17 Burst results for "F. O. R."

"for " Discussed on Mindfulness For Beginners

Mindfulness For Beginners

05:44 min | 2 d ago

"for " Discussed on Mindfulness For Beginners

"Human beings are naturally altruistic. We want to help people when we see that they're struggling. It's the most natural thing that when we see someone suffering that we want to help. It's also good for mental health when we help others at belts or confidence mixes feel more optimistic. But our life's so then if that's true why don't we live in a utopian world where everyone looks after each other and we work as a species. Tim anime suffering. And there's not an easy answer to this. part of. The reason is lack of awareness so if we saw someone on our doorstep who's in trouble at we'd want to help but much of the suffering in the word happens away from direct view so we sometimes have to actively look for who needs our help. Another reason is that we can unconsciously judge people as being worthy or less worthy of our compassion. It's very easy to empathize with people that we like. But developing your empathy means not limiting it to the perceived deserving thinking about someone. You don't get along with meditating on their life. Experience bolden are understand and helps us to let go of resentment in wish them. Well we're going to do at guided meditation. Not in a moment and a final reysen is cultural depending on where. You're listening to this from than your society. Might be more individualistic or collective andor scoop things about individualistic societies Freedom of choice for example but society. It can start to lose. Its connection between human beings. When the moral and economic principle of self interest pushes our collective altruism assayed. So what's the solution. I propose an experiment. So this week i want you to pick a pearson each day. You need your help. It might be someone you know. Might be someone suffering in another country Somebody left behind by society and provide some understanding and practical help to them at might be that you listen to them with judgment at could be doing something for them sharing your time or sharing resources pick a pearson each day sometimes including a person that you don't particularly like and see how it feels to make a difference in their lives because the utopia i talked earlier israel and with unreach- and some people might tell you that it's pie in the sky and it's a hard world and you need to be tough to survive but i don't believe that that's true the world that i want to leaven is one more we take care of each other including ourselves. to start that right now. With a loving kanus meditation wishing different groups of people will. So if you wanna take a moment to get yourself comfortable. The start with three signs of the bail. The usual.

Tim anime Freedom of choice for example bolden israel
"for " Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

05:13 min | Last week

"for " Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Attack or kind of getting conspire thought. That sounds great. So can you tell us more about your practice. Alicia and where we can find you on the internet for sure so right now. I am located in virginia. I have actually two locations. Two offices one in falls church. Virginia and one in out injury the old town area and i'm actually Located at the center for cognitive therapy. And and if you would like to look that up. Online a website is k- t- psych c h dot com and. You can find me there and schedule an appointment. If you'd like to. And also i just really like to use my online platform for social media really promote mental health. Where very important to me. I think that we all can use a little bit. More education in my intention is to reduce the stigma and the encourage good language around Mental health and encourage people to have helped savior is not something that you can't handle and if for some reason you feel like you really can't handle things there. Are people out here willing to help you and that instagram name is at help me hodge so help you know the word helped me and my last name h. o. d. g. and lastly i just recently completed a an e book about healthcare kind of encouraging the things that i've talked about which is he and relaxing kind of outside of your head a little bit and not to get caught in the worry trap and i recently have a website and the web address is www dot helped me hodge dot com which is similar to mansa grabbing. Got you in. All of this information of course will be included the show. Or if you're driving you don't have to worry about trying to remember all of these. Yes hey focused on the road right. This is definitely thank you so much for joining us today at leash. I really appreciate it here. I appreciate you having me. And i really hope that this was helpful to anyone and encourages people to realize that if you are going on for you that there are congressional out here. That are more than happy. Think you. I'm so grateful. Dr hodge in her expertise so learn more about her work into check out all the resources she shared. Be sure to visit the show. Notes therapy for black girl dot com slash session. Two four and don't forget to share this episode with two other sisters in your life who just might appreciate the conversation. If you're looking for a therapist in your area be sure to check out their directory at therapy for let girls dot com slash directory. And if you wanna continue digging into this topic or just being community with other sisters come on over. Join us in the sister circle. It's our cosy corner of the internet designed just for black women you can join us at community. Therapy for black girls dot com. Thank you all so much for joining me again this week. I look forward to continuing this conversation with you all real soon. Take care real housewives of miami but make it with murder. If you like the sound of that you'll definitely want to grab a copy of the perfect ruined by new york times bestselling author shinora will a gripping thriller that takes you into the sinful elite world of miami's luxury class. As one unhinged woman sets off the perfect plan to perfectly ruin another woman seemingly perfect life. This book goes all out with the drama and suspense but it also puts the spotlight on the necessity of mental health especially for women of color and the damage of untreated trauma. Issues that are important amd personal to the author. The perfect ruin by shinora williams is the target book club. Pick of the mom and it's available now. Everywhere books are sold. For more info visit shinora williams dot com. That's s. h. a. n. o. r. a. williams dot com. It's father's day ankles. Even though kohl's believes dance deserve more than just one day. They deserve to be recognized every day. That's why they have tons of awesome gifts. Dancer gonna love year round from outdoor entertaining to team apparel and accessories to watches. Baseball has an for doors to active. Wear from top brands. Like nike adidas and under armour. You'll find all his favorite things at kohl's shop now at kohls dot com to find something he sure to love. Meet your new favorite skin here. Product the gleaming vitamin c. Klay mask featuring the powerful glow duo of tumor egg in aloe. Vera is great for fading. Dark spots hyper pigmentation improving texture. Invisibly evening skin tone naturally it also reduces acne and scoring. I love the easy application. And that i saw results with only a few uses. The mask is safe for all skin types. His vegan and cruelty free. It is beloved with over two hundred and fifty thousand customers and has sold out fourteen times he had to gleaming dot com and then use kotei. Bg for fifteen percent off your first order..

center for cognitive therapy Dr hodge shinora williams falls church Alicia hodge shinora virginia Virginia miami kohl new york times williams adidas nike Baseball Vera
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Conversations. So much about leadership is about talent. It's not just the talent we have. Of course more importantly it's the talent that we bring into our organizations the talent that we developed and never in history. Has there been more challenging time of really finding great talent today. Were going to be making the invitation for all of us to do a better job at finding talent and especially finding talent in the places that are traditionally overlooked. I'm so glad to welcome today's guest. Johnny taylor junior. He is the president and ceo of sherm the society for human.

Johnny taylor sherm the society for human
"for " Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

Marketing for Consultants

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"for " Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

"Don't don't worry about. don't think over. Just just start doing some research here. And so i started to Query or survey consultants and the first thing i started asking the bet was websites you know. How much did you spend on your website. Is your website important for you and i discovered. No it's not important for them a lot of them. Don't spend any money under websites and so this was fascinating and slightly. And so i started to dig into that more and the the great thing about the The research is it really teaches you so much about your target market. That's it's invaluable. So what i did then was. I looked at why it wasn't important. And the why. It wasn't important because most consultants get their business from referrals. And when you when you get most of your business from referrals. Your website isn't really all that important. It needs to meet a certain bar. That's it but it doesn't need to actively generate business for you because you're getting your business from referrals so so a i started looking at this on and and so i decided okay. I'm interested in. This area of how consultants are getting business and effectively marketing themselves. And so i said okay. I i have enough at this point to say. It's not websites where consultants. Let's just call it. Marketing for council for consultants. Let's just get going that that was. That was how i got to that brand. And i just wanted to. I wanted something that was different. I wanted. I wanted to hang a sign outside the door and i didn't know what to put on that sign and so i decided okay. This is one. I'm going to put a temporary and you know you can change the sign that said the door. That's fine It's to you and your four. So and so. Yeah that was where where it came from and then as i got into it and it's probably probably two and a half years now since i initially started up around I did put a lot of effort into it..

council for consultants
"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

07:18 min | 2 months ago

"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

"Bradford struggle in local communities across the country in about two hundred local communities where they were being fights over the swimming pool or the movie theater. Some some local institution with real meeting in the community where people were engaged. In in protracted organizing efforts and then suddenly they are being asked. Can you get people who washington organism loss. King organized five buses. Can you put up these posters out. Can you get everyone to focus on this mobilization. No you can't bring your own signs size and edo people have limited time and energy and there were huge numbers of people who went to that march and were deeply moved and inspired by experience and and continue working with renewed energy but organizationally. You what you might think like after remarks like that. There would be more local chapters of the end of lacey. Pe- people joining accord chapters and rain. Those metrics now it wasn't they were depleted and in. Some cases began a long term decline. It was the high water point on that hind organizing now needed the some of you know a lot of the work at that point shifted into other arenas other than speaker tests you came as is touche's began to respond to demands for change would be on a committee or be in some kind of more insider process community the nonetheless that you know when you think about the advent of sixty six hours of power power movement part of what's happening is that the traditional civil rights wins at the local level had been gained a four that pivoted schist and there was less interception and the sixty part of our that happened. The two thousand seventeen rushing there were again. These ad hoc organizing committees came together new cases to do the work of getting people to the martyr organizing of the hundreds and hundreds on my bleated. Six hundred fifty. So which is a striking number three times the number of communities that has always protesting Three seventeen see this tripling to what you saw. A lot of cases was that then people went with matt in order to for the first time in order to do. This work continued working whether they in most cases says numerically. The largest number of those the little grouplets charged to into chapters of but they turned into all kinds of other resistance groups as well there. People were moved energized and galvanized by the experience chain and it came not a high at the beginning was the beginning of what became what you know. It's it's hard for us now. We don't have enough time and distance to really look back and see what happened in trump the thing. That's absolutely certain is that it is the single largest era of protests in. Us history by by far the numbers are just staggering. I mean the counting insertion is volunteer project to keep track of protests chop era. And when you you begin already. The women's marches eaters. Save hundreds working. Unity's ever seen protested all time western had never really been more than two hundred bases. Louis people have all participated in time until twenty seventeen building to the black lives matter surge last summer during pandemic during quarantine when we supposedly can't get together a plan and organize together in in public. And you have something like two thousand twenty. Two hundred at least different communities were purchased took place and millions in nine hundred millions of participants. So we're seeing the spread of Instinctively over the course of that for years not just in terms of absolute numbers but i think most strikingly in terms of geography. The the focus is away from washington is not everybody march on washington. It's thousands and thousands and thou- of communities emotion in a way again. I don't think it will go round in their mind. They hey i'm just living. Through the biggest era protests. Not at all interesting. It's interesting to think of. The women's march on washington is like kicking off an era which is what it was doing whereas the nine hundred sixty three march on washington. The original march on washington was sort of towards the end of a big movement. And not actually kicking off and it just when you talked about this in your book about the depletion of organizer energy and resources after like a big march event yet reminded me of in the medicare for all movement healthcare. Now we used to do around medicare's anniversary all these events annually every year we'd have rallies actually we'd have all of our grassroots groups making their own local events and they could either be protests or rallies or any other kind of actions on him. They did educational events and it was just so much it was so much planning and there was a lot of work and afterwards we just didn't we weren't sure if we were really seeing a return on this investment of these like big visibility type actions and now and i think about like had we done another medicare's anniversary action like big know widespread grassroots action thing that we were supporting here at healthcare. Now i think about like the more targeted organizing that i'm doing now. That would have had to take a back seat to this. Like sort of visibility style action. Which i think you know where we are in our movement for medicare for all. I feel like the work that i'm doing right now or the work that we're doing right now and targeted districts and like base building an organizing that kind of thing. I'd love to hear. Ben what do you think about this. Although i think we might be talking about a little bit later but in terms of that versus kind of visibility especially where the medicare for all is right now is more effective and i just wanted to ask you another question. The very first line of the book protests work. Just not perhaps the that you think. I wanted to ask a little bit more about that. So you know looking across the many mass rallies and marches that yearbook covers. What are the way that they've worked at their best. And how is that different from the way that many people envision them working that line. There's a couple ways to tease it out. So he wasn't is a different kinds of protests working different ways and that we tend to the organizers like you guys may be wrong.

washington Bradford lacey swimming medicare for all movement heal medicare King matt Louis Us Ben
"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

NO HOME FOR HEROES

07:03 min | 7 months ago

"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

"But mom knew something that the navy wasn't aware of clarence. Donner had called his parents after thirty july. To tell them that he was headed by train from california. Four schuyler new york to attend an officer training program. Clarence was alive well and had never sale with the indianapolis well the next day. After receiving this telegram clearances mother. Ruth letter to the chief of naval personnel vice. Admiral randall jacobs she wrote quote. We're pleased to inform you that we have talked to our son since that day and also had a postal card and a letter. He is now in route to enable school in new york in quote. This donner went on to explain that radio technician second class donahue was taken to treasure island california and from there ferried to the cruiser. Uss indianapolis the be a passenger to some island base in the pacific. He had been on the ship but a half hour when the call came through for him to take his year and go back. Onshore is donner was no doubt thrilled. And happy to report vice. Admiral jacobs that her son was quoted safe and well in quote and hoped her letter would quote help. Keep your record straight in quote. Not quite the navy simply changed. Its status radio technician. Second class donna. From missing an action to being a survivor of the sinking. Of course i like just about everyone else in the world was not aware of the donner mystery in two thousand twelve. When i was working in my cases for the united states department of defense in honolulu hawaii but in the course of investigating hundred and seventy nine other cases while there i stumbled onto a whole series of other odd cases connected with the indie mystery which seemed to indicate that some of the casualties of the sinking had actually been recovered and buried at sea. But we're still on the official roles of the department of defense as missing in action now. Swamped with thousands of other gatien's and running out of time in my contract i wasn't able to follow up on those clues until a twenty seventeen when a team of investigator from the rick stone and family charitable foundation was sent to the naval history and heritage command on the washington navy yard in washington dc. Their mission was to search the archives of the naval history and heritage command for any information that might help clear. Some of those indications i had been concerned about in two thousand twelve. Shortly after that trip they will history and heritage. Command asked me to review some excellent research that have been conducted by one of their own historians. Docker richard hulliber and independent author miss. Sarah lasik concerning the donner mystery. The question was simple was donner. Lost at sea was donner a survivor. Donner never on the ship. In the first place both dr hulda and misled discovered that within hours of arriving on the indie donner's notice of acceptance into an officer training program in her off had awry and was incredible efficiency. The orders given to him to report the ford scholar. New york were delivered to him on board. The indianapolis is deployment to the pacific was canceled amid the chaos of the ships hurried. Secret redeployment to deliver the atomic bomb components to tinian island. Donner's arrival on board was apparently recorded but his hasty departure overlook thus when the paper records were reconstructed after the sinking he he remained on the final cruelest resulting in complement of one thousand. One hundred and ninety six sailors on board. Uss indianapolis that number was one too many in reviewing the amazing amount of documentation already collected. I concurred with the conclusions. There was then a simple matter of finding radio technician. Second class clarence donner in twenty seventeen and confirming. The facts were some foundation research in hand. I actually health. On the johnson cemetery in polat ca florida and confirmed with the cemetery administrator that radio technician second class. Clarence william donner was there. He had died at age. Eighty two on one february two thousand and two. Well we reported our foundations confirmation to the naval history command and in march twenty eighteen. The united states navy finally corrected the records and removed radio technician second class honour as an indie crew member on that last fatal voyage. He wasn't lost at sea and he wasn't a survivor. what he was. Which probably the luckiest man of all who had ever set on the uss indianapolis be it ever so briefly and the bottom line is this mom was right. Something tells me that there will be other no home for heroes podcast about future investigations into other uss indianapolis mysteries. Staus stay tuned home for hero. Thank you for listening to this episode of no home for heroes. We hope you've enjoyed today's production. It's really been a special one for us to produce. We invite you to check out our other episodes on apple. Podcast tune in radio podcasts. Blueberry or whichever platform you liked to listen to podcasts. We greatly appreciate your comments and a special lake is available for you to contact us on our website at www chief. Bridgestone dot com. We again thank you for your support. Our mission to provide information to the families of missing american servicemen and missing american service. Every assistance counts. And you could have until next time. Be careful be safe in wishing you fair winds and following sees. I'm your host works known reminding you that towards the nation that has no hero. Shameful is the nation. that having heroes or get snuffed..

Clarence california Ruth polat ca florida march twenty eighteen tinian island Donner Clarence william donner New york no home for heroes Staus indianapolis Sarah lasik one thousand Eighty two twenty seventeen today randall jacobs new york washington dc
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

05:34 min | 10 months ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Merrily. We wanted to understand what their attitudes are denied. Because we'd studied every other group in the workplace but we hadn't looked at at straight white men who you know hold so much positional power and if we're really going to drive change. We all need to be engaged. When i found so encouraging was one we asked then majority men. You know how important is deny to you at work. So not you know. Generally as a general good but how important is diversity and inclusion to use civically at. Were we found that only ten percent of majority men sad. It's not important to me at all and forty two percent said it's very important to me so to me that gives me hope. And the efforts in statements we see coming out from a livestream male corporate leaders and the their intentions in there a weakening around race. You know my desire is to extend that to keep their attention to ensure is a sustained movement. But i have a lot of hope that it can be based on those survey results. We also found that those true believers we call them. Those who think dna is very important are highly likely to be senior and as you said david so important that they set tone so that's something that has given me hope. I did not realize that there was that kind of a base of work and so we did find that they're not as likely to To act indian either more likely to believe in it but less likely to be an actively so i think that's what we need to accomplish as a movement is to ensure that base is activated as allies. Bad there's a lot to work with their. So that's something i've changed my mind on and really excited about julia taylor. Kennedy is with the center for talent innovation. The new report is the power of belonging what it is and why it matters in today's workplace. Julia thank you so much for all your work. Thank you so much for highlighting at dave and for having me on. You heard me introduce juliet being from the center for talent innovation and right after we recorded this conversation they announced a change of name for the organization. They are now called cocoa. And so you'll find references to that in the episode notes today and also this week's weekly leadership guide julia. Thank you and your entire team. At coco for the continued work. You are doing in the space. In addition several other related episodes. You may want to out if this conversation has gotten you thinking. I'd recommend my past conversation with julia as well episode. Three ninety eight what you gain by sponsoring people also with julia in that conversation. We talked about the distinctions between mentorship and sponsorship. And i loved the distinction. She makes in that conversation about mentors. Talk with you sponsors. Talk about you. It's a shift that many of us should be thinking about in how we lead and support folks inside and outside of our organization three ninety eight a great complement to this conversation today about belonging also recommended his episode four forty one that journey towards diversity and inclusion willie jackson was my guest on that episode a leader very much in the space. We talked about the journey that you may take as a leader but also your organization may take towards diversity and inclusion another good complement to this conversation again. That's absolute four forty one also helpful to you may be a episode that aired earlier. This year on the dave's journal podcast called changed my mind as a recent events have unfolded. I've changed my mind on things over the last few years. I did a deep dive on that. In that episode. You'll find that on the journal. Podcast and linked up in the notes as well and then finally i also produced a audio course a free audio course earlier this year and the title. That is making the most of mentoring. Mentoring is one way that we can help. Support belonging in organizations and of course sponsorship a key portion of that as well as i mentioned a moment ago but mentoring for us is a good starting point and in the free audio course on the coaching for leaders dot com website. You can access five key steps. They if you start will really help you to leverage the power of mentoring in your own work. All of that you can find on. Coaching for leaders dot com. If you have not already. I'd encourage you to set up your free membership at coaching leaders. Dot com. that's gonna give you access to the entire library since two thousand eleven searchable by topic of episodes one of the topic is diversity and inclusion which of course this will be filed under many other conversations. We've had about diversity inclusion over the years many more coming in the next year so watch for that. In addition you'll also get access to the weekly leadership guide that comes every wednesday plus the free audio courses one of them. I mentioned a moment ago by entire online catalogue and library. All of the details on kuching for leaders dot com to set up your free membership and you will be off and running next week. I'm glad to welcome patrick. Lindsay only back to the show. He's going to be returning to teach us about the lessons from his newest book. The modem join me for that conversation with pat next week have a wonderful week. And i'll see you back next monday. Take care of everybody..

center for talent innovation julia julia taylor willie jackson dave juliet Julia Kennedy david Lindsay patrick pat
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

07:57 min | 10 months ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Our lives and most of us wish and hope for that kind of belonging at work too but what does belonging look like in the workplace and. What can we do as leaders to help our teams organizations support that kind of belonging today a recent study. That's come out from an expert organization. I know is going to help us with some practical steps to move forward on that. I am so thrilled to welcome back to the show. Julia taylor kennedy. She is an executive vice president at the center for talent innovation driving cutting edge research into the issues impacting. Today's professional workforce they have an eye toward solutions for more inclusive and equitable global workforce and world. She led the sponsor dividend research which we passed featured on the show and co author disabilities inclusion mission critical unlocking the value of veterans in the workplace and the power of the purse. Engaging women for healthy outcomes she spoken at the united nations the carnegie council for ethics and international affairs the conference board and many other places and has been featured in the washington post. Cbs news forbes. Time in the harvard business review the center for talent innovation recently released a new report titled the power of belonging. What it is and why it matters in. Today's workplace julia. I'm so glad to have you back on the show. I am so thrilled to be back on the show. Dave thank you for inviting me. The pleasure is mine last time when you were speaking with us about the importance of sponsorship so many people reached out and i know found the research of the center so helpful and some really glad to dive with you today on belonging and this is one of those words that i think a lot of us have a sense of what it means but i am curious before we dive in when you engaged in this research. How did you define a longing. Good place to start dave what does belonging need. And that's actually where we began when we embarked on this research. What we saw was lots of companies and celebrities actually and politicians using this phrase in this concept of belonging saying you know. I want to find a place where i belong. That belonging is so important to foster when looking to connect especially with people who have different backgrounds from your own we saw this concept of belonging. Ily coming up to the surface and so we wanted to drill down definition of long and so we hold together a few measures that we saw out there. In our literature review that had been used to measure belonging different community context schools in neighborhoods and one from india at had measured a belonging in the workplace to create our own measure. Twenty four questions to understand when you feel you belong at work and when we step back and look at these twenty four questions. They really fell neatly into or elements or buckets or elements as we call them of belonging. That's what we used to build our definition so to us belonging at work means you feel seen for your unique contributions seen is that erste element connected to your co workers supported in your daily work and career development and for route of your organization's values and purpose. So you can see there elements here of being visible understood and connected supported in your endeavors and really then feeling apart and feeling proud of the place where you work and all four of these together contribute to that feeling of as you looked at belonging through those those four lenses. Who did you study in the research. So our methodology for this research very similar to the studies that we've done in the past we like to use a robust mix of both qualitative and quantitative methods so that we ensure that incites that we're getting from our data and from our interviews are put into context so we started with that review. Then we did some expert interviews work with a few advisors to shape our research hypotheses when out and fielded a nationally representative survey in partnership with organization out of the university of chicago to thousands of respondents in the us all college educated professionals and then we also did focus groups and did a series of interviews ban of course the pandemic head and we wanted to make sure that we were confident in our findings given how much the world has changed so we read fielded. The survey ended a few more bogus scripts after the pandemic hit so that we could be documenting how it impacted along in the workplace. There's so many fascinating outcomes from this study and one of them. That was really interesting to me. As this is one of the first studies that is also including some of the data that's included after the pandemic and as we're all responding to this and imai remembering correctly that the results are available. Publicly that folks can can download them easily. Yes so if you go to our website talent innovation dot. Org you can download the key findings for free. You can purchase the report for twenty bucks pretty easy pretty easy to get the findings. Yes perfect and i'm going to link up to all that in the episode notes and as i was reading through the results. There's so many things here that are just fascinating that came out of this and so many implications for us as leaders and one of the key findings is that a slight uptick in belonging leads to a really sizable increase in engagement and loyalty. Tell me a bit more about that. One of the key things that we wanted to understand is how important is it. Focused on belong in the workplace as we saw more and more companies weaving it into their own strategies round talent retention knitting gauge moment. As well as diversity inclusion wanted to say well as fostering belonging really work to get more knitted engaged. Please feel a part of the fabric of your organization and that was one of the strongest findings. is that even a small uptick in your belongings score as we call it. The outcome of that twenty four questions gail that we constructed even a slight uptick in your belongings or can lead to a really significant increase in your loyalty to your organization your likelihood to stay or the retention figure. You talked about your engagement in your current job. And it also leads a decrease in an individual's sense that they feel stalled in their careers. So lots of really good outcomes that both employers and employees are looking or and so when you feel you belong when you feel those elements of belonging that correlates to these great feelings of engagement and loyalty and west feelings of frustration. Or harir stall. I wanna ask you later more about some of the practical things we can do as leaders and as i'm thinking about what you just said part of the hope that i have coming out of this data is that while. I think there's the intention for all of us to want to do. Big things in our organizations to create belonging into into people feel included that small shifts can also make a really big difference that if we're willing to just take some first steps back. The data shows that that can really be significant absolutely and you know another signal that points to how how belonging.

Julia taylor kennedy center for talent innovation d carnegie council for ethics an center for talent innovation Cbs news washington post united nations imai julia Dave dave university of chicago india us gail
"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

"I am benjamin day. I'm stephanie nakajima and this is medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare so today. We're gonna discuss a topic that is central to our success in winning medicare for all when we as a movement talk about what it's going to take to win often when you hear issues like fundraising publication electing the right. Legislators there's other things that usually come up. But i think there's something that maybe even more important than any of those things putting us on the path to victory and that is of course confronting the deeply ingrained racism and our structures and cells. When you look at where. The united states is in compared in comparison to its pure countries. It's impossible to explain why we are so much more of an unequal and capitalist society than everywhere else that looking at the role of racism through our history <hes>. Its impact on our safety net and the neglect and vilification of our public programs. So this is like a big conversation and we could probably have several podcasts on it but today we want to talk about racism specifically in the healthcare system and how medicare for all would and wouldn't address in a racism at the doctor's office and and then a little bit about the interrelated nature of our movements a movement with the larger fight for racial justice. And why and how. They are interconnected so ben. Do you want to introduce our guest absolutely so it is my great pleasure to introduce the wonderful person on the screen with us <hes>. Dr beata amani. Who is an associate professor for. The charles r drew university of medicine and science and <hes>. This is a timely is a lead co chair of the covid nineteen taskforce on racism and equity which is housed at the ucla center for study of racism social justice and health. Welcome dr money. I'm so excited to be here. It is great to have you so before we dive into this deep topic <hes>. Can you tell us a little bit about your background. And why did you choose to become an epidemiologist with a focus on racism and what is epidemiology. So i mean that's a that's a wonderful question. Just what is an epidemiologist. Because i think for so many people. My friend circle in my family <hes>. This current moment had them <hes>. Here in the word and being like <hes>. Isn't one of those. So epidemiology is essentially like the science and the studying of the disease distribution pattern the the distribution patterns of disease <hes> and anything associated with z's <hes>. And it's not only about studying the the distribution and the pattern of disease and its related outcomes but it's also about studying the things that go into effect right the things that are in place the policies and practices that we have what are the effects of those things on the distribution of disease disease-related outcomes. So what that meant for me <hes>. I think growing up was. I always loved <hes>. Health and i loved politics <hes>. And i was always thinking about the relationship between these two things <hes>. And so when. I know you're thinking about how to have some sort of impact especially as a young person <hes>. And you hear about like institutions. Like the cdc or the who right <hes>. You really can you know. Start to give a sense of like. What does it mean to be able to like. Go out and steady and to collect information that can be so useful that it can actually save. Lives like on a larger level. These are to me that young person you know who was really drawn to like the field of setting in a deniau genes that then overtime epidemiology. That also came to me a tool set and a set of ideas that belonged to and we're a service of a system that <hes>. Not only structured by racism. Right like us. Stephanie mentioned beginning at the heart of what we're talking about today <hes>. But also was instrumental in structuring it and and creating and maintaining that <hes>. And so then what that meant for me. Somebody who was studying it was that i was really drawn initially to infectious disease epidemiology <hes>. Because you saw so much like an equity <hes>. And also just they kind of racialized ideas about populations being generated around who's sick. Who's not risk of people who are not sick from those. Who are you know. So all those racial congregations <hes>. And then moving into what we call behavioral. Fb and the idea that <hes> people's behaviors and they're like and and you know people's behaviors and their own actions can be connected and related to their health. So there's a potential for some sort of empowerment right to what i am. I think you know today like loosely. <hes>. and specifically your social epidemiologist. Somebody who wants to study the distribution of disease and disease related factors <hes>. In populations and communities on basant understanding systems structures in power

medicare benjamin day stephanie nakajima Dr beata amani charles r drew university of m ucla center for study of racis disease disease ross ben united states cdc Stephanie infectious disease
"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

Mindset for Life

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

"And then afterward, the time to reconnect with the ideas and to reflect now, there are a lot of good ways for us to do this reflection. The International Association for Journal, Writing Provides a lot of suggestions some of them I'm going to share here some of them I will encourage you to check out in your own time. So here are some of the strategies. First of all, they advocate that journal writing helps you to let off your thoughts from the day in a manageable way so that you're not hiding your emotions, you're not dumping your emotions on other people, but you have this space to focus on what you're feeling and what you're thinking, and maybe the whys behind it. And also the what you WANNA do next it gives that time to pause. Look at the page where you can know, grow and care for yourself through express a writing. Now. There is this attitude where if you decide, you're going to start writing things down like during this reflection process I like to refer to it as journaling. So I'm GonNa say that throughout the rest of this podcast and often in other podcasts If you take up the habit of being. Don't get yourself when you don't do it. So if you skip a day, skip a week, skip a month event. You can get right back to it and just add where you left off. I've been a journal keep her since I was twelve years old. I'm nearly fifty something and I'm very excited to say that I have consistently kept journals since I was twelve years old. There were some periods of my life like when I was single going to college eighteen, nineteen, twenty years old I was able to write in my journal every single day pages and pages about all my thoughts things I was learning all my experiences. Maybe even sometimes multiple times during the day..

International Association for
"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

"Right here, this is not about politics kiss. Health. Emergency can't wait brought up theoretical face about better. Well never ever thought the. We have been. Reporting Daily! In, this matter of Camp Ross. And that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts. Believe in slavery. I, am Benjamin Day? AM, Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare. Including all the K pop fans all over the world who came together to sink trump rally. Yes for those who haven't heard. Trump headache coronavirus rally in Oklahoma. And a bunch of young people filled out fake reservations so that he ended up with an empty stadium. And it turns out, they mostly from south. Korea where they already have single payer healthcare, those lucky bastards. So today Yellow Lucky! We have a really special guest Marc Duds Ick the national coordinator of the Labor Campaign for single pair. Thank you mark for joining us. It's great to be here Ben and Stephanie. Thanks Suit. Could you just tell us first? How did you get into the single payer movement? Wow well. I was the. President of a union in the union called the oil chemical. Atomic Workers Local Union in New Jersey. That had about. Forty different. small chemical and pharmaceutical plants under contract. and. In the nineteen eighties, we began to see that and we were having more and more of a struggle on. Bargaining for health care for our members, and We, actually invited. David Himmelstein to speak our district council meeting in Nineteen eighty-eight when Jesus of the single payer. Yeah I think this is not long after they actually launched php the Physicians for National. L. Program, and You know I gotTa say when I first saw David show up I was like man. Who is this hippy doctor? What does he know about healthcare But you know he really framed. The issue. You. Know made us made me think about you know..

Stephanie Nakajima David Himmelstein Atomic Workers Local Union Benjamin Day Marc Duds Camp Ross Korea Oklahoma Physicians for National Medicare coordinator President New Jersey Ben
"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

Mindset for Life

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

"And so I have some principles or points that I'd like to share today, seven keys of innovation and creativity to get us going. So the I thought is that as we think about creativity, especially in light of when we feel limitations. Or when we're struggling personally in need to tap into our wellness and have some reserves going. Creativity can can really be a relief to us, so the first key is to accept you are creative. You have creativity. Everyone is creative. We all have a natural ability to be creative, and while we are creative in different ways or indifferent degrees than other people. Yes, we are all creative. Number to. Practice creative thinking to develop it. Did you know that creativity can actually be increased their other kinds of natural abilities. People have that can be increased. Such as interpersonal abilities, athletic skills, physical agility and music ability. I'm sure we could be many many more skills and abilities. We could grow. Creativity can be thought of like a skill can be like a skill as well. And it could be increased through regular practice now if we don't use our creativity at also makes sense that we might think we're just not creative. Instead it would be better to say that we need to tap into our creativity and develop it. As, we practice, we're going to expand experience both fear and failure because we are practicing. Anytime. We're practicing something. We're going to fail just like we're going to succeed and we're going to grow in that ability. So understanding that fear and failure will both come along while we're being creative, that can help us. Keep going rather than stopping when we feel afraid or when we make mistakes and fail. He number three. Be Willing and open to new possibilities. If we are stuck on routines, traditions or the way we've always done things, it can be very challenging to find a new creative approach according to Nancy Napier. The executive director of Voices State University's Center for Creativity and innovation organizations might have different missions, but in order to be creative or innovative, they typically have a willingness and a desire to be creative. One question that can help this process grow is what can we do? That is better or different. Key number four. A mindset of abundance helps creative ideas to flow if we are focused on lack or what we don't have, it can be kind of challenging to create, but when we focused on what we do have. What possibilities exist what opportunities there are connections between unrelated things and solutions creatively can absolutely flourish. Principle number five. Continue to learn. Creativity taps into the existing knowledge. We have our imagination and attitude. And it connects with our resources are habitats and our culture to build solutions that's according to Tina seelig she's a best selling author and Stanford University professor who focuses on innovation and creativity. When we think about this lifelong learning helps us grow our creativity by trying to our existing knowledge..

Center for Creativity Tina seelig Nancy Napier Stanford University executive director Voices State University professor
"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

For Realness Sake

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

"Of people at a young age or like you get told that you're like the man of the house or something like that. Who wants to hear your problems? I get it. Once you express a little bit of vulnerability. Then you know. You're the foundation says like so the foundation is we or seems we then everything crumbling because you're never given the opportunity or maybe you didn't feel like you should take the opportunity to express yourself as a kid. You grow up thinking that no one wants to hear your gripes. Because you're supposed to be strong you're supposed to be x Y Z. Whatever mail Standard they've created. Or you know me personally I grew up. I was the only child I was eleven and I feel like I missed that That part of my life could learn how to express myself so You know there's a lot of time spent I spent time alone And I was the only kid so it wasn't like I could call my siblings or say You know this is going on on only one house right so I think that's what it was for me like me not really learn how to express myself and when things were going on. The House is kind of like all right. Let me put these here. Let me This is why like learn how to draw. I had drawn pat. Had that's my room so I just sit at a table and just drop it off spilling so yeah I can relate to that. I think that that's Kinda how I was Mama was like A. She showed us like hardcore. Like what you doing type Thing but in the midst of that like I think I got so caught up in like try not to be wrong for everything than I. I forgot what my own feelings were because it became like how could I not get in trouble? Not Saying I was getting in trouble all the time but it really like. It didn't take much like my mom. She was she was on it like white on rice. Like one little thing. What you you being respectful and it was like to the point where I think. I'm not sure if I'm expressing must lie. I'm not sure if if the if what I feel is going to translate. Well am I able to properly communicate my feelings to you without coming off as being disrespectful or that come off as being you know just wrong. And so a lot of times. My feelings were given to me. Don't obamacare what's your attitude you know You could go in the room with all that or you know. Don't disrespect me actually. I'm having a rough tie crab I'm already crying on the inside. You know like just that part so it's not really Really truly being given the opportunity to express myself without reprimand or without feeling a feeling like something terrible is going to come after this of course a lot of parents say you know you can talk to me but when really comes down to it can I can. I really truly express myself to not be afraid of the repercussions of this. Are you GonNa take what I'm saying you get later? Is this a safe space for me to talk and a lot of times? I didn't feel that and so I didn't share in. It took me a long time to learn how to share. I was Twenty three years old when I was in that council or was twenty four. When I went to that. Y'All I was a substance abuse counselor for three years when you had your specialized training. Yeah and I had to go. I was in the military. And they sent us to this like it's called index is School for Substance Abuse Counselors where we like go through this process of group therapy for like two months and it was. It was super intense. I was like they compared to like a mental health. Counseling Program A Master's mental health counseling program like Events because it happened so fast but you. It's like super impactful because you learn a whole lot name anyway So yes so throughout that process in the beginning because I didn't have the tools given to me as a child to know how to properly communicate. I thought that everything I said was like not right so when we got into this group the mass that I was wearing was exposed. I couldn't just be the everything's okay care. They didn't want to hear that they want here. Know what's going on with you because you're not saying anything but you need to shake united saying thing but your eyes are watering. We want to know what you're what you're going through so that you can be you know an effective counselor for someone else. In the beginning. That was really hard for me because I didn't mind so was not. Let me try to get my feelings out my mindset was I don't want to offend anybody else or what I say because for my entire life that's how I had operate. I couldn't say what I wanted to say. I had to make sure that what I said sounded good enough that I WANNA get into trouble. I could get what I wanted. You know saying you know what I mean. And that's not necessarily. My mom was ready with the broom. Stick or bell but it does say that I. I walked on eggshells a lot of tyler. Her not knowing just knowing communication isn't taught a lot of house a witness Effective communication. I think that that those are the things that shape us. You know learning how to communicate effectively as a kid. You didn't witness effective communication. I rarely witness communication and so it was very hard for me and it's still hard for me now. You want me to communicate. I don't know how to it's not that I don't want to communicate with you. I don't know how to and I get that. But it is frustrating like we are working our communication. I think we're doing way better but in the beginning especially when I was going through the whole council hours trying to fix you as I was fixing myself going online every day I had a new diagnoses. You got problems to our Omar. Don't don't do that council amiss. I Joe Patient I will hold it because I'm learning some stuff that is frustrating. I think that for us now. It gets frustrating. Because I'll get stuff out open in like have it. Conversations take three hours like I'm down for that and you're like a less table. Let me think conor person and I read a lot of times to me is is more so so. I don't say the wrong thing because I've only learn how to communicate to ways One is Dulcie not Too is you express yourself with anger. I don't want to a lot of times Get Mad at you because I don't know how to express myself and then we'll wind up and you know have an argument because now I'm frustrated and I don't want to talk to you I wonder if more people feel that like if more guys have those sorts of feelings angry brothers yeah. I know a lot of systems that light to talk late super contrast but I I hate that because it makes it you know it takes us a long time to resolve problems because it's like okay. We could already talked about this. And then you know it can get bigger than what it needs to be. So what are some ways? Because I'm always trying to look for sluice so there's no ways that you think you can improve that while I've learned how to Early in our relationship I think that was most effective communicating when I was in the music And I think I should go back to doing that. Sending me music is you know. Here's your apple music. We like you know just a little form of expression a journal a couple of weeks ago kind of gamma films out But I do think that I can Start to just tell you the little things that don't feel when I feel in them. I think I can do that. it's going to be hard internalize a lot. Yeah but I'm I'm ready to hear it because I like I get excited feelings like oh so. I'm like really afford that because it helped me. Just be able to understand you better in like give you what you need not just me trying to pull the words out of you which is what I do now. You gotta understand like I internalize so much like is like putting stuff in a box like a chest and like.

School for Substance Abuse Cou apple tyler conor Joe Patient
"for " Discussed on For Women Who Love The F-Word

For Women Who Love The F-Word

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on For Women Who Love The F-Word

"Tell us a little bit more about your journey yes My journey started when I started designing garments nationally in India fashion. Styling has been my passion since childhood. Gradually I'm collaborating with my brother. And together we are doing couple of evens internationally through aesthetics Patrick International in which I'm not a partner in founder of a woman. Asep W I told early at the static and the National Council for Progressive Woman. But just got an working in more than twenty five countries. I am actively working for all round development of females who are actively actively involved in business education so this our social enter was. I'm doing this as it says my orgin and my mission to see women getting in followed across the globe. And how do you you know. I'm I'm sure a long journey. They're all definitely ups and downs. What were some of your greatest struggles? And how did you overcome them. Yes yes yes definitely everyone struggles and I do. I am also facing and I must say my greatest struggle has been a dominating knitting mill driven society and all those who cannot acknowledge of woman rising beyond prescribe limits of the society it. Actually I was previously a housewife for fourteen years so a housewife turning and enterpreneur. Bill is not taken positively by by the some by the same my society what we can say so. This is the thing. I always faced a struggle struggle so that the society has you know the prejudice. And you know that you have been such an amazing role model. So is there a person person or something that has encouraged you or motivated you to become you know to step out of their comfort zone out of the societal prejudice into becoming so successful today. Yes sure my family my brother and my friends. They all helped me to overcome Tom. This society do motivated me to motivate me to work and always encouraged me to come overcome struggles struggles and definitely with those motivating people. My hard work in that Because I want to show this world a real real power of women. This is the main motivation which I come with my old friends. My brother my family. And all these all were with me to motivate all the time so sounds like there is a very strong network that you have so sir young amongst all the accolades you have and the things that you've done to you. What is your greatest success? Thus far Yes okay I would say that my greatest success is my international penetration of my programs. If you talk about my shows idle evens We are in two kids evens which employs competition related to singing fashion dancing. I'm seeing drawing instrumental feutry too many more which is coming on national. TV also and we are doing couple of evens that awed international leadership summits Passionate Lifestyle Exhibitions International Fashion Week International Film Festival. And now I'm coming up with the film Fest Film Film Shot Phil Morton Women Involvement. Also though I think so up penetration international penetration of all my programs. It is my greatest success. What is your big Y? I Love Your Energy and passion over women empowerment. I'm hearing in your voice. Even though you're in India and Singapore right now I can hear it right over there so share with me. Your big. Why is when I launched Aesthetics International Council for Progressive Recieve Women in twenty? I started with a vision to empower women throughout the world and now with the starting of twenty twenty I could see. My dream is fulfilling as my organization. Aesthetics International Council for Progressive Woman has spread breaded. Its Wing in more than twenty five countries with fifteen hundred plus members. This I think is big I wanted to do. My mission is not yet accomplished but still I could see I would be able to do it definitely. So what are your three top business tips or life transformation tips you have for women. I mean considering your journey. Yes yes my my eight. Three business. Tips for women is that a woman should have a realistic mystic vision. They should have a desire to succeed and drum leadership ship come on these other. Three dips business dips. I would like to suggest to women. How did you choose your inner circle off all the partner in your business to to be where you are today Dan? So many things right invested in the council you develop the aesthetics international platform fall which is now international and worldwide. So how do you choose Yes my inner circle will will always have people who are for nature dedicated to the organization's vision and can be of of love into leaders and in a relationship. You know when you will partners you say positive you talk about. They're willing to work with you to become leaders. Usually we may see power struggles right. How do you manage them like expectations? Managing their goals or what you want versus what they want want. How do you do that as a woman I would like to say although my family's wipe supportive but of course power struggles are always there? I have to manage my family my work in such a way that Mutual equals are satisfied. While definitely league with this we can definitely get sexists so in a male dominated society where a lot of things. Oh you know dating. They don't look at women where women can have an achieve success. You have now broken the record for many women so how Oh has impacted you as a person from a housewife fourteen years to now then. I was a home housewife. Definitely I was having bream to get access to do something in my life and now Evan enterpeneurial from last three years I'm working and yes I'm feeling very great. I feel like to do to gather. Are there more women attract more people because according to me that if we feel like to Laker if I talk about late gathering women and talking to them and giving them father giving them business tips and how I From a housewife. I feel very accomplished. And what is your favorite court book. Doc Dave read. It has empowered you that you wish to empower others. Who's listening in today that there is a book you can win You can win because being a howls life. Before and now enterpreneur the book. I would like to sure effort. Everyone is that has written by shift. Keira you can win. Because Vina's don't do think different things they they do things differently. It motivated me to achieve more and more than life. What is advice for women still sitting on the fence? It's about taking estrogen. I always advised and my meetings. I do business gonNa meet like in all the cities of India India because I have ninety plus districts in which my open eyes ation is working in India and in all the meetings I suggest all the woman who was sitting on the fence like they should come out sitting. There will make you you. Might I be struggling women but jared bet interval to come out and let stand in public. This is the only at why and while Bologna strong together. We are unstoppable. Isn't it yes yes exactly. This is the feeling I want to like. Get gather and I want to give that together. Women can do while many thinks. Wow Okay so to you. Who and what is a sole Seoul rich woman every woman who is generating power in Apollo was feeling the power of being women who can learn the things from others with not jet not facing an jealous problem who can empower other another woman every woman who is generating power and has crossed the fence? All women I can say on the one. So what you're saying that women who generate power through the actions is a sole rich woman. Actually they are so rich woman. So how can audience reach you. Anyone can across the world can reach me. I'm very active on social media. Anyone one can join my organization and he women can join Mouth Nuys Asian. It is free of friel false free to join. You can connect me on all the social sites facebook twitter instagram WHATSAPP and Messenger. And how do you spell your name. So that the audience.

India Aesthetics International Counc Aesthetics International Counc National Council for Progressi partner Patrick International Phil Morton Seoul facebook Bill Mouth Nuys Asian Tom Bologna friel Evan enterpeneurial founder Laker Doc Dave Vina
"for " Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"for " Discussed on Science for the People

"The views expressed on science for the people are not necessarily the views of this station, its affiliates sponsors or advertisers. This week on science for the people we're discussing mouth and things may trim yard. I up Dr. Dina timing young, discusses her book about crochet and hyperbolic geometry and how making geometric models that people can play with helps teach math. After that. Janelle, Shane discusses her hubby of training neural networks to do things like named colors, come up with Halloween, costume ideas and generate knitting patterns. Welcome to science for the people. I'm your host Marion kogo. Joining me is Dr Dina time in ya who studied mathematics at the university of Latvia later teaching at Cornell University. She came up with an idea for tactile exploration in non Euclidean geometry using crocheted hyperbolic planes. She's authored two books involving crocheted mathematical objects experienced in geometry Euclidean and non Euclidean with history. And the one we're here to discuss crocheting adventures with hyperbolic planes which just released as a second edition. So thanks for joining me today. Thank you. Bye thinking. So one of the things that's almost always a challenge to do with with an audio only sort of show is discussing mathematics because a lot of the time we were teaching math or learning math, it's printed materials in a book, or you're writing formulas, which are always sort of. Challenging to describe out loud. So why have you spent so much time over the years, popularizing ways of building physical models of mathematical objects of is a sing says to get back, though approached is a mess Matic's and if sodas, a something, some real sing yo can touch. So it's easy to understand Lexi's full concepts and also takes away a lot of mass on exotic they, it goes, if it's something you can make Baio dome, hence well than its means something veal. So you can explode it than you'll can hold it in your hands and just see what does properties, wine that might raise who some, you know some pose questions, why? And then that's that's the Serey which on why? Yeah, when I was when I was looking up, some of the videos of talks that you've done that are on line. One of them you started off with holding up this crocheted model of yours and asking. Who in the audience would be interested in playing with it, and people seemed kind of intrigued by it. And then you asked who would be interested in doing some hyperbolic geometry in like the everybody's face sorta went. So is that a sort of response you get often? Yes, yes. Well, of course it depends on the audience if that is like a scientific audience, like I was just like recently, Ismay was invited to Natalia's International Institute for physics, was a confidence in jail metro south matter, and it was like really highly creative people who are working creating new materials and exploding this kind of geometry. And they've interested say, news dive, it'll be talking about clap it about the geom- at the end, they exactly wanted to do with the attack that way. Giving a new perspective does the defendant way looking familiar sings? And of course, when I'm talking kosher ebbs, then crocheter say, oh, yeah. Well, we. We have done this thing because some of these, some of these. Negative negatively, curved Kushtia. Did pieces come out when you do mistakes throwing to crochet something flat, some some deleo something like some hat and get it off holes Suwit came first for you. Your understanding of the math or or or crew chain model of it that then led you to understanding the math. Oh, and that was so-so tooth separate sings because I was crocheting as a hobby, and I so thought myself crochet to finish my anything pieces because I was considering myself it. And then when I had to each other jail mcdonagh's saw the paper model and wanted my students to explode these paper models. And as the.

Baio dome Marion kogo Suwit Dr. Dina university of Latvia Dr Dina mcdonagh Janelle Lexi crocheter Kushtia Cornell University Ismay Shane International Institute for ph Natalia
"for " Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"for " Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"They spend a lot of time trying to hack into people's computers because all of that encryption is based on the on very hard mathematical processes. Quantum cryptography is based on the very laws of quantum physics itself. So it's almost like saying well. If he wants to bring the system. You have to defy gravity. Gravity is a fundamental. You can't do it. It's no matter how hard you try no matter how good your computer is is the same thing with. You'd have to defy the laws of physics and break the law zapanta visits. So that's a very exciting application. Another big area. I think is going to be what we call quantum simulations so for example one one industry which is really really important in the health care sector is pharmaceuticals for example where you want to be able to model the of drugs and how the different molecules interact with each other and so on turns out to get to you know These drugs with large numbers of molecules. It's a very hard thing to simulate on a regular computer a quantum computer we could simulate it much more efficiently and you can imagine that would be a really really important. Application and one of the examples is in pharmaceuticals but there are many other such examples. Where the quantum computer could simulate a quantum kind of system involving large numbers of atoms and molecules much better than any existing classical computer. So how close are we to the quantum computing revolution turns out. It's not an easy question to answer. I think it is an exciting time. But it's it's the kind of excitement we've felt before as well so i'm sure back. When the first transistor was built the same sort of excitement was you know felt by the scientists back then and yes. It was the start of building a huge ecosystem and all of the technology we know today. So are we at that same kind of women now. I'd say it's a little early to make that kind of claim but it is exciting because finally we have Examples off small scale quantum computers so ibm for example has a working quantum computer. It's it's kind of like having toy computer like the very earliest transistor circuits ever built We're at that state so very very early. Nobody could have predicted. When you know transfers being developed where technology would go. Nobody would've ever predict by phone. So we're at the same stage where we have no idea where this technology is going to go building. A quantum computer is a very challenging thing. We need to to play with the laws of physics. so we need to improve for example the basic elements. We need to make sure they are behaving even more quantum leap than they actually giving the moment so we need to do lots of fundamental research to understand how we can do. So that's on the physical side and like the computer you need softwares. We have particularly good examples of what the quantum computer could do. but we're just scratching the surface. Meanwhile mary of quantum materials significant new inventions are well. Underway says professor demo. Shelly do believe we are at a crossroads. A very important point. I do believe that we are there. Were y but certainly some of some of the most advanced countries. And i believe we are. You know the time is ripe for for that to be taking place. That particular pollution in canada we have built were wide very profound understanding of phenomena. We have technology state of technology. We can use to explore nominee We are the love of discovered material now perfecting these materials in in devices. And i'd like to make an example. We nowadays we are able to bill materials atom by atom layer by layer evacuate. So we have extremely clean extremely perfect material down the atomic level. I like to mention a few examples. One which i find really fascinating is clean. Energy so clean. Energy is based on you decision materials. So for instance in fuel cells. And what we're doing. The quantum minor institute is is working on the refinement of new materials. That could be used for this purpose and so we have research direction is it. Your is quantum appears clean energy for a better word. And i i believe we already making major a breakthrough in this direction and we see more coming in the next few years directions where we have already Devices developed are that of a conversion of heat from light sunlight into electricity. And we're doing that. In carbon based materials these days and we have developed technology which allows to generate an electron microscope. A portable if you like electro microscope learn more scale electric. Usually these objects are as large as room. And now you have a portable one and the interest of that is in many application for instance in medical application developing countries so again broad impact that we could have these are some of the key areas in by by no means. They exhaust all the possible directions that we're working. Despite the advances of the past century the quantum world still holds many mysteries. Professors shaheen coach. Now we're getting to Ask new questions in our research where we try to think about how certain aspects of the theory we haven't really explored you know some of the strangest parts of it. Things like superposition and entanglement which are very weird phenomena Which don't really make sense to us in our everyday macroscopic world. Now we're trying to exploit those pieces of teary. Because we're at a point where we can build experiments and try to test this in the lab as research into the subatomic worlds continues. Canada's stands position does a leader in the field. The scientists agree. There's no doubt that candidates leader. Hi internationally in quantum research. This is a result of the fact that governments very early on here decided and saw the potential in quantum technology for long-term application to society canada's been investing in the spiel for thirty years and we have program which nationwide program wildlife might be safer program candidate used to for vast research which has it programming quantum materials that pro has been there for thirty years and really connect head the researchers within canada into a very strongly interactive teeth and perhaps one of the strength of canada being very collegial research environment. They collegiate community. We asking you. Didn't we should be very proud of their place. The quantum arena. We have were leading researcher in this area. We are globally recognized as an expert in the field and now we see that the quantum community in canada is getting together so that we can compete at international level. And see if i is a very key role in this Canadian fourth making sure. We have strategic investment in infrastructure better use of infrastructure and so far things are heating up now and there's a lot of great research teams all around the world and for example china is investing huge amounts of resources into have launched the quantum information satellite. That has already demonstrated entanglement from space. Maybe that'll be a new quantum space race. So the challenge for canada to keep up our thanks to professors kimberly hall. Michele pio hola he coach and dema shenley for sharing barren sites on quantum research by more research stories. Like this one on innovation dot ca slash stories and subscribe to the canada foundation for innovation on your favorite podcast app..

quantum minor institute canada Shelly ibm shaheen quantum arena kimberly hall Michele pio hola dema shenley china canada foundation for innovati
"for " Discussed on Coaching For Geeks

Coaching For Geeks

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching For Geeks

"For even houses or the if you straight breaks what do you did we time stop you stop building it buck of does nice which thing is failure leroy you only fire when he quit so if you pick yourself buck open you see this through to the end even if you miss today you've done something amazing for yourself you she definitely ah in achievement over trophy of some so and who knows what will give away at the end of via if the challenge so the longer you have streak groceries though the bigger the ex p bonus because you creating new habits actually creating new your will connections in your brain the more you do it the more come second nature the morial absorb it the more will become unconscious comparisons and more who guard the more you will level which is what it's all about more than you do the wheel the wheel of stats check your stance how full he levelled up there any of this of drops need a bit of attention you get some data you see how he did and you plan the next quest while december will be upon us then few looking for love or the great times do so look if you look continue with the out to terrible time for about or food or the wine all the parties may well i am doing the help stop everyone thought i'd be giving wealth patisserie well because that's how we spend more time on working on coaching geeks develop can do with facebook ads do marketing with developing courses we've got secret meetings with organizations that khan really talk about at murmur murmured we've got all this kind of stuff sure during this time of being a very much in the diet has been trying to take a bit of exercise in up up loss to styling but twelve kilojoule twenty eight pounds.

looking for love facebook khan twenty eight pounds twelve kilojoule