17 Burst results for "F. O. R."

"for " Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

Marketing for Consultants

04:49 min | 5 d ago

"for " Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

"Don't don't worry about. don't think over. Just just start doing some research here. And so i started to Query or survey consultants and the first thing i started asking the bet was websites you know. How much did you spend on your website. Is your website important for you and i discovered. No it's not important for them a lot of them. Don't spend any money under websites and so this was fascinating and slightly. And so i started to dig into that more and the the great thing about the The research is it really teaches you so much about your target market. That's it's invaluable. So what i did then was. I looked at why it wasn't important. And the why. It wasn't important because most consultants get their business from referrals. And when you when you get most of your business from referrals. Your website isn't really all that important. It needs to meet a certain bar. That's it but it doesn't need to actively generate business for you because you're getting your business from referrals so so a i started looking at this on and and so i decided okay. I'm interested in. This area of how consultants are getting business and effectively marketing themselves. And so i said okay. I i have enough at this point to say. It's not websites where consultants. Let's just call it. Marketing for council for consultants. Let's just get going that that was. That was how i got to that brand. And i just wanted to. I wanted something that was different. I wanted. I wanted to hang a sign outside the door and i didn't know what to put on that sign and so i decided okay. This is one. I'm going to put a temporary and you know you can change the sign that said the door. That's fine It's to you and your four. So and so. Yeah that was where where it came from and then as i got into it and it's probably probably two and a half years now since i initially started up around I did put a lot of effort into it..

council for consultants
"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

NO HOME FOR HEROES

07:03 min | 5 months ago

"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

"But mom knew something that the navy wasn't aware of clarence. Donner had called his parents after thirty july. To tell them that he was headed by train from california. Four schuyler new york to attend an officer training program. Clarence was alive well and had never sale with the indianapolis well the next day. After receiving this telegram clearances mother. Ruth letter to the chief of naval personnel vice. Admiral randall jacobs she wrote quote. We're pleased to inform you that we have talked to our son since that day and also had a postal card and a letter. He is now in route to enable school in new york in quote. This donner went on to explain that radio technician second class donahue was taken to treasure island california and from there ferried to the cruiser. Uss indianapolis the be a passenger to some island base in the pacific. He had been on the ship but a half hour when the call came through for him to take his year and go back. Onshore is donner was no doubt thrilled. And happy to report vice. Admiral jacobs that her son was quoted safe and well in quote and hoped her letter would quote help. Keep your record straight in quote. Not quite the navy simply changed. Its status radio technician. Second class donna. From missing an action to being a survivor of the sinking. Of course i like just about everyone else in the world was not aware of the donner mystery in two thousand twelve. When i was working in my cases for the united states department of defense in honolulu hawaii but in the course of investigating hundred and seventy nine other cases while there i stumbled onto a whole series of other odd cases connected with the indie mystery which seemed to indicate that some of the casualties of the sinking had actually been recovered and buried at sea. But we're still on the official roles of the department of defense as missing in action now. Swamped with thousands of other gatien's and running out of time in my contract i wasn't able to follow up on those clues until a twenty seventeen when a team of investigator from the rick stone and family charitable foundation was sent to the naval history and heritage command on the washington navy yard in washington dc. Their mission was to search the archives of the naval history and heritage command for any information that might help clear. Some of those indications i had been concerned about in two thousand twelve. Shortly after that trip they will history and heritage. Command asked me to review some excellent research that have been conducted by one of their own historians. Docker richard hulliber and independent author miss. Sarah lasik concerning the donner mystery. The question was simple was donner. Lost at sea was donner a survivor. Donner never on the ship. In the first place both dr hulda and misled discovered that within hours of arriving on the indie donner's notice of acceptance into an officer training program in her off had awry and was incredible efficiency. The orders given to him to report the ford scholar. New york were delivered to him on board. The indianapolis is deployment to the pacific was canceled amid the chaos of the ships hurried. Secret redeployment to deliver the atomic bomb components to tinian island. Donner's arrival on board was apparently recorded but his hasty departure overlook thus when the paper records were reconstructed after the sinking he he remained on the final cruelest resulting in complement of one thousand. One hundred and ninety six sailors on board. Uss indianapolis that number was one too many in reviewing the amazing amount of documentation already collected. I concurred with the conclusions. There was then a simple matter of finding radio technician. Second class clarence donner in twenty seventeen and confirming. The facts were some foundation research in hand. I actually health. On the johnson cemetery in polat ca florida and confirmed with the cemetery administrator that radio technician second class. Clarence william donner was there. He had died at age. Eighty two on one february two thousand and two. Well we reported our foundations confirmation to the naval history command and in march twenty eighteen. The united states navy finally corrected the records and removed radio technician second class honour as an indie crew member on that last fatal voyage. He wasn't lost at sea and he wasn't a survivor. what he was. Which probably the luckiest man of all who had ever set on the uss indianapolis be it ever so briefly and the bottom line is this mom was right. Something tells me that there will be other no home for heroes podcast about future investigations into other uss indianapolis mysteries. Staus stay tuned home for hero. Thank you for listening to this episode of no home for heroes. We hope you've enjoyed today's production. It's really been a special one for us to produce. We invite you to check out our other episodes on apple. Podcast tune in radio podcasts. Blueberry or whichever platform you liked to listen to podcasts. We greatly appreciate your comments and a special lake is available for you to contact us on our website at www chief. Bridgestone dot com. We again thank you for your support. Our mission to provide information to the families of missing american servicemen and missing american service. Every assistance counts. And you could have until next time. Be careful be safe in wishing you fair winds and following sees. I'm your host works known reminding you that towards the nation that has no hero. Shameful is the nation. that having heroes or get snuffed..

Clarence california Ruth polat ca florida march twenty eighteen tinian island Donner Clarence william donner New york no home for heroes Staus indianapolis Sarah lasik one thousand Eighty two twenty seventeen today randall jacobs new york washington dc
"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

NO HOME FOR HEROES

04:22 min | 5 months ago

"for " Discussed on NO HOME FOR HEROES

"Agents the average time for identification after remains are received in the epa laboratory is reported by an internal analysis to be eleven years. The preponderance of the evidence indicates that private robert joseph griffin was killed after reaching shore on tara was red beach to all the facts seem to indicate that he was not killed in water and his remains were not washed out to sea in fact private griffin was obviously identified. His wounds were noted in almost all of his official records even though he was relatively new to his unit therefore is highly likely that private griffin was given a burial on the island perhaps in a hastily dug grave by his company mate while still under fire if private robert joseph griffin is not one of the possible matches to the unknowns listed in iron investigation or one of the recent recovery from tarawa that. Dpa has not yet been able to identify. It is likely that he lies today. In an undiscovered grave on tarawa. If that's the case it may be a long long time before at least one hometown. Hero makes his way back to the louisiana swamps. Thank you for listening to this episode of no home for hero. We hope you enjoyed today's production. And we invite you to check out our other episodes on apple podcast tune in radio podcast or blueberry or hey wish whichever platform you.

eleven years today robert joseph griffin tarawa no home for hero tara griffin one apple one of the possible matches one hometown louisiana
"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

Mindset for Life

05:29 min | 6 months ago

"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

"We embrace mindset for life is a podcast that we use to explore thinkings attitudes and habits that lead to how we behave and ultimately who we become. I love the mind set for life. Podcast because you and i we get to talk about these very things that many of us have allowed to hold ourselves back for years and years and yet they don't really have to. The real obstacles are inside and becoming the better version of ourselves or the best version of ourselves means that we shed light on what holds us back and we push it out of the way and we pave a new path. I'd like to give you this little analogy. I heard by a man who has a website called brain bydesign. It's very intelligent and wonderful stuff and highly encourage you to check out his website and his workshops. This idea is that your brain has these highways where information is communicated if you look at the highway it's really just like a highway you would see out in the world. There are many lanes for the big mac truck to drive down that highway..

years mindset for life brain bydesign mac
"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

For Realness Sake

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

"We even began right. I'm gonna do right. I'm wanna know something. Actually love being an attorney I think that it has presented share challenges just like any profession does but the one thing i will say is. I've learned a lot about my resilience in the short amount of time that have been an attorney ana allen's a howard for law school so my job right now coming back home but I worked at a law firm and clerked for judge. And i think we never realize like when you come out into the world did when they say this is a very white male dominated field then got never forget when i was clerking at clerked for black judge in jersey but people would just like one either not think she was a judge which was allowed to me or to like. I've gotten confused as the secretary on so many times to the point. That people can understand that i i graduated law school and so it was kinda like i did. I there secretaries. actually this wonderful white. Italian lady So you may want to her right. And so but i've had to deal with those microaggressions like all the time Law firm in my practice group. I was the only black woman. Remind you my family's in thirteen states can count on. Maybe two hands the amount of attorneys of color that includes black asian hispanic at the firm. Easy wasn't it. Ns i this is in like twenty twenty eighteen so this is now and bags that while i was there they promoted their first black woman partner. I'm like this has been around. For how long and we still have i. But that's the reality eighteen right but that was that's the reality of being a black woman lawyer. Where and i think we're going to disobey but like you either going to create your own spaces or you're going to go in and disrupt the space is that technically are not really even built for you and that is that is what it means to be lacking and illegal thaw man i think that's why representation is so important any time i mean a black woman that is doing something that you know quote not the norm in our society. I'm always like. Ooh i gotta talk to her because we need people like you to be on the front end showing us in most really showing the younger generation that it is possible. Yes girl you keep playing breaking the walls down girl in tearing them spaces. Okay thank you girl thank you. I think you're real june for our culture. Like i said you're a lawyer. You have a nonprofit agency anna consulting agency. So why don't you go ahead and tell us about your driving businesses in your platform sure. I'm outside with the nonprofit. Because i've had that one a little bit longer and that's my baby So with the nonprofit. I started that in twenty twelve and It's called mommy which stands for instilling my ability to naturally Embraced excellence and what i know. What focus i. It's funny it's a play on a name that actor one of my cousins Her middle name the money so it's kind of like a play on her name on and what it stands for me is.

ana allen howard for law school jersey anna
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Merrily. We wanted to understand what their attitudes are denied. Because we'd studied every other group in the workplace but we hadn't looked at at straight white men who you know hold so much positional power and if we're really going to drive change. We all need to be engaged. When i found so encouraging was one we asked then majority men. You know how important is deny to you at work. So not you know. Generally as a general good but how important is diversity and inclusion to use civically at. Were we found that only ten percent of majority men sad. It's not important to me at all and forty two percent said it's very important to me so to me that gives me hope. And the efforts in statements we see coming out from a livestream male corporate leaders and the their intentions in there a weakening around race. You know my desire is to extend that to keep their attention to ensure is a sustained movement. But i have a lot of hope that it can be based on those survey results. We also found that those true believers we call them. Those who think dna is very important are highly likely to be senior and as you said david so important that they set tone so that's something that has given me hope. I did not realize that there was that kind of a base of work and so we did find that they're not as likely to To act indian either more likely to believe in it but less likely to be an actively so i think that's what we need to accomplish as a movement is to ensure that base is activated as allies. Bad there's a lot to work with their. So that's something i've changed my mind on and really excited about julia taylor. Kennedy is with the center for talent innovation. The new report is the power of belonging what it is and why it matters in today's workplace. Julia thank you so much for all your work. Thank you so much for highlighting at dave and for having me on. You heard me introduce juliet being from the center for talent innovation and right after we recorded this conversation they announced a change of name for the organization. They are now called cocoa. And so you'll find references to that in the episode notes today and also this week's weekly leadership guide julia. Thank you and your entire team. At coco for the continued work. You are doing in the space. In addition several other related episodes. You may want to out if this conversation has gotten you thinking. I'd recommend my past conversation with julia as well episode. Three ninety eight what you gain by sponsoring people also with julia in that conversation. We talked about the distinctions between mentorship and sponsorship. And i loved the distinction. She makes in that conversation about mentors. Talk with you sponsors. Talk about you. It's a shift that many of us should be thinking about in how we lead and support folks inside and outside of our organization three ninety eight a great complement to this conversation today about belonging also recommended his episode four forty one that journey towards diversity and inclusion willie jackson was my guest on that episode a leader very much in the space. We talked about the journey that you may take as a leader but also your organization may take towards diversity and inclusion another good complement to this conversation again. That's absolute four forty one also helpful to you may be a episode that aired earlier. This year on the dave's journal podcast called changed my mind as a recent events have unfolded. I've changed my mind on things over the last few years. I did a deep dive on that. In that episode. You'll find that on the journal. Podcast and linked up in the notes as well and then finally i also produced a audio course a free audio course earlier this year and the title. That is making the most of mentoring. Mentoring is one way that we can help. Support belonging in organizations and of course sponsorship a key portion of that as well as i mentioned a moment ago but mentoring for us is a good starting point and in the free audio course on the coaching for leaders dot com website. You can access five key steps. They if you start will really help you to leverage the power of mentoring in your own work. All of that you can find on. Coaching for leaders dot com. If you have not already. I'd encourage you to set up your free membership at coaching leaders. Dot com. that's gonna give you access to the entire library since two thousand eleven searchable by topic of episodes one of the topic is diversity and inclusion which of course this will be filed under many other conversations. We've had about diversity inclusion over the years many more coming in the next year so watch for that. In addition you'll also get access to the weekly leadership guide that comes every wednesday plus the free audio courses one of them. I mentioned a moment ago by entire online catalogue and library. All of the details on kuching for leaders dot com to set up your free membership and you will be off and running next week. I'm glad to welcome patrick. Lindsay only back to the show. He's going to be returning to teach us about the lessons from his newest book. The modem join me for that conversation with pat next week have a wonderful week. And i'll see you back next monday. Take care of everybody..

center for talent innovation julia julia taylor willie jackson dave juliet Julia Kennedy david Lindsay patrick pat
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Our lives and most of us wish and hope for that kind of belonging at work too but what does belonging look like in the workplace and. What can we do as leaders to help our teams organizations support that kind of belonging today a recent study. That's come out from an expert organization. I know is going to help us with some practical steps to move forward on that. I am so thrilled to welcome back to the show. Julia taylor kennedy. She is an executive vice president at the center for talent innovation driving cutting edge research into the issues impacting. Today's professional workforce they have an eye toward solutions for more inclusive and equitable global workforce and world. She led the sponsor dividend research which we passed featured on the show and co author disabilities inclusion mission critical unlocking the value of veterans in the workplace and the power of the purse. Engaging women for healthy outcomes she spoken at the united nations the carnegie council for ethics and international affairs the conference board and many other places and has been featured in the washington post. Cbs news forbes. Time in the harvard business review the center for talent innovation recently released a new report titled the power of belonging. What it is and why it matters in. Today's workplace julia. I'm so glad to have you back on the show. I am so thrilled to be back on the show. Dave thank you for inviting me. The pleasure is mine last time when you were speaking with us about the importance of sponsorship so many people reached out and i know found the research of the center so helpful and some really glad to dive with you today on belonging and this is one of those words that i think a lot of us have a sense of what it means but i am curious before we dive in when you engaged in this research. How did you define a longing. Good place to start dave what does belonging need. And that's actually where we began when we embarked on this research. What we saw was lots of companies and celebrities actually and politicians using this phrase in this concept of belonging saying you know. I want to find a place where i belong. That belonging is so important to foster when looking to connect especially with people who have different backgrounds from your own we saw this concept of belonging. Ily coming up to the surface and so we wanted to drill down definition of long and so we hold together a few measures that we saw out there. In our literature review that had been used to measure belonging different community context schools in neighborhoods and one from india at had measured a belonging in the workplace to create our own measure. Twenty four questions to understand when you feel you belong at work and when we step back and look at these twenty four questions. They really fell neatly into or elements or buckets or elements as we call them of belonging. That's what we used to build our definition so to us belonging at work means you feel seen for your unique contributions seen is that erste element connected to your co workers supported in your daily work and career development and for route of your organization's values and purpose. So you can see there elements here of being visible understood and connected supported in your endeavors and really then feeling apart and feeling proud of the place where you work and all four of these together contribute to that feeling of as you looked at belonging through those those four lenses. Who did you study in the research. So our methodology for this research very similar to the studies that we've done in the past we like to use a robust mix of both qualitative and quantitative methods so that we ensure that incites that we're getting from our data and from our interviews are put into context so we started with that review. Then we did some expert interviews work with a few advisors to shape our research hypotheses when out and fielded a nationally representative survey in partnership with organization out of the university of chicago to thousands of respondents in the us all college educated professionals and then we also did focus groups and did a series of interviews ban of course the pandemic head and we wanted to make sure that we were confident in our findings given how much the world has changed so we read fielded. The survey ended a few more bogus scripts after the pandemic hit so that we could be documenting how it impacted along in the workplace. There's so many fascinating outcomes from this study and one of them. That was really interesting to me. As this is one of the first studies that is also including some of the data that's included after the pandemic and as we're all responding to this and imai remembering correctly that the results are available. Publicly that folks can can download them easily. Yes so if you go to our website talent innovation dot. Org you can download the key findings for free. You can purchase the report for twenty bucks pretty easy pretty easy to get the findings. Yes perfect and i'm going to link up to all that in the episode notes and as i was reading through the results. There's so many things here that are just fascinating that came out of this and so many implications for us as leaders and one of the key findings is that a slight uptick in belonging leads to a really sizable increase in engagement and loyalty. Tell me a bit more about that. One of the key things that we wanted to understand is how important is it. Focused on belong in the workplace as we saw more and more companies weaving it into their own strategies round talent retention knitting gauge moment. As well as diversity inclusion wanted to say well as fostering belonging really work to get more knitted engaged. Please feel a part of the fabric of your organization and that was one of the strongest findings. is that even a small uptick in your belongings score as we call it. The outcome of that twenty four questions gail that we constructed even a slight uptick in your belongings or can lead to a really significant increase in your loyalty to your organization your likelihood to stay or the retention figure. You talked about your engagement in your current job. And it also leads a decrease in an individual's sense that they feel stalled in their careers. So lots of really good outcomes that both employers and employees are looking or and so when you feel you belong when you feel those elements of belonging that correlates to these great feelings of engagement and loyalty and west feelings of frustration. Or harir stall. I wanna ask you later more about some of the practical things we can do as leaders and as i'm thinking about what you just said part of the hope that i have coming out of this data is that while. I think there's the intention for all of us to want to do. Big things in our organizations to create belonging into into people feel included that small shifts can also make a really big difference that if we're willing to just take some first steps back. The data shows that that can really be significant absolutely and you know another signal that points to how how belonging.

Julia taylor kennedy center for talent innovation d carnegie council for ethics an center for talent innovation Cbs news washington post united nations imai julia Dave dave university of chicago india us gail
"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 8 months ago

"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

"I am benjamin day. I'm stephanie nakajima and this is medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare so today. We're gonna discuss a topic that is central to our success in winning medicare for all when we as a movement talk about what it's going to take to win often when you hear issues like fundraising publication electing the right. Legislators there's other things that usually come up. But i think there's something that maybe even more important than any of those things putting us on the path to victory and that is of course confronting the deeply ingrained racism and our structures and cells. When you look at where. The united states is in compared in comparison to its pure countries. It's impossible to explain why we are so much more of an unequal and capitalist society than everywhere else that looking at the role of racism through our history <hes>. Its impact on our safety net and the neglect and vilification of our public programs. So this is like a big conversation and we could probably have several podcasts on it but today we want to talk about racism specifically in the healthcare system and how medicare for all would and wouldn't address in a racism at the doctor's office and and then a little bit about the interrelated nature of our movements a movement with the larger fight for racial justice. And why and how. They are interconnected so ben. Do you want to introduce our guest absolutely so it is my great pleasure to introduce the wonderful person on the screen with us <hes>. Dr beata amani. Who is an associate professor for. The charles r drew university of medicine and science and <hes>. This is a timely is a lead co chair of the covid nineteen taskforce on racism and equity which is housed at the ucla center for study of racism social justice and health. Welcome dr money. I'm so excited to be here. It is great to have you so before we dive into this deep topic <hes>. Can you tell us a little bit about your background. And why did you choose to become an epidemiologist with a focus on racism and what is epidemiology. So i mean that's a that's a wonderful question. Just what is an epidemiologist. Because i think for so many people. My friend circle in my family <hes>. This current moment had them <hes>. Here in the word and being like <hes>. Isn't one of those. So epidemiology is essentially like the science and the studying of the disease distribution pattern the the distribution patterns of disease <hes> and anything associated with z's <hes>. And it's not only about studying the the distribution and the pattern of disease and its related outcomes but it's also about studying the things that go into effect right the things that are in place the policies and practices that we have what are the effects of those things on the distribution of disease disease-related outcomes. So what that meant for me <hes>. I think growing up was. I always loved <hes>. Health and i loved politics <hes>. And i was always thinking about the relationship between these two things <hes>. And so when. I know you're thinking about how to have some sort of impact especially as a young person <hes>. And you hear about like institutions. Like the cdc or the who right <hes>. You really can you know. Start to give a sense of like. What does it mean to be able to like. Go out and steady and to collect information that can be so useful that it can actually save. Lives like on a larger level. These are to me that young person you know who was really drawn to like the field of setting in a deniau genes that then overtime epidemiology. That also came to me a tool set and a set of ideas that belonged to and we're a service of a system that <hes>. Not only structured by racism. Right like us. Stephanie mentioned beginning at the heart of what we're talking about today <hes>. But also was instrumental in structuring it and and creating and maintaining that <hes>. And so then what that meant for me. Somebody who was studying it was that i was really drawn initially to infectious disease epidemiology <hes>. Because you saw so much like an equity <hes>. And also just they kind of racialized ideas about populations being generated around who's sick. Who's not risk of people who are not sick from those. Who are you know. So all those racial congregations <hes>. And then moving into what we call behavioral. Fb and the idea that <hes> people's behaviors and they're like and and you know people's behaviors and their own actions can be connected and related to their health. So there's a potential for some sort of empowerment right to what i am. I think you know today like loosely. <hes>. and specifically your social epidemiologist. Somebody who wants to study the distribution of disease and disease related factors <hes>. In populations and communities on basant understanding systems structures in power

medicare benjamin day stephanie nakajima Dr beata amani charles r drew university of m ucla center for study of racis disease disease ross ben united states cdc Stephanie infectious disease
"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

Mindset for Life

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Mindset for Life

"And then afterward, the time to reconnect with the ideas and to reflect now, there are a lot of good ways for us to do this reflection. The International Association for Journal, Writing Provides a lot of suggestions some of them I'm going to share here some of them I will encourage you to check out in your own time. So here are some of the strategies. First of all, they advocate that journal writing helps you to let off your thoughts from the day in a manageable way so that you're not hiding your emotions, you're not dumping your emotions on other people, but you have this space to focus on what you're feeling and what you're thinking, and maybe the whys behind it. And also the what you WANNA do next it gives that time to pause. Look at the page where you can know, grow and care for yourself through express a writing. Now. There is this attitude where if you decide, you're going to start writing things down like during this reflection process I like to refer to it as journaling. So I'm GonNa say that throughout the rest of this podcast and often in other podcasts If you take up the habit of being. Don't get yourself when you don't do it. So if you skip a day, skip a week, skip a month event. You can get right back to it and just add where you left off. I've been a journal keep her since I was twelve years old. I'm nearly fifty something and I'm very excited to say that I have consistently kept journals since I was twelve years old. There were some periods of my life like when I was single going to college eighteen, nineteen, twenty years old I was able to write in my journal every single day pages and pages about all my thoughts things I was learning all my experiences. Maybe even sometimes multiple times during the day..

International Association for
"for " Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Some self care things that I think are important I also. Also. Think giving us again. A lot of this is mindset. We have been trained in condition to be available and accessible. That actually isn't what most people need from you. People benefit from having good boundaries, and sometimes it is our lack of boundaries that keeps people in a place for feel coat. Opinion on us because we have a need to feel needed, right? boundaries are your best friend. They have to be in. It's. It's not about creating barriers to accessing you. It's about creating a boundary around your resources and conserving that, so that can be used more effectively for those who actually needed including yourself right creating a boundary around access whether it be you giving information receiving information I. Think Boundaries are really really important. They get a bad rap, but they are so important for keeping you intact. I think those are some of the things that we. Want to be intentional about is in. Being not available so that you can refill, your own cup is important, especially, because none of us are unaffected, I also think that it's really really important that we are mindful about the ways we are evaluating the way other people are coping or dealing, because I've seen friendships unravel in the midst of trauma in chaos, because we are not clear that somebody is in it with us, or they're not available in the ways we need them to, but if we can just remember that we're all doing the best that we can. And Our grief looks different. It doesn't mean we're not doing it. It just means it's different, and it's important that we don't impose our values on other people's grief, process. So several times throughout this conversation Dr Robinson you said, this is what I'm concerned about on the other side of this right, and so of course I'm not asking you necessarily to read into our future, but I am curious about some of the things that you think we will have to be making sure we're paying attention to. As we kind of come out of sheltering in place in you know things starts to open up a little bit more. What kinds of things do you think we do need to be paying? Attention to? Our might expect related to grief. Gingrich's is going to be a big one being triggered by everyday things right, and so it may be. Having some anticipatory grief around going back to work that is is normal, right? It's normal in general, it is heightened in this setting, because a covert hasn't gone away right, and because we have this additional layer around the injustice, instill navigating what life looks like as we embark on. Free writing some of the fabric of our society right so we may not be sure how we're going to be treated if we walk into the grocery store or other spaces right, all of those things creates but also some inside around that, but knowing that desired, he comes with the grief, a loss of normality loss of of the norms loss of structure. All of those things I think being acutely aware of what are triggers are in knowing that those can change. We have been removed particularly thinking about our kids are. are even adults who generally have let's say society or situational based triggers. They've likely not been encountering those sugars because they've been at hall. Where most folks may not experience those triggers that the experience in the workplace or in school, or just out in society in general, so we've not had to practice coping mechanisms around them in, so we might feel ill, equipped or e compensate right in the face of those so again. That's another regrouping retrigger I think other pieces around heightened anxiety where already seeing some impacts of socializes they. Are In increase suicidality. I think that many of the reports are indicating this next wave of endemic is gonna be on the mental health It's Harvard here. We haven't even talked about the ways. Our kids are grieving in the ways that they are missed in the sheer amount of. Under the the level of under resources right where you're under-resourced shoe, help kids in general with understanding the language of what grief looks like them. Inciting those are all things that we will hack grapple with sooner rather than later because we do not. We have been so inundated with Justin. Safe that we haven't even had an opportunity to be well in so I. think that we. We have we're going to have to reemerge that? What is it like to do more than survive is that's what we have been. We have been in survival mode right as people trying to stay safe from covid as black and Brown. People in this country. What happens when we have to go back to day-to-day functioning whatever that looks like we're expected to buoy producing to thrive. We don't have the coping skills to do so. We don't even know what that looks like anymore. Those are the things that I'm concerned about from appearing. Tangible Perspective yeah absolutely so, are there any additional resources you share lots with us last time, but are there. Any new resources are things that you think people might WanNa. Check out given what we talked about today. Until I, think that being connected with Nami, so the national lines mental illness they have in can access a resource group such as support groups all over the country. The Association for Death Education Counselors. That's for clinicians. To be trained in in doing some grief work as well less chew identify. Clinicians were trained in grief work so I also have a book in a in a training series. Coming out, called the gift of grief on the work for you available already, the book will be out shortly. Where we will be doing some of the work around changing clinicians as well as parents and educators on recognizing grief in the workplace in the school environment in clinical practice, I think one of the best things that we can do is to be able from a personal perspective to really do the work. To identify what your loss history is, what you're coping strategy is your trauma history so that you can get the support you need. In from a clinical perspective, we have to build capacity for very long time. Clinicians have been saying I. Don't do work in. My response has always been. If you work with people, you do Greek work that is being called Sir Roost now. And they're scrambling to get educated into get trained. Now's the time to do that. into looking at some of these programs. Either three universities or Some formal programs in grief. I think incor- rest acts as great, and of course it will include all of those resources in our show notes, and where can we find you Robinson? What are your social media handles as well as your website absolutely I am Dr Agenda on facebook? After Agenda Robinson instagram message on twitter in Congressman Ismailis site perfect. Thank you so much for joining us again. For sharing your wealth of knowledge, I appreciate it. Thank you so much for doing this for having us against. Dr Robinson was able to join us again this.

Dr Robinson Gingrich facebook twitter Association for Death Educatio Harvard Congressman Justin Nami WanNa Brown Sir Roost
"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Medicare for All

"Right here, this is not about politics kiss. Health. Emergency can't wait brought up theoretical face about better. Well never ever thought the. We have been. Reporting Daily! In, this matter of Camp Ross. And that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts. Believe in slavery. I, am Benjamin Day? AM, Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare. Including all the K pop fans all over the world who came together to sink trump rally. Yes for those who haven't heard. Trump headache coronavirus rally in Oklahoma. And a bunch of young people filled out fake reservations so that he ended up with an empty stadium. And it turns out, they mostly from south. Korea where they already have single payer healthcare, those lucky bastards. So today Yellow Lucky! We have a really special guest Marc Duds Ick the national coordinator of the Labor Campaign for single pair. Thank you mark for joining us. It's great to be here Ben and Stephanie. Thanks Suit. Could you just tell us first? How did you get into the single payer movement? Wow well. I was the. President of a union in the union called the oil chemical. Atomic Workers Local Union in New Jersey. That had about. Forty different. small chemical and pharmaceutical plants under contract. and. In the nineteen eighties, we began to see that and we were having more and more of a struggle on. Bargaining for health care for our members, and We, actually invited. David Himmelstein to speak our district council meeting in Nineteen eighty-eight when Jesus of the single payer. Yeah I think this is not long after they actually launched php the Physicians for National. L. Program, and You know I gotTa say when I first saw David show up I was like man. Who is this hippy doctor? What does he know about healthcare But you know he really framed. The issue. You. Know made us made me think about you know..

Stephanie Nakajima David Himmelstein Atomic Workers Local Union Benjamin Day Marc Duds Camp Ross Korea Oklahoma Physicians for National Medicare coordinator President New Jersey Ben
"for " Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"The secretary of the Navy made one decision. The captain made a different decision. And the reason why the secretary of the Navy made his decision is based on the actions of the captain But you know in every situation. I think Iran poem military to find out there was like seventeen hundred people that engage within the poll and stuff and eighty eighty four percent said. Yeah this guy is the greatest of all time. You know a good leader. And that's the belief in in some of those that are that were no I. I understand their point because they made sure to reach out to me a couple of them to say. Hey listen. He's he's circumvent. Circumvented the chain of command. Well you know that for certain. Do you know that he didn't I reach the chain of command? Don't make the assumption that he didn't do that and he just blasted out an email. Well we sent out an email in unauthorized email account. Yup He he definitely did that In in his fault but that does that warrant relieving him if his command in itself. No I don't think so and then the other thing though that I wanNA bring attention to. Is that two year talk about leadership to you're talking about is spot on my back. Got New dawn security details and they put me in dumb spots. Like I'm not going to be like. Hey Bro you know do this you know I almost always use it as a teachable moment like check it out on trying to manage perception manager quality of life here with the client. Yep this is war. These are the implications of what you did. We gotta make sure that this doesn't happen again because you just you know. This is going to have implications here here here here here and here now in this spot now. We're in this spot. Yeah because we live and die as a team and when that learning you know it's like inception that learning happens. Then you have done something that so much more valuable than just discipline. And then if you do have to discipline It's just so much more effective that what you're talking about man. That strategy is is really really a good one also bringing them up to your teaching them in in. You're you're you're you're taking a a moment of weakness in your turning it into an inspirational moment to bring into your level and for them to see and now what happens is that you. You're you're playing with their emotions. You've now made them disappointed in themselves that they have now put you in a position and now the man. I don't want everyone if they respect you and they and they you inspire them they don't WanNa disappoint you. It's like your dad. You don't WanNa disappoint your parents. Yes so I mean you think about even the situation of where You know we had whistleblowers are individuals who were cadre members of ups off at were complaining about the the standards being changed for Ranger School for Special Forces. You know it's the same type of situation that command had to react because the news. It already gotten out. They leak that information and chose to go out to the public and to the media in order for it to be there it left little opportunities for the command to be able to do it now to their defense. They all say well. We brought this to the attention of the command and the command did little action. As a matter of fact they told us to be quiet and go away but every every action has a reaction. And that's what we're kind of talking about here You know in to have an open. Communication understand both sides opinions both sides perspective is what's most needed and Brian Byron I'll go to you in terms of what you do today. You know in protection if you had a you're dealing with hype visible clients and stuff you know and if this was a situation where something which might seem very minor occurs in which a gets out into the media and starts impacting your brand your company and what it is that you do for a living for your organization. You're going to have to take some kind of action at to your point. You said well I use use it as a teaching moment. Not Everybody would use that. As a teaching moment they'd say I'm GonNa cut the cancer. I'm going to get rid of this guy to show an action that I'm a leader. I'm following the right ways. I can't have individuals that act this way so therefore I've let this individual go. There was no track record or pattern of behavior that suggested that this was like on the spectrum of of behaviors that I expect from this dude than I would dare. I would definitely use it. A teachable moment because You Know Robert Greene. Forty-eight LAWS POWER. One of those learn how to turn your enemies into allies and former enemies have things to prove. Which isn't exactly right but For instance but that same principle you know someone who makes a big mistake. I believe can become more valuable to the team because the learning from that mistake means they're never going to do it again and they can influence other people not to make that mistake so anytime. I see dude mess up big and he knows he messed up big. You know it's like okay. Here's an opportunity to make this guy even more valuable. If if we can just navigate this in a really effective meaningful way if I really this already matters to him so I'm where I need to be in his art and his mind you know. So let's make sure we leverage this and see that's that's kind of my leadership style hundred percent man. I like to Kinda rebuild people anytime I can because it it. It proves to make a really strong team when y'all got your scars and all that stuff but you're still together and you're covering each other. Yeah and do about quitting well. In the military a lot of times we do after action reports to talk about you know the mission said what occurred what you know what we need to do. Better and those types of things so as a team we can improve upon that and it's all a learning moment right. It's all And I'm judy and everybody gets a chance to to speak you. Know and call their their teammates out and talk about this. We hear that a lot in especially in special forces where you know in ODA's and stuff they go through this a lot where they sit around and After a mission set they get the opportunity to say. Hey listen if you done this right. This wouldn't have occurred. Or Hey you know and Byron you may have dealt with the same thing in your line of work with the regiment and some of the other things mean you know it's you know from being on Free Fall Team and a demonstration team to rain judgment. It's it's you know it's you have to be able to eat humble pie on a daily basis and you have to be able to sit there and have your brothers or sisters. Sit there and go. Hey you didn't make formation on the job. Hey you you didn't clear your corner correctly. Hey you didn't do this if you had it on this this this this this is the second third fourth fifth orders of effect would have been a lot different if you would have done it right on the front end and sometimes you have to take and go. Yup I screwed up guys. I've got to be better and again goes back to what we said. At the beginning you know that continuous strive for perfection. In will I ever attain perfection? Nope but I'M GONNA try for it. I'M GONNA continue to be the best that I can be and you know by if I was on a protection detail which very well could potentially happen in the future and Barnes. The is the lead these fired. What's up fired this cool and I fail at that that thing Barnes GonNa look at me regardless of being friends. He's GonNa let me have it and I'm looking dead in the facing Dan. I screwed up. I let one of my home down and I've got to be better in the in in this in whatever it might have been you know what I'm saying. So one hundred percent. I think that in my opinion is what turns into the definition of a warrior high in today's Society Man because like now we're not chasing down killing things all the time. We're not like banging shields and swords anymore but I think that the modern warrior or you know the guy gets out and is like what the heck am I supposed to do like. I don't see the fight anymore. I don't I don't know who what where AM I. Fight is I'm dying inside your bro in the mirror. This is your new warfield. This is your new battlefield and your life's going to reflect back to you the fruits of that Labor ship of being able to fight yourself weaker versions of yourself and transform to better versions of Yourself. And so whether you're a mom a single mom with your you know like whatever. Your fight is whether it's against like wait finances relationships. Ptsd as a warrior. Your job is to just be the line between the chaos and the order in your life. I believe and you're always trying to push into that chaos and establish higher order by becoming a better and stronger version of yourself. And when you when you if you really got that warrior engine and you when you step into that. It feels like home. It's like man. I went so hard for the Marine Corps. I went so hard for some war. I didn't understand sometimes. Now I'm here and it's time for me to fight for myself. Fight for my family and fight for people who are dependent on me like on my own volition. Okay Dude like I know how to go hard like I know how to go now. It's time you heart you know. That's that's the conversation I'm having with myself and I tried to inspire others to have with themselves when they wake up in the morning. It's like not as a matter where you are as a matter. How much progress you made and all that trash you look yourself in. The Mirror is another day. It's time to fight like now after Siegel's happiness. It's it's part of the problem that I think that we have with guys getting off active duty and the transition. You're talking about Byron with you know guys not having that mindset of losing that mindset or not knowing how to apply it into a new world a new society but I think some guys and Gals I people within the military may run into these same types of situations even in a PCs. Let's face it. You may be spending two years or so with a high speed unit and guys and gals that are really motivated and had the right mindset and you're all one you know in in sync and all of a sudden. Upc's two totally different environment and these people don't have the same mindset that people don't WanNa get along and work as a team and you know have a cohesive environment They don't communicate the same way all those types of things in makes you frustrated Where I think you're also trying to say Byron is that you gotTa Find Your Own Way and you gotta play your personal mindset to the situation and make it even better one percent And that that's that's you know something. I wrote a book. I wrote a book called finding meaning after the military And it's about this very thing. It's about that transition that you go through but it's about finding your new fight because when you get out here and you wake up on that first morning and you ain't got no alarm clock in your life here you know and you're cutting your candies. You're making short driving. You're wearing right now. I didn't even notice that. Learn real you. Will you eventually learn? Hopefully not the hard way there. You know them you know comes with there. Should be a statue of of responsibility on the West Coast to balance out the statue of Liberty Because Freedom Without any purpose Alec at kills a lot of people and I think what happens is people they. They don't find their new fight and they just wandering through life. And what do you do something? You don't have a purpose for you can't find value. You know what I'm saying the way staying on the counter what to do. I don't know you throw it away. You MISSED USE IT. You abuse it and then it gets eliminated. And so that's why got brothers and sisters out here going through what I call the atrophy of identity. You look in the mirror and who used to be has gone so far away because wait movie real man. You're like I'm never again. Ptsd is knowing. You'll never be that tight again. That didn't answer every you know and you start to you. Tell them the same stories and your wife doesn't care about your stories anymore. She's heard it too many times..

Brian Byron Ptsd secretary Navy Iran Barnes Ranger School for Special Forc West Coast Robert Greene ODA judy Dan Marine Corps Alec Siegel
"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

For Realness Sake

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on For Realness Sake

"Of people at a young age or like you get told that you're like the man of the house or something like that. Who wants to hear your problems? I get it. Once you express a little bit of vulnerability. Then you know. You're the foundation says like so the foundation is we or seems we then everything crumbling because you're never given the opportunity or maybe you didn't feel like you should take the opportunity to express yourself as a kid. You grow up thinking that no one wants to hear your gripes. Because you're supposed to be strong you're supposed to be x Y Z. Whatever mail Standard they've created. Or you know me personally I grew up. I was the only child I was eleven and I feel like I missed that That part of my life could learn how to express myself so You know there's a lot of time spent I spent time alone And I was the only kid so it wasn't like I could call my siblings or say You know this is going on on only one house right so I think that's what it was for me like me not really learn how to express myself and when things were going on. The House is kind of like all right. Let me put these here. Let me This is why like learn how to draw. I had drawn pat. Had that's my room so I just sit at a table and just drop it off spilling so yeah I can relate to that. I think that that's Kinda how I was Mama was like A. She showed us like hardcore. Like what you doing type Thing but in the midst of that like I think I got so caught up in like try not to be wrong for everything than I. I forgot what my own feelings were because it became like how could I not get in trouble? Not Saying I was getting in trouble all the time but it really like. It didn't take much like my mom. She was she was on it like white on rice. Like one little thing. What you you being respectful and it was like to the point where I think. I'm not sure if I'm expressing must lie. I'm not sure if if the if what I feel is going to translate. Well am I able to properly communicate my feelings to you without coming off as being disrespectful or that come off as being you know just wrong. And so a lot of times. My feelings were given to me. Don't obamacare what's your attitude you know You could go in the room with all that or you know. Don't disrespect me actually. I'm having a rough tie crab I'm already crying on the inside. You know like just that part so it's not really Really truly being given the opportunity to express myself without reprimand or without feeling a feeling like something terrible is going to come after this of course a lot of parents say you know you can talk to me but when really comes down to it can I can. I really truly express myself to not be afraid of the repercussions of this. Are you GonNa take what I'm saying you get later? Is this a safe space for me to talk and a lot of times? I didn't feel that and so I didn't share in. It took me a long time to learn how to share. I was Twenty three years old when I was in that council or was twenty four. When I went to that. Y'All I was a substance abuse counselor for three years when you had your specialized training. Yeah and I had to go. I was in the military. And they sent us to this like it's called index is School for Substance Abuse Counselors where we like go through this process of group therapy for like two months and it was. It was super intense. I was like they compared to like a mental health. Counseling Program A Master's mental health counseling program like Events because it happened so fast but you. It's like super impactful because you learn a whole lot name anyway So yes so throughout that process in the beginning because I didn't have the tools given to me as a child to know how to properly communicate. I thought that everything I said was like not right so when we got into this group the mass that I was wearing was exposed. I couldn't just be the everything's okay care. They didn't want to hear that they want here. Know what's going on with you because you're not saying anything but you need to shake united saying thing but your eyes are watering. We want to know what you're what you're going through so that you can be you know an effective counselor for someone else. In the beginning. That was really hard for me because I didn't mind so was not. Let me try to get my feelings out my mindset was I don't want to offend anybody else or what I say because for my entire life that's how I had operate. I couldn't say what I wanted to say. I had to make sure that what I said sounded good enough that I WANNA get into trouble. I could get what I wanted. You know saying you know what I mean. And that's not necessarily. My mom was ready with the broom. Stick or bell but it does say that I. I walked on eggshells a lot of tyler. Her not knowing just knowing communication isn't taught a lot of house a witness Effective communication. I think that that those are the things that shape us. You know learning how to communicate effectively as a kid. You didn't witness effective communication. I rarely witness communication and so it was very hard for me and it's still hard for me now. You want me to communicate. I don't know how to it's not that I don't want to communicate with you. I don't know how to and I get that. But it is frustrating like we are working our communication. I think we're doing way better but in the beginning especially when I was going through the whole council hours trying to fix you as I was fixing myself going online every day I had a new diagnoses. You got problems to our Omar. Don't don't do that council amiss. I Joe Patient I will hold it because I'm learning some stuff that is frustrating. I think that for us now. It gets frustrating. Because I'll get stuff out open in like have it. Conversations take three hours like I'm down for that and you're like a less table. Let me think conor person and I read a lot of times to me is is more so so. I don't say the wrong thing because I've only learn how to communicate to ways One is Dulcie not Too is you express yourself with anger. I don't want to a lot of times Get Mad at you because I don't know how to express myself and then we'll wind up and you know have an argument because now I'm frustrated and I don't want to talk to you I wonder if more people feel that like if more guys have those sorts of feelings angry brothers yeah. I know a lot of systems that light to talk late super contrast but I I hate that because it makes it you know it takes us a long time to resolve problems because it's like okay. We could already talked about this. And then you know it can get bigger than what it needs to be. So what are some ways? Because I'm always trying to look for sluice so there's no ways that you think you can improve that while I've learned how to Early in our relationship I think that was most effective communicating when I was in the music And I think I should go back to doing that. Sending me music is you know. Here's your apple music. We like you know just a little form of expression a journal a couple of weeks ago kind of gamma films out But I do think that I can Start to just tell you the little things that don't feel when I feel in them. I think I can do that. it's going to be hard internalize a lot. Yeah but I'm I'm ready to hear it because I like I get excited feelings like oh so. I'm like really afford that because it helped me. Just be able to understand you better in like give you what you need not just me trying to pull the words out of you which is what I do now. You gotta understand like I internalize so much like is like putting stuff in a box like a chest and like.

School for Substance Abuse Cou apple tyler conor Joe Patient
"for " Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Quote. I have had some conversation with Tiberius. According to your desire my dear Livia as to what must be done with your grandson Tiberius at the Games of Mars. We both agreed in this that once. Aw We ought to determine what course to take with him for if he really sound and so to speak quite right in his intellects why should we hesitate to promote him by the same steps and degrees? We did his brother but if we find him below par and efficient both in body and mind. We must be aware of giving occasion for him and ourselves to be laughed at by the world which is ready enough to make such things the subject of Mirth and derision for we never shall be easy if we are always to be debating upon every occasion up this kind without settling in the first instance whether he'd be really capable of public offices or not with regard to what you consult me about. At the present moment I am not against his superintending feast of the priests in the Games of Mars. If he will suffer himself to be governed by his kinsman SALONA says son that he may do nothing to make the people stare and laugh at him but I do not approve of his. Witnessing the Circassian Games from the pull Venar he will be. They're exposed to view in the very front of the theater nor do I like that. He should go to the Alban Mount For if he capable of attending his brother to the mount why is he not made prefect City thus my dear Livia. You have my thoughts on the matter. In my opinion we ought to settle this affair once for all that we may not be always in suspense. Between Hope and fear you may think proper give your Kinsmen Antonia this part of my letter to read and quote in another letter. He writes as follows quote. I shall invite the Youth Tiberius every day during your absence to supper that he may not SUPP- alone with his friends so pcs and Theodorus. I wished the poor creature was more cautious and attentive in the choice of someone who's manners. Air and gate might be proper for his imitation. In things of consequence he sadly fails where his mind does not run a stray discovers a noble disposition and quote in a third letter. He says quote. Let me Die Livia if I am not astonished that the declamation up your grandson Tiberius should please me for how he who talks so ill should be able to declaim so clearly and properly. I cannot imagine and quote. There is no doubt but Augusta's after this came to a resolution upon the subject and accordingly left him invested with no other honor than that of the augural priesthood naming him amongst the heirs of the third degree who were but distantly allied to his family for six the part of his estate only with a legacy of no more than eight hundred thousand sister. She's upon his requesting some office in the state. Tiberius granted him the honorary appendages of the console ship and when he pressed for a legitimate appointment the emperor wrote word back that he sent him forty gold pieces for his expenses during the festivals of the Saturnalia and Sidga Larrea upon this laying. Aside all hope of advancement. He resigned himself entirely to an indolent life. Living in great privacy one while in his gardens or a Fila which he had near the city. Another while in compagno where he passed his time in the lowest society by which means besides his former character of a dull heavy fellow. He acquired that of a drunkard and game. Stir notwithstanding this sort of life much. Respect was shown him both in public and private. The equestrian order twice may choice of him to intercede on their behalf. Wants to obtain from the console's the favor of burying on their shoulders the corpse of Augusta's to Rome and a second time to congratulate him upon the death of Sa- John us when he entered the theater they used to rise and put off their cloaks the Senate likewise decreed that he should be added to the number of the Augusta College of priests who were chosen by lot and soon afterwards when his house was burnt down that it should be rebuilt at the public charge and that he should have the privilege of giving his vote. Amongst the men of consular rank this decree however was repealed. Tiberius insisting to have him excused on account of his imbecilities and promising to make good his loss at his own expense but at his death he named him in his well amongst his third airs for a third part of his estate leaving him besides a legacy of to millions of sister she's and expressly recommending him to the army's the Senate and people of Rome amongst other relations at last guys his brother's son upon his advancement to the empire endeavoring to gain the affections of the public by all the arts of popularity. Claudius also was admitted to public offices and help console ship jointly with his nephew for two months as he was entering the forum for the first time with the fash. She's an eagle which was flying that way alighted upon his right shoulder. A second console ship was also allotted him to commence at the expiration of the fourth year. He sometimes presided at the public spectacles as the representative of guys being always on those occasions.

Tiberius Livia Venar Augusta Claudius Alban Mount For SALONA representative Augusta College of priests Theodorus Rome Senate compagno Sidga Larrea Sa- John
"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

Coaching for Leaders

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"for " Discussed on Coaching for Leaders

"Webster's dictionary defines diplomacy as the skill in handling affairs without arousing hostility. No doubt that. Today's guest is an expert in diplomacy. I'm so glad to welcome to the show today. Susan Rice Susan served as the United States ambassador to the United Nations. During President Barack Obama's first term in office. She was leader appointed by President Obama as national security advisor a position. She held until the end of his presidency. Today she is the distinguished visiting research fellow at the School of International Service at American University. A nonresident senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times. She is the author of the New York Times Bestseller. Tough love my story of things worth fighting for Madam Ambassador so glad to welcome you to coaching for leaders. Thanks so much David great to be with you. Your experience with diplomacy started at seven years old. You grew up in a household. Where both of your parents clearly loved you and your brother but as you say they had no business being married and there was an intense fighting that lasted for years. And you write that as a young child you intervened a lot. What did she do to intervene? As you mentioned starting at about the time I was seven I would hear them fighting quite loudly and sometimes violently. When I was trying to sleep at night I had a younger brother who was two years younger than me. Still do thankfully if I heard the fighting sound like it was getting kind of scary and out of Control. I would sneak downstairs and spy on them. See what was going on and if it did seem like it was going in a- scary direction I would step in. Sometimes that meant you know trying to talk them down and reason with both of them and sometimes it meant you know trying to separate them. But I felt like I didn't do it. It wasn't going to happen and I wanted to ensure that for me and my brother you know things were as safe as they could be and I write a lot in the book about my parents who are both really wonderful accomplished professionals who taught me a huge amount and themselves came from very modest backgrounds and rose to do great things both of them but in the realm of their marriage it was not a happy paradigm and. I had to learn to mediate to a large extent. I'm not sure I'd call that diplomacy because sometimes to separate them to try to defuse the situation. It wasn't always diplomatic but it was mediation and inadvertently I think. In Retrospect I. I learned some experiences with conflict and parties that are perhaps intractable opposed and trying to resolve differences that served me later in my life and career in ways that I could just depicted as a child and deed. What did you learn from those early moments that as you reflect on your career in diplomacy that you still pull from well? I think I learned from an early age in large part from my parents fighting but also from being a family where debate on issues and on the news of the day and between and among the you know my dad and my uncles or over the dinner table when it was me and my brother and my mom and dad that you know. A robust debate and the robust argument is fine. When it goes and veers into you know the scary or the violent as it did sometimes between my parents obviously. That's not fine but what I think I developed. In addition to some experience with mediation was a lack of discomfort and some people are with conflict with disagreement with argument. I'm not scared to express my own opinion to do it with confidence. I'm not scared to disagree or dissent and I think that did help me to be willing to stand up to be conflict averse not to provoke conflict by any means but if there is a robust debate to be engaged. It's it's not something I've ever shied from the thing. I think I learned from experience with my parents is a measure of resilience in those early years. Between Seven and eight when I first started being drawn into their conflicts through the time that I was roughly fifteen when they long since broken up but then had a very public very ugly an antagonistic custody battle over being my brother. Those were really challenging years for me. Socially emotionally academically and so I had to figure out how in the context of a broken home and a lot of pleasantness. I could still find my pudding as a student. Find my footing as the leader. Repair my friendships. Which I think I had you know around fifth and sixth grade. Done a good bit of damage to just because I was so angry and bringing that anchor to places where it wasn't expected or appropriate so I had to learn how to be my best when things were harder than they might otherwise have been and I realized along the way that I could take a punch in the form of what was going on my family life and keep running and sustain that part and be okay ultimately so I gained a ironically through data degree of confidence in my own strength and resiliency that I also think helped me as a senior official down the road and the knives you the bullets might have been flying and I was able to. I think draw on that reservoir of experience and belief in my own ability to persevere that proves helpful Indeed you were an assistant secretary of state back in the Clinton administration and former Congressman Howard. Volpi you had a deep respect for took you to lunch one day early in your tenure and had some pretty direct words you write in the book that he said you are too hard charging in hardheaded rather than listen. Well he said you are overly directive and intimidate others so much that you quell dissent stifled. Contrary advice. He allowed that. I was smart but to Brash. Knowledgeable but immature. He warned me bluntly that I would fail as an assistant secretary if I did not crack horse and you you say later that you came to largely agree with his assessment and so curious. What did you do to shift from that? Well the context for this was I was at age. Thirty two named an Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. I think I'm still the youngest person ever to have been named a regional assistant secretary of state and I came from four plus years of working in the White House including closely with the president and the National Security Adviser and I knew the substance of my brief very well but I was young and I had never led a team the size of the one that I was leading and virtually all of the senior people all of the ambassadors. It reported to me and many others were twenty to thirty years. My senior most of them are career. Foreign Service officers mostly white men and I was very young and African American woman in an environment where in any event they were very few women or minorities and I had just had a brand new baby three months earlier and so I was impressed feeding mother in a small c conservative culture where none of what I represented was particularly familiar and so I came in very determined as many political appointees are that you know. We have a finite amount of time. We have an agenda on a get through. I had the support of the Secretary of state at the time who is Madeleine. Albright and President Clinton the National Security Adviser and we knew what we wanted to do and I wanted to get it done And about six months into my tenure in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight a series of crises hit war broke out in east Africa. War broke out in the Congo involving six other countries. In what was known as Africa's First World War Angola Sudan Liberia? All these things sort of came to crisis simultaneously and then in August of nineteen ninety eight al Qaeda attacked our embassies in Kenya and Tanzania killing twelve Americans and over two hundred Kenyans and Tanzanians and so it was a horrific loss and a huge emotional and policy blow for all of us who were working on Africa at the time and we had lost our colleagues and so against this backdrop of the pressure of the terrorist attack the fact that we were constantly receiving a stream of credible threats against other of our African embassies that we had to take very seriously. It was a very stressful time. At my approach to dealing with it was rather than sort of wallow it emotion and address the pain that we were all feeling ahead on my approach to it as a young and relatively inexperienced leader was just to charge through it to kind of I did with my parents divorce quite frankly you know we have a crisis..

assistant secretary President Obama president National Security Adviser Assistant Secretary of State f Africa Susan Rice Susan Belfer Center for Science and nonresident senior fellow United Nations Webster Madam Ambassador United States ambassador New York Times Bestseller Congo advisor visiting research fellow New York Times President Clinton
"for " Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"for " Discussed on Science for the People

"The views expressed on science for the people are not necessarily the views of this station, its affiliates sponsors or advertisers. This week on science for the people we're discussing mouth and things may trim yard. I up Dr. Dina timing young, discusses her book about crochet and hyperbolic geometry and how making geometric models that people can play with helps teach math. After that. Janelle, Shane discusses her hubby of training neural networks to do things like named colors, come up with Halloween, costume ideas and generate knitting patterns. Welcome to science for the people. I'm your host Marion kogo. Joining me is Dr Dina time in ya who studied mathematics at the university of Latvia later teaching at Cornell University. She came up with an idea for tactile exploration in non Euclidean geometry using crocheted hyperbolic planes. She's authored two books involving crocheted mathematical objects experienced in geometry Euclidean and non Euclidean with history. And the one we're here to discuss crocheting adventures with hyperbolic planes which just released as a second edition. So thanks for joining me today. Thank you. Bye thinking. So one of the things that's almost always a challenge to do with with an audio only sort of show is discussing mathematics because a lot of the time we were teaching math or learning math, it's printed materials in a book, or you're writing formulas, which are always sort of. Challenging to describe out loud. So why have you spent so much time over the years, popularizing ways of building physical models of mathematical objects of is a sing says to get back, though approached is a mess Matic's and if sodas, a something, some real sing yo can touch. So it's easy to understand Lexi's full concepts and also takes away a lot of mass on exotic they, it goes, if it's something you can make Baio dome, hence well than its means something veal. So you can explode it than you'll can hold it in your hands and just see what does properties, wine that might raise who some, you know some pose questions, why? And then that's that's the Serey which on why? Yeah, when I was when I was looking up, some of the videos of talks that you've done that are on line. One of them you started off with holding up this crocheted model of yours and asking. Who in the audience would be interested in playing with it, and people seemed kind of intrigued by it. And then you asked who would be interested in doing some hyperbolic geometry in like the everybody's face sorta went. So is that a sort of response you get often? Yes, yes. Well, of course it depends on the audience if that is like a scientific audience, like I was just like recently, Ismay was invited to Natalia's International Institute for physics, was a confidence in jail metro south matter, and it was like really highly creative people who are working creating new materials and exploding this kind of geometry. And they've interested say, news dive, it'll be talking about clap it about the geom- at the end, they exactly wanted to do with the attack that way. Giving a new perspective does the defendant way looking familiar sings? And of course, when I'm talking kosher ebbs, then crocheter say, oh, yeah. Well, we. We have done this thing because some of these, some of these. Negative negatively, curved Kushtia. Did pieces come out when you do mistakes throwing to crochet something flat, some some deleo something like some hat and get it off holes Suwit came first for you. Your understanding of the math or or or crew chain model of it that then led you to understanding the math. Oh, and that was so-so tooth separate sings because I was crocheting as a hobby, and I so thought myself crochet to finish my anything pieces because I was considering myself it. And then when I had to each other jail mcdonagh's saw the paper model and wanted my students to explode these paper models. And as the.

Baio dome Marion kogo Suwit Dr. Dina university of Latvia Dr Dina mcdonagh Janelle Lexi crocheter Kushtia Cornell University Ismay Shane International Institute for ph Natalia
"for " Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

08:08 min | 3 years ago

"for " Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"They spend a lot of time trying to hack into people's computers because all of that encryption is based on the on very hard mathematical processes. Quantum cryptography is based on the very laws of quantum physics itself. So it's almost like saying well. If he wants to bring the system. You have to defy gravity. Gravity is a fundamental. You can't do it. It's no matter how hard you try no matter how good your computer is is the same thing with. You'd have to defy the laws of physics and break the law zapanta visits. So that's a very exciting application. Another big area. I think is going to be what we call quantum simulations so for example one one industry which is really really important in the health care sector is pharmaceuticals for example where you want to be able to model the of drugs and how the different molecules interact with each other and so on turns out to get to you know These drugs with large numbers of molecules. It's a very hard thing to simulate on a regular computer a quantum computer we could simulate it much more efficiently and you can imagine that would be a really really important. Application and one of the examples is in pharmaceuticals but there are many other such examples. Where the quantum computer could simulate a quantum kind of system involving large numbers of atoms and molecules much better than any existing classical computer. So how close are we to the quantum computing revolution turns out. It's not an easy question to answer. I think it is an exciting time. But it's it's the kind of excitement we've felt before as well so i'm sure back. When the first transistor was built the same sort of excitement was you know felt by the scientists back then and yes. It was the start of building a huge ecosystem and all of the technology we know today. So are we at that same kind of women now. I'd say it's a little early to make that kind of claim but it is exciting because finally we have Examples off small scale quantum computers so ibm for example has a working quantum computer. It's it's kind of like having toy computer like the very earliest transistor circuits ever built We're at that state so very very early. Nobody could have predicted. When you know transfers being developed where technology would go. Nobody would've ever predict by phone. So we're at the same stage where we have no idea where this technology is going to go building. A quantum computer is a very challenging thing. We need to to play with the laws of physics. so we need to improve for example the basic elements. We need to make sure they are behaving even more quantum leap than they actually giving the moment so we need to do lots of fundamental research to understand how we can do. So that's on the physical side and like the computer you need softwares. We have particularly good examples of what the quantum computer could do. but we're just scratching the surface. Meanwhile mary of quantum materials significant new inventions are well. Underway says professor demo. Shelly do believe we are at a crossroads. A very important point. I do believe that we are there. Were y but certainly some of some of the most advanced countries. And i believe we are. You know the time is ripe for for that to be taking place. That particular pollution in canada we have built were wide very profound understanding of phenomena. We have technology state of technology. We can use to explore nominee We are the love of discovered material now perfecting these materials in in devices. And i'd like to make an example. We nowadays we are able to bill materials atom by atom layer by layer evacuate. So we have extremely clean extremely perfect material down the atomic level. I like to mention a few examples. One which i find really fascinating is clean. Energy so clean. Energy is based on you decision materials. So for instance in fuel cells. And what we're doing. The quantum minor institute is is working on the refinement of new materials. That could be used for this purpose and so we have research direction is it. Your is quantum appears clean energy for a better word. And i i believe we already making major a breakthrough in this direction and we see more coming in the next few years directions where we have already Devices developed are that of a conversion of heat from light sunlight into electricity. And we're doing that. In carbon based materials these days and we have developed technology which allows to generate an electron microscope. A portable if you like electro microscope learn more scale electric. Usually these objects are as large as room. And now you have a portable one and the interest of that is in many application for instance in medical application developing countries so again broad impact that we could have these are some of the key areas in by by no means. They exhaust all the possible directions that we're working. Despite the advances of the past century the quantum world still holds many mysteries. Professors shaheen coach. Now we're getting to Ask new questions in our research where we try to think about how certain aspects of the theory we haven't really explored you know some of the strangest parts of it. Things like superposition and entanglement which are very weird phenomena Which don't really make sense to us in our everyday macroscopic world. Now we're trying to exploit those pieces of teary. Because we're at a point where we can build experiments and try to test this in the lab as research into the subatomic worlds continues. Canada's stands position does a leader in the field. The scientists agree. There's no doubt that candidates leader. Hi internationally in quantum research. This is a result of the fact that governments very early on here decided and saw the potential in quantum technology for long-term application to society canada's been investing in the spiel for thirty years and we have program which nationwide program wildlife might be safer program candidate used to for vast research which has it programming quantum materials that pro has been there for thirty years and really connect head the researchers within canada into a very strongly interactive teeth and perhaps one of the strength of canada being very collegial research environment. They collegiate community. We asking you. Didn't we should be very proud of their place. The quantum arena. We have were leading researcher in this area. We are globally recognized as an expert in the field and now we see that the quantum community in canada is getting together so that we can compete at international level. And see if i is a very key role in this Canadian fourth making sure. We have strategic investment in infrastructure better use of infrastructure and so far things are heating up now and there's a lot of great research teams all around the world and for example china is investing huge amounts of resources into have launched the quantum information satellite. That has already demonstrated entanglement from space. Maybe that'll be a new quantum space race. So the challenge for canada to keep up our thanks to professors kimberly hall. Michele pio hola he coach and dema shenley for sharing barren sites on quantum research by more research stories. Like this one on innovation dot ca slash stories and subscribe to the canada foundation for innovation on your favorite podcast app..

quantum minor institute canada Shelly ibm shaheen quantum arena kimberly hall Michele pio hola dema shenley china canada foundation for innovati