35 Burst results for "Expedia"

Expedia, Vrbo Implement Enhanced Screening Process for Washington, D.C. Bookings Ahead of Inauguration

Steve Scaffidi

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Expedia, Vrbo Implement Enhanced Screening Process for Washington, D.C. Bookings Ahead of Inauguration

"24 hours to go until Inauguration day securities ranching, ending up to another level in the nation's capital, CVS, and the only Rocco Expedia is stepping up screening for those who have booked travel in the DC area ahead of tomorrow's inauguration. The travel site along with its home rental service, v. R B O isn't canceling plans to cross reference all bookings against extremist watch lists. The move follows a similar measure by competitors air being The last week experienced and air being, people say users must present user government issued ideas to get their request fulfilled.

Rocco Expedia CVS DC
The State of Agile With Vasco Duarte, Ryan Ripley, and Chris Williams

Badass Agile

05:02 min | 4 months ago

The State of Agile With Vasco Duarte, Ryan Ripley, and Chris Williams

"One of the questions that came up. I is you know. Let's let's start angry. What pisses us off about. The current state of agile as we experience it daily today. I'm pissed off. And i'm not taking it anymore. I guess i'll i'll jump in here. I've you know todd. And i have been talking a lot lately about we. We've been working with a lot of companies who have been sold. These million dollar multimillion dollar transformations And you know people are slapping different frameworks and different methodologies on top of really deep rooted cultural issues and they're not getting anywhere and at once the money runs out the consultants go away and they're not better off and really tired of watching that play out over and over and over again It's just turned into this big money. Grab where big box consulting firms just slap a bunch of consultants and and others into place. They clear their bench charge as much as they can. They don't really do anything. And then leave and it just That is just perpetuated and over and over again. It leaves a just makes everything more difficult you know. I'm more than happy to come in and clean up and try to teach professional scrum and help companies kind of undo the damage of these big box consultants. But it's like oh. Can we just skip that step in and really learn how to work in new ways and i don't know what do you guys think so. I see the same happening Looking back. I saw the same happening in finland. Let's say late. Two thousand two thousand eight two thousand nine. We heard through the grapevine that accenture have created a natural practice and they had a two hundred page manual and then of course. I was working with At that time two thousand eight dollars working with the one of the first safe adoptions. It was called achard released train at that time. A rt which i thought was kind of a cool art right because his own about art. There's no science to working with people. It's all about leaving the moment understanding. What's going on and reacting and then of course failing but learning quickly and then adjusting right and if i think what what ryan is said and turn the to all the way up to eleven. I would say that we have lost our way we were talking about. The ryan was talking about bringing kanban back to its origins simply fight. Well i would like to remind everybody that this whole atul think did not start with -scriminate. Didn't start with condon either. It started with the small talk community. Doing what they called at that time. Extreme programming xp and if we go all the way back to the roots extreme programming was taking the best practices and just turning it all the way up to eleven. We hear a lot about how safe doesn't have a customer in the big picture. And so on juno that. Xp had a practice called customer in the room so every team had a customer literally. That's what they called it. The customer that told them whether they were going in the right direction. So if i go to what pisses me off is that we're forgetting what it was that we started back in the late nineties. Early two thousands. And i'm not talking about technical practices. We've forgotten those very much. That's for sure. But i'm talking about everything else. Even the the whole idea of what agile is about agile is not about delivering more crap faster. It's about delivering less but delivering what matters about focusing on value. It's about iterating quickly and so the theme in in my presence here on this episode is gonna be you know. How do we turn at all the way up to eleven. Just like expedia back in the in the late ninety s. I liked that. I feel that this thing about who buys the most agile right now. It's either banks or insurance. Companies tend to have the biggest budgets to put out jalen play and so they're of a certain size by their nature if you look at the startup community if you look at small enterprise small medium business if you look beyond tech and you look at how companies are are are pivoting and adapting now during covid nineteen. I still see a lot of really good. Agile really customer focused agile. They get it because they have to. They're hungry. It's easy when you go around a small business to see the customer desire to say. How do we want our customers to feel. That question is present in everybody's mind. We want customers to feel cared for special part of something good. We want them to have not features. Stop talking about features and buttons do but what capabilities we give them and again. I prefer to talk about that. In terms of feelings customers feel safe. Customers feel tend to cared for whereas the minute you bring into a large scale environment. Things start getting compromise. Things get lost in translation as we try to make this work at scale.

Achard Ryan Todd Accenture Finland Condon Expedia
Airbnb Tops $100 Billion on First Day of Trading

Geek News Central

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Airbnb Tops $100 Billion on First Day of Trading

"Aaron be airbnb. Open one hundred six dollars per share on his first day of trading on thursday more than doubling in the sixty eight dollars per share price set for its appeal the day before. This is a weird time to go public but did but hundred and forty six dollars per share. The company now has a market cap of eighty six point five billion dollars more than doubled. Evaluation company sought in the ipo. Just a day ago. That puts aaron. Bb passed the market cap of private chapel giant booking. Which has evesham eighty six billion competitor. Expedia has martin of eighteen. It also is market. Cap exceeds mary at hilton maria. An hilton so This is this is awesome. did very very well.

Aaron Expedia Hilton Maria Martin Mary Hilton
Airbnb is larger than all hotel stocks after its IPO

CNBC's Fast Money

01:16 min | 4 months ago

Airbnb is larger than all hotel stocks after its IPO

"One of these things is not like the other awards sesame street. Just take a look at the travel sox. Airbnb is market. Cap now. Stands at eighty six and a half billion dollars that is bigger than booking holdings marriott hilton and expedia and it goes beyond travel with. Today's gains. Airbnb is now bigger than target and goldman sachs. We could talk about money being left on the table. We talk about the huge. I stay pop but the question that we need to answer tonight is simply. Does that make sense. That i mean what you say. They're into four billion dollars in revenue. They're expecting double digit revenue growth. At least the analysts are start doing the math. I mean it's going to take in my opinion five years to deserve this valuation. And maybe that's the way the world is right now. Maybe people don't care maybe this sort of the grey fool theory thing but when you sort of look at this and look at jordache yesterday and save yourself. What am i missing i. It doesn't make any sense to me. It takes a long time to grow in these evaluations. And oh by the way we didn't even talk about but the employment Situation this country is not getting better. As a matter of fact that seems to be getting worse and although we can talk about know the summer of next year things getting back to normal a long time from here to there so in my world. It's ridiculously expensive melissa.

Airbnb Marriott Hilton Expedia Goldman Sachs Melissa
How To Align Your Customer Experience

eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

05:45 min | 6 months ago

How To Align Your Customer Experience

"Now my guest and says, episode is Tim Ashe who is an acknowledged authority on evolutionary psychology and digital marketing. He's a sought after international keynote speaker and the best selling author of two books I one landing page optimization, and more. Recently unleash your primal brain actually just listened to recently on audible. Fantastic. We're going to dig into that one for sure Tim has been mentioned by Forbes as a top ten online marketing expert and by Entrepreneur magazine as an online market influence to watch. For nineteen years he was a CO founder and the CEO of site tuners, tuners dot, com and their digital marketing and optimization agency. Tim has helped create over one point, two, billion dollars in value for some amazing companies that I know. We all know Google expedia harmony facebook and American Express and cannon and Nestle there's massive list year semantic new to it and humanity Siemens anyways in countless direct to consumer brands. So exciting to have Tim today busy schedule. But please join me conversation with Tim Today. So. Tim Welcome ECOMMERCE battling. A Ha-. Very. Happy Veer Steve. So you've had quite an eventful career I might add keynote speaking around the world are writing bestselling books year you run international conferences, I guess pre cove in our doing some virtual events. So tell me a little bit about best can your entrepreneurial journey so far? Sure. Well, I've worked in a variety of high tech companies when I started university at UC San Diego my undergraduate majors were in computer engineering and cognitive science, and then I stayed there for graduate school and what would neural networks or what would now be called deep learning or machine learning or A. And this was early days We didn't have the big data sets that we do now with the Internet. So I switched Internet marketing and started my first marketing agency back in the early DOT com days and Never, let go of the Tiger's tail and twenty five years. Later I decided you know running an agency wasn't my highest and best use on the planet. So I decided to focus on what I really enjoy, which is the thought leadership in the form of as you mentioned, keynote speaking and writing my latest book and spreading knowledge out to people as opposed to working on client accounts. Right? and. So I did mention a little tiny bit of top of the show but you know you've worked with a lot of some really great ecommerce brands some of the largest brands I might add like what are some mistakes that you see kind of consistently some of these e commerce brands are making today will if we restrict people have different definitions of ECOMMERCE, I, just WanNa start there for some ecommerce anywhere. Any website that has as A. Checkout anything where you sell items directly and for others, it's more restrictive and I'd say it's a e commerce catalog and that's I think a more standard definition. If you also use a lots of different items, you have a homepage category pages, search results, pages, and product, and so on. It's not a website where there are two or three things for sale in those early incidental. Would I don't know is that a fair definition or how would you agree with that? Totally would agree with that yes. So In the case of large catalogs, I'd say the common mistakes that we I've seen in my careers one gratuitous use of motion and wasted real estate on the homepage in the form of giant sliders everybody seems to have those Sh. Yeah. That's a big known my book I talk about I have a whole e-commerce best practices section in my landing page optimization book and I devoted a page to why sliders. An evil that should be immediately removed from your site. While you know what part of it I think to is that it doesn't position the brand well, enough I think with having like motion and I think when people have a lot of different slogans, tag lines or kind of looks and things going out other different sections on the site they think they're trying to blast all of their bullets out on this highly sought after a piece of real estate versus maybe having a proper positioning statement or something. One thing that's very important. That's key to why someone should click. Through or why someone shown up on this particular website having one message and one brand image and go further than that I, would say that I'll numerate the reasons why you shouldn't have a slider on your homepage. The one that you mentioned is by far the most important our brains from an evolutionary perspective are designed to notice things moving in are visual field. It kind of has survival value. If you know what I mean here is coming to eat me I need to know what direction and how big is right So. they're they're an interrupt, their the nuclear option in the face of motion graphics won't get looked at and even in the face of graphics, text won't get read. So anything that's graphics or text on your site can't possibly compete with that atomic bomb of a slider on your homepage. And and another reason that really bad is because it's trying to pretend you have more real estate than you really do. So everybody wants a piece of the homepage and lurk. We can add another frame tour slider. Well Great. Thanks. So now have to sit through a longer commercial nobody likes to do that on broadcast TV. There's certainly don't have the attention span to sit through five three seconds sliders to make sure they saw every frame of the crap you're trying to throw them on your home page You don't really an editorial problem. You can't decide what's important. So you're trying to cram it all in there and make everybody happy except your site visitors that are trying to give you money,

TIM Tim Ashe Tim Today Entrepreneur Magazine San Diego Veer Steve Forbes Siemens Google Co Founder Nestle Facebook CEO American Express
Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

Business Wars Daily

04:07 min | 8 months ago

Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

"I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business worse daily on this Tuesday August Eighteenth David Brown is on vacation. There's no other way to say, this twenty twenty is a weird year and yeah, that's a whopping understatement particularly for the travel sector, the latest news and the beleaguered lodging industry. It looks like AIRBNB will go public before the end of the year. The multibillion dollar home sharing company has long been eyeing the public markets. Early, this year AIRBNB was planning its IPO even though twenty nineteen. had been a rough year to in the first nine months of that year and the company lost more than three hundred and thirty million dollars growth was slowing competition already rough was increasing from aggressive rival Expedia, which owns short term rental brands. We are be O- and home away as we reported here, last year the entry of Marriott into the luxury home sharing business didn't help either. When the pandemic hit things took a dramatic turn for the worse the company faced a Billion Dollars in cancellations its valuation dropped from thirty one, billion dollars in twenty seventeen to eighteen billion dollars. This April, the next month airbnb laid off. Two, hundred people a quarter of its staff. It also slowed down plans to expand into TV and transportation the verge reported. Things were looking dire enough that even though it had plenty of cash on hand airbnb chose to borrow money and take on new investment to get through the crisis in total. The company raised two billion dollars at what the verge called. The steep interest rate top executives cut their pay and the eight hundred million dollar marketing budget was slashed the New York Times reported. It all seemed like one gigantic headache I say O'Brien Chessy in his crew. And yet AIRBNB still plans to go public by the end of August. AIRBNB could file IPO paperwork with the SEC if it does shares could trade before New Year's. At first glance that sounds crazy. But it actually reflects a little good news for the travel business along with some dramatically new patterns of travel behavior both here and abroad what do I mean? We'll think about it if you were stuck in the middle of a crowded city, this spring or summer working at your dining room table, would you stay put? Beginning in May a certain number of US said Hell? No. They had a Derulo areas where they could rent other people's homes, AIRBNB bookings, both in America and overseas began climbing back from their black hole for the three weeks starting around Memorial Day vacationers reserved twenty percent more homes than they did a year earlier according to Bloomberg business was best far from the madding crowds in. June. Reservations in the countryside jumped twenty five percent hosts in rural areas earned more than two hundred, million dollars in that month alone payments DOT COM reported international travel is virtually impossible and of course many. Of US are still avoiding airplanes so more and more of us are taking vacations within two hundred miles of our homes about one tank of gas in many cases were also staying longer after all many people no longer have to get back by Monday to go to the office we just take our work with us in a meeting in July CEO Chesty expressed amazement at the rebound in bookings. There is something I never would have imagined telling you the New York Times reported a kind of defies logic, but in June reservations also grew at rival Vr be oh, the Motley fool reported. Optimists see these numbers as a sign of life for the travel industry as a whole but predicting the future of travel right now is best left to gambling halls AIRBNB is fortunes could change suddenly depending on the course of

Airbnb New York Times Elaine Appleton David Brown United States Dot Com O'brien Chessy Expedia July CEO Motley SEC Bloomberg Chesty Derulo America
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 8 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Expedia Revenue Sinks 82% Amid ‘Worst Quarter the Travel Industry Has Seen in Modern History’

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Expedia Revenue Sinks 82% Amid ‘Worst Quarter the Travel Industry Has Seen in Modern History’

"Group is reporting an 82% drop in revenue in the second quarter is the pandemic has just about shutdown. The travel sector, the Seattle Online travel company, reports a 90% drop in total gross bookings for the three month period that ended June 30th compared to a year ago. Expedia CEO Peter Kearns says the second quarter was the worst that the travel industry has seen in modern history. But they started to see bookings improved slightly in May and June.

Peter Kearns Expedia Seattle CEO
Michelle Obama to release show on Spotify

podnews

03:06 min | 9 months ago

Michelle Obama to release show on Spotify

"Join me for the Michelle Obama podcast. You can listen for free only on spotify. Bracken Michelle Obama's higher ground production company is launching the Michelle. Obama podcast on July. The two thousand, nine, hundred, another exclusive show to spotify that new exclusive apple news today podcast that we reported on yesterday. It has an RSS feed after all can expedia added to some podcast APPs including Overcast Marco Armand describes that as a hack. However, the RSS feed is hidden from third parties in Apple's API and it's mirror. Your L. has also been disabled, and so the intention appears to be. Be that it's an exclusive. And the verge described it as such now we discovered a May many radio fronts. PODCASTS also withholds. There are s feed address. If you use the apple API and at the time, apple declines to confirm this or comment on how this achieved Dan Meisner has spotted than apple is self hosting the Audio? Other apple shows are hosted by art nineteen. An evoke terror suggests in article that we linked to today from our show notes and our newsletter this could be the beginning of the end of the feet and possibly podcast hosts, too. In other news apple is hiring for a US and Canada and deter for apple podcasts. Go go go jobs dot net. Sin Has announced a new distribution agreement with. An Indian music podcasts and video service with one hundred and fifty million active users and to radio DOT COM has a new distribution agreement with twitch, which will bring live radio programming to twitch his video streaming platform on me cost media. somethingyoushouldknow has joined Westwood One podcast was formerly signed to DAX. Captivate has an agreement with songs for podcasters toward our podcast to licensed songs from independent musicians I'm an adviser to them. Radio Days Africa had a session about podcast in. You can read up on the topics discussed for watch the whole. Whole thing if you like four soccer ventures is a new company launching a podcast network. It plans to spend six figures growing shows. It's also partnered with a girls soccer network following on from its launch of a secure podcast distribution. Yesterday on me. Studio has posted an in-depth blog piece at our private premium and secure podcast feeds and the school of podcasting Dave Jackson has updated his big list of podcasts about podcasts. We're hoping he does a podcast about it and titles it the podcast about the list of podcasts about podcasts podcast. Sorry. And, in Podcast News Entrepreneur. John Roya has launched John Rowe show row sold his former company to salesforce in two thousand and fifteen in the first episode. He's interviewed by Jordan Harbinger and jury duty trial of Robert. DURST changes the game for true crime podcasts according to crime story media. WHO's making it? The podcasts launched earlier this week and is to follow the trial of billionaire Robert Durst as it happens,

Apple Bracken Michelle Obama Barack Obama Spotify Soccer Michelle Robert Durst Dave Jackson John Roya Africa Marco Armand Expedia Captivate Dan Meisner United States John Rowe Jordan Harbinger Canada
Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

Marketing School

04:05 min | 10 months ago

Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric. Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about why learning to say no will accelerate your success. Let's reframe this real quick and early days Neil when you're starting out as an entrepreneur. You would always look at the newest opportunities. And what would you do about those opportunities? I always said not always what most cases I said. Yes, and that's what ended up causing me to do one too many things derailing my focus and funny enough 'cause less success over time I think what Neil's also saying is a lot of us become more and more successful. You're going to have more and more opportunities coming your way, and you can either accept the fact that you're. You're drowning in opportunity, or you can do something about it and say no more and funny enough Steve Jobs said this in the past. He says what's really lead to apple. Success was the ability to say no. They said no way more things than they said yes to. And when he first came back to apple after he was fired, he shut down many different product lines, and that's just the basis of it. It's really saying no all the opportunities that you're drowning in. When you say no, and you end up focusing on the stuff that really matters. That's when you double down I was once talking to entrepreneur name Brian Lee, and he created a company called shootout with Kim Kardashian before that was legalzoom, and the most recent one was honest company with Jessica Alba. And I remember years and years ago I. Don't know Bryan while at all I. don't even know him really by interviewed him for my blog years and years ago, and he mentioned one thing that really resonated with me, and he said you need to have super laser focus only tried to do one thing at a time and the moment your growth slows down and you can't get it to keep growing. That's when you expand until then you just stick with what you're doing. Yeah more Buffett and Bill Gates when they first met I believe this is a story, or this wasn't when they first met someone albums. Like what's the secret to your success? They both wrote down one word on a piece of paper and flip it over, and they said focus was the main obey. And the other thing to do just to give more examples. You look at Zillow. You look at glass door. You look at all those companies it's who's the one guy that started all those companies again rich partner. Expedia, glass, door and Zillow, yeah, but he focused on each one. He didn't try to do all of them. At the same time, he took the domain expertise that he had is like I. Know How to build a two sided marketplace. I know how to take advantage of Joe I know that there is a gap in the marketplace attack that so he used the same thesis three times, but he didn't try to do them all at the same time and I can tell you. These guys are older and more experienced than I. can say Neal My. We're getting older. We're not up there yet with them. We don't have the. The experience that they have yet, but I can tell you as Neela I've gotten older. We've gotten better at saying. No, I'll say better than before, but still trying to get better at it. It's hard because we all have the shiny. Object Syndrome. And when you learn to say no, it'll make you really understand what you should be focusing on. Because there's so many opportunities out there. In many cases, we missed the ones that are the best ones because we say. Yes, to so many that we don't spend enough time uncovering the true potential of anyone, business or anyone, strategy or anyone concept, and the same goes with your marketing. Even in the air. Can I talk Omni Channel? Yes, you should go omni channel, but focus on one or two marketing tactics out once doom, really well before you expand into all in because there's not enough time in the day to do everything perfectly well, unless you have a massive team, the other thing is I would google the T. sheets, marketer, and really understand as a marketer that you should try to go deep on one. One thing and then you try to expand and get a little more breadth, but the depth is what you really want to folks when people talk about what Neal's known for Seo or what I'm doing for I think largely people was. This is weird, sometimes WANNA go speak at a conference. They don't know what to call way, so they called me an seo extraordinary and I don't know where the hell they got that from. The same problem yeah. Seo Eric. All right. Put into this box, but I guess that's what we know and Belize pisses me off sometimes when I'm lying. Put into a box, but you have to be okay with that because you try to be everything being nothing

Neil Patel Steve Jobs Zillow Eric Neal My Apple Bryan Joe I SU Bill Gates Jessica Alba Kim Kardashian Brian Lee Partner Belize Expedia Buffett Omni Google
Growth in Turbulent Times

a16z

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Growth in Turbulent Times

"Begin by describing a typical growth model and discuss how that fundamentally drives a company's business strategy the first voice who here is Brian's followed by Andrew when we think about a growth model. The question is how does one court of users lead to another cohort of users? And how are you answering that question? In a way that describes not only how you acquire users but the actions they take in your product what those actions generate and how you reinvest whatever that output is back into generating more new returning users so within this model you have hypotheses around the who the what the why who were doing these actions. What are the actions that they are doing and why they are doing them? These are all fundamental hypotheses whether you have it written down or not. I think like a very very simple simple shortcut version of this might be something like I find yelp because I searched Best Dumplings San Francisco and then a yelp page comes up. I'm excited about yelled at some point. Some percentage of those users end up actually than leading reviews and those of us get index like Google and then they end up in Google listings and more people find it right. And so that's kind of how one group of users might indirectly than lead to another group of users versus something like linked in which is focused on getting people to invite their colleagues at people that they're meeting through professional networking and is very focused around getting you to send invites and that's a very different type of loop? It turns out that there is like many many many flavors of this. This is kind of like a verbal version when you go deeper. You're actually able to translate this set of hypotheses and ideas into spreadsheets and numerical models for what's actually happening business and understand with lows right. You're operating against this hypothesis right. That hypothesis gets stronger over time. As you run experiments you validate them. You see the data in data kind of feeds the quantitative version of this in this environment. A lot of those hypotheses are thrown out the window. And what we validated in the past might have changed as a result. You might have tailwinds or headwinds right. The quantitative variables behind these things. Either get stronger where they get worse. But the only way that you actually get a decent picture about is by going through each one of these individuals steps asking those squash right once. You drill down into a spreadsheet. What kind of data are you tracking? What are those metrics? Like if you're a travel company right now I think you're seeing very specific metrics Right if you start with the end of the funnel. What you're saying is a number one. There's going to be fewer people actually like booking and converting like if you're expedia our king regardless of whether or not are looking at flights my guess is percentage of people who actually look out the flight versus. Actually Book. The flight like that conversion rate is probably down. You probably have folks that doing research. Because they're not quite sure. Like when defy or the wafted shut the State Department website where I can actually go and then all the way to the demands question of how many people are in that activity versus. I guess. Light if you're you're inside of you know one of these collaborations tools what's going to happen. Is All of a sudden every is going to be sending more invites other users. Because we're the meetings in right now and says results of that all of those metrics go up when it's happening is if you think about the verbal version of the growth model as a series of events that chained together than what you start to realize they're going to be certain steps that are. GonNa go way way up. 'cause the entire growth models like really radically amplify or there's going to be ones that dramatically tempings out and if step one or two is the growth model start hitting a lot of friction than of course. It's just going to get harder and harder because each group of users going to produce fewer and fewer users if you think about it from an acquisition standpoint saint big engagement well. There's a couple things about this though one is that. I've seen a ton of categorical data out there. People saying this is what's happening to be to be south or this is what's happening to this category and I think I specifically founders. Who Probably. Let's do this. The category is interesting. But it's actually not that helpful. Everybody sits on a spectrum of people who are experiencing extreme headwinds class pass for example would probably seen what ninety percent of their business disappear overnight. And there's people who are seeing extreme tail and if you're sitting on one of the spectrums your job is easier the data's clear it's immediate of what is happening and what the net result is but the founders who are in the middle of the spectrum the hard job you actually have to look at each one of these individual steps to understand what might be changing. What might be happening to build specific. Hypotheses of how. Your Company should act and respond. Most companies will need to go back to basics and reassess their businesses from the bottom up if you are a travel company or an in person fitness company. How do you go about completely? Revamping and reevaluating your growth model. How can founders be proactive rather than reactive? I know it's like Old Silicon Valley message of talk to your customers but honestly this is one of those times where you need to be talking to them at least a couple of customers at a couple times. A day founders. Ceos executives the leaders of the team. Because the only way that you're really going to be proactive is going to get a sense. For what is going on in your customers. Lives and how things are changing what questions they're asking and how their behaviors are changing. And by the time that comes through the data. It's just GONNA be too late and so if you WANNA be proactive. You'd have to go back and rely on a little bit of basically founder intuition in the way that you build that founder. Intuition is just by having lots and lots of conversations very close to it. I think a really big thing strategically. That's changing right now. Is there's a whole discussion for flex? Even be the output goal at the moment. I think this is where the growth model overlays with. Some of the financials the company wildfire. You know we've had several years where it's all been about top line growth and you have a lot of companies that are looking for two x three x five outs year over year growth and then the growth model ends up meeting to support that but I think the whole industry is saying okay. Well maybe actually top line growth of that type of several hundred percentage points. Italy is actually not the focus. Is Everything so uncertain you? We have to watch our cash. So then what I've seen in conversations I've been in is then. Your growth models are actually as much about. How do you grow efficiently from a cash standpoint? And so if you're thing about okay. We need five x growth. And that means that people need to invite each other as at a certain rate. And if they're not then maybe you need to make that up with a marketing spent with financial incentives for users to use the product whether that's in the form of free subscriptions or in the form of a lower priced lane or if your marketplace company you might give people discounts that are dropped into. All consumers

Founder Google Yelp San Francisco State Department Brian Expedia Andrew Italy
With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

Business Wars Daily

03:49 min | 1 year ago

With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

"How does a little holiday in the Scottish highlands sound lovely? Even during this lockdown plenty of people thought so and reserve properties for rent on the global travel website booking dot com in fact so many tourists continue to putter about the Scottish countryside that it alarmed the locals like rural residents all over they feared travelers might bring Kobe. Nineteen with them at overwhelmed. Small hospitals and so in Blackford. The areas presumably exasperated member of parliament asked booking dot com to quit offering reservations for the bucolic countryside. Finally last week the giant travel company complied. Now you can't get a reservation at a cottage in the Scottish highlands until may ninth or later at least not on booking dot com so reports the Scottish newspaper the National. So why am I telling you this? Little story well because it offers a small taste of the big problems facing the travel industry like so many other industries. Covert nineteen is upended everyone in the travel business from tiny. Bnb's to the largest players that's especially true of booking dot coms biggest rival expedia travel and its parent company. Expedia group in addition to owning. Its namesake reservation site. Expedia group owns other household. Names including travelocity ORBITZ HOTELS DOT COM B. R. B. O. And home away just to name a few the multibillion dollar travel conglomerate however is far less steady than it had appeared to be back in December it ousted. Ceo REPORTEDLY DUE TO DISAGREEMENTS WITH CHAIRMAN. Buried diller and the board over Corporate Strategy Diller who also runs entertainment giant. I A C took over day to day responsibilities along with board vice-chair Peter Kern in February prior to the couvert nineteen onslaught in the US. The company announced what it called disappointing twenty nineteen earnings. It announced plans to lay off three thousand people or about twelve percent of its workforce at the time diller called the company's Sclerotic in bloated sclerotic by the way means rigid or slow to change. Not exactly a compliment. He planned to streamline the business which he believed had become too large and complex by the end of February. The company had put plans in place to save three hundred to five hundred million expenses annually and then the virus which had already been wreaking havoc globally hit the US hard. The effect on the travel industry is beyond devastating the US Travel Association estimates losses of more than five hundred billion dollars in direct travel spending. That's nine times worse than the impact on the travel industry after nine eleven according to Forbes sadly the travel association predicts more than eight million. Us travel industry workers will have lost their jobs by the end of this month. And if the pandemic is devastating most businesses those with fragile foundations like expedia are scrambling to ensure they'll survive last week. Expedia received a promise of a rescue package to private equity firms Apollo global management and silverlake are buying a stake in the company for one point. Two billion dollars that alone however may not be enough to help it withstand the travel slump. So expedia is also borrowing another two billion dollars to give it more liquidity. The company says along with announcing the deal expedia also named Peter Kern as CEO observers say. Kern who has roots in private equity will be well suited to the moment meaning. He'll be comfortable cutting jobs and expenses. The big question of course is not just who will survive. But who will thrive after the pandemic crisis abates and investment in a travel business? Even at CEO prices could be seen as a positive sign. Long-term read Raymond a partner at Apollo Management said in a statement. Expedient is a world class company with an unparalleled collection of online travel brands. He added that the firm which will take a seat on expedience. Board looks forward to collaborating on expedia growth and innovation

Expedia Us Travel Association Peter Kern Diller CEO United States Blackford Corporate Strategy Diller Apollo Global Management Kobe BNB Orbitz Raymond Vice-Chair Chairman Partner Forbes
Upstream w/ Dan Heath

Developer Tea

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Upstream w/ Dan Heath

"In the book you get into these details a little bit more mechanically Specifically talking about you know uniting people and What are the changes? Actually that you need make to assist them. How do you determine some of those things Finding Leverage One thing I'd like to talk about specifically is how do you know when this is succeeding in the point of no when we're talking about the The children that are that are drowning. It might make sense that if you had a rate of children drowning when every five minutes in that drops to one every twenty four hours then that might make a good measurement but it's not always that easy right. No it's not and I think the reality is. We live in a world where in the fictitious parable world. I mean my guess is that enormous corporate America. What people would be a measured on is? Is the speed of Rescue You know it and in fact. There's there's an example in the book. I think illustrates this. Well it's about expedia the online travel site and back in two thousand twelve. This guy named Ryan O'Neal is studying some data about the call center at Expedia. So if you book a flight or hotel or something in something goes wrong with your reservation you call one eight hundred number. What he found made his jaw drop. He found that for every hundred customers. Who booked a transaction? Fifty eight of them ended up calling the call center for help. Which which would pretty much seem to nullify the whole point of having an online self service travel site and so he starts digging into figure out why are so many people calling us in the number one reason people are calling. I mean to the tune of twenty million calls in two thousand twelve was to get a copy of their itinerary was twenty million calls. Can I get a copy of my tannery? And so he and his boss. Just they're like this is madness. We've got to do something about this. And they make the case to the CEO to create a special team to work on this and they do and The technical solutions as you might expect are pretty simple. They changed the way they send. It's not like they forgot to send the itineraries. They were always sending them. It's just they would end up in spam or customers would delete them thinking they were ads or the sort of thing so the change their strategy and emailing they added a self service tools on the VR and online and so forth and they basically took twenty million calls and whittled them down to zero so from from a technical perspective. This is a trivial problem. But I think what's interesting about? This story is is why this problem got to this level like you would think that there would be an alarm bell. That would go off somewhere. Once you reached like your your three million call for hi Tenora like people would start to take this seriously but but the deal is that expedia like like virtually every other company has to organize itself or chooses to organize itself in in silos. And so you got a marketing team whose job it is to to attract customers to expedia versus. Kayak or someone else. And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make the site so smooth and intuitive that the customers are funneled toward a transaction. Then then you've got the tech team that makes the plumbing run and keeps up time high. And you've got the call center that's trying to minimize you. Know the the response. Time to fueled a customer issue and to keep them happy via net promoter score or something like that and from a silo perspective like all of those goals make sense but but the problem is when you ask a very basic question. Like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call us. The answer was nobody. Yeah Yeah and it was even worse than that like none of those silos even stood to benefit if the number of calls went down and so. That's something I think that that's really interesting. About upstream problems is that it's often very easy to find owners for downstream problems like your house catches on fire. It's the fire departments problem at that point. Like It may not be an easy problem. But it's an easy problem to define an owner for verses if you flip things around and you say whose job is to keep customers from calling or whose job is to keep your house from catching on fire will. That's a very different

Expedia Ryan O'neal America CEO
Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

Marketing Over Coffee

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

"Good Morning. Welcome to marketing over coffee. I'm John Wall today. Our guest is Mark Irvine. He's the director of strategic partnerships. At Word Stream. GonNa talk to us about what's going on in the advertising space and we are going to focus a lot on cove nineteen in what's going on. He's done a bunch of research on how this has affected searches. And what's going on with all the ad networks so we're excited to have him with us here today. Mark thanks for joining US John. Thanks for having me. This really exciting. Let's take a step back. Talk to us about Word Stream. What do you do and how did you get there? So Word Stream is an online advertising software that agencies and advertisers alike use to manage their advertising across Google search display Microsoft Bing facebook and instagram and so effectively. A lot of what people do online is a lot of repetitive tasks. In terms of how you go about managing ad campaigns what we do is we try to supply. Yeah that's really the big thing for me when finding out about you guys and talking about what you do is just that as a marketing department gets bigger. You reach that point where you've reached the first milestone where you have one person that you're just kinda like okay you become the ads guru and they're the ones that are doing the testing and learning what's working and not working but then they hit a point where they have to roll them across all the different networks the different channels and it reaches this point where it's completely unmanageable you know. They're spending like an hour of each day in each of the tools and you guys are an alternative to that. Did you see a specific point when somebody finally just cries uncle and comes to talk to you? Is there any specific place where you tend to see people give you a call? Yeah you know. It's really interesting. Because a lot of the businesses we primarily work small businesses and a lot of the people who are working with. They're not just in charge of that one ad campaign but they're also doing email and they're also doing seo and quite frankly a lot of these small businesses they're oftentimes the owner or someone who's out in the field at the same moment in time what you can't do as you operate business what. I've learned I can't do effectively. I can't manage. People manage business manager ad campaigns and do a task all at the same time. If you're just learning paid search or if you're just learning online advertising we specifically focus on okay. Here are the seven things that you need you every single week to be successful on Google Bing facebook and as you go about adding to that yes of course google and being or Google and facebook. They all share similar concepts online. But how you go about making sure. That your touching all of your advertising equally in effectively is a learned task. Yeah I do love that idea of. It's not just. It's not a system for experts where it's a power tool that someone would go in and do all of this kind of stuff but it's really an expert system in that it's reaching out proactively using okay. Here's the things you gotta get wrapped up this week if you want this to work and and it kind of puts people on the right track. That's interesting to me though that it does go all the way down to kind of smaller businesses and people who that's not their whole job so I actually Kinda come in a lot earlier in the cycle that I thought was the case. Are there any guidelines as far as spend or like how much of the marketing mix is coming from advertising? Are there any stats there? As far as when somebody can reach this point you know we often see. We do have people who've never advertised before we have agencies who are just beginning to offer paid search to their Seo clients or what have you. They're just beginning to get in the paid search space. Broadly across the board. When I talk about thirty thousand accounts we see an average spend of about a thousand dollars a month so it's still relatively small across all of their networks but beyond that we take small businesses and we also have some some larger guys as well who use the platform for for time management just for honesty and credibility. It's one of those things that paid searches so simple to get started at so simple to feel like you know what you're doing and in that same process just dangerous enough to be bad at one of my favorite hobbies to do a google search for hotels and in your local city and then go and do the same search on bing and you'll see like expedia or priceline or these large brands off have very different ads across those two networks oftentimes inaccurate ads between the two. So it's very easy to have a large budget and still be unsuccessful on a network. Yeah Yeah I can understand that you are kind of all over the place and it's interesting to me to that it's great. That is all the way down at that thousand dollar a month price point. Because that's definitely doable for for small businesses. Especially if they're able to get a return it only a thousand dollars then. Yeah it seems like you WanNa get up and running as quickly as you can and get to the point where you're not worried about the logistics. But you're actually you know testing ads and getting some useful tweaking exactly. Logistics isn't the thing that gets anyone who has a bed in the morning. So whatever you can do to make sure that you're going in and making changes that are effective in your ad copy rather than just pressing a series of buttons and Google ads or facebook. How can you go about making change? That's GonNa Affect Your Roi. Okay now another interesting thing with your background that I wanted to touch upon love to hear about just kind of how you got to where you are but a big part of it. Is You know your data scientist for a number of years. So you have the background that that we love to talk about people kind of getting in playing with the number so tell us a bit more about your role as data scientists and how you got over there. Yeah it's really interesting. I at ridgely had no interest in marketing when I first started my career. I actually majored in math because my mother told me that. If you'd be willing to do people's math you'll always have a job. And so lo and behold I found my holden in marketing a world where traditionally people were not mathematically your data and I joined word stream about seven years ago and at the time word stream had a still a whole lot of thousands of individual clients. We had a lot of data. But what were we doing with? That data was unique to the individual account. My role as it is. Scientists was really investigating not just the role with an individual accounts. But what was going on across thousands of accounts win at change happened when the Google Surp- changed when new ad copy was tested. When they google start running out with new tests or started watching new ad formats. There are changes that people see in terms of the numbers and anecdotally. Everyone has some sense of what's going on their own account but what's going on at large. We suddenly became the largest data repository outside of Google to begin to run those numbers so I spent six seven years at word stream really just running the numbers under saying the trends in terms of what made someone successful with their online advertising our own client set and as a had all that data as I understood all of that started working closely with the individual ad networks with our partners at Google with partners Microsoft with their partners that facebook. And so now. I'm having Lengthy conversations about the changes that they're having and how I think it's going to impact our SNB's sweet

Google Word Stream Facebook John Wall Director Of Strategic Partners Microsoft Mark Irvine SNB Business Manager Scientist Ridgely Instagram Holden Expedia Priceline
Some Canadians have made it home. Others havent.

The Big Story

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Some Canadians have made it home. Others havent.

"Are you there. I'm always here Jordan. Where where am I? GonNa go fair enough. Well it's the first day of the work week was your weekend any different from your week. aside from not making this podcast not really. I mean. I've just been kind of cooking and taking long walks no complaints. Can you even tell days apart right now? No I usually ask about three times a day. What Day is it today? I keep thinking that I'm supposed to take my garbage out Because every day feels like garbage day now for whatever that's worth but here's a question. Have you felt lucky over the past little while I don't know about lucky of definitely felt very fortunate? I've been trying to look on the bright side of things I mean. I'm very fortunate to have been able to work from home as soon as needed and my partner and I keep each other company. Why have you felt? I really have for whatever it's worth you know when we do research for the show. I tend to dig into the worst stuff. The reports out of Italy Reports from frontline hospital workers in Canada and in the United States and it really drives home the point and this weekend we were reading and listening to stories of Canadians who found themselves abroad when Justin Trudeau said. Hey this is serious. It's time to get home yet. That's that's easier said than done. Yeah and I traveled in February and I think about it. Now you know if it had been a couple of weeks later at the time everybody said it was fine to go a couple of weeks later. I would have been in that same situation. Yeah and some people right now are stuck where they are and today We're GONNA talk to somebody who just made it home under the gun barely and We'll hear from somebody at the end of today's episode. Who is not as lucky? And she'll quickly tell you where she has her situation's very fluid So we wanted to get her information there at the very least but quickly for people who still do know what day it is. Can you tell us where we are? Clara's the quote Unquote workweek. What ever that means now begins while the latest from Canada's Health Minister Patty. Hi Do. Is that if you're back from a trip and you've been told to self isolate and you don't do that. You could face a big penalty. It is critically important especially for those returning home now to ensure that they follow this public health advice that we're giving them and the advice will be not just advice if if we if we need to take stronger measures we will and that actually happened in Quebec. A woman who tested positive for the Koran virus was arrested for violating quarantine order because she was out walking her dog. Prime Minister Trudeau says between Monday and Wednesday. There will be more than thirty flights bringing Canadians. Who are abroad back home. And we are now seeing the first case of Cova. Nineteen in the north. It's in the Northwest Territories. And they've now shut down their border to all nonessential travel uh some. Mp's are being called back. On Tuesday to adopt the emergency measures that were announced last week. Those include the twenty seven billion dollar fund for direct support and the fifty five billion dollars to help business liquidity through tax deferrals as of Sunday evening. One thousand four hundred and thirty six cases of Covert Nineteen in Canada with twenty one deaths. When you find yourself in a situation like our guest today did of course you second. Guess yourself a little bit. Why did I go? How did I end up? Here what could I have done differently? It's natural but I think you have to remember as fast as this thing. Seems like it's moving now a few weeks ago unless you are really paying attention. It didn't seem that it was going to get bad. And besides buck once. You're stuck you're stuck. There's no point in questioning how you got here. You just want to get home and to do that. You might need the help of the government and as we know government. Can't help everyone right now today. I can announce we're working with Canadian airlines to make commercial flights available for as many Canadians who are stranded as possible. Now we won't be able to reach everyone over going to do our best to help those. We can't nothing is really guaranteed anymore and so you take your chances like today's guest Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Julia Morales is a student at McGill University in Montreal and today she is in Montreal and safe so first of all. Juliane glad to hear that. Thank you go out to you back your home now. Yes where were you last week? So last week I was in Morocco originally I was will kind of just traveling everywhere and ended up in ten years from where I was supposed to take a flight back to Montreal. Tell me how you got there. Why were you there? When did you go that kind of stuff? So Group of four other students and a professor and I left from McGill University on February twenty seventh to leave for Morocco on a geological field trip. We were going to go steady the geology of the area and sort of understand what processes lead to the current geology of the region and supposedly for two weeks however we were not able to board our flight out of Morocco because of travel bans that were then instilled by the government. What were you thinking? And I don't mean this in a bad way. But what what were you thinking as the flight approached? And you knew you were going. Were you worried Had you heard anything from the government or anywhere else advising you know actually going into the trip I think. Any of the stresses kind of just related to the usual stress of traveling. Do we have everything we need. Is Everyone have a tenth? Is Everyone have hiking boots Nothing related to the extra corona virus because as we had seen on government of Canada website about point. Morocco is very safe. There were no cases or I believe zero. The two case cases of corona in the country and Italy had yet to undergo this boon which we now have seen the past two weeks So we felt quite confident in going to the country and being safe in coming back. Tell me about when that situation changed in Morocco. What were you hearing? What was happening there so every night as we would have dinner we would actually go on the corona world meter website and see what the the statistics were saying about the spread of the virus and even until the last day we were supposed to be their only about. I believe eighteen. Total cases in the country So we weren't too concerned about our state in the country more was going on in the neighboring countries such as Spain particularly Because obviously we're seeing that it was exploding all over Europe and immediately saw that the political response in all these countries with started closing down borders. We started to get concerned about the fact that we may not be able to return but up until then we have not heard anything from our airline or the government in Rocco or the Canadian government. So we weren't we again. We're not too concerned about the idea that we were going to be able to come back home. Tell me about making the decision to try to get home. What happened and what you do that. Yes so we arrived at Tangiers airport as we were supposed to and as we walked into the airport we received the news that essentially Morocco was closing. Its borders to about twenty countries. It was GONNA stop international flights in and out of twenty countries and among those were Canada. Which is quite surprising because the USA was not on the on that list in the US has many more cases of corona virus than we do and at that point we immediately started looking for other flights out of the country and we managed to book another one through Qatar And three days later we were supposed to cash played. We found out that Qatar was also closing. Its borders and would not allow us to fly through there so this all began a whole spiral of trying to find any flights out. What did you do but did we do what we kept? Trying to find. More flights we booked another flight out of Casablanca on Foulon really quickly counseled expedia actually called us about like a few hours. After having both in told us that the play it would not be going out. We booked another flight with Air Canada which then got cancelled. We booked another flight through Royal Moroccan. That also cancelled we for pretty much just desperate to find anything that would get us out of the country so our original flight was supposed to go through. Casablanca before then heading to Montreal. So you decided to take a flight to Casablanca since it's like a major flight hub in the country and we figured that our chances of getting a flight out would increase if we were in that city and so we just kept trying once we arrived in Casablanca airport. We tried to make sure if our flight would actually be going out. And the people at the counter told us that they couldn't even find our

Canada Morocco Montreal Prime Minister Trudeau Jordan Heath Rawlings Casablanca United States Mcgill University Qatar Italy Casablanca Airport Air Canada Canadian Government Partner Cova Clara MP Royal Moroccan
Personal Preparation for an Economic Slowdown

Clark Howard Show

06:13 min | 1 year ago

Personal Preparation for an Economic Slowdown

"Want to talk now about the latest developments involving the corona virus. And how it might affect you moving forward now. The Corona virus has spread to more and countries and federal authorities announced. Just a little while ago that there are a greater number of reported cases in the United States than prior realized and I wanNA say something first about the health risks so corona virus. If you have not heard has a very low fatality rate it has the potential to spread and mutate potentially. I'm not a scientist. I don't really understand how that works but I can tell you where it stands now with the infections around the world it has an extremely low risk of death doesn't mean you won't get sick and feel miserable if you get it right. It is creating enormous impact on economies around the world and is starting to have serious impact here. In the United States there are certain parts of the United States economy that are being decimated by the Corona Virus. The Nation's airlines and cruise lines cruise lines taking it potentially worse than airlines and their stocks are just falling off a cliff. Expedia as just announced. They're laying off three thousand people. There are internal factors expedia. But I'm sure that even though they didn't credit credit mentioned in anything I've seen from expedience parent that the corona virus is at play. But you're going to find. A lot of companies are going to announced layoffs or quietly offer people the opportunity to go on unpaid leave or various things like that as part of a response to what will be potentially a slowdown in the economy as for a recession in the United States. This is an election year and it is very unlikely although it could happen. It's very unlikely that will follow much of the rest of the world into recession this year. Because during a presidential election cycle the administration power uses every lever that has access to to try to pump money into the economy to keep the economy out of a full blown recession but the effects of this will be that the tremendous job engine. We've had in the United States over. The last nine years will at least go into applause neutral. Maybe even a bitten to reverse. So where's that affect you? And how does it affect you in my mind? The Way I think about this is when you know. There are certain level of storm clouds gathering. The thing that you and I need to do is prepare for the possibility of a storm hitting us as an individual or a family. And the you make sure that you are prepared and by prepared in this case it's about having your finances in order. This is a time that you need to really think about things before you impulsively by them. You need to think about having a reserve of cash. Need to think about if you've been relying a lot on let's say overtime hours from your employer or the paycheck itself. What would you do if you suddenly faced layoff? Are you prepared for that? Because if I'm right in we go into what economists refer to as a growth recession. It's where technically economy is still growing but the job market gets week. We've been awhile since we've experienced anything like that and you need to be prepared. So this is one of those moments where an economy is flashing warning signs. And you can see it. You know people talk about what's going on with stocks and all the rest but if you really WanNa know the direction of an economy you look at what's going on with interest rates not stock stocks are getting the headlines because things have been a little ugly but the reality is when you look at what people were expecting to earn on money that they would get from bonds. When you're bond it's like you're a bank lending money so organizations and when I see that people are demanding less interest the longer out you go that means there's more and more concern in the money crowd with what's going to happen with the economy moving forward so it's like we've got an early warning signal it's like things are flashing yellow and I want you to be prepared so really look at take the time to look at what you know what. You're spending what you're buying and think through what you need to do to make sure your finances are okay. If suddenly you find your hours cut back or your pay cutback back or your job eliminated or you prepared for that.

United States Expedia Scientist
Expedia: 500 people in Seattle will lose their jobs

News, Traffic and Weather

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Expedia: 500 people in Seattle will lose their jobs

"Travel giant Expedia group is announcing massive layoffs including hundreds of jobs on the chopping block at their new Seattle headquarters couples Joe Marino reports on the impact of the far reaching cuts one of the biggest names in online travel is about to send thousands of workers packing Expedia is laying off some three thousand employees a whopping twelve percent of its its total total workforce workforce so so this this is is part part of of their their plan plan to to simplify simplify and and streamline streamline as as they they say say Taylor Taylor Soper Soper has has been been tracking tracking developments developments for for geekwire geekwire says says Expedia Expedia chairman chairman Barry Barry Diller spelled out the problems in a recent earnings call he would call the organization bloated organizations that we kind of lost our way Expedia says

Joe Marino Expedia Taylor Taylor Soper Soper Geekwire Geekwire Barry Barry Diller Seattle Chairman
The Latinx Political Leaders of... New Hampshire

Latino Rebels Radio

08:38 min | 1 year ago

The Latinx Political Leaders of... New Hampshire

"Bernie Sanders. Just crushed crushed. The Latino vote wasn't even close. Think right now I saw the data from Ucla even though the entrance polls had sanders at fifty one fifty two percent. There's data out there from Ucla that actually looks at actual caucus data caucus voting. That had senders over seventy percent in in field of a lot of candidates. Like I think it was like seventy one and eighteen for Biden Sanders ran away with it and it got me thinking when I came back. I had to share this conversation that I recorded during the New Hampshire primary with nine. That's right Latino and Latina leaders in New Hampshire and I thought you know what? Let me drop it right after Nevada especially now that sanders got such strong Latino support. Because I think this notion of White New Hampshire White Iowa and then we're waiting for the diverse voter in Nevada and then this is when the real contest begins. I kind of want to dispel that a little bit. Especially because once. You hear the voices of these people in New Hampshire. They are there and they care for their community and their politically engaged. So I hope this conversation could at least give some thought as to why maybe someone like Bernie. Sanders is having more appeal than usual with Latino Voters Latino voters across the country. So anyway this conversation was recorded. I believe two weeks ago. Yeah around then in Manchester New Hampshire before the New Hampshire presidential debate the democratic debate. So here it is. I am at a restaurant Mexican restaurant in Manchester caused. Anything gone and we're going to have a conversation about Latinos in New Hampshire. It's ridiculous the people that are around this table. They've kind of told me their story before when I'm let them tell my story to tell their story. Their stories are amazing. Everyone's like ordering hoppy those right now. There's chips and Salsa so anyway so that's what's happening at this restaurant in Manchester. Now this get get closer like a circle. Yeah we're good because I just think I only have one Mike so I'm GonNa make sure that everyone gets to say acknowledge. The person may be. Hi How are you? I'm so what I'm GonNa do I is. I'M GONNA go around each part of the room and I wanted to tell me who you are your connection to New Hampshire and anything that people need to know about you. That's like amazing. I already heard some stories. I WanNa get this on on record so I'm going to start with this fine. Like incredibly like Suave Mexican man. Who told me his story? Oh my God so I wanted to ask you your name. Your Connection New Hampshire what you do and then just tell me a little bit about your story so let me check your level here and okay. My name is Alejandra Ruth from Mexico. I came here thirty years. I went to the United States and twenty seven twenty years. I'm leaving in New Hampshire all the time because we live in Hudson and I even my most of my activity western Massachusetts. I got involved with a New Hampshire politics because I discovered there was white. Supremacy is we're coming to my town Hodson because they thought that Dot Colson. Welcome them because at that time There was Sabin cases of profiling by the police things that we need to do something about that. And then we speak up on the themes change and now we have a very good communication between the police. And the Latino Community Hudson saw. That is quite made me to be involved and I was very active on Mexico. When I was a young student at the university I was climb over the movement of the nine hundred sixty eight and then in some was forced to leave Mexico because by two attempts of innovation there and Soak night game from Spain to here so I said well I cannot be silent when I saw the Latinos and the people who have been leaving their countries because their governments failed to them and they were coming here to look for Better Life. Just thought these were not doing the support they supposed to to them. Wow Okay I need a moment with that story so I'M GONNA go over here. Thank you for sharing that. That's amazing I'm going to go over here. And you tell me. Your name your connection. You Hampshire what you do and tell me a little bit about yourself. So hold on. Let me check. So I'm Ali. Sandra Rodriguez Murray and I moved to Hampshire. When I was five from Miami I am currently a regional organizer in Manchester National with a group called rights and democracy and we organize our across a variety of issues. Having to do with health care the climate worker's rights but I also volunteer in my spare time with Org Psycho Sacha and I'm really passionate about immigration immigrant rights My mom is an immigrant from Iowa and I remember as a kid going the capital with her and her becoming a naturalized citizen and I have a lot of different immigration stories and statism my family. My Dad is actually his first generation from Scotland. So I just have different connections to the community but I even though I'm in New Hampshire and such a like white stay. I still feel like really connected to my Latino side like I've always been close to my family in Miami and we spoke Spanish at the house. And Yeah but I love growing up in the Hampshire. That's great all right. So this handsome young men over here to who told me his. He's looking all right. So tell me. Your name your connection New Hampshire and how you got here and what you do now so here we go three okay. My name is Sebastian windass. I came here in two thousand one raft in nine eleven and then You know I can't muster j. One foreign student I can't work for three months. I was supposed to leaf and decided to go back home. Because there's a better opportunity here For four years of the first four years of my life here in America was undocumented So I know exactly what people were. No paperwork go through I know everything about immigration system because experiencing myself and then in two thousand sixteen I became a US citizen in a kind of made a promise to my kids. You know a to get involved in now that have voice and I can say some speak up. I need to get more involved with my community. just got elected as a democratic delegate for the for on behalf of Bernie Sanders. We're excited with Carlos So you know. He's just just the fact that we're bringing Latino community. Which is a small Hampshire? You know to everybody's attention is something that I find really inspiring you know and I think there's more this more that we can do Just because I was I was a greener holder and then it doesn't mean that can get active community man. I'm I'm like being blown away by these stories and I still have two more stories to share and there's more people coming. There's actually more people coming here and I'm GonNa Talk to the man that organized all this conversation and he gets the present themselves so I'm looking straight at him You introduce yourself you tell me like how you got to New Hampshire and wow all right here we go. My name is many expedia. I am so a little bit about myself. I came to New Hampshire and twenty fifteen to work on the Hillary Campaign Vin working in politics since two thousand twelve with Obama's campaign But I came here as an organizer. I'm originally from California from Santana. California born raised Chicano but I After the primary decided to stay here loved it so much work for the mayor of Nashua worked for Senator One of the senators here and then eventually decided to run for office myself so I am one of two Latinos who are currently in the four hundred person state legislature and one of my goals is to hopefully get more let to run because we need deserve to have representation in our State House and we need to make sure our voices are heard there. So really proud to be here and really proud to hopefully get more More Latinos

New Hampshire Bernie Sanders Hampshire Manchester New Hampshire White New Hampshire Manchester Ucla Iowa United States Mexico Nevada California Expedia Hudson Alejandra Ruth Mike Miami Barack Obama
"expedia" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall during the conversations to get the seven thirty seven out of Iran. I'm still shocked at took as long as it did like I understand that the paperwork needed from the government. But like how that didn't just start the like while the aircraft is diverting. I feel like they could have just started the paper been done with it already. We know this is going to be problem. It was the US held it up. Today was the shutdown that impacted because it had the US fault. I'm just surprised that they were such I I'm surprised at took so much paperwork that the shutdown could have affected it, right? Like, how is it? Not like a Cup. Like one guy saying, yes, we approve an exemption for whatever embargo rules exist. Go fix your plane, and then it's done and her stand obviously bureaucracy works in strange ways, and whatever. But it's just it's always amusing to probably have to put some take a penny. Leave a penny for the wall contribution in there. Give us give us a small fund for the wall. And we'll we'll release your paperwork. We're terrible. But sadly, kinda true. So Expedia and United are kind of having a war of words in lawyers at this point. Expedia swing United. What's why what's the reason for their? So they they have not negotiated a new agreement under current agreement expires November October and two weeks ago. United was gonna cut off access to expediate United tickets because they believed it was not in the best interest of the customer that Expedia continue selling tickets on United beyond the October date, if because they wouldn't be able to service those gets which is fair once you, you know, it's it's like when you take it with a partner that's about to exit once partner exits you can't do anything with that ticket other the cancel it. So which is completely fair. So Expedia sued United and the problem the one of the things lawsuits under seal. So you don't know why they're really suing each other other than the fact that they're they're trying to come to more favorable terms as the term, so they came into government where United did not pull access and fifteen. Fast forward to now they're still in a litigation because United still there's still coming to agree. And it sounds like speed is not really willing whatever United wants to wants to charge them there. And and Expedia continues. It seems like Expedia pushing people to more United tickets to force United except Expedia terms beyond the Stober date showing that they can actually drive the volume or just saying while you're gonna cause all these passengers disservice by not negotiating with us. I think has less to do about the volume I think it has more to do with putting them in a corner. He's gonna work United's probably say, it'd be generate enough traffic on her own right? Yeah. I I'm pretty sure you're not gonna balk. But it's funny like Expedia right there used to be so many different. Oh, teas but Expedia pretty ones half, the Otake portfolio. Yep. Yep. Say yeah. It's not just Expedia dot com. Right. It's no many many different. That does make that complicates things. A little bit. I my only thought on this is we go through this every X months with picking airline in pick. Not a and in the end, they always seem to figure it out because they do both need each other. Whether they want to admit it or not and just I can do without the drama, but I that's not my choice. It's a lot of time in court right for results that we think is coming right. Who's who's actually making money off of this? United doesn't make money off of it. Expedia doesn't make money off of it. The lawyers make some money, which is great..

Expedia United US Cup Iran partner Otake two weeks
"expedia" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

Defensive Security Podcast

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

"Yeah because if specially if you don't know where where the point of entry is i guess so the other thing of note is that friend of the show a friend of ours dr sorry professor andy green of kiss you also got volved in this little project gets mentioned in some of the press articles as being reached out to buy some of the local media so this shadow onto good guy yeah smart guy all right he doesn't work as much as i do want to say that anyway it on next next door comes from databreach today and the title here's expedia orbitz suspected suspects eight hundred eighty thousand payment cards stolen what struck me about this was the amount of time that has gone by since i last heard about a major credit card breach involving an online retailer it's it's been quite some time i can't remember one in in recent history at least a large one i mean i think small ones happen all the time but so the story here's that orbits which was recently acquired by expedia apparently head some legacy system compromised in some unknown way and apparently the attackers would have had access to eight hundred eighty thousand payment cards but but wait there's more right not just payment card information but also you know the other kind of information that you might leave if you were booking you know an airplane ticket such as your name your birth date your phone number your email address your mailing address gender i'm guessing passport numbers kt they don't say passport numbers ktm's but i bet you that stuff's there to window preference eyler yet yet what kind of of food preference you have.

professor expedia ktm andy green orbitz
"expedia" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Oh any while they bought them which is owned by expedia and wait a minute we gotta get this straight expedia owns trip advisor but the accident then decided to split apart two separate companies but really i think they still have the same parent but turbot visor barry diller he owns everything just very no steep okay all right that i see on every trouble conferences in two thousand i started my website night and steve golfer at a little table next to me hey i remember such a dumb idea love yeah made a billion dollars yep guru you look you look up your flight exactly but i'm not talking about see grew this one's called sea link ceiling this this is a competitor they just started out in beta i kind of like their layout better but they're not they're not as good as c group but it's an alternative all using the same data or do they have their own little thing they're supposed to have their own thing but i have a feeling most of them are are taking stuff off guru just scraping sikh guru well they say that not but now is seat guru based on riders flyers you know there is secret was not okay seat link is reader reviews and stuff like that but secret was not let me put in korean of them have not updated american airlines triple seven two hundred series and there's four different versions but you check them all and they're not they're not like the one i flew the other day which has been around with this with this configuration for over a year so it's like what are these people thinking.

expedia advisor billion dollars
"expedia" Discussed on Outliers

Outliers

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Outliers

"What changes did they bring a new as a person and for example do give up on the entrepreneurship because of this out how how how did you walk with these okay get so is the only good thing that i must say is i didn't pick spin in supposedly failure that simple things so the fat bald was a good expedia ends we exited we off of the loss of more happen so in a sense i can truly claim to see have seen all the sites of an entrepreneur group site did a bad side and that is ugly said there's hardly anybody i think it in the open game dosing alkhilewi sites have seen alternate swing that seemed it's not that i'm seeing bone become an entrepreneur because you only see the that smarter would things happen and i think if it is meant to happen intimate will happen what does teed me as a person i think what attend me as a person is in a one other things that the citizen entrepreneurs must be emotionally passionately in water than that business and widely edited it is the most important thing in their life my experience tells me that he should not be the most important thing in my life so live will start to begin have nor done a startup because of the that's not the only reason obviously that has been deal was suddenly hesitation but i'm hoping subtly once an entrepreneur all this i'm hoping to come back and maybe you never know when find this idea may come but could do but what i have the mistake that i did not let me ask he's that i'm absolutely fight.

expedia
"expedia" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

"So do you still hate that i despise that there's a burn you button if firms by buttons yeah it is might omni channel we take a quick quick poll we gonna keep the news these keep it i don't like i'm not a fan the news he's all right well i anyone a second the motion to keep news the second letters and not only favor i i all those posed navy i if is atoll i five right with as as the host i'm going gonna tiebreak allegedly the news thing the news goals are you get an almost follow tests which absolutely have musical musicals at will kicking off the news ecoles kohl's today in song in the next key f mina is the expedia partner conference just wrapped up in a very impressive fee this can hold a team i like it anyway yeah so the expedia porter conference 2017 just wrapped up and instead of just home at one item in the news there are hundreds of he'll pieces of news out there coming out of the conference several pieces are focusing on the fact that road pluses really starting to come into its own other people are talking about how expedia is starting to monkey around a little bit with showing thirdparty rates on their actual system so a lot of really interesting stuff this coming out in aesthetic on diving into it here i will have a lincoln the show notes to a google new search for the expedia party conference that everyone can dive into inter's dozens of news articles and all of them are really really good so i suggest someone spent some time and go through this ad so according to expedia people are really excited about expedia is revved plus they allow that sing it on related about people being yeah and we had some folks makes me you're on the show while by we did how episode on ref plus when they kind of first rolled it out in it was a rule popular episode a lot of people in enjoyed it got good feedback.

expedia lincoln ecoles kohl partner google
"expedia" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Did you see that the new ceo of rubber is the guy who turned expedia around yes i've met him a few times darawsheh coral shroud covering shushing yes a fiving that was a good that was a good fix i think i these uh you know he is uh he took expedia which was struggling and instead of just painting you know slapping a coat of fresh paint on it re really rebuilt the company i didn't know this but a expedia was a wholesaler they would by the rooms from the hotel and then resell them and he moved agency model which is what i assumed that they were doing like a travel agent does where they get a cut of the booking but uh he changed and he had to change the whole business model and everything for expedia but turned that company around so i think he has the experience uh that is going to take to make hooper uh i do i hope so because i love over and like you know this goes party like expedient those guys don't make money from air i mean they make very little if they make any right they're making their money from hotels and package deals roses and things like that that's where the money on trust um so i got another site for you if he got a time i do all right so i actually put it in the show notes this is a little bit longer your l and also tweeted it smoky mountains dot com bags slash fall hyphen foilage at hyphen map is this the today to go see the foliage in the smoke he's well it's actually not about the smoky mountains at all my ever to mention the mix up the euro oh but they have a prediction they have a a prediction now for four fall age across the whole united states you can slide the little lighter the bottom because they can't you're going to be housing at the time to go everything's green but let's say a few leaves september 17th oh.

ceo expedia hooper
"expedia" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on This Week In Google

"So his uh skill it uh moving at really rebuilding expedia which was struggling when he took over and changing their model from a wholesale model to an agency model i didn't even know that they you know i had to read all is trying to understand it for a uh you know could understand benz article but bensaid this is exactly the kind of guy you need because he rebuilt expedia from the ground up he didn't do the easy thing he did the harsh true that's true he did expedia did he rebuild and needed rebuilding elbows her lynch uh this is actually gonna remember yahoo i think actually getting a financial wizard into yahoo remember yahoo sorry of scattered i'll just added of this uh us but this was their problem they hired a product person instead of financial person and i think a lot of tech silicon valley companies tech this was a good move for precisely the reason span out lies up and because at a certain point in time you've created a product in now you've got to understand how you disrupted the market for my financial perspective it doubled down on that and that's where i think netflix is going to succeed or fail with its content play did it make the right bet um with its its content strategy so i i just thought that was kind of their parallels we see often in newburgh actually if they recognize this they made the right decision been says it's clear that uh coasts were shot he has demonstrated the patience and resolved to fix problems at their root and as this year's make clear uber's culture needs a fundamental reworking not simply a fresh coat of paint coast russia he seems that ideal candidates take on the problem with a fundamental level and has already shown expedia is willing to walk the walk on issues of sexism in particular.

expedia yahoo netflix russia newburgh
"expedia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"A russia he's an indian american or american indian dot indian not further indian all aerial and he he's well regarded meg whitman was really being pushed by the major investor in lubers company called a benchmark and they wanted a woman initially right and they couldn't find one the i mean she said she was not given the job the other women all turned it all down uh the ones who were deemed to qualify to do this and i am i talking about women are qualified it is very rare for a woman at this point to run a fortune 500 company or in this case probably a fortune one hundred company but who wide edged the rare it's rarely for a man to to have the skills to do but who wants this you've got a sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace you've got your trade secrets lawsuit from google that you're going into you still have the the driver lawsuit going on i fcc pass joe yeah exactly who wants his anybody who wants a challenge to turn around a company of this magnitude he got to go down as this guy straighten out well that's what happened with expedia he exploded the company grew it like crazy i'm assuming expedia is profitable very profitable so you grab those people why would they leave well because baby they've done that been there done that in terms of growing a company now let's go on with the new challenges not like money is an issue for co of that ca of this no but it cited carpenter doesn't keep working on the same bookshelf after he's fixed it already live on your fix some no seven i feel like this guy was building houses in that analogy and all of a sudden that go billed as the white house or you know at eighty puts yeah but he got gun building a what you know what i mean he had already with expedia done something huge cells built multibillion dollar business all right coming back the remains of all the sailors the ah at the uss john mccain have have been recovered i'll carry the story when we come back are in the.

russia meg whitman lubers company harassment google expedia carpenter white house john mccain joe
"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of expedia the founder of zillow the founder of glass door let's talk a little bit about glass door in two thousand and seven you found the company which helps yes people find jobs understand the salary and compensation they're getting in gives folks a better sense of what what they should be getting for their role in the marketplace zeller that's right of their assessment a threat i actually cofounded it with a guy named bob hohmann who worked for me at expedia he was a development manager mall most all of my companies that i am involved with i've cofounded with people who worked for me at expedia zillow to those well so you're cofounder of aeg i've founded expedia you know inside of microsoft and i cofounded zillow with an expedient guy and a microsoft guy a guy went to college with and then i did the same with glass store and i've done it with a few others as well anyway but to gaza short so yes the idea with glass door is not too dissimilar from expedia and zillow and that is to turn on the lights in the room to give show information they didn't have before and specifically what is it really like to work there do people who work there approve of the ceo and leadership what do people make what do they really we make what are there what are the real salaries and job titles in ten years how do you ensure the integrity of than information had he make sure so there is a site rate might professor there are other educator related and you.

founder zillow zeller bob hohmann expedia aeg microsoft ceo development manager gaza professor ten years
"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is the cofounder of expedia the founder of zillow the founder of glass door let's talk a little bit about glass door in two thousand and seven you found the company which helps some people find jobs understand the salary and compensation they're getting in gives folks a better sense of what what they should be getting for their role in the marketplace zelda that's right a fair assessment attract i actually cofounded it with a guy named bob hohmann who worked for me at expedia he was a development manager most all of my companies that i'm involved with i've cofounded with people who worked for me at expedia zillow to the as well so you're cofounder of aig i founded expedia you know inside of microsoft and i cofounded zillow with an expedia guy and microsoft guy agai went to college with and then i did the same with glass store and i've done it with a few others as well anyway but to glass door so yes the idea with glass door is not too dissimilar from expedia and zillow and that is to turn on the lights in the room to give show information they didn't have before and specifically what is it really like to work there do people who work there approve of the ceo and leadership what do people make what do they really make what are there what are the real salaries and job titles in ten years how do you ensure the integrity of than information had he makes sure so there is a site rate my professor there are other educator related and.

expedia founder zillow bob hohmann development manager aig microsoft ceo professor ten years
"expedia" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

Wall Street Business Network AM 760

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

"The cofounder of expedia the founder of zillow the founder of glass door let's talk a little bit about glass door in two thousand and seven you found the company which helps people so find jobs understand the salary and compensation they're getting in gives folks a better sense of what what they should be getting for their role in the marketplace that a fair assessment of right i actually cofounded it with a guy named bob hohmann who worked for me at expedia he was a development manager mall most all of my companies that i am involved with i've cofounded with people who worked for me at expedia as well so you're cofounder i founded expedia know inside of microsoft and i cofounded zillow with an expedia guy anna microsoft guy agai went to college with and then i did the same with glass store and i've done it with a few others as well anyway but to gaza dark so yes the idea with glass door is not too dissimilar from expedia and zillow and that is to turn on the lights in the room to give show information they didn't have before and specifically what is it really like to work there do people who work there approve of the ceo and leadership what do people make what did they really make what are there what are the real salaries and job titles in ten years how do you ensure the integrity of that information had he make sure so there is a site rate might professor there are other educator related and you.

expedia founder zillow bob hohmann microsoft gaza ceo development manager professor ten years
"expedia" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Acquired

"This is interesting yeah i mean what what if expedia had had pulled the trigger yeah that sort of the obvious one right at and i don't know drew drew what do you think about that uh i mean at you like i would would deference to my friends at expedia i'm not sure they would run as good job managing these businesses as as book into it as priceline signed it rather uh ending out the good job was just leaving it alone hurt exactly i mean is the fact of life you see play you know i guess a better question as we are why did was gunned fogel the one euros us stepped up this deal you to where all the great silicon valley zsa zsa vezio investor of all time uh it does seem who who is the intermediary that they sold the two is like the private private equity firm no i i think i could be wrong in this but i think it actually was just a uh a group of uh of private um individuals uh private investors in europe uh thicker too yeah i mean seems like there is opportunity cost for them is the real story here y yeah you know why let it go but i i think um this might be a good time drew when we were preparing for this episode you mentioned um sort of a difference between expedia is mna strategy and frei signs emini strategy in that priceline sort of took these risks on early kinda subscale businesses that they saw potential and and expedia tends to to by more establish things that have a very reasonable growth trajectory from there that they can add to their portfolio does it seem like i'm getting that right and i would love to hear your thoughts on that yeah i think i think the deathly characterize a lotta the deals that that may priceline successful active booking uh agota uh and and again i think we you know you saw the strategy we just talked about from priceline slide a buying these businesses in effectively you know being a largely passive investor uh holding them accountable for growth giving the capital to continue to grow um but but not taking to active a role in in the management integrationist businesses.

expedia priceline fogel europe
"expedia" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on 100 PM

"There's is a huge supply part of the business um it's almost hard to fathom how big and how complex expedient gives in terms of the different solutions that people think about every day to make sure people can easily go where they want to go it's an empire basic while i think but it's a a a good a good one for the better serving for the better it at one of the smaller companies have actually worked with when you compare it to amex or chase how many folks at expedia inc approximately i the inc approximately twenty thousand yeah kosh hence load big companies so orbits what is part of you were it orbits their yard of the expedia inc good empires yes yes yes so about that i'm if he on the tiny but i think about a year and a half ago expedia acquired orbits worldwide which is also its own mini empire you could say that had a collection of brands like were bids cheap tickets eib bucher is also a distribution business so we were acquired we were headquartered in chicago but now a lot of us serve kind of the greater good so there are still people that focus on the individual brands but i focus some on a product level on solutions and and features that can serve a number of brands okay so than is scratch pad an asset of expedia inc that's leveraged across multiple properties or it's a more jeweler feature of expedia dot com it is not specific to expedia dot com so there is an organization within expedia called the brand expedia group that contains brands like expedia orbits uh cheap tickets travelocity and actually all those brand.

expedia chicago amex expedia inc
"expedia" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

"I'm just weirdness going on so a lot of just really fundamental technical seo things are apparently huge issues on the expedia site and now it's kind of coming back to bite of in the but because they have lost significant visibility forced some of their really high traffic keywords so i don't know i found this interesting what are your thoughts so you're saying seo is not dead i believe it or not an estimated not dead usga does anyone want to try to pronounce name kerala wits but totes carello its is that what we're saying guerrillas dot com yeah it a hats off to this individual because they have done some legwork if i was in charge of digital marketing for expedia i'd be picking up the phone and call in this person saying the you want to job because i mean they they win in depth on this stuff and other legwork in an osce there with probing some some heated meetings inside expedia for whoever is in charge seo because they missed some fundamental stuff on this so it is great i i think if we step back and try to apply this to the people that are listening right to a hotel he is the listening that have their own seo challenges seo is complex it is very very tough there are so many technical nuances to it in a changes every single day which is why is one of the most intimidating parts of seo which is why becomes neglected right.

expedia
"expedia" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"One of the expedia sites one of the priceline sites they may offer you free upgrades if you book direct a no upgrades if you don't book direct avic spirits all these things because i have an unusual situation i have status status that sound so snobby what are you call it i'm i'm an elite level that sounds bad to i i'm at a ranking with the various hotel frequent stay programs that made me eligible for a variety of privileges that i four fit because i'm price oriented more than i want the luxury touches and this is the choice you'll have to make because i do almost one hundred percent my hotel bookings with priceline and hot wire where i don't know where i'm staying till after i paid nonrefundable but most people won't do priceline are hot where but they still will use a third party site like expedia hotels dot com or booking dot com or blah blah blah dot com and so when you use those there's going to be the punishment for you and that's the reality of how this game is going to be plate now there's a third thing to add in some confusion there are some ufo hotel bookings sites which i've had complaints about and there are complaints about them all over the web on all the travel review sites and stuff if you comparison shop and there's some hotel booking site you've never heard up in its offering an incredibly cheap price.

expedia priceline one hundred percent
"expedia" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Also own booking dot com kayak a goda bitter all various booking sites and then expedia owns hot wire in hotels dot com which are both big booking sites they also own travelocity who knew expedia own travelocity and a couple of other smaller hotel sites and then if you look at eh v r b o r home away they on them too so there's gonna be a continuing fight between the priceline group the expedia group marriott hilton hyatt when dim as they all struggle i see i forgot i see is these big hotel group's fight against the big booking groups because hotel groups all want you to book direct they went you be brand loyal they don't want you to comparison shop and more and more you're gonna find that they're going to offer you a number of privileges if you book direct rather than through one of the priceline group sites or one of the expedia group sites so you're gonna have to decide it benefits matters more to you matter more to you or a price matters more to you so what kind of benefits well they might offer additional hotel stay points or off your hotel stay points the don't get if you book with one of the price liner expedia sites they may offer you a free drink when you come to the hotel if you book direct they may offer you free wi fi fi book direct but charge you for it if you book through.

travelocity expedia priceline marriott hilton
"expedia" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:53 min | 4 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on WTMA

"Now the world's largest hotel brand owns all of the store would brands between them they own now sean thirty thirty five different hotel brands and you've got one big group after another hilton having a big group wyndham having a big group with a whole bunch of different brand names and then booking hotels there are two people out there to organizations who control most of the third party booking in the united states and around the world by the people at priceline also own booking dot com kayak oh goda bitter all various booking sites and then expedia owns hot wire in hotels dot com which are both big booking sites they also on travelocity who knew expedia own travelocity and a couple of other smaller hotel sites and then if you look at it we are o home away they on them too so there's going to be a continuing fight between the price lion group expedia group mary i hilton hyatt them as they all struggle i see i forgot i see his these big hotel groups fight against the big booking groups whose the hotel groups all want you to book direct they weren't you be brand loyal they don't want you to comparison shop and more and more you're gonna find that they're going to offer you a number of privileges if your book direct rather than through one of the priceline group sites or one of the expedia group sites so you're gonna have to decide if benefits matters more to you matter more to you or a price matters more to you so what kind of benefits well they might offer additional hotel stay points or off your hotel stay points but you don't get if you book with one of the price liner expedia sites they may offer you a free drink when you come to the hotel if you book director may offer you free wi if you book direct but charge you for it if you book through one of the expedia sites around the priceline sites they may are you free upgrades if you book direct.

united states priceline travelocity expedia director wi sean hilton hyatt