33 Burst results for "Ezra"

"ezra" Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

03:13 min | 2 months ago

"ezra" Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

"Mouth wide open to gobble. Ezra up but ezra was expecting this. The medical don was using his size and weight to bully others. But azra was now quite big to since becoming a giant squid. He held out his two long tentacles. And grab the metal don on either side of his wide jaws then as were tilted and lifted his body up and over the medal. Don's back where he grabbed the shark body in a firm grip with his eight suckered arms. What are you doing. Bellow the meguid. Don sing if you're ticklish. Answered azra and he began tickling. The meg ledeen roared with laughter squirming through the water as it struggled to get away from the tickles. Oh stop i can't stand it. Suddenly from all over the reef sea creatures emerged to see what ezra was doing. When they saw the mega on being tickled into helplessness. They all began to laugh too soon. They were all following about delighting in the big bullies wriggling as it begged for the tickling to stop when ezra felt he done enough. He led the mega odongo and the big shark saw. All of the creatures on the reef laughing at him pulleys. Don't like to be laughed. At the mega don turned his tail and swam off into the ocean. Deep never to be seen again the creatures of the reef chaired and suddenly the see was a riot of collar as hundreds upon hundreds of fish emerged into the waters. One particular green fish swam up and ezra recognized it as the j. genie. Well said the jean genie. You did a grand job there. Thank you said. Azra high never liked bullies. You've still got one. Wish you know reminded the genie new fancy another adventure. Think i'll save it for later. Said azra for now. I'm going to enjoy being giant squid a bit longer. How about a game said mabel. How 'bout chase suggested leo. Okay agreed azra. But if i catch you you better watch out. You might get tickled the and..

azra ezra meg ledeen Don Ezra Bellow Azra don mabel leo
"ezra" Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

07:39 min | 2 months ago

"ezra" Discussed on Short Stories for Kids: The Magic Factory of Storytelling

"As was taking his two dogs. Maple and leo fra. Walk along a sandy beach. Although it was a nice day with a beautiful blue sky and not a cloud to be seen. He was the only person for as far as he could say. The dogs raced along the water's edge occasionally plunging into deeper water before bounding out shaking off and racing away once again. That was until leo began barking at something in the soft wet sand. You've found another crab asked azra laughing. Both dogs were confused by crabs. Perhaps because they all look like walking rocks but when ezra got closer he could see. It wasn't a crap at all. It looked like a handle attached to something a pot. Maybe he ducked down around the edge of it and pulled up at brass object. Just like the one he'd seen in the story of aladdin said azra. It looks like a magic lamp by. Could it really be magic. He thought that was only one way to find out. He gave it a rub. The land began to glow fight braiding gently in his hand. As billows of thick green smoke began to pour out of the spout maple and leo ran in circles. Barking excitedly as the green clouds thickened a thicker emerged from them tall and powerful with his arms folded and jade colored skin. If was a genie. Oh i am jay genie. She said i shall grunt you three wishes as row couldn't believe his luck a real jeanie and three wishes. Whatever should he wish for. i said azra. This is tricky and it's hard to think with all this barking. He thought for a moment then he said i know. I wish my dogs could talk. Your wish is my command said jade genie and with a green flash. The barking suddenly changed. Ezra ezra it's a big green league coming play with. The big green lady said the dogs as they continue to run around and around as ra- laughed. It was funny to hear what they're barking men. And for your second. Wish ask jade. The genie thought ezra as he pushed a hand through his hair. I know i want to be turned into a giant squid and battle emec wahdan. The j. jeannie looked surprised. Mugla don's were the big sharks that ever lived. I know said azra ruled. Lots of teeth reminded the genie yelped mabel in. Leo high. see said the j. Genie thinking very well a battle. It is ammo. The green flash. Everything changed they were underwater alongside a wall of colorful coral and rock. It was the edgy reef. Headed should have been teeming with sea creatures of all shapes and sizes and colors but there were no creatures to be seen. Hey look at me said leo. I'm a dog. Fish me to send maple and look at you as raw. You look funny as a held up his hands to have a look but instead brought up eight. Long arms covered with rows of circular. Suck is and two long tentacles. Hyman giant squid. He said with delight where all the fish asked leo swimming back and forth. It is strange admitted. Azra new think there would be somebody. He swam closer to the carl for a better look and their cowering between a gap in the rock. He could see a little blue fish. High said azra. Don't be afraid we're not gonna hurt you. The little blue fish trembled. You might not want to hurt us but the mekka don does the medical don said ezra is it here somewhere said the blue little fish. It's a great big bully. All the sea creatures are terrified of it. We spend all our days and nights hiding from it. That's terrible said azra. you should too suggested the little bluefish otherwise. He'll come and bully you. I'm not afraid of that. Big shark said ezra flexing his arms and tentacles. I'm gonna go sort him out once and for all very brave of you said the little blue fish. But he's got awfully big teeth. And just gobbles. Anyone that stands up to him. Chess let him try said. Ezra suddenly a large dark shadow pass over their heads causing the little blue fish to wriggle deeper into its crevice. Oh no it said the nagla. Don's coming maple leo. Get behind me instructed azra. Leave this big boy to me. The giant shark circled them dropping. The lower and lower in the water as it checked out the strange newcomers to the reef. Finally it approached showing off an enormous toothy grin. Who will well one of our than as and i'm here to make sure you leave this reef alone. Who's the ride said. The meguid don with a chuckle. And how do you propose stopping me. I'm bigger than you are. I'm stronger than you are. And i've got lots and lots of big sharp cheese. He opened his mouth wide to make sure ezra got a good look at them. Maple whimpered behind him. Said azra might be bigger and stronger and have more teeth. But i'm smarter than you are. The mega don looked furious or you. So in lima dummy now said azra. Just a bully and bullies need teaching. A lesson said the now angry. Magli don loyd to see you try and without warning it surged ford.

azra ezra leo fra jay genie jade genie Ezra ezra Mugla don Leo high leo sandy beach Maple aladdin Azra jeanie mekka don jeannie mabel Hyman don swimming
"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

Star Wars Sessions

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

"Woke the spice trying. If you're a new listener comments and that was the game noise absolutely. Sit my your turn next week. Short beat back on point next week will is q. And i hope to get one hundred percent again. We one hundred four hundred. We've never had with the episodes. We've done a game. We've never had a clean sweep so somebody will do one day but today is not that day however ease that this episode of star wars stations where the fund is an and they're already gum working to find must supply walker. They can find a stalwart sessions dot co dot uk search for us on social media such stalwart sessions will be. That's where instagram take. Talk facebook the lot. We're gonna be that if you wanna send us a message. Maybe a voice snow appear in the show. Maybe you know so good fun. Send us an email to email out. I won't worry. We'll send it to email senator to hello that at stoa sessions dot co dot u. k. I said a sell out i'm done. I'm gonna gather bear. We're on cost provider and ankara fermat on stitcher tune. In many ways gonna poke costs. You say you do the show which we certainly hope we do. Please consider leaving us at five star review on the oppo cost provider choice head on over to puchase dot com and do the same. I'm david papa. Cost is awesome are on there every few that you leave every positive writing more people as we can engage of you guys more. Which is what we're about. We love hearing from ancient everyone of you every week. So thank you. Yes police told. All your star was friends about us. Tell your mom your.

facebook next week instagram five star today one hundred one hundred percent david four hundred dot co dot uk one day dot com dot co ankara fermat
"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

Star Wars Sessions

08:43 min | 8 months ago

"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

"You do you think do think there'll be anything from the prequel era in clone wars explored in asaka the show right because it seems like an unreasonable batch. Stuff up is because it seems that. Lucas omar actually starting to go down the prequel More you know. And it's not just. We've clone wars and an imbalance animated. You know the fat every cost of recall steph that bro obi-wan back and whatnot is just this cultural shift from you. Know i think in two thousand fifteen. There was this reluctance to almost acknowledge. The pre man one of the biggest things one of the biggest town in points. I remember was stoic. Celebration twenty-seven tain for the forty eight forty years of stalwarts event. Empanel they said. Oh yeah hiding. Kristinsson is going to be here. You know and that felt like a big deal because that wasn't the case beforehand. It didn't feel like that. You know so yeah anyway to do think anymore. Lot things the prequels gonna be You explode in a asserting. Hope soap because sites hiding great are all based it as well. I think they read on that. Hey the was being Story may not be as where received a well told as you know they would have liked. Now that i've taken over a book right. That is the story so people have these stories and we we love the stories. We recognize him for all of their flaws. But we love to films man and there are untold amount of people who do as well over there people who don't which is fine but they are part of the canon that of the story so they have to acknowledge him. And i'm glad they. But in a soaker and it depends. How long is it is an eight to ten round series in that bogged down too much in the post if it was a longer form series. Yeah i'd like to. I love seeing anything. Komo's ian live action but when we saw the joy super bachelor george zuri in manda. This is great museum in In the clone wars and in the frequent but seen him in this particular format. My looks great. Would we see too much of it on on on the show that we will. I think we'll get references. I think we'll get name. Drops may be but it's a search is foot grand. Admiral thrown is richer in that will be the league now. Sabine rain captain. Rex may be turning up are they. Were guaranteed to get captured rex. Think i think we will do this just because they got back in. And i think we're guarantee you'll now think with guaranteed to get civilian rain because the rebels set it up. I think and i'd love that. But i think we do. I think we will get tricky wrecks. And i think though. I think they'll do the owed on somebody to help us through this. And then the next episode fund captain rex. He will be ninety. At this time. I think so. Be dead Precisely precisely hundred thousand pregnant on a tayshia. Rex will be dead. Ron is date. Rexha clung like accelerated life span saying united. My mind's already look him a in rebels. Abbott bit i don i but yeah maybe i think definitely get a actually get criticized because i definitely definitely get sabine rain. You know if anything i think will get. We're more likely to get people from rebels so y- harrison duda or other people. I think we're gonna go too far back into the carnivores because what we have rex. Rex is going to be a bit of a codger by then and the clone wars were. You're twenty thirty years before they start on. So shaw they would be stretching but So yeah on that. My final thoughts are made him a suit could cost in. They were hokuto. Be good statue. seek ipo. Luna for my shoe he might be too old. But i think he'd kill it is interrupted and for the soka show excited and this conversation with broiler. Rain has actually has actually got me more excited at the possibilities. None of these might come true too. But i'm excited for way. They choke could go a what about you. So final thoughts man right. I reckon we're going to get a soaker in in this series. might whether it's going to be mold. Who series of just one and it's going to be about the such full. Ezra we eventually toward the end of the series find as rough for whatever reason A deny fits. We're gonna see the wall between welsh with betty good. You mentioned that that would be interesting easy if we do. If we do. Sit my or one explained. Because i do believe recently it was Into you know some so. What's the the wall between modes wasn't twen- travel but something else but counted something else right side time so with an pretty much. It's a hard one and so do the sultan point of view mazzi boy. So i stay. Cl- j j just stay clear. I love cosmic star wars but other anything that relate to any kind of time. If you haven't if ezra's tightening up how on earth can you explain that you want to meet foods like you can't just lie all his extra alright stairmasters cost of the hotel. Yeah he's been absolutely oneal berrios and he doesn't even look like astro now. we're talking about rex. Not nine year old is just gonna let lie. Non eurozone does only does is get boozed up and then goes to fish and chip shop and and i just chuck him. A few freebies have have a curry sauce and a small chips. Ozark greg's pie with a five now. Might of your five is dottie gets through it. Grab move lenders attentive. Might yeah buddy. And then it's gonna lead. We're going to see thrown towards the end and i think we're gonna start hearing about swan throughout mandalorian ranches of the new republic mirror head honcho of the empire. The imperial remnant. And i think i believe thrown is going to be vital. Four the return of pow pertain guy. He he certainly was instrumental in charter out. The route to the unknown regions which led power poteen to exco area in canon. And also they remnant so is there may so basically. You're excited i'm excited. Don't forget man we. We got a whole story. Thread in students demand lawrence season to the wall. We barely talk about because mandalorian season two is so flipping good. Might we got smoke. Cons in these tubes. I come on a lie. I'm telling ya the only series la reliability up for the foundation of the sequels and it's going to retort remember. I said man with i with what i get. I deny so they could create palpitation. Strand cost some enough to do a pipe. Say man that's true that's true. Now that would be mad. Magin if we serve bobby ri- and i got the got the go from killing eve back johnny coma. That's it you know you got you got the whole family bag is law reunion so happened in this okay so you heard it here first today. I'm excited to share with you. The john and dave concurrently developing two new spin off series exclusively for disney plus one rangers of the new republic. And the other featuring fan favorite mcconnell sat within the time line of the mandalorian these interconnected shows along with future stories foresight new audiences embrace our most passionate fans.

george zuri eight Kristinsson mcconnell today ninety hundred thousand Lucas omar disney Abbott Ezra Luna Ron first nine year old harrison earth dave manda eurozone
"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

Star Wars Sessions

07:37 min | 8 months ago

"ezra" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

"It's. It's nice the for star wars fans nine high. We've got these talented people coming on board. But no one else knows them yet. That hours and then off to that right so there is a little bit. That doesn't always work. And you know. That's not the role. But i think overall this is. This is a decent tossing. And i'm looking forward to to if this room is in detroit. I'm looking forward to seeing a the mina masud in this role Will they give him blue contact lenses. My that is the question that they did they did. I remember rosario saying in the behind the scenes like and contact lenses to fit the animated character too closely. So i've got to imagine that they would do it for as roma antelope with star. Wars fans don't necessarily look out for is kana things but when he's mentioned to me if there is a different it the ocd may thinks roy kakuta machinate. He's not the same character author. Different color So i i hope they would say town is deeper and none of the cost isn't confirmed as to speculation from Coyote but is out there and people are picking up because let's face it. There's not much guy on install we we could probably put a rumor they might get traction tip because nothing talk about but Somebody leaves trying to get his name out. There and i think is fantastic. Every taught me does as rahu coli on twitter. Since last september he has been basically banging the drum and teasing people. He's british actor inside a decision myself. lucasfilm frame of mind to conduct would try of gyroscope. Shopping dot quotes. And it's not for any reason. Why wearing lucasfilm teasha. Honestly i really have a a lot wearing it on the job like a renamed pacer people getting very excited and he keeps sending than you out because he's having a good time doing it but rahu coli is. It's actually a week younger than me. So he's might be their age to play israel He's ready put himself out now. I think he's having a bit of fun. He's being in a zombie. The holding of man apply banners. He's one of the main guys in that. He's on the hardy. Quick shows will he would also fit the bill because mainly masud at our who coli with both fit the bill in terms of what they look like as they both have that distinct is readiness to them. And i've seen a hokey and he's a very decent actors. Well no more hit of his work than being massoud artist into that. He's having fun putting himself out there saying to know wh as an extra cost thing to be down. I want it segments. Rosario dawson did get somebody fan. Caster is ochre and she tweeted sat. Oh yeah let's make you act out love this. And they're not free three or four years later she is a soaker so any of the The innocent cody online yet. I have a have a notch lighting. You'd make four again a good as bridge to store it. Sold for the band's really. I'd love him on the show. Actually maybe we rather but yeah come a window you listen my come. A may Yeah again you know. I think i would eat. He looks like ezra disney it looks like israel. I think it could walk. I think it could work. But there we go. I think it all comes down to the acting and as roma Because once can you need to at least of a soka right. you had as a I'm gonna say childish counting about what but almost a childish character in close Early climbers than she grund an undeveloped as a character especially and then by rebel. She's matured a lot and she's a lady ryan cheese. She speaks like an adult. Yeah and then in. You know mandalorian man. She's like spice crises spice wizard about. So i don't know i think the only thing with the esra character is we've seen him really as an adolescent as maybe you know Kids adolescent a now. What you know a an auto that might be a bit more of a culture shock than yeah. So cathy actually. I'm gonna sat right now. Good point just point. It's just a little about what about tell you the gray the dude who voices in ripples. He's he has acted on television. My leeann in films fees ago one one tighter grain to play as roberto he knows the character inside and an s face it. He sounds like as bridget disease. Ezra and he's got. I mean he's no less experience had made him a suit. He's not quite maybe quite an experience as row who they're actually. I beg to differ. He's and he knows the character. So what stuck with him from getting tighter. Food has a good one. Good point i to montenegro either a really wouldn't i mean it's with the okay thing we're never going to truly find out why ashley eckstein was was not chosen to live action. I think the you know between us. We can actually of gas and come to a conclusion as to why. Yeah and maybe. It's the same with with tyler gray adducing. That's a bit more of a grace spice. If you in the palm oh boy but now let's say let's say are along as long as the story is good my boy. I don't mind a really done mind. I'll go question view because we're told might cost in and all that whatever we do know is a rosario dawson is going to be plan a. So catania in the show which is just code. Asanka i was of course announced at the disney invested. I lost year late last year. Which i couldn't believe i still get over that night that i i. I didn't even give us took over today. They save that for the are now we because we weren't even expecting much. I don't think anyone was expecting anything. Big maybe just like an update on a few things and that's it and lombard man. Why oh you get in ranges of the new republic and a soka awhile and then the roll out the carpet and oh yeah. There's more coming by the way Bubba hiding christians bub-bubba This other stuff bad batch over fan mildmay absolutely mad yes i get. Soak it But the soka show the asuka show. We know as there's gonna be you know and oh well we kind of now wait wait. Let's let's just for now. Assume that as bridge from stall was rebels is going to be a asakusa. Show.

Rosario dawson Ezra roberto last september ashley eckstein today ezra disney twitter star wars ochre esra both disney invested roy kakuta british christians four years later four rahu coli one
Vox Media Publisher Melissa Bell on recent departures and future content

The Digiday Podcast

04:14 min | 11 months ago

Vox Media Publisher Melissa Bell on recent departures and future content

"Okay let's get into welcome. Melissa thanks for taking the time happy to be here always enjoy the digital passed so last month bucks co medical esiason as recline as well as vox editor in chief larne williams announced. They're leaving bucks. So what's going on a box. You know it's a it's a story that's a little bit about fox could also just think this is a major europe change. You spoke a little bit about the founding of ox. We started almost seven years ago. We'll have our seventh anniversary in march this this next year and it's been an incredible period of growth for us i think particularly over the last three years We really expanded into the multimedia platforms that. You're talking about television in podcast. Obviously our newsroom grew as well. And it's been fantastic to watch this growth. But i think this year with everything in change in and everyone kind of considering their next steps. I think individually as romance and lauren all in conversations with me realized that they were ready for different step in their careers and similarly i think fox is ready for a different step in its direction in twenty twenty one and it aligns really to sort of say okay. Let's make this. Let's make some big significant changes all at once and let's move forward into into a new era. Vox they have all been huge instrumental. Parts of oxen have really left their imprint. On it and i'm really grateful for all they've done but i'm also excited for what's to come next. And there's some precedent for this. Because then i think it was. Twenty seventeen was when as a became editor at large. That was. Lauren was promoted to editor in chief and that seemed to coincide with also something of a new era for box like today explained. Hadn't launched yet. The netflix show explained watching. I think a year later so like with this now. Kind of that precedent being set. What are you expecting for the next era. Vox what's going to be different about fox in two thousand twenty one. Yeah i don't want to ever speak for Think it's a really interesting story. A bit In his in his decisions what he's always done. And i think that this is this is evident two thousand seventeen and evident now is that he and matt and i came up with a strong idea about what fox could try to solve for audiences. We really knew that there was there was something that we needed to help with journalism overall. But what we sound is that having others come in and take that sort of seed of an idea and build something invariably ends up with amazing incredible work. And i think that when ezra step back in two thousand seventeen he did so purposely to let someone like lauryn williams take the helm and lead. Vox into sort of this next generation. And you see the you see the impact that she had Over the last few years. And i think what we're looking for is to find some new folks who are ready to be those new leaders in taking different directions. We also i think have created space internally for a lot of the really talented people we have to step up and take box into different directions today. Explain you mentioned is is our daily podcast and i think it's a great example. We hired sean. Rahm ashore are host to create something. That really gets out what we want. Vox to be at its very best. Something that Jewels deep into stories of the day But does so in a way that is that takes topics seriously but artiste itself too seriously that brings both joy and understanding to its audience. And that's not something that i could have ever come up with. That's not something that could have ever come up with. That's really something that sean developed with his tastic team and i just you know i've always found that if you give creators space to do great work. They're great work will accomplish in so we're looking forward to that in the next

Bucks Co Medical Esiason Larne Williams FOX Melissa Lauren Lauryn Williams Europe Netflix Ezra Matt Rahm Sean
UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

UN News

01:17 min | 11 months ago

UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

"Should adopt ambitious new targets to tackle hiv aids to avoid hundreds of thousands of additional infections and deaths from the disease linked to the covid nineteen pandemic the un said on thursday citing data showing the pandemic's long-term impact on global hiv response. Un aid said that there could be up to nearly three hundred thousand additional new hiv infections between now and two thousand and twenty two and up to one hundred and forty eight thousand more aids related deaths. This collective faded to invest sufficiently in comprehensive rights-based people. Scented hiv responses has come at a terrible price. Said winning be anemia executive director of you and aids. She added that the only way to get the global response against hiv aids. Back on track was by tackling the inequalities on which epidemics thrive although countries in sub saharan africa including swan and ezra teeny have achieved or even exceeded targets. Set for two thousand twenty. Many more countries are falling way behind urinate said in a new report called prevailing against pandemics. Its proposed targets for twenty twenty five focus on a high coverage of hiv and reproductive and sexual health services together with the removal of punitive laws policies. Stigma and discrimination. If these targets are met the world will be back on track to ending aids as a public health threat. By twenty thirty the agency

HIV Aids UN Anemia Saharan Africa
"Framing a Different World" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"Framing a Different World" Week

"This week's theme comes to us from Liam Dodd and is called framing a different world. Here's why Liam chose this theme. He says. My Name's Leeann Dodd. Theme Cherries is framing a different world. A chose this theme because I think all of us can benefit for hearing from those of unique expertise or experience is able to provide a new ones new perspective on the way we drive society with each other or just very peaceful. And here are the episodes chosen by Liam for the team along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode of the week comes to us from the Ezra Klein show and it's called Contra points on taking the trolls. Seriously it's eighty one minutes long. Here's the description. Youtube is weird. Tomorrow's politics are happening today. Next episode comes from it could happen here and is called the second American civil war. It's forty eight minutes long. Are you worried about the possibility of the second American civil war in episode one of it could happen here Robert Explains why 2016 was the first time he started to seriously worry about. The next episode comes to us from Length Uzi Azam and is called sounds. You can't hear babies, accents and phonemes. It's nine minutes long. Why does it always sound slightly off when someone tries to imitate your accent why do tiny children learning your second language already sound better than you even though you've been learning at longer than they've been alive what does it mean for there to be sounds you can't hear. The next episode comes to us from the dream podcast and his called magnets. How do they work? It's forty one minutes long. Here's the description. The road to wellness is paved with particles and protons. And the last episode of the week comes to us from Fox mulder is a maniac and his called synergy. It's forty nine minutes long. Oh boy it's the one where a cosmic planetary alignment turns agent moulder into a crazed sex offender. Don't miss this episode. Those are the episodes chosen by Liam. For this week's theme framing a different world.

Liam Leeann Dodd Ezra Klein Uzi Azam Youtube Fox Mulder Robert
interview With Roger Glover Of Deep Purple

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

interview With Roger Glover Of Deep Purple

"I had a chance to spend some time with his Band on the road throughout Mexico we had some great journeys. We had a great lunch legendary ban that is on a long goodbye tour that apparently is getting longer because they've just released a great new album called whoosh here is Roger Glover of Deep Purple Raj. How are you my friend? I'm great I'm great. You remember that luxury. Well, we we. I don't remember what city it was in but we stumbled upon some some spot and remember the band playing and we had a couple of drinks. It was a wonderful afternoon. That's right. There were more in the band we're eating in the restaurant. That's really true. We have a great photo of that somewhere. But anyway have you been Roger I mean it's It's crazy times in the world and deep purple is such a global touring band. It must be quite strange for you'd have to be sort of tethered down right now. a very strange Initially the longest time I've ever had. Is Our full. Stop. Jane. Cooking cleaning. Gardening. Well. You've got a young one you gotta young onto don't you? Too Young well, eleven and nine that's pretty young. That's a that's a that's younger than mine. So I know what it's like it's it's a lot of work. On, my older one is came over for a couple of weeks. She shot forty now and married and my two grandkids. FOR THE MOA It's been a hectic hectic time I. Keep Thinking this a rehearsal took permanent retirement. But I you know I don't want that to happen. So we live in hope. we recorded this album nausea year and so. The original release date was June sometime to go put back to August. Having sitting on a new album beside long without getting released. He's like old hat to us now and yet everyone tearing it for the first time. Yeah. I was GonNa ask you used to that I was GonNa ask you about the time line on it because if I'm not mistaken when we were traveling together and we did run through Mexico together, I remember some rumblings at that time from some of the guys in the band about the idea of. Doing a new record. So at that point, it was still in the talking stages I think and then I'm assuming you wrapped up touring everybody said Yeah let's go for it and you once again connect with the Bob with Bob. Ezra talk about the timeline and and given that you guys are short of winding down. was there differences in the band as to whether you should do new record or not? No. No wasn't actually it was. Quite organic. We'll wanted to do it. I think the thing is since probe. we've done three albums with him now and there's I think there's a feeling that our age seventy S. This is the Korea and we we've got three Amazing albums. showed a sort of a late flowering of abandoned Korea if you like. Very happy about that what what is it? What is it about the connection with the Bantu Baba's your and you know I've talked Alice Cooper about this and he's got a long history with them and a few other artists and I've actually talked to Bob and interviewed him a timer to what what is it for you? What is it about the purple guys that he's brought out of you guys that you feel so comfortable and wanting to be creative with him. And Klay in Toronto. Eight nine years ago. We didn't meet him that night, but the next day we had. A breakfast meeting with him. And he said some great things. He said he really loved musicianship in Swanton Ahe of the band. And He said. Should forget trying to you know, right. Songs to get you know. Parades forget sixty s just be yourself some stretch out. Not Keywords because we started writing. whatever immagination took us. and. I think we had a whole news of the writing experience lost three albums of Philip songs we could never written. Back in the seventies. So the the nineties so so You know. S Precious that connection. We get along with them really well, he looks very efficiently in the studio he encourages. Spontaneity. Encourages. freshness of all recording at the same time, we will go in the studio at the same dominant record the. We don't allow things on you know.

Klay BOB Roger Glover Mexico Philip Alice Cooper Korea Jane Ezra Swanton Ahe Toronto US.
Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

Environment: NPR

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

"Joe Seventy National Park has been closed for nearly three months because of stay at home orders but today the park is reopening in a limited way Cap Radios Ezra. David Romero reports that the closure has had a huge effect on nearby businesses. On the way into Yosemite National Park from Fresno sits the Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain Railroad, which shut down with the rest of California in March Scott. mcghee runs the operation. We lost every single tour group and school group that we had coming up here. Yosemite is opening with a lot of restrictions. Only about half of the average June visitors are allowed in, and they must make online reservation for each car in advance, Jamie Richards Yosemite spokesperson. We're going to be monitoring condition daily. We're GONNA make adjustments as needed and we're going to work to maintain safe conditions for visitors. Only two campgrounds are open in the larger one. One is operating at just fifty percent of capacity. Other campsites are closed due to staffing Richard says she's interested in seeing how the animals in the park respond again the people we've seen a lot of bears out in active we will see when the park reopens. How the animals continue to reopen adapt to visitors coming back last year, visitors spent more than one point seven billion dollars in the four California counties that surround the Park Brooke. Smith with visit Yosemite Madera. County says that could drop by as much as half this year between fires in government shutdowns. This is definitely the longest we've ever gone with you Ashleigh. Up when she first heard, the park was opening Amy George and her husband Kyle Mon- Holland from Davis. California rushed to book a few day passes. I was drinking coffee I'm like I'm just GonNa. See and says I go. July twenty second has day passes Great. That's our twentieth anniversary. The pair of teachers spent their honeymoon in Yosemite. George has visited the park since childhood and the reservation system has long term effects. Maybe this'll lessen the impact that humans have had on the environment on Yosemite. George hopes unlimited spaces. Don't discourage people from trying to make it to the park. She wants everyone to enjoy Yosemite like she always has for NPR. News I'm as David Romero in

Joe Seventy National Park Yosemite Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain R Yosemite Madera David Romero Amy George California Park Brooke Fresno Jamie Richards Scott. Mcghee Richard Smith NPR County Kyle Mon- Holland Davis
Legends 11 Why Goldfinches Look Like the Sun

Iroquois History and Legends

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Legends 11 Why Goldfinches Look Like the Sun

"Why gold finches look like the Sun. This is a traditional Hodeidah. Schone story as told by Mabel powers in her nineteen seventeen book stories that Iroquois tell their children today with special guest performances by Ezra and Ethan Carter Ages seven and five respectively. It was so moons after raccoon outwitted Fox before they again met. Raccoon was scurrying by when Fox saw him now Fox had not forgotten the trick that raccoon had played on him when he burned his mouth with what he thought was magic. Papa's but in reality. It went by another name Jack in the pulpit or to others a fireball. So Fox began to chase after raccoon. He was gaining and would have caught him had they not come to a tall pine tree. Raccoon quickly ran up the trunk and reached the tippy top of it. Try Get me up here. Flax said raccoon there. He would be safe for. The Fox could not climb the Fox lay down on the soft pine needles and waited for raccoon. Come down the Fox lay down on the soft pine needles just sitting there waiting for raccoon to eventually come down but raccoons stayed up in the pine tree. So Long Fox grew tired and sleepy. He began to close his eyes and thought he would just take short nap. Raccoon watched until he saw the Fox was sound asleep. Raccoon had been sitting on the tree along while and when he tried to move he noticed that his paws were very sticky and then he smiled and said to himself. I know how to deal with box. Then he took in his mouth some of the south from the Pine Tree. He ran down the trunk and quietly rubbed the pitch over the eyes of Sleeping Fox shortly thereafter Fox awoke with a Jerk. He Sprang up and tried to seize raccoon but alas he could no longer see what he was doing. The lids of his eyes were held fast with the Pine Tar. He could not open them. The raccoon laughed at Fox's plight and then ran away and left him shouting back over his shoulder. Trial me now. Fox Fox lay for some time under the tree. The Pine Gum as it dried held the lids of his is closer and closer shut. He thought he would never again see the sun. Some of the birds were singing nearby and he called to them and told them of his plight. He asked if they would be so kind as to pick open his eyes. The birds disgusted among themselves and then flew off and told other birds pass soon. Many of the little dark songs tres flew back to where Fox was laying down and then Peck Peck went the little bills on the islands of the Fox bit by bit they carefully picked away the Pine Tar. If one grew tired another bird would come in and take its place as they stood on his snout at last Fox saw a small streak of light shortly thereafter. One of the islands was able to fly open and then shortly thereafter. Another the sun was shining and the world looked so very to Fox as he opened both of his eyes he was very grateful to the little birds for bringing him light and he told them that he would give them anything they asked for. The little birds talked among themselves and then looked back and said to Fox. We don't like doc fabrics we to look like the Fox looked around him and saw some beautiful sunflowers growing nearby. He took the pedals and pressed them. Grinding them into paint and then with the tip of his tail is a brush. He began to paint the little dark birds like the son. He thought that he would start by painting. The body's first but the birds were so overcome with happiness before he could move onto the wings and tails on the top of their heads and dozens of little birds darted away like streaks of sunshine shouting as they went.

Fox Fox Raccoon Pine Tree Long Fox Pine Tar Hodeidah Mabel Powers Flax Papa Peck Peck Ezra Ethan Carter Jack
"ezra" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"ezra" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"In hopes of helping you get through the boredom you can go to youtube and just look for my channel. Just search my name Fred Mimic until next week cheers welcome back to of the Bourbon. Pursuit the official podcast of urban Kenyan Ryan back in Bardstown road again at off. But this is fun. We love going on the road and and and today it's funny because you know we drive around bartend we do a lot of these interviews However this one place that I had never driven up and we drive past the quite frequently. Especially if you're a frequenter over to keystone liquors yeah. Yeah you drive by the cinemas movies in. It's right across the street. It is and But this is one place where I drove up and I was. I was amazed like how beautiful the grounds are here at luxury distillers and being able to The first thing that we saw a was like some a house that you said your your buddy grew up in that owned the land here And then we saw their their resident peacocks. Oh yeah yeah this. I've been up this driveway. Many Times. You know as a running joke that. I'd say that I'm from Bardstown but I am from Bardstown and Grew up hanging out here with a buddy John and his family so It's a beautiful property. Got a bunch of old farmhouses gold house and some peacocks and they were like Kenny walked up and they kind of spread their feathers out. I think they're excited because he can in. So yeah. Maybe maybe who knows. Yeah but you've been you know just being town seeing the construction and everything but never really seen it till now on man it's an it's an impressive property in all the distillery and everything so talk about the property But you know this is also were. Were getting a chance to talk about a company. That's kind of like a unknown Titan in the industry you know it's they've they've had a lot of established brands that have been out there For the longest time it'd been a sourcing product and now that they are seeing the light they're like. Hey we gotta grow. We Got Expand. We got to We gotta start pumping out our stuff to And so when we start talking about these brands a lot of them are going to start bringing a lot of names like rebel. Yell like as Brooks like these are all lanes they are that these are all the names that you're probably very familiar with and I didn't know much about the distillery in the people that are behind it so guilty. I don't know much but now I do know because we just did. The tour got family history. And it's like a really cool story so I'm excited to share that with our audience. Absolutely and that's a good way to kind of segue into our guest today so today we have. Philip. Philip is the brain ambassador for luxury distilleries. So Philip. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you Ryan. Thanks for having me on absolutely so before we kind of get into this and start talking about the whiskey and the two were in the grounds and all that sorta stuff again. Let's kind of talk about You know your history your upbringing. 'cause you're you're young strapping lag names Lux. Obviously you have something to do around here. Yeah so you know the we kind of talked about like your family's been in this business What forty years now? Something like almost sixty years almost sixty years so talk about your first run in with Bourbon. My first run with Bourbon honestly was was pretty recent Over the past two to three years. When we decided to build a zillion that so your mom and dad I mean it's really was as a personally. My my first run in with Bourbon was was recent but as a company we've been in the Bourbon Industry for over forty years doing some private label stuff with my grandfather back when he was still still around and David Sherman originally started the business with my grandfather. Paul when they were doing that private label. Bourbon just for for different grocery stores or or convenience stores around the country. And then we we bought our first Bourbon In I believe ninety three with Ezra Brooks from from Glenmore distillers who's now bisazza racking has kind of grown from there and You know that was a little over twenty years ago now and we've grown. We've had award brands and grown our brands over the past twenty years and into into big big names. That allowed us to now break off from sourcing in start our own distillery and have everything distilled in house verse Sourcing Bourbon from somebody else okay. So let's get back to the original question. What was your first. My first run with Bourbon was was probably three years ago in Colorado when I was when I was living there and decided I wanted to get away from kind of the the vodka. Vaccines started. Drink some different stuff and my mom actually came to me and said they'd be really opportunity for you. Know maybe heaven idea of getting into the industry as we're getting ready to build this so I jumped Kinda head over heels into the Bourbon Industry and kind of ran with it from there. Went to Moonshine. University in Louisville and Where I really got introduced Bourbon and whiskey and that kind of helped me engulfed by self in the industry and engulf myself in what. Bourbon really is especially here in Kentucky in Louisville. Where it's you know America's spirit and in most popular spirit so So she was the catalyst that you didn't really you're like it's there. You're all saying I'M GONNA do my own thing. Yeah I'd never even really wanted to be in the industry. I was always not necessarily pressured. My Dad always said do whatever you WANNA do He was never pressuring. Mito was always his friends or my friends asking. When are you going to get in the industry when Riina do this do that? So because I'm sure your friends are like. Hey Yeah I mean I would take boxes a boost to college with me whether it be vodka. You'd be wrong. We we use lescot and how we used to own Admiral. Nelson's so that was a pretty good for us and that was a fun product in college and everybody enjoyed that. But you know on the Bourbon side. I really didn't know much about it until I started taking classes. And really engulfing myself and it with steven thief like I said as well with Moonshine you and my mom is said you know. Take a chance. This is something that's different. It's something that's new. It's going to be something that you can help grow and you can be a part of. I was working in a ski shop in Colorado two years out of school and You know love in life but it's hard to work in a ski shop for the rest of your life. We're GONNA ski town so I need to find something a little different. And I I've I've used my dad and different people in the company and then the industry has kinda stepping. You know stepping box to help me work into it and learn more about it and I feel that I've I'm learning. You know every day whether it be with our products or the distillation process or the supplier verse distributor side And you know with my job. It really allows me to learn Frequently in in continue learning In traveling and seeing different how Bourbon. Whiskey is viewed in California verse in Kentucky Versus New York. You know I like to call You know the Bourbon trail like the Napa Valley the Mid West now because you guys probably see it firsthand as well where everybody's flocking here now for for that Bourbon. Even the peacock's evenly they're always there they love it here so kind of talk about what you do. See The difference in in Bourbon whether it's the community or culture as you're doing these travels you know just across the US. What is what's up in that kind of stands out to you. I think something that really stands out is the recognition of the bigger brands You know you go to California where I went up to Seattle for Seattle cocktail. Weaken people never heard a luxury but they had heard of heard of Heaven Hill and maker's mark in Jim Beam and You know being for me my passion and and what I really strive to grow not only are brands but our brands are part of a bigger name. Now looks row so I think you know dance. Your question Kennedy The major difference that I see is how quickly a brand like throw catches on in Kentucky Because you know we're year in seven months out from putting juice in our first barrel and people recognize those brands like you know they. They have the all throughout time. They recognize luxury now. As in San Francisco whiskey fest. Those are all whiskey enthusiasts. So they're GONNA you know they've probably been following those brands but they're not super familiar with it. Maybe they've seen that luxury logo somewhere and now they're going to be you know. I'm going to be there and they can learn more about it on a firsthand basis or up in New York. I was up there in personally introduced. Dave Nicholson Reserve into the New York. The Boston market in front of all the distributors so just different brands that aren't necessarily recognized throughout the country or are don't have a lot of backing to them that need help you know growing And with the distillery. It's allow us to help. Grow those brands in a different way where we can one bring customers here in you know they can see that product. We have people from all over the country if not the globe coming here When they come to see Heaven Hiller Jim Beam or makers marker limestone branch down in Lebanon. They drive right past us now So we're in very unique spot. Here that It allows us to help grow. I mean you're go ahead Ryan. I'll go all right. I'll keep going. I was talking about like is yeah I mean. We talked about kind of beginning to show that you know the the rebel. David Nicholson blood oath. Like Ezra books like these are these are pretty iconic neons in in whiskey. They've been around for a long time but people didn't really know a lot of the background and so looks row is also I? Is it underneath the umbrella or an extension of of LEX CO as well? Can you kind of talk about the differences? What you have there yeah absolutely so Lux. Co is I like to call it our parent brand but looks looks. Rose actually technically a supplier of co- You know we own it as a family My Dad You know is the chairman. Ceo Still looks row. But we we act as I supply for Lux Coz Bourbons But we're also owned and operated family operated out of Saint Louis with my father. myself my brother and my mom. My brother's not in the industry's he's an aerospace engineer. But he sees a one a little bit of a different path than myself but You know to each its own. I've found a niche here. But yeah I mean. Locks Co is is a worldwide supplier of of spirits. We own a multitude of about one hundred from brands ever clear. Probably being the biggest. My GRANDPA Paul's purchase that Way Back in the day. That was the first popular guy in college in to this day. Proud to admit. I've actually never drinking every clear. Yeah really genital never drink and so it's it's ever clear as you know the biggest one but then we've got Pearl Vodka Arrow cordial's We own three different. Two Kilos Wars Tequila which are mixed. Oh which you can find in you know like a Texas roadhouse well It's well Margaritas usually whereas Tequila We have elmore Tequila which is ultra premium as well as exotica Tequila All based out of Mexico But it all you know. We're the suppliers for that so we we've been partnered with the Gonzales family over there for a thirty forty years. My grandfather worked with Rodolfo Gonzalez father so still very family oriented and then over on row. Even you obviously can't get to Lux row if you don't have lux co And so we've over the past twenty years. We've purchased all of our Bourbon brands as we're Brooks Fan. The first in ninety three from Glenmore distillers and then we had rebel yell in ninety nine we purchase from Stetzer Weller David Nicholson is one of my favorite brands to talk about because it started originally started in Saint Louis Missouri. And we can go into that story. You got a little bit of a.

Bourbon Ezra Brooks Kentucky Bourbon trail Bardstown Glenmore distillers Colorado Ryan Paul David Nicholson youtube California Philip bartend Fred Mimic official Jim Beam Louisville Dave Nicholson
Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

Coronacast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

"I'm health reporting tyler. Journalists Daughter Norman Swan so norman. There's been a lot of talk recently about people not taking the pandemic seriously and people that interested to talk about how to talk about it with the people in their life. Who are still wondering around too much. Do you have any tips on how to convince that person who just doesn't want to seem to get the message yet road depends through the are probably more often than not but this preaches coming here being a younger person who feels that they're invincible and they'll just go out and get it and they'll be over it and after all they'll say isn't it just like the flu and so here's the argument one is that yes. It's true that younger people are not as likely as older people to die from it but there are plenty of younger people who die for from it. So if you think you're steel belted. You're actually not thirty to forty percent of intensive care. Unit beds are taken up with people who are relatively young and some of them die and there are no known risk. Factors for why those people died because it's not like elderly people with heart disease and diabetes and so on the no other particular risk factors so you are actually playing. Russian roulette by going out and doing it and the second reason you need to actually be serious about this is do you have family so parents and grandparents you're contributing to the spread to the community and actually could kill them and then the third thing is is when you were at school. Did you have friends that we're on to do nursing? Did you have friends who went on to mid soon or work in healthcare physios and so on because if this gets out of control they will actually die because twenty percent of people of healthcare professionals will get this. They'll get a big doors and many will get it severely and there are doctors and nurses dying of this. Is that what you want? If that isn't enough to convince people I think there's something wrong with them so I do it for yourself but also do it for the people around you people that you love. That's right because it's not guarantee you're going to get a mild dose of it so David's asking if we can clarify what the differences between nineteen and size cough to SARS. Cov too confusing SARS. Cov Two is the virus that causes covered so covered. Nine thousand nine. Is the disease so flu? Like symptoms runny nose fatigue loss of taste loss of smell sometimes diarrhea. That combination of symptoms is the disease and the disease can go for a week. And then you get better or can go for a week. And then after a week you fall off the cliff and you get really seriously ill. That's covered nineteen SARS Cov. Two is the virus that causes it and it's called SARS Cov too because this conversion over related virus to SARS which affected people about fifteen or more years ago in various countries of the world. So it's kind of a second version of the SARS virus not really. The SARS virus was the second version. People say it's the corona virus really what they should be saying. It SARS Cov Tube and the reason why you separate the two is that some people are infected with SARS Cov two and either have very very mild symptoms so mild. They don't know they've got it or totally is symptomatic and sixty percent of infections of SARS COV which leads to covered nineteen are from people who are asymmetrical very minor symptoms and therefore the don't know they're spreading around so speaking of spreading it. We're also getting a lot of questions about testing and testing kits and people are asking. Why can't we being Stra? Just manufacturer testing kits. If there's a shortage there are labs that can produce the reagents and which is the chemicals you need to analyze the genes on the virus. So we do have those reagents around and we can manufacture but we don't have many facilities left in Australia which actually can do that so over the years. We've lost industries in Australia. Which have the tooling which allows you to produce these kits at mass-scale so we can produce the kids but not in the quantities. That's required us as why we're having to import them but we do have some machines around which can actually do this. Sort of testing on mass. They're taken up with other work but we do have those machines to so we would have to create a manufacturing facility with over controls there that we just don't have at the moment so that's some questions from grownups but we're also getting heaps of questions from kids and we've covered a few over the last few episodes but let's keep doing that. Clara has sent this in from isolation at home she and her family have called symptoms. And they don't WanNa make other people seek Clara an league in Adelaide. Five two more. Why IS CORONA VIRUS? Started a really good question Clara and the reason. It's so bad. Is that first of all? It's very contagious. And by contagious. We mean how many people would spread to so if I've got the infection or let's say you had Clara. How many people could you infect around you and on average you in fact two or three people one for the time that you've got the virus that's actually quite a lot so if you've got the flu it's under twos maybe one and a half people but if it was a pretty mild infection then you wouldn't worry too much and eighty percent of people eight hundred ten people? It is actually fairly mild but in twenty percent of the people it gets severe. And that's because it locks into receptor in your long. That's a lock and key mechanism in your lung and can create a really bad lung disease. So it's not a smash a lung infection as your whole long reacts and almost go solid and you lose the ability to take air from the atmosphere breathe it in and get oxygen going into your bloodstream. And that's why people die of this. We have you feel better soon Clara. We've also got a question for six year old. Ezra get virus when you already have a different virus while we'll happen mix or something else. That's a really good question as a really clever question really no but if you were to get influenza if you were to get the flu at the same time as covered nineteen that's the disease caused by the virus. Sars virus then the likelihood is that they will add or multiply together and damage your lungs and damage your body much more than each individually and maybe much more than each so. It's not multiplying by to the effects could be multiplying by four or six. Because they work with each other to actually make your body worse. That's if you get the influenza or say the common cold it could make everything much worse with other things like say for example if you've got cancer diabetes and so on usually means that your immune system your ability to fight this office weaken so you're more likely to get an infection and more likely to be able to resist it very well and so your body if you like is distracted because it's taken up by fighting the cancer or fighting the diabetes then your body's distracted and you're more vulnerable more open to the infection. Hope that explains in language that Communicates Clearly Ezra but really good question. Sorry research groups all over the world looking for different ways to treat and KUA card. Nineteen and the W. H. O. The World Organization has just launched a mega trial of four of the most promising corona virus treatments. Norman what are they testing? So they're testing a variety of drugs testing this anti-malarial co Corcoran related drug called Haiku. Hydroxy chloroquine which may be a bit stronger. They're looking at HIV drugs which are anti viral anti retroviral drugs. Ones Le Vian routine over the has been some disappointing results. I think from those two. But they're going to have a look at them as well and maybe add an immune stimulant called Interferon Beta which helps to which helps to attack viruses. So in other words you might get three drugs working together which might affect the immune system and love noon system to attack. The virus in interferometer has got some nasty side effects which would probably have to monitor it. And then there's this other drug called Rim desert here which is a recent drought produced by a drug company called Gilead for another purpose for another virus and go to try that because they think they might get an effect with the SARS Cov too. So what they're going to do. It's it's not a randomized controlled trial they're gonNA allocate people to one or other of the drugs or the or usual care drug combinations registered as a trial and watch what happens to them as the go through so that it's not going to be a perfect trial but we don't have time for a perfect trial. We just go to be able to get people. On these study drugs we know on average. What percentage goes on to develop serious disease and needs to be ventilated and we know roughly what percentage will go onto dine. Can we developed from that and then we'll do comparisons between the different drug groups. How do they know that these drugs are ones that might work? The don't really so some of it is a bit theoretical but there have been some small pilot studies which suggests that there may be ineffective anti-malarial the not very good studies. But they're not good enough to say to everybody let's get onto Corcoran and there are side effects from from these drugs as well so you don't want to recommend them because it distracts from what might be the cure and your door to real mess out there. So you really want to know. Divided all up. There's some indications from small studies uncontrolled studies relatively uncontrolled studies. These drugs may have an effect. And I were GONNA do scale up the trial and see when you compare them in a reasonably scientific way which one standout if any because non may but we gotta get on and find out.

Influenza Clara Norman Swan Ezra Diabetes Australia Lung Disease Adelaide Corcoran David Le Vian Cancer Chloroquine W. H. O. The World Organizatio Stimulant Interferon
2020 Update

Iroquois History and Legends

05:04 min | 1 year ago

2020 Update

"And welcome to Iroquois history and legends. This is Andrew. We just wanted to give you a short update on where we're at. I know that for almost everyone in the world right now. We're dealing with an unprecedented time in world history never before has so many people been sequestered in every pocket of the planet. Due to the scare about this virus we know looking from history. And as you all educated listeners know the world is full of histories of pandemics and horrible plagues We know how decimated the Hodeidah schone best estimates are other native peoples of North and South America lost upwards of eighty percent of their population due to play in diseases and thankfully. We're not dealing with anything on the scale of that but even still it is a scary proposition realizing that so many of our people that are already dealing with health issues and loved ones that are on the elderly variety and it even affects some people in the younger demographic as well so we know. It's a scary time but just be assured that people will always stick together. They will help each other to quote the great philosopher. Fred Rogers whenever you see something bad happen to the helpers there will always be helpers and we know that's the case no matter what culture nation or community you live in. There will always be people there to help and we hope that you are those people that are helping others. Anyway I wanted to let you know where Caleb and I are at obviously at the time of this recording. New York is one of the epicenters in North America for the disease and Caleb his hands full trying to to do his job to support his family I myself and my family are currently in Asia We are stuck. It's not feasible for us to go back to North America. I had recently moved to Asia to try and do some schooling and that's about exactly when the virus it so we've bounced around from a few countries and currently we are in Malaysia. That is also on lockdown. Now we're not immune from that either. That makes it very difficult for Caleb. Obviously to record together since we're literally on the other side of the planet but that being said even though were from each other and My microphone equipment is in a another country. I thought let's try. Let's try and put something out. Caleb and I being together really doesn't work for us to do a narrative episode for me by myself. It our chemistry. We just need each other But I do have some other co hosts here with me. My two young boys are getting older. And they love hearing the Haudenosaunee Children's stories as much as anyone so they've asked if they could help along with this. So here's what we're going to do The kids and I are going to attempt to put out some more traditional. Iroquois Children's stories during our time in quarantine as long as that is don't expect a huge vast amount. We still got homeschooling for them to do. I still have online classes for my language study. But we thought we'd try that being said. The audio quality is definitely not going to be as good Just because I don't have the wonderful Blue Yeti microphone so we'll be dealing with some subpar speakers but we hope that you and your kids can enjoy these tales and hopefully it'll give us something to do as for the future of the show. Caleb and I will still need to talk about that obviously putting out multiple episodes every few weeks or every few months is Not Feasible right now. We're going to commit to that. After this all blows over Caleb and I would like to do maybe an episode or two to To tie off the vast history of the final two centuries to catch us up to modern day but that remains a lot to be worked out. We thank you everyone for listening. If you know friends or family that are looking for something. Do recommend our podcast. Don't let them binge on Netflix. And all that other stuff give them something productive to do to stretch their brain and learn something new. If you have listened to the entire series well go back and start again believe it or not but Caleb and I do not remember everything that we shared not by a long shot We both have to go back and listen to our hold episodes and be like. Oh Yeah I forgot about that if we can go back and learn stuff that we've already said I'm sure that That you guys would get a lot of knowledge out of going back and listening again. Thank you everyone for listening and look for a new legends episode coming in the future with Andrew. Ezra and maybe even Ethan thank you everyone

Caleb Iroquois Children Andrew North America Hodeidah Schone South America Fred Rogers Netflix Asia Haudenosaunee Children New York Malaysia Ezra Ethan
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
Nicholas Braun, "Succession"

Popcorn with Peter Travers

13:41 min | 2 years ago

Nicholas Braun, "Succession"

"What's the news. What's what's going on. How good this sick fashion. We call a good penthouses gone. Yeah i mean i'm sure i could be way better. I just don't know how what what take what happened with your your house. Oh i'm <hes> got rid of it smelt of rava the rich yeah yeah yeah. That's the nicest hotel been of course it's. I'm sorry new york apartment in it's a hotel room. Well there are aw. I can't give away things if they haven't been on yet but tears. The greg is hunting for apartments to live and and in subsequent episodes. There are amazing thing so you going up into that. The bed is like the size of this door you a._m. Squeeze into it knocking my head on the ceiling right but it's a loft so that's cool but i've yeah it's a very real thing you can't in an apartment in new york for any i mean shopping for apartments and you've got to spend money to just have room to move around even in my apartment right now. I can't even like do do a push up on the ground not that i try to do push ups all the time but like sometimes i do round and sometimes they just want to stretch you know like do like like stretch stretch my legs or something again that what are you six four. I'm six seven what that short. I take it back when i was younger in auditions editions and now at this point i'm on popcorn with peter travers so i feel like i can be honestly. I'm six seven. Wow yeah no yeah. There's a lot sometimes times. When you're auditioning actresses who are five one yeah well yeah i pretty much any any rule so if i if there's a father and and he's shorter than six to like i have no chance of playing his son really picking yoon about it. Yeah yeah yeah oh. I've lost a lot roles because of my height because because you know it's hard to photograph maybe for some people or or they don't want to put the lead actors on apple boxes which i understand india now on a movie once where it was a walk and talk through high school and they're actress that was playing my love interest she and and i were walking in the gave her a track of apple boxes like twenty pieces of wood lined up together leap almost white. Luckily they weren't saying. I thought maybe it was like a jump. No she had this nice wooden pass to walk on and then she couldn't walk loudly because it would make noise on the wood so i sorta stuff is awkward. I guess maybe in a stone age of movies when alan ladd was with field rent in the boy on a dolphin. He was like five four so they they dug a trench for fielder renter walker right that you should make them do that. This should dig up flooring for they should do. You should be haulage. You are yeah yeah vetco star walk in the trench except wouldn't i need to walk. You would walk in the trash you were. I would need to walk you wouldn't they would need to stay. Stay on grounds. That's it none of that for you so i walked down the trench there on the boxes. Maybe i should bring a little if i'm just so confused now into image of you as zach attack yeah. That was the first sky sky high of course i'm film critic that would in fact that those fifteen years ago had a clip because is there was hair like yeah what leads blonde bleached platinum blonde thing. I glowed in the dark if you if if you turn the lights off and look real close you could see glowing but you couldn't in the light. That was one of the sad parts of that character yeah that that's a good that was my first big part yeah and when that happened what happened to you did you. You've got that part and you said i'm gonna make it in this business. It's gonna be great. I don't know if you ever say that. I don't know i don't know if you ever know sixteen and and i i remember getting it. The moment i got the call and i screamed and screamed for some amount of time and it was just the greatest moment of my life screaming screaming with my friends. I was just screaming but you know i did think this is the real version of my dream. This is a big real movie. You know it's not a play. It's a in connecticut is doing small plays a little short films student films and things but this this was like a real. I was gonna get paid like real real money and <hes> go do it in l._a. You know so that that did feel like the moment where maybe i thought oh. Maybe i'm i keep doing this but i don't think you ever know that you're gonna well connect you going to that's never going to be eh. What happens it's going to be do. I get another job exactly who i ever work again. That's part of the deal. Exactly you have to get. I used to it. I can't get used to it. It's like it's not i never well. I guess maybe right now. I feel like the shows come out and and we're we're gonna have another seasons so that's technically another job. Oh and they'll be h._b._o. Will be just wheeling wheelbarrows full of money to your door to what happens season three. Oh wow cool yeah and you cash. He warned his show that about this great wealth and you grew up and knowing your father you know so there. There must have been up to billions that you grew up yeah. The also votes both before five yachts. I can't remember when we were young. When your father author craig brown did design some of the great album covers of our time he designed the sticky fingered stevie wonder you know he did all of that a big big time people but now being the jealous bastardy is he's become an actor yeah after your job. He started. I why he started started for. He's the reason that i started to give him his son. Come and sit down next to me and i'm gonna tell you he he said. I don't have anybody to run my lines with for this audition. We read them with me. I don't wanna talk to my voice memo anymore. So i was was just learning how to read six seven down. I wanna go outside and play you know. Please let me go outside. No sit here and read. These me helped me prepare child. It was really intense bar jail me repair repair. I have a big audition but there was a great encouragement of you to do this. Yes they're getting get good critiques from him. Yeah yeah i do i do. I think i think yeah i think he tells me that i'm good. Critique isn't good then. You need to have some honest response. I should have them. Write an article for for me or something right up nice document to build. You know this kind of thing because you did that you had t._v. Shows <hes> ten things. I hate about about you know. You're really good at comedy but i've seen you play really creepy horrible people as well <hes> stanford prison experiment fair menu. This guard red state. What goes on when you get apart like that. You look to break it up. Do you say don't want to be funny now. I want to be something yeah. I well. I don't know i think i always liked being funny. I eh but i usually i got a lot of rules where i played a good guy good ernest fella and so when those parts came along. I thought this is a really a good opportunity to look at those darker parts of myself and show some colors off that i haven't gotten to show before stanford prison was was interesting because is a lotta. My friends were in that movie so i got to just treat them. Horribly always a good thing yeah yeah so just got to yell at them and force them to do things and fight fight them like ezra miller. He and i were wrestling a lot in that movie and that was really fun just sort of bashing into each other. I like those opportunities where you just get to. I don't know i get to be meaner. Tougher have amine side dip yeah and and how does it manifest itself no no sorry. I'm sorry i'm sorry even didn't seem so me. No no wasn't wasn't before. I go to a couple of questions from the world of the internet. Oh my gosh they're here. I have to ask you about your music career. Oh wow because that must be discussed. Cool devoted are you to it. What is it <hes>. I love i love. I love to write songs. I love to sing. Gosh i just remember you're going to have yeah yeah so i was just at a great song you though so we'll stay to the end but are you. Do you go on a tour with the band. Since succession started like it's been tougher to do music becomes it's okay you know i understand just greg it does and brain space the whole rockstar thing will come later. Yeah i can do it into my thirties. Forties right look mick jagger hundreds. There's there's no stopping it but i do love it. I love i love music. It's it's something that i think about all the time but it's not right now in my periphery but but i i yeah i love doing and i love making stuff and <hes> yeah so good. We'll see. I hope i hope i get to we'll see in a minute when you when you think on but right now let's take a couple of questions from the world outside from mike h. What is your favorite seeing you filmed for succession my favorite scene. I filmed for succession <hes> very good reading. What's my favorite scene for success. What is my sorry going to do that whole bit. It was done minutes. I think there was a scene where sure i was really high on the patio during the thanksgiving episode last season where matthew comes out and he tells me i'm going to have to shred the documents and and i really liked playing. I liked playing drugs. That's always fun. Actually the scene where i got such can integral part of your life. I guess and e._s. Wanna play it on screen right. You bring right now. I i get that. We want to bring in who we are too. Yeah mike satisfied with that. That should be good and then yeah. I also liked other drugs scenes snorting. The cocaine with kendall was really was really fun. There's a theme here. It's great okay. Let's throw one. I'm greg greg. Did that would venture another question now from terence k of the three roy siblings. Who do you think would be best to lead waste because i guess schiff i think shift. I think we need a female c._e._o. When a company company like this we need some tenderness you know it's not that tender but he's not at all but you know i think she has her moments and <hes> and i think she has. We need a female perspective all right. It's time time for the song. Oh gosh come on you to hold over. People sat in that chair who sang their heart out. We'll have this one song. It's kind of old song okay so you didn't write it. I didn't read it but it goes happy birthday on the it's your birthday but to have the birthday birthday. They're happy birthday to you all very very move but at the same time that was such a cop out you know it was it was nice and it's rare air to see any of your roles. Do something so really nice. Yeah you know so you want. Something meaner removed this but the next time you're on. We're gonna gonna do some kind of rock and roll something sexy version of mama. I promise thank you

Greg Greg Mike H New York Apple Peter Travers Alan Ladd Wrestling Stanford Ezra Miller Mick Jagger Yoon Connecticut Zach L._A Schiff Craig Brown Ernest Fella India
Before driverless cars come driverless office park shuttles?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:59 min | 2 years ago

Before driverless cars come driverless office park shuttles?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed. You can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard and get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace and by click share with click share and you're meeting you can share your scream instantly leap from any device click share instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet or phone onto a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's that's the click share effect visit. Click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial. What if the self driving car revolution is an office park shuttle from american public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm molly would everyone is very excited about autonomous honest cars but with every day they feel a little farther away waymo. Alphabet self driving car company is still testing fully autonomous cars as taxis in the phoenix area tesla is putting semi-autonomous features onto its own cars for consumers to buy and some companies like boston-based optimus ride are are thinking the immediate future is a little more contained the startup which yes is named after the transformer is betting on low speed vehicles that carry people around defined geographic areas it is not the sexiest use of autonomous driving tech but it might be more doable optimus ride. I just started a contract. Giving people free rides around the brooklyn navy yard an industrial park in new york city marketplace tech producer stephanie us went to check it out optimus ride vehicles stick out the black six passenger electric automobiles have the word self-driving in all capital letters on the back kind of like when you see a student driver and like student drivers these vehicles still have teachers that ride along to human monitors are in the front seat ready to jump in if needed they drift the passengers as well before everyone has belts meet you in the back demille ezra's tech investor. He's just coming from a meeting at a startup accelerator in the navy yard. He didn't know that self-driving shuttles would be there but he wants to know everything about them third driver. Do you know what technology are of a using in the car. It's laser scanners and cameras that the vehicle uses to sense things like pedestrians and other cars. Oh and it won't go more than fifteen miles per hour that that may be the reason passengers thing. They don't seat belts in the front seat. One of the human minders holds a laptop on the screen. There's something kind of like a heat map or obstacles appear as the the car is seeing them. You'll see on the screen that that spotted that person you see that orange object and we'll probably see that by second ryan chin chen is the c._e._o. And co founder of optimus ride he says you'll see this kind of driverless tech on the street way before you can ride any kind of distance in a fully autonomous car good for example that is if you're able to drive a thomas lii in times square in a snowstorm and drive all the way to harvard square in the boston area. There's no car company in the world world can do that today and will likely take more than ten years and chen says there's a five hundred billion dollar market for autonomous shuttles and what he calls geo fenced areas like college campuses office is parks and airports. Let's test validate. The business model developed the technology and then as we get better. Let's increase the complex. Let's make the gio fence larger. Let's increase the speed. Let's let's go to an air. That's a little bit more urban but it's going to take some time for optimus ride to get rid of their human monitors. Missy cummings is a professor of robotics at duke university. She says machines can't yet see the world the way people do once we've been taught with that red stop sign means we can approximate we can estimate we know what what it means. Even if there's only parts of the stop sign showing driverless cars on the other hand have a hard time improvising when conditions change they will follow the rules and only the rules that you tell them at the navy yard the optimists vehicles are really careful at a four way stop. There's an uncomfortably long pause before the vehicle accelerates. We'll oh stop observed. We see you can see all of the cars that are coming into this intersection and we are predicting what they're gonna do. They doing the same loop over turned over again c._e._o. Ryan says that optimus vehicles will learn the rules really well and like every good student driver. They'll eventually get more confident. That's that's marketplace. Tech producers stephanie us you can see pictures from her ride at marketplace tech dot org and now for some related links which is a little more reading about how the cold reality of self driving cars starting to sink in. It's gonna take a lot longer than we thought. The tech might not actually be the panacea for everything from traffic to the environment to safety that we have been promised all along and let's be honest. That's how technology works. It comes out and it's a little slower a little bug ear and has a lot more unintended consequences than we expect it. I've got a bunch of links to articles on our website for the past past few weeks saying basically the same thing and i'm gonna brag a little bit and say i wrote about this in january twenty eight th there's a link to that piece to on marketplace tech dot org back then. I said the tech was still a little dodgy. The talent to build that tech was really hard to find lawsuits over intellectual property would start to proliferate and the safety not was still kind of an open question. Let alone that we didn't know what driverless cars would really due to the economy or traffic or how they might interact with the millions of people driven cars on on the road and all of that is still true that actually here's some interesting dish on the intellectual property part just in the last week apple and tesla sued former employees for allegedly stealing self driving taxi grits and taking them to chinese competitors and the biggest maker of lighter technology valentine nine sued to chinese companies or allegedly stealing trade secrets as well and that's just one of dozens of lawsuits over self-driving tech you know are that saying we were promised jet packs those might still get here sooner hollywood and that's marketplace tech. This is a._p._n. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share an award winning wireless presentation system with click share and you're meeting you can share your screen instantly from any device no more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait for tech problems to be fixed click share instantly projects speakers laptop tablet or phone under a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect visit. Click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Optimus Ryan Tesla Missy Cummings Brooklyn Navy Phoenix Boston New York Duke University Co Founder Chen Stephanie Us Producer Apple Hollywood Professor Five Hundred Billion Dollar Ten Years
Perspectives on China and global power

FT News

12:48 min | 2 years ago

Perspectives on China and global power

"How will the struggle for power between China and the US play out. And how will it determine the future world order, Fred Stedman, put this question to China expert, Ron meter he was reviewed a series of books looking at the issue from different perspectives. Ron, thanks for coming in. You looked at a number of books for us in a book Sesay about China and the west. And what struck me right? From the get-go was that you talked about this interaction between these great powers, China and the west, the US is being almost unique in its complexity, and I thought, why is that? Why is this more complicated than other great power interactions, that we've witnessed over the centuries? I think it is different. And the reason fundamentally is that we've never seen an engagement between two different types of regime that are so closely intertwined so different in terms of their values. So if you think back to the Cold War, we had at that time, basically, to political and economic systems, which were fiercely opposed to each other, but they didn't actually connect all that much. Of course, we were all terrified at the threat of nuclear war, but the Soviet Union's economy was not a major factor for the west and vice versa that AKU. It's not remotely true for the People's Republic of China. It is the second biggest economy in the world. It is now a primary economic actor in pretty much every single continent of the world and the United States. Of course, in China have been entwined in terms of finance for more than twenty years, more like thirty. Really? So the fact that we now have a rising China, which from the point of view of many liberals in the west but elsewhere has variety values particularly, of course and authoritarian type of government that is very different from what a liberal government would put forward, but it's not a place that we can simply close off or ignore that provides dilemma that was still right in the middle of solving on both sides, and one of the aspects of that. I think I'm right and say you say there's a choice there. Do we engage more with China and we're seeing this stuff that's happening in the world of technology while way, and whether it should be allowed to be part of the five G project or do we push back and one comes with a security risk? And the other one comes up tension financial economic risk that. That's lemon. But let me give you a specific example. Let's take away, which, of course, it's become this company that in the UK where we're sitting. Now, nobody had heard of probably not nobody very few people a year ago. Now, of course, is a headline every single morning on the news usually pronounced in a variety of other creative ways Hawaii audit wrong is not an upset. Right. I've heard is one prominent politician refers to it as Hawaii, which is not quite the same thing. I think that's not so much of an issue. So ten twenty years ago, we might have said that the biggest threat from the Chinese technology sector was that they were basically borrowing without commissioners, the polite way to put it intellectual property from the western world from the US from Britain from Europe Chinese would basically, taking technology that they hadn't paid for an putting into their machines had to be stopped. That is no longer the main problem does exist. But the wider problem is that actually China is now producing its indigenous technology to a very very high standard. So the reason that the United Kingdom, for instance is having a debate about whether or not, they put while way equipment in the five G network is nothing. With intellectual property theft. It's the fact that the cheapest highest quality most effective broadband network. You can have is made by hallway, and if you don't have that, then you're basically saying that you have to give an alternative company, the rights to put in the network that may actually not be at the moment, overs, higher quality. So there's a genuine balance between quality. And as you say, the question, whether there's a security risk or not, that's a new dilemma, not just for the UK but for the entire liberal world fascinating, I wanna come onto the books now because we get a perspective from China. So it's a bit more about a few from Beijing in terms of how these relationships are going to develop, what China sees its role and the other they have different conceptions of types of political systems, one of the books. I've reviewed in this particular China books essay is book leadership in the great powers by yen Shu at home. Professor yen is a very senior scholar in China. He's at Ching-ho university, one of the top institutions in that country. And he's become known. I'd say of the last. Twenty years or more in that particular field as probably one of the three or four best known most respected analysts of China's international relations. Now international relations terms without getting too technical. He's what's known as a realist is the accusation that sometimes put Henry Kissinger, Henry Kissinger, his pushes back and says, he's an idealist in realists, clothing, or was that effect. In other words, what professor yen believes is that power is the thing that actually makes a difference. So that's the position he's always had. That's why this book is so interesting, not just about him, but about China, because it makes actually in some ways rather, different case, a case that, if China is going to take fullest vantage of its rise in the world. The fact that it is now the second biggest economy in the world, and may by GDP be the biggest one within ten years. The fact that it is this huge international actor than it has to change the way, that looks the world, not just talk about power relationships, but also about what you might call the human relations, the narrative, that surround saddened, professor Yannis jesting that it will be time, maybe not yet but. Quite soon for what he calls, a more humane, the what he used the humane view of how China should relate to the rest of the world. Now that is in a sense, part of a process that we've also seen earlier with the most recent hegemony in world politics, the United States, which of course, became a power that had more battleships and more fighter planes, than anyone else particular during World War Two, but really seduce the world through what's become known as soft power. In other words, having a story to tell the world, I read professor Jens Booker saying that China has got the military. It's got the realist power. Now, it has to find the story and does he believe the Chinese leadership is current inclination to they buy that will this is one of the things that you have to read quite carefully in the book. It's not I would say a book to necessarily put next to a thriller at an airport. You know, it does take a bit of time. But I'd say get a glass of wine, give it a good going over, because it's well worth it prevents. The end doesn't at any point in the book talk about the current leadership, so Xi Jinping. The current president of China is not mentioned for Donald Trump is Donald Trump is along. With a few other names. So the United States certainly comes into the line of fire, you might say, but the wider question that he also is one that is very relevant China, which is, is the current system that China's operating, which, as we know is one that has been economically, very, very effective in terms of growth rates in terms of creating a kind of middle class, that's now, see very, very powerful in China and creating a sorta prosperous lifestyle that many consumers in China very much enjoy, but also really closing down political discourse. Is that going to be the way in which trying to get to the next stage in the implication? It's an implication of a statement but it isn't implication, is that maybe China's going to have to go beyond that if one looks at conclusions that he comes through. And again, this is very interesting because it is so much view from Beijing from thinker who is well respected both in the western China in that field, is that there's not going to be a war. This is not a story about a confrontation between China and America on the military front. But the is going to be a sort of battle for ideas and the dominance. Spouts largely economic in the Asia Pacific region. He does say very firmly the Asia Pacific region is where you're going to have to look, if you want to see what comes next for world politics. It's moving away from Europe moving away from North America. The Pacific for yen is where it's at right. Which is also the subject of one of the other books, that you looked up as referrals, China and Japan which comes to some interesting conclusions. I think it's fair to say it makes some interesting observations. It absolutely does Ezra Vogel is a scholar, but also a diplomatic figure who has actually sort of seen the rise and change in America's relationship with Asia, over the decades, he served in the Clinton administration, as secretary of state, and he became very famous in the seventies earliest that with the book who Japan as number one, which was on every business leaders bookshelf, as well as the cost many scholars, but he's always been a speaker both Chinese and Japanese and this book is about China and Japan, their shed history, which he points out, actually is not always as confrontational as it sometimes appears. We tend to think, of course of. The second World War when the two countries did have a massive conflict, of course. But he also points out that, for instance, if you look at statistics in the last few years, a few years ago, when tensions were pretty high between the two countries something like a million million a half Chinese visited Japan pass, not that many that number last year two thousand eighteen is more like eight million. So if you look below some of these surface rhetoric is saying, actually, there is a more cooperative story about economics about tourism about cultural values that are shared the maybe means the countries aren't as far apart as they might be. And this is I think, part of the white of Vogel, viewpoint because he comes from that generation of Americans who sought as part of their duty. I think in the post World War Two era to try and create a sort of agreed shed set of values in a stable community in East Asia America course, encouraged that in Europe, very successfully European Union NATO and so forth. It's never quite worked out in the same way in Asia. But that hasn't stopped a lot of those people actually, I think trying over and over again to create that similar sorts. Of stability for go. Yours decided mentioned former administration official, but other American voices take sort of more by guessing old money once say hawkish view new picked up on one someone. I believe you're actually at one point taught Jonathan ward who's written a book China's vision of victory which sounds alarmist oil is very concerned, and feels the American needs to be much more assertive in its response. That's right. Yes. New Jonathan ward. I taught history when he was an Oxford where I teach. But this book is very much about current affairs, and it's very much about policy not about history as such. And yes, I think it's fair to say that the argument he puts forward in the book is one that says that China is used the phrase hawkish, I'll say, clear and present danger, that's probably the phrase that comes to my mind. When reading it now, should say the book is one that has a great deal of information in it. It's got a lot about military power, and how China's building up its navy in particular. It's got a lot about economic power, and also of course a lot about values and the argument there, essentially is that. The United States, whether it wants to or not is going to have to deal with the fact that China is there to challenge the United States. So in a sense, that's a different story from the end should tone story where he's basically saying look the Americans and the Chinese are both going to be in the Pacific, where they're going to have to engage with each other. What story will, maybe it's time for America to actually set down the red lines if you can set down the red line in the Pacific Ocean. And actually say thus far and no further so between them those books actually point out in some ways, where the difference of view comes in terms of what's going to happen in the next decade in that Asia Pacific region. You mentioned around all the books that sort of sense that there are tensions, there is a competition of ideas, but the, the authors dancing, we're heading towards some military confrontation. And that things will be settled through dialogue to share that. I think you can see a generational difference in these books, which was as I say, in the essay, it's was reading them in tandem, because they all say something slightly different than they make up out of the picture for. Yang Tong speaking from Beijing. But, you know, with I think quite measured frame of mind. The argument is about to powers that have to live with each other, which have the potential to be confrontational, but not necessarily military sense. Maybe more on the economic sense. I think it's fair to say that as revivals book is talking about the areas where you can find agreement rather than disagreement between the actors and that in a sense, reflects his long decades of experience in the region. Jonathan ward is of a different generation. He's in his thirties. He's living, right there in the policy world of Washington DC right now, and the world, he sees is a much more confrontational. One, one in which America and China have different goals, different values different viewpoints. And that maybe just maybe those can't be contained together. Now, we're going to have to see what happens to work out in say the trade war between China and the US whether that actually could reach something more like a confrontation, but reading three books makes you realize that actually all of these viewpoints exist simultaneously. In part of the existential struggle almost is about what? Which one of them is going to prevail. Ron amid. Thank you very much. Thank you for it. That was Fred Stephen F teabags editor talking to Ron Mischer director of the Oxford University, China center. Thanks for listening. And if you're interested in events in China and Asia Pacific, lookout for latest episode of world weekly, where we talk about the protests in Hong Kong. Thanks again. If you missed our recent episodes on the US standoff in the Gulf China's threat cheese. Rare earths as a trade weapon, or the fall

China United States People's Republic Of China America United Kingdom Beijing Europe Ron Mischer Asia Pacific China Center Fred Stedman Soviet Union Jonathan Ward Pacific Gulf China Professor Yen
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"But but let me let me push you on this. Because this is this what I think is this is where my when I'm having a bad day when I'm feeling pessimistic. This is where it comes from. There's a way of framing what you're saying. And it's the way you frame it in that book, which actually really do recommend. I think it's a wonderful book. Which is it would take on some level. So little you could change so much with so little, but that's always been true. That's the why bring up that Eugene Debs, quote, which is from that from that Thome, and the fact that consistently getting that kind of ongoing engagement is so difficult to fact that the greatest orders and organizers in American history have not been able to do it for consistent long periods. The fact that it gets away from them even able to do it for a minute. The fact that it doesn't sustain it seems to me to say something about whether or not people really want that in their lives. Again. I'm one of the distinctions. I'm trying to draw is you and I truly do. But a lot of people they they they just want things to run. Well, and I don't mean that as a knock on them. It's a it seems true in basically every country. And so it makes me wonder whether or not this is more of a force of political nature, then we sometimes want to admit before we get to that because important probe there. We're not talking about people who'd be engaged on tennis shoe. News, but people have different interests there. You get one percent of the people on healthcare. Okay. They don't particularly care about public transit or tax policy. But some people do care about public transit. So the there's enough for everybody. So you don't have to overburdened people that way, the second is I would say half the population is so mired in just getting through the day just trying to deal with illness and accidents, and penury, and and daycare and dealing with each day's tribulations that they probably don't have time for civic engagement, though, they certainly should have time to make a caller to or to vote, but that's still leaves half the people. And then the other thing is and misses something, which is shall we say beyond our common pay grade, Ezra. There is something about politics that when people think about it. It strains them. It strains there. Brain literally it to them on the president's diversity. It means slender means exposing them at a at a city council meeting telling him to shut up. It means fear being sued it mere it means that they don't know as much about the politician who can sweet talk them and circumvent them. There is almost a mental strain. And to that. I say, you know, it takes a lot to learn how to be a skilled bridge flare. It takes a lot to be a skilled video game player. But but but it, but it it it doesn't have the strain. And I don't think we've looked enough into that problem. Well, let me ask you. So I think that actually brings up something interesting in it pulls me now can stop being the the very pessimistic devil's advocate here. One thing that I notice is. So one exactly what you say. I wouldn't call it straight. I think there's a repulsion from politics. I think people look at it. And it's a place of bad..

Ezra Thome Eugene Debs tennis president one percent
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"The really understand why is this so important, and I followed this trail all the way back to Aerostat all writing the Nickelodeon ethics. This idea that actually human beings need to flourish activities that they do just for the sake of that activity that this is sort of the recipe for being able to find some sort of joy or beauty or meaning in a life. That's otherwise it's going to have a lot of sort of hardship. And things that you can't control. It's this sort of fundamental human need anytime throughout the history of human civilizations. That people have been lucky enough to have some leisure time. The almost immediately fill it with some sort of structure at high quality analogue leisure. And so what's happening now in the last ten or fifteen years is actually again. Just like the lack of solitude is remarkably rare in our human history, which is that we have especially young people don't have any of these high quality activities that you do just for the sake of the quality. And so this is a big issue that when people remove distraction from their life. It can be incredibly uncomfortable, essentially, we've been papering over the void in our life. That's been created by not having these sort of Aristoteles high-quality activities, we've been papering it over with constant distraction. The kind of keeps her eyes to slightly averted from the existential. Void right. And so then you can't help but turn and face it. Once you get rid of all this distractions. This is sort of like Nucci with Facebook or something. So it's it's it's quite scary. And I was surprised the degree to which I was important to the point now where I actually advise people if you want to do something like declutter, you might wanna take a few months, I and actually just work on the analog side of your leisure time because it's going to make it much easier to tolerate when you actually do this rip the band aid off type. Action of stepping away from all of your digital distraction. And we're talking here about leisure activities and hobbies, but actually socializing is in some ways, the the biggest piece of this that Purdue gave a lot of your social connections have moved to your texting people, and you're emailing people, and that seems particularly true among young people. Now, I mean, there's a huge amount of evidence that tremendous amount of like teenage socializing has moved from in person or even on the telephone to to online and overtaxed, and there's actually been a fall in a lot of in-person socializing that it becomes much harder. Right. If you if you're if you pull back from these things and the alternative is loneliness, the alternative is that you feel left out. I mean, that's not gonna work at all. Right. But we find there's been in recent years, these these really high quality sort of epidemiological studies that are finding this sort of puzzling connection that increase social media use is creating increase loneliness, which seems to be the opposite effect at that. You would expect. And in one of the the big hypothesis for why this is true is that digital interaction so interactions. It does not have an analog component like listening to someone's voice in the nuances of it or looking at someone's body language are actually making some sort of sacrifice like actually had the travel to come see you that digital interaction. Thank you. I appreciate it. I flew overnight. The sit down next you for this interview that this sort of digital interaction actually doesn't come close to giving the same rewards as like what Sherry Turkey all would call sort of real world conversation. And so this is why you can actually get more lonely as you spend more time doing digital interaction. It's not because the digital interaction itself is causing this negative effect. It's because it's crowding out the real road conversation, which is what our brain is evolved, actually crave. And our brain doesn't understand that that number you show or a little comment under a picture on the small glowing rectangle in your hand is another human being who who's interacting with you and fulfilling your needs sociology? It doesn't understand that. Now, there's some part of your frontal cortex things that counts. And so you do more and more of that..

Aerostat Nickelodeon Facebook Purdue Aristoteles Sherry Turkey fifteen years
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"You responsibly disclosed it we appreciate your help. And they work with academia, they work with the public sector everybody. So that didn't happen overnight that took decades and it works pretty well. And is even these weird conferences where you have leg not necessarily good guy. Hackers in the room with people trying to build secure systems. And they're like, we're gonna share information. This sort of like, this is our detente zone. This our DMZ, and we're allowed to dislike talk about what's what's going on that model to me seems like an interesting one for cultural security for being able to be responsible about civic impact. Because if I report a cultural bug as people. Did there were people jumping up and down waving their arms desperately saying please don't allow this information to keep amplified in Myanmar. They I don't think they even had a reporting mechanism, right? Because if you if you Email security at big company name dot com, they will get the Email nodes low review it and see if it's legit if you Email it same addressed. And you say there is a real danger of large-scale violence because you're platforms, enabling this message. There is no reporting Email, there's nobody review there's nobody evaluate if it's true, and crucially, insecurity, they'll shut it down. Right. If g mail were to get hacked and everybody's information vulnerable, and you could control all the accounts pull information out. Google would I one hundred percent believe shutdown g mail for a day? And be have listened y'all have to wait it out while we fixed this bug. It's going to be some downtime, but we're going to get it. Right. And that has happened. None g meals case. But in some other very large systems, and yet if we had the same thing happening with actual violence, not your data, but actual via. Silence. There is no way to shut it down. And so we have to look at these models. Like, it is not that the industry is unable to come up with a model that works to respond, and they are like I said, they're mostly good folks that wanted to the right thing, and we can see that with what they did with security. We can see that with what they've done over accessibility. Right. Like, the it's been transformative like if you're blind user, your -bility use mobile phone is gone, but it's like immeasurably better than the battle days with a mouse in in the nineties, right? So like, we've made these huge strides like accessibility. And and security and these really important pillars of like, I can trust this device being in my life. And then there's this one around culture where all of a sudden, they're terrified. They're like these are making hard calls. We'll securities making hard calls all the time. Right. And there's only Kip possibly judge. Will you judging all the time when it comes to am I going to enable a diffuser a blind user to be able to use tools, and and they just haven't been able to make this leap into you're going to have to make. The same kind of vestment over the same scale of decades over the same internal changes. There was a point in the early two thousand square Microsoft shut down all of their software development, or like, we are focusing on security. We're putting everything on hold and we're going to a trustworthy computing. They're going to make sure everybody can trust our systems and apple does similar things where they're like, you know, this year are operating systems not going to have a ton of new features. We're gonna focus on security and reliability and performance. They do these like house cleaning spring cleaning were getting real serious, and you know, buttoning up our buttons and doing this stuff, and they're able to think of it in the domains that they. They feel are there's in the ones that they feel are are are there prevented yet? That's exactly right. I think that's actually a good place to to finish up. So improve our fluency a little bit. What are three books that? You've loved that. You'd recommend to the audience. Oh, gosh..

Myanmar Google Kip apple Microsoft one hundred percent
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"And I think that is the thing that the tech is turned the corner on because everybody does wanna be good. They do still have that impulse of like. We're supposed to be you know, the good guys were supposed to be the people doing the right thing. One of the things that I think about as being complex in. That is the way scale changes, the nature of ideas. I look at some of these CEO's or designers or coders or whomever, and they often seem to me now to be trapped in an idea. Then was maybe a good idea or at least an innocuous one. But is now so big. And now, they are it's slaves. It is not their slave, man. There's no way out. I'm about this a lot with the social platforms where you know. I think early on Facebook a Twitter, they're pretty innocuous. Yeah. Ended a point they reached such power and such scale that the consequences of getting something wrong on them became larger than the consequences of what goes right on them often times. I mean, yeah, you gotta have a lot of sharing of nice photos to counteract. You're breaking politics the world over right, right? And. But on the other hand, you know, if you're a Jack Dorsey or Mark Zuckerberg, or whomever, I mean, this is your institution, and you are shaped by its incentives, and you care about the people added, and he wanted to become bigger, and like there's a lot of acting on your own mind to think of it as good, and it's isn't good. It's just that. Maybe it's too big. Yeah. Or maybe it's too powerful became go to your shareholders. And be like, I think you'd just be good. If we were only at fifty percent of the salience and people's lives are at now. And that just seems really hard. Yeah. And I think that's a really accurate diagnosis, and I look at I was building social networks before jacker Zack were and and know them from back then and and had the good fortune to have the networks that I built having failed or never thrived. And so never encountering those kinds of skelly. She's like the biggest network I helped run was live journal, and it was probably ten million people. And at that time, it was huge. But to like unfathomable to have fifteen years ago that many. Apple, but this sort of classic things like well. How many bad apples are in the bushel? Right. And and at that point, it was two or three people or that were really the sort of like bad hardcore folks are like this is really a problem, you know, whether it's law enforcement or policy, whatever I have to get involved in you know, they were bad, but it didn't feel overwhelming. But also the thing that we forget is with machine learning with the sort of feedback systems that what's different from that early era the friendster era. Whatever of social media is there's a there's an attenuation and an exacerbating of the worst tendencies like radicalization YouTube is a perfect example of this. If you, you know, like, if I'm saying, you know, I'm a prince fan, and I want to see prince videos, like it's going to be like as much as you can get right as much as you possibly find like more and more and more and more until you're like, okay. This is your wild into and I get this. Where like, you know, I've kid goes on their finding videos of you know, when he was a little kid about Thomas the train unit but conspiracy videos sort of. Two minutes later or two links later, and it's because they want to drive your engagement. They wanna drive your attention. The more extreme something is the more emotionally engaging. It is. And so what's different from just scale is.

Jack Dorsey CEO Facebook friendster Apple Twitter YouTube Thomas Mark Zuckerberg Zack fifteen years fifty percent Two minutes two links
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"And I think that is something that is remiss in its wild to me that you know, as much as Microsoft in the ninety s was the, you know, the the boogeyman now, they look it's quaint is they look like, oh, well, you put you paid money, and they gave you software. It seems like a fair deal. There's one a piece of technology neutral. I won't talk about which is we're moving into this period. And I never know how much I really buy it. But we're moving into artificial intelligence and deep learning and all this driving a lot more of the technology industry, and one thing that seems to me to be in proven again. And again is that if you're training all these programs on the data we? Create. They're not neutral 'cause we're not control, Brian Resnick. Add vox, did a great feature of think about a year ago now about how quickly artificial intelligence programs. Learn to be racist. Oh, yeah. It happens. Very fast because it turns out of your training people on Google data. For instance, were like people are racist. And so they quickly learn they quickly learn racist associations and that way in which we are going to transmute the data. We have created into the data the teaches computers, and then the computers are just going to be like, computer speaking from on high. Right. And we're going to see that as as neutral ethnic. We can see what's coming on that he said that. Yeah. And that's all around us. It's just getting faster and more intense, and I look at pre computer systems, whereas you look at how did we encapsulate? Our our biases systemically before we had computers everywhere, and we did it in policy and code in zoning redlining is a perfect example of like we're going to build a. Framework for y'all must physically encoding our biases in our systemic racism, and that was at the slow pace of how lon- policier made. Right. If there's one change in a year, that's a lot. And what's the systems are doing a good way to think about it is that deep blue IBM communities to play chess or like winning jeopardy in his sort of learning the questions and learning how to move in chess? And it's thinking ten steps ahead or giving out every possible chess game that could possibly go from that movie. You just made. And then pointing that at how do you defend racist system? Tidy defend by systems with that same intensity. We've gained out every possible way that you could undermine systemic bias and tried intimidated and prevent it. Right. Because we wanna be able to preserve the model. The thing that we've taken the impression that we have to defend at all costs like that is the design the bias of learning systems is they're trying to enforce what they learned from. Oh, that doesn't Kareem way to put that. Yeah. It gets even worse. Okay. Before before we lose everybody in depression us. All right. Never to hear tech is not inevitable. Yeah. This one is great. Because it that this actually is the antidote to that. I think some of these depressing parts of this. Which is we think oh, well them these texting this tech exists. The software's created therefore all the bad things are about to happen, and it ain't necessarily so right? There are well one again like to go back to the people that everyone reveres the Steve Jobs and the Bill Gates the world or whoever or even Mark Zuckerberg. It's always treated as well. They said this is going to be a new thing. We're all going to have it. And you look at like, you know, Amazon put out a phone that could not have flopped harder than a dead. Right. Facebook tried to do a phone or a home app, and it just cratered. And you know, Steve Jobs had tons of failures where they like he's like he made a MAC cube. I was with a co-worker younger never seen this thing. And he's like that existed. I I've no idea I defend the cube. I, you know. Sure. But you know, it was just a crazy fan. Boy when I was young. Yeah. I was into all I had a you. Remember when MAC had clones for a miniature? I had. So you're all in all in. Okay, back when like MAC at two percent of the market because I didn't I didn't have five thousand dollars to spend on a lucite cube. So I was I didn't have AccuWeather I got I mean, I don't know how deep is going to go..

Steve Jobs Brian Resnick Mark Zuckerberg chess Microsoft Google lon- policier Facebook IBM Kareem depression Amazon Bill Gates five thousand dollars two percent
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"We've designed technology only let you make an immediate choice. No, long-term choices I failed very definitively in this and that I had to start up. I was trying to encourage people think long term about social media. Like, you're gonna feel good about the time spent online. And of course, we couldn't make it go because you're dependent on the Twitter and Facebook so the world letting you have access your own data, which they don't wanna do. They only want to go to others. And so it was a really interesting thing because you know, the questions that arose in building a product like that service like that everybody understood immediately. Oh, what does it mean? If this information. Is visible in ten years twenty years, or what does it mean, if I'm spending this much time online and on these pursuits, you know, with talking to these people and just reflecting back with hope Amira's hero. His how many people you said. Thank you to hear something people who say, congratulations to you feel good about that is that headed in the right way. And is a very different thing of analytics, did I immediately get that adrenaline jolt from somebody liked what I shared, so he gave me a heart, right? And those design choices are about prioritizing immediately. And it is a direct parallel between that and you know, capitalist corporations talking about focusing on a quarter instead of a year instead of a decade instead of a lifetime. And you know, again, like, I say this as a user of social media as votech company that I hope is quite successful. And it launched from taking is essential. Right. You have to you have to be able to balance that stuff and even within tech the people they say the revere the Steve Jobs the world, he was very long-term thinker you on decades scale. Regularly. Bill Gates, a long long term thinker. So the people who they say they revere regularly sat don't care about this quarter. I don't care about this year. I'm thinking about the the decades that our companies can exist in our products getting exist in and yet they they throw that lesson away as soon as it comes time to design the modern products..

Steve Jobs Bill Gates Twitter Amira Facebook twenty years ten years
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"That the work of modern advertising did to transform how our political system works really just told people to stay home, and among the sources of the utopianism in the nineties about the internet was, oh, this will bring about this will bring people back into participating politically it'll be virtual participation, but at least they won't be just being persuaded. And of course, not how it turned out. No, no, not at all. That's been one of the that's that's one of the ones he had been to. Yeah. The internet research agency figured that out pretty early on. Let me ask you about something you say towards the end of the buck way in which you're quite critical of Liberalism's turn towards identity over or in conjunction with with economics. And I I wonder about how that interaction the you're saying earlier about there have previously been this like third disenfranchised party in American politics is some of the ways I've didn't think that a lot of the ways in which we feel identity politics now is operating has blessed to do with the politics being different and more to do with more people being in it that when there's more contest over who's experiences, and and needs get met that that we feel identity politics. Even though, you know, a politics of Amano identity is also kind of entity politics. I I'm curious how you see that playing out is there is there a version of a of a of a truly pluralistic inclusive politics in which people are not going to constantly feel though the poll of the different identities in groups and races and genders and so on with. In it. Or is this just kind of the the road were on and one of the one of the things it's gonna hurt if we're able to live up to to what we say, we're going to be as a as a pluralistic multi-ethnic democracy. I don't think it is just the wrote we we are on this road. But I think there are some turns that we could make I do think..

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Our presence much of ideas, so much of people I feel like we have a lot of trouble. And this is particularly a trouble. We have in journalism and political journalism in refusing to put things on one side of the line or the other just saying, yeah. Like, there's there's a lot of it's good. Some of it's bad there the seeds of dystopia and the seeds of utopia, and it will all be there. I mean, you you talk a lot towards the end of the book about technology. And I think about that in our conversation right now about things like Facebook and Twitter and just the tech sector in general, you rewind the clock ten years or eight years, and it's all good. It's so remarkable. It's so great Mark Zuckerberg, should maybe be president. And then you now we're here. And it's like, it's all terrible. It's all bad. And I'm a big critic of these things, but it like even in some of my criticisms I can. Like, oh, we've we've swung all the way to the other side like we've really really rapidly like all the way to the other side. And that that inability to hold both things in our head at the same time feels to me like a real like real analytical failure that makes it harder for us to understand the world as it is. And then continuously surprised by the world as it develops when something like how can this thing that was good two years ago, be bad? Now, it's like it's like the endless world of if you know, this this online reference milkshake, ducks how my God. I don't know what it looks shake duck is I feel. It's like I feel like an Asia. There's a tweet I did not know about this for a long time. But it is amazing. There's this tweet that got slowly ab- a bazillion retweets were talking about. Oh, the doc. It's so cute at drinks milkshakes. And then it's like online later, it's like we regret to inform you the duck is a racist. And the ideas that in in life are all these things that are milkshake ducks. It's like everybody's like, oh, isn't this? Great. And then it's like like way to beat. It's like, oh wasn't that great. It was a milkshake tuck. I find it to be surprisingly helped. Now you read about that. I mean, another you could say the sexual revolution. Versus me to clearly those two things are in conflict with also clearly you have the same origins. Like, I think it is difficult for people to hold things. I'm not sure kind of the brain science behind that. I do think what I believe is now known as CMC, computer..

Mark Zuckerberg Facebook CMC Twitter president Asia eight years ten years two years
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Nation for writing a nine hundred page book of American history. Thank you because you can't see that. Unless you look at the long delay rightly if you just gonna like to spot like Mel like facile analogies with different moments in the past and compress the distance between you know, FDR and Obama like an accordion, then you're gonna be no allowed to know. This was that. And this isn't as now, and then there was in news this and then there was that. And everything is just kind of weird. But if you like open up, the accordion, and you look at the whole thing, and you hear the whole music, it will then you see that. Okay. So the drive for the secret. Ballot was a really important reform because people were being bribed and being bullied at the polls. But the secret ballot was actually used to disenfranchise black voters because it was a defect a literacy test. So on the one hand, it seems like wow, great. This is a really important political innovation on the other hand. It's completely backwards political move. And that happens all the time that the there's it's a I'm not sure it's two steps forward. One step back or one step forward. Two steps back. Like, that's the. Judgment issue that we are all facing like day to day. That's the news feels so disoriented because oh we've taken another three steps back today. When are we going to take a step forward? Again. Like, I can't I look a needle look a little bit of a glimmer of a step forward that that. I think is it's it's really really tricky. But another thing about it that I academy that I came to be committed to because I kept seeing it was that I wrote an essay about this maybe last year called no we can't about the fashion est fashionableness of radical pessimism and dystopia conviction. And which I said that utopianism and pessimism in politics are like thunder and lightning to actually happen at the same time. You just experience them an ETA different moment. So Obama ISM and Trump is are actually from the same moment. Their products of the very same moment. Someone like Trumpism is a response to Obama. They're both a response to the same thing. And I find that in literally kind of helpful. I'm not sure I can defend it by like I kept seeing that like the secret ballot. And is a good. Example. I it is it is about trying to make sure that people can vote cast ballots safely. Put a Milius from the start like the the kind of the people that are fighting for it. The kind of Henry George who sits his big banner issue there. Also native STS in there. Also, they really don't want black meant to vote. So they like it's it's from start. It's kind of it's ultimately going to be about Jim crow. I really love this idea. And I think this applies almost everything I think there's a real deep-seated human desire for things to be one thing or the other for it to be right or wrong or good or bad or true or false. And I finally see what is doing this show. I have so many people come on. You know, I I have a lot of people in show who you know, I mostly don't agree with. But I have to agree with twenty percent or thirty percent. I often see ideas that our way of looking at looking at the world that I think are you know, like fifteen percent right in that fifteen percent is maybe really important. There seems to me in. And maybe it's like the the human minds attraction stories. I I often wonder if it's about how we tell ourselves stories about things and stories do often they sort of end in one place or another, but but so much of our history..

Obama FDR Mel Jim crow Henry George Trump fifteen percent thirty percent twenty percent one hand
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Who are we who is we in that sentence? You have we ever been that divided? We'll yeah. No. I mean, not not to make people feel bad about asking the question because it's heartfelt. It'd be will you ask that question from a crepe place of real pain? And and I think grief, so I don't mean to mock the question, but I I always take that moment to say, okay. Well, let's think about what that question really really means. If you is you know, before a mansard emancipation proclamation before the thirteenth man with fourteenth amendment the fifteenth amendment before the nineteenth amendment before the Voting Rights Act. Like was there ever a day was there ever day in the world of chattel slavery that was a better day than today? No. You know? There's just no there's not there's not so take that away. And then you have to ask if you if you're talking about all of American history. And if the American people is not just some piece of cheap cynical political can't, but has actually meant to represent the body of the people, then you have think about enslaved people as forming a defacto political party and then polarization looks completely different. And then you're. Idea about progress is actually get to progressivism, right then action, then is a story of progress. And that is one of the splintering between conservatives and progressives. Because because that is a piece of you know, the kind of the moral arc of the universe. Ball. You know, king to Obama trope that is it is about making making that particular investment. But I do think that that corrective is is really really important. And so yeah, so I guess I go back to so for a long time. When people ask me this question has it ever been so bad if we ever been so divided? I always like offer up this thing. But then I think it was it was really this past summer with the the detention of migrant children and their separation from their parents, the I kind of decided I had to revise the argument because it has it ever been this bad that corrective still really important, but then there's a sort of like with a now, let's think about that. Because that's really hard to compare that to episodes in America pass, not not and. He'll come up with the narrative of progress. It feels actually this. This really relates to the issue of of what is our narrative because on the one hand, I the exact same reaction as you do to the has it ever been this bad question. I I wrote this piece of probably about a year ago now called American democracies survive much worse than Trump in the point that piece, basically, it's almost always been worse. I mean, just objectively like American democracy. American politics is almost always been worse, even in the periods. When we think it's been better. I mean, my mother was born before segregation ended and like well before segregation ended the these are not this is not ancient. But on the other hand, I think the I think the thing people are reacting to a little bit in that question of has it ever been this bad is that we have a story, and then a sense of continuous American progress. And I think that on the one hand to having a more realistic sense of our history. Furnishes kind of optimism from no, it's often minorities, isn't that bad. But also by the same token, having more realistic sense of our history is a reminder that progress is not unstoppable. And it's not even even in just American history on stopping that we have long periods of when we decline when we when we go backwards and be could have longer ones in the future. And so on the one hand like has been this bad. It's been much worse. But I think the feeling like of ricochet the feeling of like Donald Trump to Brock Obama to Donald Trump that people are are reacting to and they they ask that question. It's a thing of like wait have we ever turned around after think, that's what people are really asking. Like like, how can we be turning around? We're not supposed to turn around. But we have before. I mean that that's also not a new experience in American life. It's just one that in our in our narratives of progress. We don't it seems to me really teach. Yeah. And I do think that's important. And that I mean that was very very good. Just..

Donald Trump Brock Obama America one hand
"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"ezra" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"It's like the poser the kind of bro, white boy. So that in there. There's that result. Like, there's not that there's always been that tension. And so you'll in the money, and you have like the Howard zinn it thing ever, like Newt Gingrich his PHD in American history and thinks themselves great American story, and he's kind of retailing this triumph. This story that could have been written by George Bancroft in the eighteen thirties. But I think people who are doing the sophisticated work. And I would you know, absolutely can't coats among them are actually trying to break out of the false division. Right. And see. And I think the boys in Douglas were in this tradition as well. An and see both sides of that and see that they are actually flip sides of the same coin of a single coin. Also hero quibble back because I think something that's interesting in the way, you put that division the sort of American atrocity versus American progress is it it often feels to me that this is a struggle certainly in the political space where it eventually trickles down to trickles down to acts. Like may that it's a struggle over. What makes America? Great, right. It's a struggle. Over is our greatness of that is encoded in our. Passed in our ideals, and like the broadly men who have you know, run our institutions greatness in a kind of struggle, a kind of constant effort at perfection. I mean, in some ways, politically, I think President Obama was like the the central articulated certainly recently of like that idea of the American story. And then you have Donald Trump come in much cruder way. But I think if you kind of like pull back the rhetoric and look at what's inside of it. It's a an appreciation for what was achieved here. I see a lot more of that out there. Right. I think you could you know, you could put some Jordan Peterson in that category. He's talking more about the west in general. But there's it feels to me that there's a real there's a tussle over. What is the story? We're telling a story a story of my God, look at what we achieved or as a story a story about, you know, the people who had to fight past the names and narratives that are often within that achievement for for something else. What do we want to honor, and it shouldn't necessarily have to be binary, right? Like, just histories complicated, and people are complicated. But that feels to me like where this collision. Been in in the past couple of years at least. Yeah. And here locally agree. We've reached a point of agreement. I absolutely. And that is because that is history as politics, right? That's ideologically driven historical argument. So make America great again is a historical argument. It isn't argue historical argument in four words, it stipulates that the past was better than the present. And the only way the future can be better than the present. Is if we return to the past. So that's what conservatism is right? Like, that's this whole, you know, William F Buckley like goose, we stand a thwart history calling out. Stop like that was the slogan of the national review like we wanna stop history. And we want to go back. That's what a conservative politics is. And therefore if you are a conservative trying to use history ideologically, that's the history that you resurrect if you are a progressive, and of course, like these two terms contained within them their argument about history, right like histories of March progress, right? That's what progressivism believes the progressives. Believe they believe in the idea of progress the eighteenth century. Theory enlightenment idea of moral progress than nineteenth century idea of technological progress. Whatever version of progress, they believe in they believe in progress. So yes, we can like that's that's the that's the ideologically driven understanding of the relationship between the past and the present and the future. I that is binary because those are partisan positions. I don't think they reflect how history housework will change happens or the relationship between historical forces and historical change. And I think we accept as historical argument stuff that is really just partisan by another name. So let's go to your book because rather rather than be at this high altitude you've a sentence early in the book that it felt to me like in many ways the thesis, which is the American revolution did not begin in seventeen seventy five and it didn't end when the war was over. But what what do you mean by that?.

America Jordan Peterson Douglas Newt Gingrich Howard zinn George Bancroft Donald Trump William F Buckley President Obama
'Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald' movie launches this week

Todd Schnitt

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

'Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald' movie launches this week

"Office preview. Out this weekend is fantastic beasts crimes of Grindelwald, the second film and JK Rollings fantastic beasts series in this installment the title wizard escapes reassembles his followers with the goal of words in witches ruling over all mortal creatures it's up to Dumbledore and his former student to fight this threat to all of mankind. This fantasy adventure stars any red main Katherine Waterston, Ezra Miller. Zoe Kravitz Jude law,

Jk Rollings Zoe Kravitz Katherine Waterston Ezra Miller Dumbledore
Ezra Miller Stuns in Jaw-Dropping Puffer Coat Dress at 'Fantastic Beasts' Premiere

Lori and Julia

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U.S. judge blocks Texas fetal tissue burial laws

All Things Considered

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. judge blocks Texas fetal tissue burial laws

"A federal judge is blocking a Texas law requiring that aborted fetal tissue be either cremated or buried in Austin US district judge David Ezra ruled today that the law place unconstitutional obstacles in the path of a woman's right to choose to terminate her pregnancy as we're writes in his decision that the law in question, quote would likely cause a near catastrophic failure of the healthcare system designed to serve women of childbearing age within the state of Texas lawyers for the state argued that the law protects human dignity and has no adverse effect on abortion.

President Donald Trump Senate Mikey Cheryl Senate Judiciary Committee Kavanagh Vice President President Trump Windsor NPR United States Lakshmi Singh Montclair State University Joe Biden Jack Dorsey Congressman Eliot Engel Washington Texas CEO Johnston Npr Red Cavanaugh
building a fictional world

The Ezra Klein Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

building a fictional world

Vikings Greenland Iceland