

diane president united states anthony kennedy mitch mcconnell trump sonia sotomayor nina totenberg