35 Burst results for "FAO"

"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

12:41 min | Last month

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those <hes>. Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that <hes>. That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

eight hundred million dollars india Eight million hectares africa eastern africa january twenty twenty one west africa eighteen million people Kenya december last year seventy years this year last month eighty million dollars a year ago eastern ethiopia southwest asia second year last summer
World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge  UNs FAO

UN News

07:50 min | Last month

World in much better place to fight desert locust scourge UNs FAO

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting.

Kenya Africa Keith Pressman Ethiopia West Africa Southwest Asia Mali India Yemen Somalia Pakistan Iran FAA NFL Lucas Mediterranean
"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

07:40 min | Last month

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"It's been described as a biological time bomb the worst upsurge in decades this time last year. Swans of desert locusts started to spread across countries in the horn of africa devastating crops and people's livelihoods. Fa yours emergency campaign appealed for urgent action to avoid a looming locust plague and humanitarian crisis. Now one year on. I'll we winning the fight. I put that question to senior locust. Forecasting officer keith pressman case when we spoke a year ago or it was just as the desert locust swarms with starting to invade the horn of africa. Could you briefly sum up the events of the last you well. A lot has happened in the past year. The last time we spoke a year ago swarms or just invading kenya in the horn of africa. They're spreading through other countries in the region. And since that time now there has been several generations a breeding. So what that means is that the locust numbers had just increased further and this is mainly due to exceptionally good weather. Conditions for the locus. The the problem did not remain only in the horn of africa but last summer there is a very important threat to west africa. Fortunately that did not occur but there was an additional extension of the current upsurge in southwest asia so in countries like iran pakistan and india. Fortunately the end of the summer. I very intensive efforts of those countries. The app surge was brought under control there but it still remains in the greater horn of africa. So that means them. Kenya's mali ethiopia dan and yemen. And that's that's what we're facing now again this year. And it's very interesting because you know when we last spoke a year ago. I mentioned swarms invading kenya. Well that's what they're doing again now and they started invading kenya from the north from eastern ethiopia from central somalia. I'm just before christmas and this was predicted so similarly to what happened last year again is not a surprise. We were expecting this and are we in a better position now. Are we better place to fight the desert lucasville. Much much better. You know last year at this time. We're in a very very precarious situation. We had you know. Huge numbers of locust swarms had developed and were moving in invading countries. That had not seen logos for seventy years. You know such as kenya other countries. That was a worse situation and more than a quarter of a century. They just simply were not prepared to respond to such a large scale invasion. They weren't trained. They had no resources. I'm no vehicles no spray equipment. No pesticides no aircraft. You know no logisticians. You know all of the elements components that you need in order to invoke control campaign so we were really. Let's say trying to catch up very quickly. We had no funding you know. Let's say desperate collectively desperate. I should say and the country's nfl. We're obviously we're scrambling doing the best. We could have that time but it was not enough we had to really really upscale and that's what's been achieved so now here we are in january twenty twenty one. It means we have everything in place. Yes we do have shortages of funding to keep those operations going in. This is extremely critical. But at least we're not at the stage of having to look for aircraft or having having to order equipment from abroad and wait for it to be delivered. All of the countries have those Elements in place. The faa ledge. Emergency response has seen incredible. International support including the mobilization of funds to tackle the small towns and prevent a humanitarian crisis always succeeding in the fight against desert. Lucas that show. We are succeeding. Yes if we had not been what we've been doing for the past year we would have seen a play by now. You know swarms from west africa to india from the equator to the mediterranean. We don't see that so. I think that that's confirmation that we are succeeding. We have probably less locust swarms than we did a year ago. A doesn't mean that you know we can sit back and relax but you know. There's a lot of work to do but i think the response as you mentioned from the international community has been exceptionally good globally. A more than two point. Eight million hectares retreated and twenty twenty. And that's an extraordinary achievement. These efforts of course they've saved enormous amounts of crop production an estimated two point seven million tons of crops or save last year. That's enough you know to feed eighteen million people for an entire year. The cost of that That was saved is something around eight hundred million dollars and you put that into balance with you. Know what did it costs to save that production we received last year. One hundred and ninety four million dollars so with that investment were able to save you know eight hundred million dollars or the food in additional able to to protect and safeguard one point two million households their livelihood. It's so you know our desert. Locusts extremely devastating. Obviously the response in the pasture has been exceptionally good. And of course you have to remember. We're competing against other emergencies. Such as covid nineteen indeed twenty twenty was a particularly challenging year. What can we expect for the will. The current upsurge continuing the problem. Is that the weather. Continues to favor the locus and you know. In the past locus upsurges lukas plagues they collapse because of two factors on because of the human intervention. You know the control operations everything that. We're trying to do to reduce locus numbers and a failure in the weather at and so far we're saying the former i'm we see those upskilled control operations working very well. I mean more than twenty one aircraft or an operation in eastern africa. But we haven't seen the break in the weather. We had again an extraordinary event last month in the horn of africa. Right exactly where the locust were we had a cyclone in december. Cyclones don't occur in the horn of africa december. But this is the second year in a row where we've had that so until we see you know kind of a break in the weather. And what does that mean. It means a failure of seasonal rains essentially or very unusually cold temperatures or strange wins that might carry all the locus into the ocean and where they would paris but until we see that we still have the challenge to to manage. This locus upsurge and try to to reduce impacts on food security and people's livelihood so for this year twenty twenty one and basically from now until summertime. We need eighty million dollars and the majority of this would be spent on maintaining those essential control operations by air and by ground as well as protecting the livelihoods. That was cave craftsman. Faa's seniors locust forrcasting..

eight hundred million dollars india Eight million hectares africa eastern africa january twenty twenty one west africa eighteen million people Kenya december last year seventy years this year last month eighty million dollars a year ago eastern ethiopia southwest asia second year last summer
"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

06:11 min | 2 months ago

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"Process.

"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"There were floods earthquakes that lead people fleeing their homes and becoming dependent on food assistance. But also i believe that food aid or food assistance. These days has moved on a great deal and a lot of the time. it's no longer about handing out. T- lentils sugar any of these things really increasingly these. You might get a text message on your phone and a bank account is topped up or you may be able to go to shop in deepest somalia and spend the cash credited to your mobile phone in one part of jordan some of the big refugee camps there for syrian refugees. There are place where you go into the camp shop and you compared with an irish scud. The economy of food assistance has changed a lot. One thing hasn't that's wall. I think if anything what we've seen is is prop sits post cold war that they're continuing conflicts but they are conflicts that are lasting longer and longer because many of them are civil wars Many of them are not being sorted out by great. How right now if you look at the world free program will king. Sixty percent of our work is actually in countries that hit by conflict and you know when the world food program was Made a laureates of nobel peace prize. The citation made it clear that there can be no end to hunger without peace. And i think that it's very hard. Those of us who work on food assistance to accept after seeing the numbers of hungry people in the world declining year on year after year. We seem to be making progress. And now that's gone into reverse and that partly to do with the impact of climate change but it's a lot of it has to do with conflict which is.

somalia jordan
Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

UN News

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

"Fresh swarms of desert locusts are formed in the horn of africa threatening crops in the food security of millions the un food and agriculture organization fao warned on wednesday according to the agency locust infestations increased over the past month in ethiopia and somalia as a result of extensive breeding favorable weather and rainfall with populations predicted to increase further in coming months. New loker swarms are already forming and threatening to reinvade northern kenya and breeding is also underway on both sides of the red sea posing a threat to our trailer. Saudi arabia sudan and yemen. Fao said in a news. Release the greater horn of africa witnessed one of its worst. Ever desert locust infestations earlier this year. A new crisis could have devastating consequences for communities affected by recurrent drought conflict. High food prices and the coronavirus pandemic the upsurge occurred in spite of an unprecedented campaign supported by fao and partners in which more than one point three million hectares of locust infestations were treated across ten countries. This year control operations prevented the loss of an estimated. Two point seven million tons of cereal enough to feed eighteen million people year in countries. Already hard hit by acute food insecurity and poverty.

FAO Africa Somalia Ethiopia Red Sea Kenya Yemen Sudan Saudi Arabia
Antimicrobial resistance - the next pandemic?

UN News

05:21 min | 3 months ago

Antimicrobial resistance - the next pandemic?

"Around the world people plants and animals are dying from infections that cannot be treated even with the best medicines available. That is because of the rise in antimicrobial resistance the increasing failure of antibiotics and other life-saving drugs to treat diseases. It is a global problem that threatens to be the cause of the next pandemic is the food and agricultural organization or fao chief veterinary officer keith. Suction explains to fao's. Two lamas is antimicrobial resistance. The next pandemic. We've been facing this problem antimicrobial resistance for some time. It is spreading. It is affecting every country on the planet so in that sense it is already in a pandemic and perhaps People are very aware now of the impacts of the covid pandemic but they may not be so aware that the antimicrobial resistance that we face is equally if not more important in terms of its long term impacts on the planet on human health. It's already a estimated. Seven hundred thousand people a year die from drug resistant infections. In other words infections that normally could be treated. But because of antimicrobial resistance those have become untreatable. Were not able to be treated with what was available and it's a situation that is expected in many ways to really worsen over the next decades and if left unaddressed we expect it could cause around ten million deaths a year by two thousand two hundred fifty. What exactly drives antimicrobial resistance. Essentially we are. The reason that antimicrobial resistance is growing. It's the way that we use these precious chemicals. These precious molecules to treat infections We've become accustomed to using antibiotics to deal with our health problems. We use the main people to Treat infections We also use them animals and they used also in other agricultural sectors to some extent we live in one planet We have really what we consider as is common resources of water which are used between people and animals and in our environment the exchange of drug resistant microbes is taking place. And that's because those microbes Have developed resistance. Because of the behaviors we have with The way we use antimicrobials so in the end it's a problem that affects all of us but it comes in the end from our own behaviors. And how do we tackle this problem. Are there any lessons. That can lunch from our response to the covid. Nineteen pandemic of changing our culture of quite significant. Do we really get past this behavior. That when disease strikes we think of using antimicrobials At the same time preventing those infections in the first place would be even better. If we didn't have those infections to start with. We wouldn't need anti microbial so it is important to really reduce the risk of disease for animals for people and that will actually reduce the antimicrobial use convincing enough people around the world that we need to change our behaviors. That's not a small thing so we've seen in the pandemic cow Practices can help to reduce the risk of becoming ill the way that we wash our hands the way that we use mosques the way that we would keep distance. We've learned a number of things now. We also have to apply those lessons. The behavior change. It is possible it sometimes can be done really quite quickly so i think we've some things that we can apply to this more silent pandemic of antimicrobial resistance so all of us have an an opportunity to make a difference. All of us can participate in in controlling antimicrobial resistance. What's can countries due to tackle this global problem and how is fao supporting them. Changing the way that we utilize antimicrobials had to large scale and at an individual scale is important to To control fao has been working now for more than five years to to help countries to put into place then national action plans. Full control of antimicrobial resistance Currently working in over forty countries in africa asia and latin america at country level. We need to see a combined effort of sectors medical battery agricultural and from the side of policy legislation and the environment that signs difficult but through one health platforms for antimicrobial resistance device a tool that's used by countries to bring those sectors together because really this is a problem for all of us We all have a role to play We need others to play their roles as well. We have to work together and together. We're already seeing that That will make a difference at national level and bring us back on. Track to control antimicrobial resistance.

FAO Keith Latin America Asia Africa
UN agriculture agency calls for global response to the food security crisis

UN News

06:18 min | 4 months ago

UN agriculture agency calls for global response to the food security crisis

"What she impact is the covid nineteen pandemic expected to have on global food security and people's access to safe and nutritious food. The number of food insecure people in the world prior to the COVID, nineteen pandemic was already surprisingly high and unfortunately trends in trying to eliminate hunger around the world and in the most vulnerable countries not good trends are efforts to really try to solve hunger and to solve food. Insecurity. While they've been great concerted efforts from so many different partners to the CEO. We've got more work to do and so when you add the covid nineteen pandemic to that and add the economic implications, soaring unemployment rates, income losses, rising food costs, all of these began to jeopardize food access in both developed and developing countries. This is improving, but we also know that the pandemic is going to have serious long-term effects on food security and where are the biggest areas of concern. I think we I have to say we're we're concerned about about every every country that is experiencing the continued effects of of the pandemic where we see challenges in in controls and other measures but. The areas of the world that already had very severe existing crises. So take countries such as Yemen that already has very severe conflict that occurs inside those borders places with natural disasters whether climate related shocks, places where we see other pests and other types of playing. So I think about the Greater Horn of Africa especially that right now is is under siege not only from Cova did but also the desert locus crisis and plague other kinds of climate related shocks flooding that has been occurring there. So we sometimes save for places like that we have a crisis within a crisis and these are places to sadly where inequality and food security already exist as well. So these types of of regions really need. Much more targeted and much more intentional types of support. How does FAO's Cova Nineteen Response and Recovery Program planned to build back better post pandemic and in pursuit of sustainable development goals we recognized here. FAO, that while clearly in the days and weeks after we really saw covid many ways explode around the world that there was an important need for A. Humanitarian response, but it only took a few months after that to realize that there were again going to be these more medium to longer term impacts around the world and on global food systems as a result of this pandemic, and so we very quickly moved to create the response and recovery plan really through very inclusive consultation with all of our colleagues in. Country Offices and regional offices around the world because we knew here at our headquarters in Rome, we needed that moment of the situation on the ground in each of these places and to be able to identify really concrete needs and demands, and we also knew that having this more comprehensive approach to responding to Covid. We would also need to ensure that there's continued engagement with governments with development partners with the private sector and so many others that could contribute to this building back better. The plan overall has seven key priorities. The first is clearly our commitment to a global humanitarian response plan. So that's more of the emergency short-term work that needs to be done in the food crisis. The next areas are. Data for decision making. We also need to focus on economic inclusion and social protection. We need to focus on trade and food safety standards. We also know that we need to boost smallholder resilience for recovery. We need to make sure that we can prevent the next zoonotic pandemic and we need to also continue to focus on overall food systems formation and. So those are the seven key global priorities that have been set out in the plan but we also know that they will resonate differently from one region to another. So we've also been coordinating with our regional offices to make sure that they essense, regionalize, and make more of these plans fit for purpose and fit the needs of the countries in their region. In addition to government will what else is needed to successfully roll out the carpet nineteen response recovery? program. That's a great question and I think you're right in saying that government will is is really very much at the top of that list. But in addition to that, we need to make sure that other partners other experts are also fully aligned in in this supportive effort we know that there's the importance of making sure that we as a UN. The other UN agencies that are also very much focused on. The Socio Economic Impacts these longer term at impacts as we say. Tied to cove it whether it's tied to health, it's tied to education or infrastructure. Making sure that food and nutrition is a part of this larger multilateral response that are UN family is pursuing is key but I think also needing to think about some of the more maybe nontraditional partnerships. Again, I come back to our relationships with academics with private sector with. Civil Society this is going to take all of us beyond just donors and national governments and an organization like Fao to ensure that this does not become a food crisis. We think we're on track for that but we know again that the longer term efforts are very important to this overall success

FAO Covid Cova UN CEO Africa Yemen Country Offices Rome Civil Society
Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

AdExchanger Talks

05:28 min | 4 months ago

Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

"Our Hawaiian is chief strategy officer and CO founder triple lift. An eight year old programmatic advertising technology company triple lift has developed at products that have a closer match to the look feel and voice. But. Wide Range of media types and environments sounds like native. That's what they do They also support video in ot advertising and have other initiatives as well. Excited to have Arianna talk about some of that I reached out to our because I think he has a unique. Perspective on. Programmatic advertising at the current state of digital advertising overall that sometimes runs against the the larger narrative which is, which can be a negative narrative at times. So I'm looking forward to chatting him with him about that as well. Ari Welcome. Thank you so much act I'm delighted and honored to be here. Great to have you here Let's have a minute on you I. You got into start up stuff like right out of college. Is that right? Yeah. Even actually in college I. Ran My first startup analysis seventeen years old where I was really fortunate to be at a school that took entrepreneurship really seriously in fact, I I majored in entrepreneurship which is hard to believe as even a thing. And there were local businesses on my campus. I was able to as able to buy one into one of them. That did local shipping and storage, and so I got sort of taste in above that is still with me to this day building businesses from the ground up and just trying to make customer super happy. And we're your parents entrepreneurs have how did you get this bug? Yeah. So my parents are also entrepreneurs preneurs They started something on the order a dozen different companies. Many of them, not successful. And so I got to sort of see that growing up what I think is really important. It's like being around that failure from a young age and not having any stigma towards it was really impactful for me because. It shows that it's okay. As long as You keep trying my parents certainly keep trying in in some of them. Worked out okay and so I was fortunate to be in the sort of like environment where starting businesses was normal and expected in my parents very much supported me even at very young age when I tell them, this is what I want to do with my life I want to be an entrepreneur. And did they. Actively, encourage you was a kind of A. Son You're going to be startup founder. Yeah. It wasn't like you know. Jewish boy, and so the first inclination was to be neurosurgeon button when I got a D. on my first bio exam I think entrepreneurship became the clear path and it's funny because I was just going through things of my childhood from home and apparently when I was four years old, we went to FAO Schwarz he'll toy store and they printed. Out A car said Arlo an entrepreneur and so I think clearly there was there was maybe some program going on from a young age that that this was a path that they would like to see me go down and I've been very fortunate to be able to do it. I think it's like one of the most wonderful things that's happened because Entrepreneurship for many isn't considered a path at all like when you go to college or when you're young that isn't a thing that you think about you often think about professions that have a very clear path. And Entrepreneurship is not a clear path. So I would I try and do now in my clinical free time is I'm help other spying entrepreneurs. With their path towards entrepreneurship because I think, it's one of the most wonderful fans. That's Kinda funny. Hey honey sign's kind of a poor student. Push them towards the Internet. Yeah. That's where he belongs. No, that's great and Tacos through these couple of jobs you had before founding triple, you were head of business, development, oyster dot, com what was that all about? So Dot Com was a hotel review site that was subsequently acquired by trip advisor and a really beautiful idea which is people spend a lot of money on vacations and the worst thing that can happen is you get there and the hotel is not what you expected or paid for. And so the idea was to send a undercover reporters to full real expose on what the hotel is actually like with real unadulterated unedited photos and Iran monetization there. So this was a really crazy experience where they were publisher and I was twenty years old. They brought me on to make money from ads and I didn't know anything about online advertising. I just graduated college. And it was still the middle of the recession. and. So what I what I did is basically called up at that time it was ad networks. And I asked to speak with the product folks and I would just pepper them with hours of questions about how their technology worked, how the relationships of publishers and advertisers work. Essentially, I was able to learn from them how the industry worked at that time. There wasn't the wealth of knowledge of the sort of add exchanger dot com, a publications that we have today, and so one of the only way to learn about it was from other people and I was able to learn basically from the partnerships in vendors use are the publisher side and so. I started on the publisher cited from there I went to APP nexus. which became clear because when I was at one of the things I was doing all the time was you know in my lunch breaks I would log into DSP and start changing the line nine of prioritization across the different campaigns and ad networks I was working with. So I, was looking at who is paying me the that day and I would tweak the waterfall

Publisher Advertising Technology Dot Com Arianna Chief Strategy Officer Co Founder Fao Schwarz Founder Arlo Iran Advisor
COVID widening gender gap in Pakistan

UN News

05:06 min | 5 months ago

COVID widening gender gap in Pakistan

"In Pakistan, women are major contributors to agricultural production and food security for their families. But like many other nations, the COVID pandemic is exacerbated an already alarming gender gap there. That's especially true for rural women where the amount of work and responsibility that they've had to show the has gone up leading to a decrease in living standards as they're forced to stay at home and care for others. Meaning Darla he food and agriculture. Organization representative to Pakistan explains to Charlotte Lomas how the UN agencies supporting women in the countryside despite the corrosive impact of the pandemic rural women that work in agriculture seventy, five percent of the labor force, and it's women and girls. So it is a vast majority you have to know that in Pakistan although the contribution of agriculture to GDP is, for example, in nineteen percent but the contribution of workforce is fifty percent in this fifty percent seventy, five percent women. So this tells you already the importance of women in Agricultural Pakistan. However. This is a country where the gender gap is still very, very high and one of the big issues is that not just they're employed in agriculture but most of them are unpaid. And the gender relations in in Pakistan and in rural. Pakistan in particular also very much influenced by culture and by customs, which in some of the areas are very conservative. So these are seen as barriers which are very difficult to move and and change the covid nineteen outbreak forced many people out of work. What impacts says, the the nineteen pandemic had on rural women in Pakistan. It has affected women in many ways I because of the lockdown second because for example, many of the daily wager which are men usually in the cities when they have been locked down, the have returned back to their villages. So what has happened is that the amount of work that the women had to put In to continue, sustain the livelihoods their family has increased enormously in addition it has brought back like taking care of sick members of the family. Oh, elders in the household and extra responsibilities. Also, we taking care of children which during the time in particular when schools got closed, we've seen for sure an increase in domestic violence because this came with the stay at home confinements. But at the same time, we saw that they had even lost whatever access the previously managed through the years to gain little by little in terms of access to health care and reproductive care This with the covid nineteen has had a tremendous impact on the women. So it's not just the daily wage. Or the fact that are number of hours in the field as increase the together with the work of taking care of the family. But really when you put it all together covy has basically exacerbated situations which are already difficult. We've seen many countries around the globe turn their attention towards the cloven teen economic recovery. How is FAO supporting rule women in Pakistan despite the limitations the shift of investments the was the response to covid nineteen infection has basically. made the situation even more difficult. In that sense we always have the gender component of the project, which is usually very strong. So it's not as an add-on, but really thinking on how you reach the women and with Covid Nineteen, I have to say that we manage many communities and villages we invested been more into digitalization, and in some cases, this works pretty well because women don't need to move they can convene in an area. Where they can seat distance wearing masks. So not to further spread the virus all get infected will reduce the risk of infection to what extent is the recognition of the importance of achieving gender equality. In Pakistan. There is increasing awareness that these underinvestment on women or let's the limitation put on women or the gender gap that women face in this country actually have impacts not just on the economic growth potential of the country, but also on many other aspects such as achieving food security and healthy diets and nutrition. So there is a slow movement where this is starting to become an important realization.

Pakistan Agricultural Pakistan FAO Charlotte Lomas Representative
Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

UN News

05:42 min | 5 months ago

Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

"While Sudan has been hit by devastating floods the worst seen in decades impacting more than six hundred, thousand people across seventeen of the country's eighteen states with homes destroyed and farmland damage. Just ahead of the harvest season, he's been another shock amid multiple crises according to the Food and Agriculture Organization FAO urgent funding is needed to support a country already facing alarmingly high rates of hunger and food insecurity. Dominique Bergin FAO's director of emergency resilience has just returned from a mission to sedan. He told Charlotte Lomas how dire the situation really is for people there. They're just returned from Sudan couple of days ago where I wasn't a mission already to the floods which have been affecting the countries over the last couple of these floods are truly devastating down the largest thinking the country in over seventy years who have conducted happy assessments with the me of coacher and found that up to six hundred thousand households have been affected by the impact. Of the floods more than two point, two million actors have been damaged. So it's quite serious but the problem here is that this comes at the top of an already difficult situation for millions of paper as a matter of fact, before these, let's nine point six million people were already in acute food insecurity ready a very difficult situation related to a variety of of issues social economic crying he's covid crises and even know in some part of the country the issues already locust. So quite serious situation that therefore Esguerra, our full attention. You travel to two of the affected sites what were your impressions? So we went to two of the most affected states we undertook mission with government officials as a matter of. Factly culture was with us and we spend today's in blue, Nile State, and in Sennar state, and they're what we could see is the variety of the damaged. We saw the impact on commercial farmers, and with few damage, they will be very little employment opportunities for the people. So one of the things we saw. We saw. Livestock owners, Pasta list being severely affected. By doing of the floods having lost for some of them up to seventy five percent of their livestock, which in turn is a problem for them because this is their main source of livelihood we saw that forty two percent of those affected by by the floods are women and it all sorts. So we went to the field we we spend time with them, and what we saw is that I mean situation is very, very severe. This time of the year they should have sorghum that is one meter and a half I ready to our best. Instead, we could see field full of. wheats with sorghum and that will not be honest. So in talking to these women, we understand they're already struggling. They're adopting what we call negative coping strategies, which means that they are cutting the number of the means to quantity of them is and what we found is that at this point of the ready, they're only having one meal per day and very basic meal. So very T- tuition and therefore these people need our assistance. How will this floods affect food security across the country? The food security situation prior to the floods was already severe nine point six, million people in acute insecurity. Two point two million people in emergency face. When we visited the blue states, what was clear is that we were in a state where twenty seven percent of the population prior to the plots was already in acute with with insecurity. So it is clear that with the impact of the ways, the fact that people not be able to harvest with the fact that they have been losing animals with the fact that prices are extremely volatile and ever tendency to increase significantly. The estimate is that the food security situation will further. And therefore, we need to be ready to provide at scale. Livelihood Saving Assistance. In collaboration, of course, we other agencies what is doing to assist Sadan since the beginning of the year I feel despite the covid situation has been able to provide assistance who about nine, hundred, twenty, thousand people, which is quite significant in this context. Now, what we are doing is that we are appealing for additional resources innovation essentially to the floods, but the flood. Being one more driver of accurate with insecurity. So, what we are doing is essentially appealing for seventy million dollars additional. To basically cover the needs of the people for the coming season in terms of cash assistance for people to meet the most immediate needs press agricultural inputs for the coming season so that immediately they can go back to their productivity. Always bearing in nine FAO wide providing humanitarian livelihood saving activities is very keen to build the zillions of populations which as we know are essential when people face regular shocks.

Livelihood Saving Assistance Dominique Bergin Fao FAO Sudan Food And Agriculture Organizat Sennar Director Charlotte Lomas Sadan
Report: Unpublished White House document puts 18 states in the coronavirus ‘hot zone’

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:03 min | 8 months ago

Report: Unpublished White House document puts 18 states in the coronavirus ‘hot zone’

"Learning new details about an unpublished report from the White House Coronavirus Task Force. It runs counter to the happy talk. Constantly hear from this administration instead. This previously unreported document warns that eighteen. Eighteen states are now in the red zone and that they need to enact much stricter public health measures, including mandating masks, limiting gatherings to less than ten people and ramping up testing in areas where coronavirus cases have spiked doctor. She's The director of the Harvard Global Health Institute told the Center for Public Integrity. Quote the fact that it's not public makes no sense to me. Why are we hiding this information? From the American people? This should be published and updated every day. Joining us now is Dr. as she saw director of the Harvard Global Health Institute. Welcome back to the show. For being with us. Thank, you for having me on. When you look at these three vital of information needed at any point in the pandemic, but certainly while much of the country sees their caseload spike. What is your theory on taking the CDC out of that hospital patient reporting data on not releasing the White House Coronavirus Task Force recommendations for those states that are surging and on shielding or keeping the CDC officials who could offer scientific advice to everyone as Chris as said at the end of issues so eloquently everyone is struggling to figure out the back to school pace. Is Really Hustling. What the strategy coming out of our federal government is! We are in the middle of the pandemic. Things are getting worse clearly in the United States, and we need to be guided by science and evidence, and we need to be hearing from our government scientists, and these reports that that coronavirus task force report, which I think is a really high quality report. It was produced by American tax dollars. The American people have a right to see the American. People have a right to hear mar scientists the American people have a right to the knowledge that they have aid for. We're not getting that right. When you hear Dr Fao, and you see the forums in which he is having to turn to communicate directly with the American people, or we also hindered by the fact that this White House is putting such a heavy emphasis on disinformation that the good information has to struggle and seep through the cracks to get to us. Well there's no doubt about it that there is a lot of misinformation out there. Some of it propagated by the white. House. But a lot of it coming through various channels on facebook, etc, and misinformation in my mind is the sort of we are facing two big challenges, virus and the misinformation around the virus and some days I think I can't decide which one is worse than the other. It's a huge problem and fighting misinformation while we're fighting pandemic makes it much much harder to protect the American people and keep people safe. You know it's such an interesting point to just just muse on I mean where would we be? If everyone had trusted all of the scientists from the beginning I mean. Where would we be if we'd really heated all the stay at home orders if everyone were wearing a mask, today and social distancing. Do you think our numbers would look different? Oh my goodness I think if we had done with the scientific community has been arguing for if we had ramped up testing and tracing from early on if we had started wearing mass when the evidence became clear that mass wearing was work. And where would we be with? have far fewer cases. We have much more of our economy open. We'd have far fewer Americans dead and we would be looking forward to opening up schools this fall with social distancing and with controls, but it would be very different economy in a very different country. We this is all self inflicted wounds as far as I'm concerned.

White House Coronavirus Task F Director White House Harvard Global Health Institut United States CDC Center For Public Integrity Facebook Dr Fao Chris
PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

podnews

03:04 min | 9 months ago

PodLP: a new podcast app for the next billion listeners

"Well, it's next stop to S. an ANDROID Kawhi s is the third most popular mobile operating system in the world, aiming to help the three and a half billion people along US connected in India. Seventy million kaiwas s phones have been cells. They cost seven dollars each. Pain, is the first podcast. APP for the platform Thomas Barosso pod that Nigeria Uganda and Tanzania are among the top countries using the APP so far. Free podcast hosts sounder has launched these sounder discovery suites, which they call the first-ever Keyword based analytics tool along with audio seo and sound bite sharing all free for creators. Be, W scripts is apparently looking at setting stitcher poppies told by someone familiar with the matter that the company has been looking for buyers for some time, audio craft and Australian Broadcasting Conference has announced its first set of speakers. We linked to those today. The event normally held in Sydney in New South. Wales will be virtual this year. IHEARTMEDIA and vice news it's produce a new show called Vice News reports a weekly investigative series, covering critical new subjects from around the world at launch, next quarter Conde nast as also announced a podcast network. The Independent Filmmaker Project has extended its twenty two thousand submissions process to on July the first. They're looking for innovative audio. Audio creators in any stage of development is a link in our show notes and newsletter today. Fox is planning a podcast. Advertising Industry summitted free to virtually attend, and on June the thirtieth for one eastern time whereas I in your podcast stats, probably nowhere, I'm guessing there's good news I've vokes -application currently used an anonymous user identifier and don't have their own user agents, but they plan to implement one soon. Hariri megaphone is now hosting podcasts from noisier, a Bristol based production company. My lover that I show real narcos has topped the charts in many different countries zoom offers end to end encryption to all of its users after work by the F.. F.! Paula Rogo is to write a regular column on medium about the African podcasting scene. In focused news marketplace minutes is a new show from Westwood One and marketplace. It's a sixty seconds reports updated three times a day for smart speakers and podcast also air on commercial radio in the US from Gimblett, the latest episode of science versus has a return guests Dr Anthony. FAO CI the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, giving an update on the spread of the pandemic in the US. Bloomberg has a new serialized podcast called foundering out. It'll bring. It's listeners inside one big story from Silicon Valley each season the first season we work and launching today all hands talks with CEO's and other sea level leaders about how being people I. Company is a strategic advantage.

United States Vice News National Institute Of Allergy Pain Bloomberg Paula Rogo Australian Broadcasting Confer Wales Conde Nast Thomas Barosso Westwood One Silicon Valley Hariri India Nigeria Bristol FOX
"fao" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

07:16 min | 9 months ago

"fao" Discussed on KNSS

"Our phone number throughout the show eight five five four hundred seventy two eighty two eight five five four hundred seventy two eighty two we're gonna get into the FAO chief Fulop or what I think is really kind of the end of the weaponization of cold but they're trying to re build fear and rebuild change in action and shut down the economy and a fear of a second wave but as a weapon it just doesn't exist America's moved on but we're going to some of the technicalities of that and why America can and should move on but move on responsibly and safely once we get into the primary election that's a big night for New York and it's a big night by I say primarily New York because I believe the Democrat party's within a civil war their problem prior to coal fed and prior to all the racial unrest was there a party divided at war with themselves now most people that really study and understand what's going on just following the news cycles in being wagged get you have it start with Hillary Clinton going left of Bernie Sanders in twenty sixteen edge to party to socialism and Bernie was more than willing and the party was more than willing to continue to go that direction and they had to go further in that direction in the mid term election to get control of the house now you have the squad at A. O. C. so what you have is socialist the social justice program they've they're out recruiting and they're targeting establishment Democrats I mean AOC herself took the place of a ten term Democrat and their goal is to take over the party first then eliminate the electoral college and ultimately dismantle the Republic so we're gonna see in an LA times story they don't get it they think it's progressives against centrist no it's radical socialists against progressives who ultimately want to get to the same place but the social serrated be there now they don't want to play it a little bit more gently and a little bit more patiently the course are all being trumped by the radical anarchists now who are challenging both of them in the streets so just as Barack Obama seemed very irrelevant as as a wimp that didn't go far enough and that was hurting Joe Biden until they got to South Carolina well that's kinda how Bernie I mean I I actually make the case Bernie is one the most irrelevant people in America today why we're already far left where he was going to take us we have even got election day well more about that next hour but first I want to cover this this particular story it really falls under whether it's black lives matter or antifa or any of these movements from chop formally known as jazz to this story it really is a case of just being more revealing than productive being more revealing to everyone then getting us closer to achieving what they're trying to in other words they just say too much and reveal their agenda so if you're not following the bouncing ball you just wake up one day ago how do we go from officer show band all cops to defining all police departments two all white people in general whether they're alive or dead from past centuries how do we get there well this I get there there is one that not a lot of people are familiar with and what it really blatantly shows you is how the out of control leftists youth are now feeling very empowered and they're demanding bullies to Rice University in Houston we go a student group at Rice University is demanding the administration fund a non residential black house on campus as well as removed a prominent statue of the university's founder and a top student official making these extraordinary demands claiming apparent censorship because a top student Fishel deleted some of the comments of these positions and so we're going down the list here's here's basically their demands and again just kind of like jazz then chop are you realize this is a hostage situation with with demands to prove it so the call is for a black house it was made in a public Facebook post on rice's official graduate student association page now grant you none of them have said Weitzel have to die like Georgia but let's follow the bouncing ball on this it was written by a rice graduate research assistant Danny Purdue here's what black undergraduate students have demanded from rice university's administration I hope their listing hash tag no more lip service hatch to Aztec black lives matter the post also sought the removal of an iconic statue of university founder William marsh rice the hiring of more black professors black faculty well being counselors and black therapists the inclusion of hate speech and rice's code of conduct and an increase in the number of black students accepted the rights they never really get specific about qualifications presumably no matter what more blacks admitted an Instagram account representing the rice black student association has published a longer list of demands believe it or not including that if a black new student request to have a black roommate now they're segregating themselves during orientation week that request must be honored black houses according the BSA's Instagram page should have all the features of residential college but specifically made for black students and black organizations to congregate hold events it would be best to have a central save space the black students can meet and hang out in at any time of day it's not clear how this description would square with the Facebook post calling for a non residential blackouts similar to a cultural center if you will at other universities students also seek better lighting for their photo ID's noting that many black students have had significant issues with the photographs that are displayed on their student ID's we deserve to be photographed and represented properly without having to make modifications and adjustments moreover the students a cert course description should include tags so that it indicates race ethnic and cultural groups are included since many course titles did not make it clear if they included diverse perspectives in course material I think you see where this is going so I think you know when I said in the opening monologue it's important to go beyond symptoms and get to disease there is a group of people and somehow we have raised this generation to be this way and they don't like what we are what we've baton and they want to take over what we are immediately and change it forever another way of saying it in a way I hope you don't hear anything other than my heart in the truth what I saw on that video with officer show van and George Floyd it's tragic was murder it was unacceptable.

FAO
Who Is Winning the COVID-19 Vaccine Race?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:00 min | 9 months ago

Who Is Winning the COVID-19 Vaccine Race?

"New face on the race to develop a corona virus vaccine as cases surge in several states. Terrell joins us with the very latest. Hey, MEG! Hey, Melissa Will Sanofi providing an update on its plans today seeing now that it's program in porter ship with GlaxoSmithKline could be human clinical trials in September and potentially in a larger phase, three efficacy study by the end of the year or early twenty twenty one now that's still a few months behind where other companies are but Sanofi, CEO pointing out that their technology is one of the only ones that's proven in. In an approved vaccine, already have a flu vaccine based on this technology separately. They also have a partnership with translate bio, and you can see that stocks up forty seven percent today an expanded partnership. They're going to work together on other vaccines to not just the Cova vaccine, and that's an Mr platform similar to Madonna's, and that's a little bit further behind the GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi vaccine so Sanofi. They're having two different Cova. Tracks ongoing. Meanwhile, the first efficacy trials in the United States those thirty thousand person trials expected to start in July from dern and Pfizer AstraZeneca close on their heels, potentially starting July or August with their trial Johnson and Johnson expected in September and then of course as we mentioned gs K.. Sanofi at the end of the year, so these big companies all gearing up to start these large scale efficacy studies within weeks already. What is the earliest projection by accompany MAG for back backseat hitting the market or getting FDA approval? Well we've seen from some companies like Astra Zeneca. Could deliver this vaccine by October if things go well, FIS has made similar projections, but today Dr Fao. She was testifying on the hill. He reiterated the end of Twenty Twenty early twenty twenty one time line for the earliest, these vaccines could be ready. It's all going to depend upon the rate of infection. In these large-scale efficacy efficacy trials because the more infection there is the faster they will prove that they work

Sanofi Flu Vaccine Cova Twenty Twenty Glaxosmithkline Johnson Astra Zeneca Terrell United States Pfizer Astrazeneca FDA CEO MAG Dr Fao Dern
Wisconsin Supreme Court strikes down Wisconsin's stay-at-home order that closed businesses to limit spread of coronavirus

Jim Bohannon

10:24 min | 10 months ago

Wisconsin Supreme Court strikes down Wisconsin's stay-at-home order that closed businesses to limit spread of coronavirus

"A piece of audio from a state Supreme Court justice this was from esquire magazine in discussing the governor's order to stay at home the assistant Attorney General Colin Ross appeared to be rethinking his career choice Bradley the Supreme Court justice went full on Glenn Beck never go full on Glenn back this is what the press called full on Glenn back listen to this judge my question for you is where in the constitution to the people of Wisconsin confer a sorority on the singles on elected cabinet secretary to compel almost six million people to stay at home and close their businesses and face imprisonment if they don't comply with no input from the legislature without the consent of the people isn't it the very definition of tyranny for one person to order people to be imprisoned for going to work among other ordinarily lawful activities where does the constitution say that's permissible council one of the bravest guys and the guy who appointed her to the Supreme Court successful governor economic education healthcare reformer Scott Walker joins us now governor how are you Sir Eglin even better today because of the Supreme Court yesterday sure okay so the Supreme Court yesterday in Wisconsin struck down the stay at home order what does that mean well there was no stay so it means technically anyone anywhere in the state of Wisconsin could be opened the one caveat to that is welcome to the home rule states so there are still the ability of local jurisdiction so a handful of communities city Milwaukee city of R. we're seeing a Dane county or state capitals at all very Liberal Democrat areas there governor should be there mayors and or account executives issued similar orders to what the governor's administration will done but for everybody else it means technically any retail establishment or whatever's open last night around the state there are other places out there although and I heard the tail end of year your last segment in the end the governor I've said for weeks the government can get out of the way but ultimately the market will determine when businesses reopen when employees feel safe to come back in when the when customers ultimately come back as well but it the first step is getting the government out of the way so Z. the get the new governor the guy who I think replaced you it had issued the stay at home order he said yesterday last night on CNN this puts our state in the chaos now we have no plan no protections for the people when you have more people in a small space I don't care if it's bars restaurants or the home you're going to be able to spread the virus today thanks to the Republican legislators convinced for Supreme Court justices not to look at the law but look at their political careers I guess it's a bad day for Wisconsin because now it's the wild west commented when it's it's like it's like they've suspended common sense not only in his statement but not others across the country we see this over and over again we've been operating for nearly two months now with the threat of this coronavirus in every time anyone goes in a grocery store every time someone goes into a pharmacy every time someone goes to the hardware store every time someone shows up in a in a manufacturing plant that is deemed essential by the government they've been able to do that overwhelmingly across the country safely so to me it just defies common sense that now certainly since the so called nonessential businesses can open finally because those justices actually upheld the law they did exactly opposite what he said they actually upheld the law now does that mean the people who've been operating safe we're certainly going to go crazy and and not use the same watching the done before of course not you know here here's here's the thing first of all I think you guys had the election when every but when nobody knew what was gonna happen and with that it shows that no there was no spread to from you guys holding L. holding the election which quite honestly at the time I would have found surprising but there was no problem for holding the election yeah I guess the the governor didn't learn his lesson from that one and when did we go from a let's not overwhelm the system let's not overwhelm hospitals and doctors and the nurses let's flatten the curve to nobody's going out until everybody is safe yeah it it's it's the flat occur versus now we have to find a cure before anyone can set foot out there the logic I went back and looked two months ago yesterday I wrote a piece on Facebook about how we need to be rational we needed to follow the guidelines we probably shouldn't have Dick's sporting events or concerts for awhile so we could figure this out but that we could do these things without shutting down the economy we just had to use our common sense we had to be purposeful interactions to make sure we're safe the same is true today over two months we flatten the curve but do you still have government officials whose immediately seem like they're hiding under their beds open a guide somehow this will just go away it's not going away it's not going to change anytime soon and if we don't win this year register Connie devastate but think of all the people across America who missed out on doctor's visits in clinics and other checkups who missed out on early detection I mean this is literally a life threatening issue even when it comes to re opening the economy so governor do you really believe that these people are hiding under their beds or is there something else involved I mean there is we have to balance things and that is what a leader does he gets advice from the FAO cheese and they save Valjean just tell me about the health effects and then somebody else has to advise is didn't tell me just about the economic effects and then I have to make choices as a leader on what we do we are now looking at a group of people in Washington and it seems to be falling on party lines that they for some reason we just don't want to open the economy and no one is talking about the deadly effects of America going down the drain or going into a deep depression not only the affects financially but the effects of health and welfare all over the globe millions could die because we go down it even amazing the group that are not aligned with that don't normally reference but even a United Nations report recently just this week showed that grave concerns about massive I mean we're talking crippling poverty around the world because of the economic effects here in their point was that this will actually have a much larger devastating impact on the Taliban casualties because of malnutrition because of the depression because of suicide because of all sorts of issues I think it's a combination of summer parade and some have an agenda when I look at Nancy Pelosi's and we could talk all day about her ridiculous three trillion dollar bill that's out there but one of the things I think's been ignored about what you did put out this week is they've got a provision that would extend the federal unemployment enhanced benefits till January one that tells me Democrats believe our whole some have an agenda that they want the economy not to open until after the start of the year which conveniently happens to be after the presidential election I I got to say if you're an American not a Republican not a Democrat now to conserve not a liberal but Americans that should scare the crap idea we should be doing something about it so do you think that the American people are I mean I think that my father used to say there is no such thing as bad it doesn't it nothing is bad it's depends on how you react to it that will make it a bad thing in your life for good thing you can go to prison for robbing a bank that's not bad that is something that you could use now to reforge yourself and and become better the corona virus I think has helped a lot of people get perspective on their life it is showing us that we need family and shows us that you know this arguing back and forth with the politics is really the Washington doesn't have the power we have the power we could use this to wake up on the bill of rights etcetera etcetera or we will allow it to destroy us do you think the American people are waking up on both sides of the aisle and saying wait a minute wait a minute these essential bill of rights liberties are really important I I do have some more slowly than others but but I do think they're waking up yesterday's ruling in the Wisconsin Supreme Court was a good step in the right direction because as I said after the ruling came out you know though okay holding the rule of law is important even in an emergency it's an important event and I'm optimistic it as frustrated as I am as as challenging as times are I think about American particular country that started out in defeating the greatest military power at the time who overcame a civil war that would have torn apart just to any other country in the world you ever came to me two world wars took on nine eleven were Americans and were country based on freedom and as long as we cherish those freedoms and liberties even in times like this I have no doubt we can overcome anything the part of that means of free will and the ability to engage in free enterprise that's something that I think it's fundamentally a part of who we are it's what king Solomon talked about finding joy in your labor I often say nobody signed by my high school yearbook saying good luck becoming it depend on the government we all no matter who we can where we come from what we look like we all in our hearts we want to work we want to find join our labor we need to get the government on lease and get it out of the way so that we can go back to work and and restore

Esquire Magazine Colin Ross Bradley Glenn Beck Supreme Court Assistant Attorney General
Fauci Says US Death Toll Is Likely Higher

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:22 min | 10 months ago

Fauci Says US Death Toll Is Likely Higher

"The Corona Virus death-toll here in the United States is down more than eighty. Three thousand people almost one point four million cases. Globally there are no more than four point three million cases and almost three hundred thousand deaths but tonight sources telling CNN that the trump administration that serious senior trump administration officials are questioning the accuracy of the death toll and whether the number is actually being inflated just yesterday on the other hand Dr Anthony Fauci told US lawmakers. The death toll is almost certainly higher higher. What's being reported but this coming Sunday almost all U s states will be reopened at least to some extent at the same time. Washington D. C. is among jurisdictions extending. Stay at home. Orders and states including South Dakota Delaware and Arkansas are serious are seeing serious corona virus cases right now on the rise us go straight to the White House right now. Our chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta. Joining US JIM. A grim new death toll and frightening new projections but the president and his team at least some members of his team don't necessarily believe all the numbers that's right well. The tug of war has begun inside the trump administration over whether the US is over counting the number of dead from the corona virus. Well aware that the president's reelection prospects are tied to his handling of the pandemic pro trump forces are attacking. Dr Anthony Fauci. Who has advocated caution in confronting the virus in control of the corona virus? Message coming from the White House. President trump is giving the administration pat on the back for the US response to the pandemic with the enormous weight of the pandemic hanging over the White House. Sources Tell C. N. Administration officials are questioning the accuracy of the corona virus death toll in the US and whether the number of dead is being over counted but that would fly in the face of testimony from top administration health expert. Dr Anthony Found. She who said deaths are likely being undercounted as some residents and hard hit New York died at home and we're never counted as cove in one thousand nine fatalities so direct. Answer to your question. I think you are correct at the number is likely higher. I don't know exactly. What was that tire? But almost certainly is higher. The president suggested. New York's number of dead was too high last month. I see this morning. Where New York edit three thousand deaths because they died and then now saying rather than it was a heart attack? They're saying it was a heart attack caused by this trump allies on Fox News zeroed in on found she. As an obstacle to reopening the country blasting the doctors cautious approach to the pandemic. Is this the Guy? You want to Chore Chart The Future Of the country. Maybe not this is a very serious matter. The decisions were making right now twenty. She has not been elected to anything to be very blonde. Is the face of this failed administrative leave a question? The entire premise of this with the chief. Buffoon of the professional has Dr Anthony. Fauci also seems to favor with the Democrats want and that is massive restrictions with no end in sight with all due respect to DR FAO cheese expertise. No-one elected him to anything. But there's one big problem for the White House a CNN poll found a solid majority of Americans trust Not The president when it comes to the pandemic

Dr Anthony Fauci President Trump White House United States New York Dr Anthony Donald Trump Chief White House Corresponden CNN C. N. Administration Jim Acosta Dr Fao Fox News Washington South Dakota D. C. Arkansas
Fauci, other virus task force members to testify remotely

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Fauci, other virus task force members to testify remotely

"Dr Anthony fell she's made dozens of trips to Capitol Hill for hearings but today will be different when he appears before a Senate panel felt she and two other White House coronavirus task force members will appear remotely while under self quarantine the last time out she testified he warned in early March that the virus would get worse nearly two months later the White House blocked him from appearing before a house panel last week today will allow FAO chief CDC chief Robert Redfield an FDA commissioner Steven Hahn to talk without president trump standing nearby like at White House briefings were he's occasionally cut them off or kept them from answering questions this will be one of the first opportunities for doctor found G. to tell the American people the unvarnished truth without the president lurking over his shoulder Senate democratic chief Chuck Schumer's advice to thou she let it rip Sager Meghana E. Washington

Dr Anthony White House FAO Robert Redfield Commissioner Steven Hahn G. President Trump Chuck Schumer Sager Meghana E. Washington Senate CDC FDA
Fauci, other virus task force members to testify remotely

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Fauci, other virus task force members to testify remotely

"Dr Anthony fell she's made dozens of trips to Capitol Hill for hearings but today will be different when he appears before a Senate panel felt she and two other White House coronavirus task force members will appear remotely while under self quarantine the last time out she testified he warned in early March that the virus would get worse nearly two months later the White House blocked him from appearing before a house panel last week today will allow FAO chief CDC chief Robert Redfield an FDA commissioner Steven Hahn to talk without president trump standing nearby like at White House briefings were he's occasionally cut them off or kept them from answering questions this will be one of the first opportunities for doctor found G. to tell the American people the unvarnished truth without the president lurking over his shoulder Senate democratic chief Chuck Schumer's advice to thou she let it rip Sager Meghana E. Washington

Dr Anthony White House FAO Robert Redfield Commissioner Steven Hahn G. President Trump Chuck Schumer Sager Meghana E. Washington Senate CDC FDA
New Cases of COVID-19 In World Countries

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

07:09 min | 11 months ago

New Cases of COVID-19 In World Countries

"Big news over the last twenty? Four hours has been the glimmer of hope surrounding the experimental drug rim desert which shows promise as a treatment for corona virus. And we're gonNA give this news. Its own segment immediately following this top news segment so hold on for that but I I thought it might be worth summarizing the state of things across the globe at the moment without just throwing a ton of numbers at you so in a very broad high level way things look like this. Italy Spain. Germany and France seemed to be effectively. Lowering their curves. Sweden and Canada are still near the peak of their diseases possibly plateauing but need a few more days of data there note. That Britain is sadly on track to surpass. Italy's total for the most number of deaths in Europe absolutely no new cases in both South Korea and Hong Kong over the last twenty three hours. In fact Hong Kong has had no new cases for five straight days and also south. Korea was one of the early places to peak if you'll recall recording nine hundred nine cases on February twenty-ninth alone Vietnam despite its ninety five million person. Population has still not reported a single death. And only two hundred seventy cases meanwhile Sri Lanka has reintroduced a strict twenty four hour curfew as a number of new corona virus. Cases has surged there and Japan will apparently extend its national state of emergency to June as the country is experiencing a second wave of infections in the US again. A very broad way looking at the case number graphs. The number of new cases are trending up in Massachusetts Illinois Maryland. Indiana Virginia Colorado Tennessee and North Carolina things are flats in New York California Pennsylvania Michigan Texas Washington State Rhode Island and Missouri. All of those are off of their some significantly and the states where cases are decreasing New Jersey Florida Louisiana Connecticut Georgia Ohio South Dakota and Idaho and yes this is a a sad statistic to end with the US past sixty thousand official corona virus deaths since we last spoke quoting the Washington Post. The California Police Chiefs Association has told its members that Governor Gavin newsom plans to announce Thursday that all beaches and state parks will be closed effective Friday. The anticipated move follows a weekend in which thousands of people took advantage of warm weather and crowded California beaches in violation of social distancing restrictions in place in the state prompting newsom to warn of the potential of a second wave of the corona virus outbreak and quotes. Dr Anthony Fao. She told CNN last night that the long awaited day where capacity for testing in the US should reach the point where anyone who wants to test can get one is about a month away specifically his quote was hopefully we should see that as we get towards the end of May the beginning of June and quotes and the number of nursing homes reporting cases of covert nineteen in the US has doubled in the past week with more than one in six elder care facilities in the US now acknowledging infections among residents or staff in five states Maryland Massachusetts Connecticut Georgia and New Jersey. The viruses struck majority of nursing. Homes and in New Jersey infections have been reported at eighty percents of the state's nursing homes. Finally this is quoting the New York Times. The british-based pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca said on Thursday that it had reached an agreement to make and distribute a leading potential corona virus vaccine. The drug developed by scientists at Oxford is now in human trials. The Oxford researchers are at the forefront of the race for vaccine because they had already demonstrated the safety of similar potential innoculations for other viruses that is enabled them to schedule. Human trials of their vaccine that will involve six thousand people by the end of next month. If those succeed the scientists hope to the first few million doses to frontline healthcare workers as early as September the deal with Astrazeneca could help ensure that a potential vaccine is available in the United States and around the world and quote a government run study of Gilead Sciences rim. Devere showed that the drug is effective at treating cove in nineteen the National Institutes of Health announced in a statement. Gilead said that the study had reached its primary endpoint meaning that patients on room desert recovered more quickly than those taking a placebo. Dr Anthony Fauci head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases or Niaid told reporters that the data from the trial showed a quote clear cut positive effect in diminishing time to recover and added that this will be the standard of care. We've talked about Rendez. Aveer A lot. In recent shows early data from a trial in Chicago indicated that patients were doing better than expected on the drug than those hopes were somewhat when a study in China indicated that patients taking room does Aveer. Didn't do any better than those in a control group in this in. Isd Study Severe was compared to Placebo in one thousand sixty three patients with neither doctors nor patients knowing who actually got the drug in a statement the NASD said an independent data and safety monitoring board overseeing the trial met on April twenty seventh to review data and shared their interim analysis with the study team based upon their review of the data. They noted that Rendez Aveer was better than placebo from the perspective of the primary endpoint time to recovery. A metric often used in influenza trials. Recovery in this study was defined as being well enough for hospital discharge or returning to normal activity level. Preliminary RESULTS INDICATE THAT PATIENTS. Who received rimmed reservoir? Had A thirty one percent faster time to recovery than those who received placebo specifically the median time to recovery was eleven days for patients treated with remedies aveer compared with fifteen days for those who received. Placebo results also suggested a survival benefit with mortality rate of eight percent for the group receiving Rim desert versus eleven point six for the Placebo Group and quote the FDA is expected to issue emergency use authorization for the drug Gilead the maker of Rim desert also revealed initial results from its own phase three trial of the drug in which it is comparing five day in day courses of treatment. The company found that a five day course is essentially just as effective as a longer course meaning the existing supply of the drug could be used to treat a greater number of patients unlike the NASD study. There was no control group. So the study doesn't speak to reservoirs. Overall effectiveness murder piracy Gilead. Chief medical officer said in a statement unlike traditional drug development we are attempting to evaluate an investigational agent alongside in evolving global pandemic multiple. Concurrent studies are helping

United States New Jersey Governor Gavin Newsom Hong Kong Nasd Maryland Italy Spain Rim Desert New York Times Connecticut Korea Gilead Sciences Rendez Aveer Oxford Placebo Group Dr Anthony Fauci South Korea Japan Dr Anthony Fao Astrazeneca
The Internet Has a Crush on Dr. Fauci

Reset

04:27 min | 11 months ago

The Internet Has a Crush on Dr. Fauci

"It just kind of started as a joke where we would send each other pictures of doctor and sort of try to comfort each other because we were all getting pretty stressed out. I don't know I just felt like some of the stuff we were sending. Each other in our group chat was really really good content. I guess we were like editing. Some of his photos and we had. I don't know we're just admiring him. We should put this out there and kind of see I felt that other people might feel similarly. In mid March the three scientists started a twitter account at FAO CI Fan. Almost every tweet is a photo of Dr Faucher sometimes overlaid with heart emojis and accompanied by a funny admiring comment. For instance are pinch tweet on our profile right now is just photo of Dr Fao. G says if you don't have a crush on this man do you even care about public health and that was just like some random thought I had and I was like that would be a good tweet. The twitter account immediately started wrecking followers. We would text each other constantly. Like Oh my God we made it to one hundred two hundred five hundred like we would text each other like so in shock. Oh Yeah we were shocked. I really didn't expect it to go anywhere at that was gonna be just between like the three of us but Yeah I just happened to end up this way. How many followers are you up to at this point right now? We have almost seventeen thousand. The speed with which this twitter account has gained ground to me indicates that this there's a much broader fandom surrounding Dr vouching than than just you know the science community I think so too. I mean. My mom has a crush on him though. She is a nurse so she's kind of tangentially related to the science community but yeah she just thinks he's the cutest thing so wait. I'm sorry I feel like I need to address this. Okay you share a crush with your mom right now. Yeah Dr Found Cheese that bringing you closer like is that Nice. Oh yeah if he's on the screen she'll scream at me Sarah doctor on TV. And she's she followed the twitter and she likes to look at it. She doesn't have twitter works so she gets confused. Some OF THE POST. But Yeah my mother for example. She is a housewife. And she's from Vietnam. She doesn't speak that much English but every time she sees him on. Tv She just says she really likes him. She likes his energy. She's like when I hear him talk. He brings out simple facts. It's easy to understand feel comfortable and I've had people like friends where I've never mentioned this twitter. But they've mentioned to me so they found or twitter organically and they say and I say oh I run. That's really my dad follows and he really enjoys it. That's true just to be clear. Do you guys think he's hot Low Key yeah I mean for an older guy for sure. Am I alone here guys? Is anyone else going to chime in back back me up? Yeah he's not. He's not bad looking well some of the pictures. It really conveys like his personality. If you've ever seen an interview with him or seen him talk at the podium. You're having the natural course of outbreak trying to peek at a high level. He's not like everybody else. He's not this STOIC. Okay we're reading off the facts. You know he really wants people to understand. And I think that that's something that really appealed to me. We also were looking at like older pictures of him and it really shows like throughout the well. Yeah we have a post where we said like glow up and we show a picture from when he was first. Appointed as director of NAIAD. Yeah of Naiad and then or more recent photo maybe ten or fifteen years ago and he looks great. I mean it's like identical. Almost we have so many photos of Dr Fao. G saved to our phones. You wouldn't believe it. Tiffany Sarah and Leeann say Dr Cheese appeal isn't just about his looks though for me the A thing in affection I have for is more like a because he's a fellow scientists and I really appreciate that and he's from NIH so I think comes from a special position in my heart for me personally. How about you tiffany. Oh no I agree. I think it's part of it. Is that we value science communication. And it's like he really brings to the and that adds so much to our crush. If you

Twitter Dr Fao Dr Faucher Leeann Naiad Fao Ci Fan Tiffany Sarah Dr Cheese Vietnam NIH Director
Playing The Hero

On The Media

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Playing The Hero

"They flow four from public health officials celebrities. Medical experts politicians facebook friends. Partisan trolls some remediated by the media. Others are just ad libbed untruths from on high. Anybody right now. Anybody that needs desk gets there. They have the tests and the tests are beautiful. Two weeks later still in catastrophically short supply. Meanwhile earlier this week trump waxed rhapsodic about a holiday reprieve Easter as our timeline. What a great time line. That would be the beautiful beautiful unless you don't want a holy day celebrating. Rip Birth to be the occasion for spreading deadly contagion to prevent that. You need some sort of miracle On March twenty first trump re tweeted quote hydroxy chloroquine and as if taken together have a real chance to be one of the biggest game changers in the history of medicine and people may be surprised by the way that would be a game changer. But that game took an ugly turn in Arizona. Man Died after taking chemicals that he thought would protect him from Corona virus and his wife is in the hospital this morning. The couple took chloroquine phosphate. The active ingredient is also found. An aquarium cleaner kills algae. What would be your message to the American public? Take anything completely anything yet. The president is even more than usually present with his rallies cancelled. He's turned the daily Corona Virus. Press briefings into spasms of self-congratulation rated at ten. I think we've done a great job. The question is what is the presses proper role here in these daily briefings Washington. Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan floated the idea of simply not airing them live. So the press has time to sift facts from reckless statements. Nyu media professor. Jay Rosen thinks. The media should not repeat the president's unsupported assertions at all unless they're sandwiched between context and fact he goes even further suggesting that the press boycott trump's briefings and photo ops Fox News Channel's media reporter Howard Kurtz called cutting trump's mike quote the height of condescension as if he wrote the media think Americans are too dumb to recognize spin and that quote only the pundits in the press are smart enough to figure that out so they will watch the president and then fill out what you need to know. Of course filtering explaining and contextualising is exactly what the press is supposed to do in all of its coverage on the other hand. Such basic journalism may have an unintended consequence namely giving cover to a chronically untruthful commander in chief. Here's how Atlantic's Adam Serwer put it this week on. Wnyc's the takeaway. Most Americans do not watch these conferences live. I think the larger issue is that they consume them through newspaper write ups and local news clips where the falsehoods erratic behavior and rambling by the president. Downplayed as producers in editors China Hammer Trump's statements into something that can be digested his information. So there's an impulse. Even when the president is not saying something that makes sense to make it make sense somehow to right around it or to edit around so should. Tv journalists just let the nation see the emperor naked at the podium or cherry. Pick his most cogent moments. What's an enemy of the people to do last weekend? New York Times Health and science reporter Donald McNeil Junior proffered a third path diminish the White House's presence by four granting the steady and trusted experts standing nearby today as you all know after nine days we've flown over twenty two thousand sorties and air operations in those air operations. We have over twenty six air to air kills by the Coalition Air Forces. That was General Norman Schwarzkopf in Nineteen ninety-one briefing. The world on Operation Desert Storm not a politician but the government's handpicked explainer of the war. One obvious choice for preempting. The president in these circumstances is Dr Anthony. Fauci director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease. Who's already been at pains to correct the record with trump just a few socially incorrect feet away. She was explained yesterday. There has been some promise with a drug. Chloroquine is potential therapy for people who are infected with corona virus. Is there any evidence to suggest that as with malaria it might be used as a prophylaxis against code onto the answer is no and the the evidence that talking about John is anecdotal evidence but Fao she seems to have been pushed farther and farther away from the president on the reviewing? Stand this coinciding with a right wing troll campaign portraying him and other experts as partisan saboteurs out to harm president trump unless I've misinterpreted the term deep state Hillary Clinton loving stooge but if we're looking for a corona virus Schwartzkopf. There's one who already has a podium. Facts CAN BE UPLIFTING. They can be depressing at times. They can be confusing at times but I think facts are empowering New York Governor Andrew. Cuomo's morning press. Briefings haven't garnered the same. Audiences is trump's prime time appearances but they've been well covered and unlike the president's widely praised. This is partly due to New York state's unfortunate claim to epicenter status. Almost a third of the nation's confirmed cove in nineteen cases are in New York City but Cuomo claves strictly to the science the data the advice of experts and the imperative of public health. He does some pastoral work but offers no POLLYANNA declarations or unfounded. Hope in a situation like this not knowing. The facts is worse. Because that's when you feel out of control on the other hand. He is a politician and his resume is not

President Trump Donald Trump China Hammer Trump Chloroquine Corona Arizona New York Times Jay Rosen Margaret Sullivan New York City General Norman Schwarzkopf Cuomo Washington Coalition Air Forces New York Fox News Channel Howard Kurtz
"fao" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"fao" Discussed on 790 KABC

"FAO treat this thing is at least ten times as deadly as the flu we don't actually know the rates because in some areas it's a lot lower than in other areas we don't know because we are not public health response is going to be we don't know how much of this is due to lack of proper medical staffing and how much of this is due to the actual deadliness of the disease itself with that said it is obviously very risky in there been a wide variety of of sort of articles put out there about how bad this thing could get the New York times has put together a model Nicholas Kristof in store Thompson writing what's at stake in these corona virus pandemic how many Americans could become infected how many might actually die answers depend on the actions we take and crucially on when we take them working with infectious disease epidemiologist we developed an interactive tool that lets you see what may lie ahead in the United States how much of a difference it could make its officials act quickly the figures are for America the lessons are broadly applicable to any country okay so they have a bunch of different scenarios here as far as what exactly could happen they say if we stayed on current track then the model predicts that roughly a third of Americans more than a hundred million people could become infected including more than nine million people at one time as we take no protective measures basically that's if we just can't leave everything as it is we don't build up capacity we don't stay home we don't cancel events that of course is not what's happening we're already moving moving along the south Korean tech which is lock it down lock everything down stay home which is a smart thing to do in this particular scenario up to a million people could die in the United States of course would be just an unbelievable trauma in unbelievable trauma to the United States that be if no action was taken and if the peak of the infections happened in mid July that also assumes that presumably the summer would not really curtail the spread of the virus which is sorted out full okay interventions early on Mattern awful lot if there are additional interventions like ending public gatherings closing workplaces and schools mass testing fortifying hospitals if those additional interventions were to begin sometime in may which I mean frankly I think it it seems like we we snapped into place pretty quickly I mean it's it's really early March if that happens then you could see four point five million infections B. and four hundred seventy five thousand total deaths that are put in perspective that be like ten times the number of people who die from the flu every year so that would still be a massive trauma if it's even earlier then obviously the numbers go down if the interventions be in one month later like in the middle of July the number of infections climbed by more than two million you get two thirds of million deaths so moving as quickly as humanly possible would be the the best possible scenario they're sort of suggesting that the best possible scenario let's say that we put into action these interventions like right now according to the times model you get three million infections at the peak about three hundred twenty thousand told us is like the best case scenario okay so maybe the wrong maybe that thing rains in the summer but aggressiveness matters right if you if you aggressively act if you if you get very aggressive like everything shuts down then they start to start to look more like a seasonal flu if you if you act right now what's the best case best case scenario you act right now everything shuts down schools shut we stopped going to ball games we stopped going to to to if we go to restaurants we stay far away from one another we clean our areas if you go to the gym let down all your equipment you start doing a lot more things at home basically revert to sort of a cabin mentality you're in here with your family you go on hikes right like that that that's sort of what your life becomes what home schooling let's cut and less communal gathering if you do that then according to The New York Times model you get five hundred thirteen thousand infections at peak and fifty one thousand total debts and then it starts to look much more like a seasonal flu as The New York Times point out what matters is not only the total number of infections but also how many occur at once related overloaded hospitals and shortages ventilators in ice use would result in people dying unnecessarily from corona virus as well as my heart attacks and other ailments successful interventions are crucial they flatten the curve we're much better off if the one hundred million infections occur over eighteen months rather than over eighteen weeks right if you look at the same number of ICU cases as before but modeled at a much slower rate to finish up beneath the ninety five thousand available ICU beds in the country then the number of deaths is a lot a lot lower so it is really important that people take aggressive actions right now not to get in groups scenarios this is one of the scientists okay so I'm just letting the scientists here is not alarmism is not politically oriented anyway be smart don't go to big parties postpone your parties okay if you're gonna have a wedding you might think about postponing the wedding until post July right your things are at in a couple of months if you're talking about major gatherings my talk about postponing these major gatherings if I my birthday party you might think about saying okay you know what next available twice as big on the birthday party as opposed to getting together this year but with that said this will alleviate this the one area of American life where where things will continue to be produced in the grocery pharmacy section so I wouldn't worry too much about that the government is gonna take some aggressive actions in terms of shoring up the financial infrastructure gonna gets more of this in just one second first talking about erectile dysfunction that's not easy usually we just brush it off altogether or blame ourselves saying things like I lost my mo Jo we use euphemisms won't it work sorry honey just not feeling it.

FAO
The Devil's Chord: Satanism in Music

ODDDIO Podcast

06:23 min | 1 year ago

The Devil's Chord: Satanism in Music

"A look into my eyes. You will see who are my name is Lucifer. Please take my hand. Those lyrics from a song called neighb- recorded by Black Sabbath in one thousand nine hundred seventy hi I'm FAO Hsun and today. We'll talk about satanism. In Popular American Music Wikipedia Satanism page states the following prior to the public practice satanism existed primarily as an accusation by various Christian groups toward perceived ideological opponents rather than a self identity religious studies scholars say that the very definition initiative the term has a history of being designation made by people against those whom they dislike. It is a term used for uttering and in the Bible Satan and the word was used as an ordinary noun. Meaning the adversary the terms satanism and Satanist I appear in English and French during the sixteenth century and Satanism didn't become an official religion until nineteen sixty six when the Church of Satan was established by Anton Levay besides being being a philosopher and occultist Levy was a musician who played multiple instruments including the Oregon in addition to his infamous satanic mass album. Other other albums would be released by levay in the nineties. This leveraging of music by the very person who established the Church of Satan made historical sense in context particularly Italy regarding art and entertainment where the concept of Satan has long been used as a symbol of expression. Many classical compositions were said to be vehicle for the the devil particularly due to the use of a specific combination of notes. A unique cord within music itself that was associated with evil. Known as the Devil's record the notes when played together has many other names including Diablo's in New Jersey. GotTa Latin for Devil and music or the devil's interval. The Tri tone the tree and the Flathead v basically. It's a combination of notes that when played together in accord become the musical equivalent of the Hebrew. GBD'S ABC's the court can be found in compositions from Beethoven and Wagner and even jazz composition such as the girl from EPA Nima and the Song Maria from West aside story fender dot com actually gives budding guitarists a tutorial on how to create the devils cord and it serves as a great description of what it is so our read it quote in simple terms tripod or yod is a fifth played. One Fret down to play of latiff with a G.. Power Cord place so your first finger on the third fred of the low e string. That's the root note or the G.. Now put your third finger to frets up on the fifth fret of with the a string. That's the fifth in this case the D. to complete the power cord placed your fourth finger next to your third finger on the next ring over the the destroying. That's the octave of the root note. Another G. strummed together. These three strings create a pleasant sounding. Chord G. D. G.. But but if you take your second finger and played a frat down as a D. Flatt instead of a d. it creates a flat. V when played after the I G or plucked slowly in a g root note G Octave d flat flat v Progression. It creates a dissonant or ugly tone especially with distortion and that that is the devils cord in their infancy. The genres of Blues and Jazz were routinely referred to as the Devil's music partially due to the innate rebellion within the sound and the lyrics themselves but also partially due to an institutionally dehumanized regard of black musicians and black people. In general neural. The devils cord first appeared in rock music when Jimi Hendrix used it in the opening of his classic Song Purple Haze it would later become a staple in the repertoire are black Sabbath. Who are cited as one of the pioneering bands of the heavy metal genre and it would be heavy metal that took the devils cord and ran like a bat out of hell? Oh with it with numerous metal bands. Such as Metallica slipknot and slayer who even named their nineteen ninety eight album. Diab Bula Sin Musica but it was black black Sabbath perhaps more than any other modern band that may the devils core part of American mainstream music the band which like every rock band at at the time was originally rooted in Blues. They first called themselves the Polka Tall Blues Band and then later they call themselves earth it was the latter name Earth Earth that presented a challenge as it was being used by another English group at the same time they were also inspired by nine hundred sixty three horror film called black Sabbath. That started the legendary Boris Karloff. They saw that a local horror movie. Theatre had a line of people waiting to buy tickets and intrigued by the appeal of this type of content. They went ahead head and wrote a song also titled Black Sabbath. The lyrics were based on a horror story and a nightmare. One of the members of the band had these horror movie lyrics combined with the foreboding introduced by the devils core helped the band create an unprecedented experience in music. According to Wikipedia the new sound was a a quote stark contrast to the popular music of the late nineteen sixties which was dominated by a flower power folk music and Hippie culture and an attempt at creating the musical equivalent of horror films and quote the commercial success of this new sound came despite being initially critically panned hand along with marketing stunts such as releasing titles on Friday the thirteen and recording music in dungeons it was clear. The dark side and music was connecting connecting with audiences it would be black Sabbath commercial embrace of the devils cord along with horror and demonic symbolism and themes that influenced every metal act that followed and laid the groundwork for every sub genre from the blackest and truly demonic to grunge to popular bands such as Nirvana van Halen soundgarden and Marilyn Manson

Devils Fao Hsun Anton Levay Italy Marilyn Manson Boris Karloff Jimi Hendrix New Jersey Official Wikipedia D. Flatt Epa Nima Levy Metallica Diablo Beethoven Oregon Wagner
"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"Neighboring Venezuela has pushed pushed over a million migrants across the border including one hundred sixty five thousand people into laguardia the influx of migrants has put a strain rain on host communities with food is limited and natural resources scalise that's why in twenty eighteen the Food and Agriculture Organization one of the United Nations decided to act. If any so tom has the details eleanor seats it's full of hurt over king a field of beans in the coming into Laguardia Iraq Kathy Kathy farmer worries he's the Saudis to dry harvest will be a bad one here in the village of Montera in Laguardia Alina a mother of four and in a few hundred families depend on agriculture and livestock for the livelihood colombian-born Ellena moved back here to the country's northernmost almost province after leaving in Venezuela for thirty years she recalls her life over there where she had a business and live comfortably until the economic crisis the Muslim soya for we decided to leave and as well as for the reasons that everyone knows because of the current canonic situation that and that's why I now back in Colombia since twenty fourteen some one hundred and sixty five thousand Venezuelans have heaven wide in the province of Laguardia Colombia's most vulnerable region as Nikola Lombardi explains he region where access to water is any shoe and also there are a recurrent droughts affecting the population and especially see they what you indigenous communities who live in the area the arid land and extreme weather events make it difficult for people to grow crops unreal livestock and inflex of migrants puts further strain and limited resources and food security that's why in twenty eighteen when forecast cust indicated a strong likelihood of drought in Guera and increase in the number of migrants a fail decided to act the UN agency's Early Warning Reaction Team Andy Columbia face or doubt a program to support in trained farmers to boost food production we're talking about drought resistant crops and Father Seeds Veterinary Services feed treatments for livestock hands for egg production and also today rehabilitation of wells to set up a micro irrigated community fields for the production of different types of crops the screen community garden is a stark contrast to the dry dusty surroundings at that took part in one of the eighth L. Trainings since where she learned new skills in Harper's vehicles divide I say Murad for us to support has been really great we learned to till soil replanted Yuca beans and fruits like melon we also have vegetables chilli peppers and tomatoes and we learn to grow food for our animals like this fodder sorghum and many other things that we have learned tools ooh and seeds from Fau has now successfully replicated what she learned on the plot of land that he rents out inactions for share the harvest well hundred twenty five kilometers northeast of Monty Lara lies the village of quiet Qui- about he barely Pana positive here life sixty one year old woman stands under the blazing Sun proudly showing off her cubbage field has been that we were taught how to how to till the soil and how to use goat manure for fraternisation we also learn how to remove weeds and how to aggregate because here we suffer from terrible drought we have assistant to water them and later on the plan to use watering cans we already managed to harvest good part of what we sold thanks to training provided provided by FAO localized owners are now able to provide basic veterinary care to their animals animality a AH irony malls are in great shape because we give them vitamins we give them to our animals when one of them get sick now they take antibiotics whereas before we I used to read them with oral sold or wherever we could find we didn't know how to treat them the FAA veterinary officer who came here taught us how to treat them and gave us animal feed ir animals have put on weight they are now in great shape date and drink sufficiently different ethnic groups took part in the training including the white people the country's largest indigenous group as well as Afro descendants and Venezuelan migrants working together either in the same field helped strengthening the cohesion under social cohesion between these different groups we were able to who reduce possible tensions that may arise in a context where you have increasing competition in the unskilled labor market and you also have soaring food prices and migrants coming to the area without land and without job opportunities with this new opportunities he's an increased food security. FAO is helping to improve the livelihood of everyone in the community and thereby mitigating the worst effects of the crisis back in the village of Montelera reflects on her new life here in in Columbia from being although you are in Colombia where we have had ups and downs but at least I'm with my family now we managed to achieve something that it might only be small for some but for us it's enough thanks to the help of the UN agencies Colombian people like me and also Venezuela migrants. Now feel more at the peace on this side of the border.

"fao" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"Let me stand on their piano. Okay. But bought that Pano from FAO Schwarz godson for. To hard. I was like toil. Always wanted since hours little, and obviously we couldn't afford it. 'cause it was FAO Schwarz. Like my mom's you could play with it in the store. So when are the money to be able to buy our body from our godson, and of course, on best friend hated me for it. He is. Family. Beautiful. Awesome. Right. It isn't new interpretation of it. Which is pretty good. Right. Yeah. So it's a new ideas inspired so mice to the original. And it's his own thing. I do believe that they are such thing as a regional thought. Sometimes I think about the sometimes I think about the quote, and I think in a spiritual sense. Maybe there's no original thought because there's like a pool I think of like a pool of information that's being channeled. So maybe in that sense. Like everything comes from God, you know, you start getting hippie dippy. Like, it's not originally yours. It's a collective thought. And it's just a matter of who scoops it I in a way, but then we think of it in a human lens like how could you say? There is no original thought when you have someone like Steve Jobs who came up with the frigging iphone and the ipod, and laptops, you know, like all the technological advances. I mean, there are a lot of gurus even going the spiritual side Yonaha feel about Osho's Matic as he is. I've read listen to tons of podcast try to gain understanding like where did he get these thoughts? From was he studying under someone a tutor or a mental or maybe the other Gu's above him now older that he that kinda helped formulate his thoughts. Yeah. Like he has to have oh gee regional guru. Really? But. They might take you. But you know, I got curious because I think that is the part of this conversation that interest me the most when you see the people that have influenced you ever wonder who influence them? Like think try to trace that. Because that's something. I've always done try to trace like I'm trying to think of like prints, for example. Right. He's someone that. I always was like, wow, it a supernova. There was no one that looked like him knowing that dress. I came his little butt sheets coming out the back of the pants or the chaps that whatever his heels and how he was in drowsiness and the the songs being like, funk and soul. Iraq in punk in just a mixture of everything. But then you think of people before him like James Brown, and you can see elements James Brown in him. You can see what's his name to the the high heel shoe legit. What's his name the funk do that be Howard's? Clint George Clinton. I see George Clinton, you know. And all so is that something that you do where you try to research your favorites? And who influenced them before them into custody? Six nine even though he'll a lot of people money. He oh, George Clinton some money right now them color journalism braids shit. Yeah. That we he stole from George Clinton pay him his money. Thank you. Go ahead. Feel like Mr. Ponto like when you hear these new artists come out, and nobody really says like who the influences are anymore like every now and then you'll get somebody. So true. I feel like it used to be exciting. 'cause you used to see an artist here and artists like Levin artists and think it was cool when they were finally tell you like, oh, you know, the inspiration from here and there and you're like, oh, yeah. And then it puts you in closer to like who you wanna see them work with or people that you would like to watch them like give a pale minds to one day stuff like that. Well, I think people and obviously against week for everyone. But I've noticed that people are afraid to admit that they've been influenced by other people because they feel that it's going to take away from how the viewed or how their work is perceived not get especially when you have these copyright conversations. You might feel a little bit anxious admitting like what you took from this or extracted from that. But honestly, I always find a really impressive..

Clint George Clinton FAO Schwarz Pano James Brown Steve Jobs Yonaha Levin Iraq Mr. Ponto Matic Howard one day
"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"This is a nickel moves with you and use basic rules, such as keeping your hands clean and cooking food slowly contributes to food safety, but when someone is leaving in place with poor sanitation, or where food insecurity is a reality. It's hard to make good choices. That's according to David Marseille communications specialists that to food and Agriculture Organization or FAO every year worldwide for one hundred twenty thousand people die in six hundred million people fall ill as a result of food contaminated with Tiriac, viruses, parasites, toxins or chemicals. Speaking to FAO star lotto Llamas, Mr. Marseille highlighted how climate change and the lack of water will make more people move to cities in consequently changed their lives in diets Mera, some extreme examples in my time working and dealing with food safety. You hear people telling stories of being able to detect the remnants of China bell embarrassed there are videos on YouTube of plastic apparently appearing. Being in rice. And there are even been cases of one food pretending to be another food so unscrupulous restaurant in some parts of the world might sell you something rather expensive, but actually something very very cheap. But I, but I would stress that these are extreme cases food safety is about falling. Very very simple simple rules to make sure that you don't catch bacteria or viruses or parasites or again going back to my own country in the UK something for mad cow disease. It's just I've never really thought about this in such detail when I buy food from the supermarket I trust that it's safe. I assume this checks and balances in place to ensure that what ends up on.

David Marseille FAO YouTube UK China Agriculture Organization Tiriac
"fao" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on UN News

"In with zero anger. The target by twenty twenty five duet African Union as pledged to banish the hen ho the symbolic act will help the continent to feed itself. Allowing farmers to get new equipment that will make the work simpler, but also more efficient and attract greater numbers of women in young people to work in the sector says FAO FAO stir two lamas sat down to talk modernization insistent ability, which is f- asako African Union Commissioner for rural economy agriculture inches. F- Impala an agriculture engineering expert at FAO agricultural sector is. The the key the backbone of the African economy. So it is very important because is a sector that feeds a nation and also provides job opportunity, and the challenges are enormous because Africa is the part of the world that has the most growing population. So we need to really have sound policy and strategy to transform our continent and say why is there a need for mechanization of agriculture in Africa? There is a need for my mechanization in Africa because we know that our yield is very low compared to other parts of the world Africa has the lowest to yield per editor. So we need to improve we need to modern more than ice agriculture. So if we want to an anger by twenty twenty five we need to identify. What are the pillars that we make this happen and mechanization is one of the? The first pillar to attend that objective of twenty twenty five to an anger and feeds African growing nation. What does mechanization actually look like on the ground for say, the average farmer so mechanization first of all is not only the use of tractor mechanization involves manufacturing distribution and operation of tools implements and machines, which farmers could use to make the wick simple to increase the efficiency of the awake and also to increase the effectiveness of their work. And we're talking about smallholder farmers here. Right. Yes. We're talking about smallholder farmers, and it is applied from production a harvesting of crops handling of crops after harvesting all the way to marketing and up to the consumption by the users of the products, the African Union Commission has pledged to banish the hand her which. A lot of farmers still use in Africa a lot of smallholder farmers. What's behind this pledge? We know that mostly women. There have hash we of working by using hand held the who's so the former chapel of the African Union Commission. Dr Zuma launch a campaign on confining the held hose and mash sheds all these traditional methods of twin agriculture tools of agriculture to the museum. I want to drive up on a legacy left by Madame Zuma to launch the first Africa museum on confining on who's to the museum it to be a symbolic museum that we want to remove all these Dr Jerry on the famine system. Emma denies buy new equipment mechanized equipment on the continents because the women suffer a lot with and held lose. And my shirts, you know. And we want to. Make culture sexy to attract the us and be more profitable and improve our yield in. Now, you mentioned women a lot in relation to the hand. Hawaii is that is that more women that used the hand hosts than men years because sixty percent of a liberal in agriculture. I've I'm women. So if you want to empower women, we have to look at to reduce the, you know, the hash walk the do on the firm that is why we are concentrating more women because those type of war is done by women. How can -eckognize -ation have help attract young people took career in agriculture so mechanization his potential can help the young people to do agriculture in a way that is profitable? And to do it in a way that is cool. That means young people can utilize for example mobile phones to operate some of the machines that in the from the can use mobile phone to order a small machine to come to their family and do some operations. Using the highest services. So this is very very good. But on top of that mechanization can help the young people to do agriculture in a way that is not very hard. Because if you do it in traditional way, then it is really hard, and they say Hardwick, but through mechanisation, the wake is simplified the fish is increased. And then more profit is obtained and that can attract more young people to come back to undercut..

Africa African Union Commission African Union Africa museum FAO FAO Dr Zuma Madame Zuma Commissioner Hardwick Hawaii Emma editor Dr Jerry sixty percent
"fao" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

GSMC Social Media News Podcast

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

"Welcome back to the social media news podcast. We are going to talk about the iconic toy store. FAO schwarz. This is a bit happier than wildfires. So I'm very excited to talk about it. Now, if you know anything about this toy store, you may know that they went out of business. They are based in New York. It's a really famous the giant toy store. It's like in the movie home alone two he goes into the FAA Schwartz. Toy store in the movie big. There's the giant piano that Tom Hanks plays on. Yeah. It's very conic. I think. I had like they have their own toy brand that I've seen toys, and I want to say there was one in like SF or something or like San Francisco have mobile stores, but the big giant one is in New York and it closed down. It was bought up by toys R us. And we all know that toys R us went bankrupt is, but the good news is that this store Schwartz is returning to New York and they're going back to their. I believe they're going back to their flagship store and Fifth Avenue. That's closed. Okay. So they had a flagship store Fifth Avenue and it closed in two thousand fifteen but now FAO Schwarz is under a new owner, and they are bringing their store back. I believe it is in Rockefeller the Rockville building. Okay. And this is exciting. It's like I saw some pictures. And it's like the flagship store was huge when it closed, and this one is also huge many things that you've loved from the old store will still be there like the giant piano, and like, you know, their clock tower, and everything and that will also be there, and it's going to be in the Rockefeller plaza. So really good location. Thirty Rockefeller plaza in thirty rock, and they're saying that the goal of this new store is to be like experiential. So some of the reason like toys R us when? Out of physicists because everyone's buying toys online. Right. And so they're trying to say we want the the experience of going to Schwartz to be better than just buying it. Toy online, right and getting to explore the store and getting to actually see the toy and play with it before you buy it like what a novel concept of being able to hold that thing before you buy it exerts kind of the same idea that Amazon had there was there like instead of just buying it online. You can come in. And see if you like it, right? Then by everything just comes back into fashion. It really good. So they're going to be like so many things that you get to do. If you go to the store, they're like walls of Barbie dolls a build a bear workshop station a racetrack for kids to play with cars a space where magician will teach tricks. There's a candy shop and just like so many things it looks like a huge store..

FAO schwarz Rockefeller plaza Schwartz New York Tom Hanks FAA San Francisco Amazon
"fao" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on KOMO

"The economic toy store FAO Schwarz returned to New York City today with new owners, and we'll see if there's any Harry Potter. Magic left in the new Warner Brothers film. Fantastic. Beasts the crimes of Grindelwald opening in theaters today. Tom Busby kinda getting into Kevin cars business there with a new movie it is twenty five minutes after the hour on first light. And Kevin is with us. Kevin. Let's talk about movies that may be less new now out in home video formats good morning, Michael if you like big fun movies. You've got the Meg about a big fund shark. A giant mega ladonna the bottom of the ocean that escapes, and then has to battle Jason Statham because that's the next step in his career like terrible movies. There's mild twenty two which stars Mark Wahlberg and an elite team of government agents trying to stop terrorists. And then there's also alpha which is out in the video stores now, which is an interesting story about a sort of a stone age family going on a hunting expedition. And one of the sons getting left on his own and has to bond with a wolf and and become the alpha to the wolf and they have to find their way back home. And then finally if you like short films and cartoons Pixar has released its short film collection volume free, which involves all of the more recent short films that they always drop in front of their movies and the Pixar films and their short films are fantastic. It's definitely worth picking up for your collection. So how are we now? Now that time of the year where it's going to be dry in terms of television releases. Well, actually, it's it's kind of speeding up in terms of.

Kevin Pixar New York City FAO Schwarz Warner Brothers Kevin cars Jason Statham Tom Busby Grindelwald Mark Wahlberg Harry Potter Michael twenty five minutes
"fao" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Center Christmas tree stands. So this is about as prime New York location as you can imagine. It will be an advertisement from the brand. And you know, as shoppers or Instagram ING their way through the store, I think they're hoping that that will create buzz. For the rest of FAO will. Now they're building a store in China. There are going to be doing pop ups and various things in stores in New York and around the country, and they probably will open other retail locations around the world. So I think this is basically an effort to recreate the FAO brand and have people think of FAO a certain way. And then probably then think about it as a place they will go to their shopping needs. I think an interesting question here is, is still a very high end toy store. So it was not, you know, toys r. us was a mass market toy store. FAO was high end. I don't know. You know, with all the buzz, they create, you know, we'll shoppers be going FAO as much in the way that they did to toys r. us when Toya's or us was a mass market store. I don't know if people will go to FAO, you know, given that a lot of their purchases, that would be hundred dollars up by it's hard to say how that will play out. But I think that what they're using his doing, taking the New York store, making it sort of about a brand position and using that to leverage. How they grow their business throughout the world that's Wall Street Journal reporter, Charles Passey, joining us in our studio to talk about the relaunch of FAO Schwarz, Charles. Thanks so much for joining us a pleasure. And that's what's news I'm Ameri for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal. Enjoy the what's news podcast. Then try the what's news newsletter, sign up at WSJ dot com. Slash newsletters that's WSJ dot com. Slash newsletters..

FAO New York Wall Street Journal FAO Schwarz China Toya Charles Passey reporter hundred dollars
"fao" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"fao" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Subcommittee chair gregg harper here's dr fao g my number one and maybe number two and number three his is influenza also i agree for the reasons that that dr shook and has mentioned when you have a respiratory virus that can be spread by droplets and aerosol and then you have the situation if there's a degree of morbidity associated with that and you can have a catastrophe i mean we've experienced in real world those types of things one that we always talk about is a nineteen eighteen pandemic which killed between fifty one hundred million people and it is likely that it would be an influenza but if not influenza influenza like respiratory virus i mean we had a scare with sars fortunately public health measures were able to contain it but influenza i or something like influenza is the one that keeps me up at night i will hidden thank you for the question i would say the threat that would keep me up at night would be the then unknown we used to if we don't know what that threat we have to be able to intensify so with the emergence exigencies as it would be the unknown that would get a thank you for each witness what area biopreparedness is of the highest priority you and why the area by preparedness of highest priority would be the ability to rapidly detect something that is entered our community has been used as a weapon as soon as we detect something the sooner we can turn on the machinery and call on the capabilities to begin making vaccines and drugs shook it i would say our global health security would be at the top of my list because as you know a threat anywhere is a threat everywhere and i think our greatest vulnerabilities are in the weakest countries of the world we saw in a bola how rapidly west african countries were overwhelmed and that was an issue for us as well so i think being able to strengthen the ability of every country.

gregg harper dr fao g
"fao" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"fao" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The press of fao john conyers remember john conyers by some former staffers of sexual harassment um some of that you know paid out secret settlements using the taxpayer money in order to put to make these things go away all this news breaking and now there's calls including from some democrats for congress to resign nancy pelosi who of course runs the democratic side of the house was asked about this yesterday by chuck todd uh listen to the way she answers this question very different than the way that is treated ruling more and the allegations against him in alabama they said there's now isiro tolerance john conyers what does that mean for him right out of that we are strengthened by due process just because someone is accused a new ad and was at one accusation is the two i think there has to be john conyers is an icon in our country he's done a good a great deal to protect women bought violence against women act which the left wing bright wing is now quoting me as praising him for his work on that and he did great work on that but the fact is a as john reviews his case which he knows which i don't i believe he will i believe that he was finished my censure that he will do the right thing and is the right thing what resort that he will do the right thing in terms of what he knows about his situation that he's entitled to due process but women are retur entitled to due process as well was he took advantage of a situation where he had an in the wake of congress and i know you guys want to change these rules but he got to hide his settlement he got to his accusers had to go through all sorts of craziness so why is he entitled a new due process in this case i we are talking about what we have heard i've asked the ethics committee to review that he has said he'd be open he it will koa newsradio natives movie believe junk hunters is i don't know who they are did you they have not come forward and and that gets you don't know if you believe the accusation that's ethics committee to review but i believe he understands what is at stake here and he will do the right thing uh huh do presence that's what.

fao john conyers congress nancy pelosi the house chuck todd alabama harassment
"fao" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"fao" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Their hand the blueprint of democratic party live affect relations from the fao and they were using them effectively crossing out the word black and riding in the word now i think it irrefutably historical research i fight all right or if there's no in i've been able to even question let alone contradict any of this data and feel what you get it kind of ari bloviate adding from people like i would carry absolutely no wait you know i think in glad you could call the argument at ignore randhir make the argument that appear the ignorant of the audience you know you you taught us a lot of things through your recent work i i was fascinated when you went through the whole you were in the middle of this big national debate about images of confederate statues confederate soldiers different confederate generals and leaders and of course you pointed out the it's a fascinating stood as fascinating fact the the real makeup of slaveowners and how that broke down remind us about how many republicans were slaveowners how many democrats were slaveowners the underlying white mike is that the late great debate wealthy they not north out debate that they why but the lately to pay for making fifty four to eighteen fixed he was aware lee between the pro lay very democratic party and the accurately republican party and when i say that people i'm dan you know they chronic oof and ask you know you have to admit that work a lot of brick or how and so i in in delight movie in oakland this book i made the following point an 18 thick either your before the civil war no republican owned a wave all the wave them the entire country think about four million of them were all owned by democrat now finns i said if a year ago the left have been thrashing around to find a single counterexample to might be fit and the i get to find one and provide he'll if you're in a very dark and dramatic way how did slavery debate out why lou currently of artists and phenomenon and what the democrats that doing now in their rampaging about confederate statue there trying to the blame lay agree and for the crime the rate back ricky meant going away from them so on the fao dot they're big lie i love the the how you've revealed that in nineteen 24 the.

fao ari bloviate mike republican party oakland civil war lou ricky
"fao" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"fao" Discussed on KFC Radio

"I don't out of pocket happy tell the story fao cited seen for i really don't understand how it happened it makes no sense to me so i did some kiss and saturday night low better kiss you've been a bit kessar been kissed and saturday sunday morning i'm trying to think exactly how it went down because it's it's very confusing because she knew like who i was put you just thought i was kfc she was like better than sex at his came to my pants like i was talking about you and i went to pull up your instagram she gave me a look like why why why are you going to someone else's instagram and so she's like wait you're not kfc again sane again i shot the most evil workers like what do you mean in a cave she's like i thought that was your monitor i thought you were kfc as a what made you think that what is vital part i why would you think that i was kfc so she didn't think i looked like she knew she was a com well she was just hoping for the real deal she was this she's like she wasn't like oh you guys look like an she missed took me for kfc she just thought that i was kfc she is that all the names mixed on yeah now i'm not going to go with that i'm gonna go with the she knows exactly who i am huge huge wanted that.

fao