35 Burst results for "Expedia"

"expedia" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

05:21 min | Last week

"expedia" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"It's so nice out there. Out there in the Mexican markets where chili stretch in the sun. High in the mountain air between backcountry skis and kids doing the first snowplow. Or next to the pool after a long day of forgetting what day it is. We're all here to get out there and come home or us than us that went away. And when you save on travelers and Expedia member, you can travel even more. It's so nice out there. So let's go Expedia, made to travel, times apply seaside for details. What.

Expedia
"expedia" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

02:38 min | 8 months ago

"expedia" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"More you went as the ability in the area this matter news. Oh yes nicholas november. The on the sandwich this way when any alanya. Yes ninety if you know middle of those death then mr both casio. Muslims principalities interested in worth market columbus. Allow any spaniard but neither this with us again north of is. But if i i i i do still get economou kanodia in ravioli mccomb yahtzee goldman temples the most important this bill semi in these awards market in l. to this innovation semi this comment that multiple night that world travel market many experience global business in up. Next ezekiel the heavier. Histon on main the skipper. Expedia theon expedia group. Abbas east thrive yet. I feed them for over thirty evening. Development endorsed companion to theater forensic field kali hit. But she didn't today can yes see that victim and they are fairly business. Abbott market debates. He'll strategically decker and then let them in the soviet alicia i live. It's unknowable for makoto. We have boy stay montesimple those those but we did ask they listening. And there'd be a little bit for monopole mass decision. Medical newspapers vehicle through ballot is i can the ethnic minorities that's got me larisa in hispania party. Harry established we need those. What in multiple cameras. So those the book on there by the glass harrison activity november kiwi bloomberg com. Relax financial base. On the amanda. Let's let's get us instead. Cover the day this into and this is still winter..

economou kanodia expedia group casio nicholas columbus goldman ezekiel Expedia Abbas makoto Abbott decker larisa kiwi bloomberg Harry harrison amanda
"expedia" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"expedia" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Expedia prices of flights from Wisconsin to Jacksonville and Tampa and Miami to try and make this a hard game for Packers fans to get to what sort of a crowd of you expecting today in Jacksonville. There? What do you think the split is going to be between states fans, Packers fans and maybe just like Rob Lowe? NFL hands at fans wearing their NFL caps just to check out some NFL football and what is going to be an off week for the Jacksonville Jaguars? Minutes away. Yeah. I mean, I guess I don't know the exact breakdown that we should expect. But unfortunately, I mean, I think probably a lot of Pakistan's were already prepared to travel and have taken the time off. And it booked flights that they could change. Um, you know, because New Orleans is, you know, usually a popular destination for road fans. Whereas safe stands are going to have to make last minute adjustments. So I mean, my my natural inclination would be maybe a 50 50 split. I don't I don't know if that's true. We'll see in the stands today. I know that good pick Jacksonville in part because it was close to the Gulf South and the Southern fan base. That they could get it would get, you know, fans a chance to get there and, you know, I mean that experience story. I think a little bit a little bit too much was made of that. It's not like they were trying to stick it to Pakistan's or anything, but I think when they represented with their choices, Hey, you get to play your home game and Jacksonville. Miami, Arizona or Denver. And this week which one do you pick? And they're like, Uh alright. What criteria should we should We base this on those criteria was good as any My, quite frankly I respected the hustle of the whole thing like If you've got to move your home game, you might as well make it feel like a home game as much as you possibly can. They picked a place where Aaron Rodgers, apparently in the state of Florida, has struggled a little bit. Well, and it's very clearly that when the NFL presented them with their choices, but the answer wasn't we don't care. Just take one. They're like, all right, we're on it. We're on it. We're going to find the best choice. One way or another. Mike. I appreciate you taking some time for us. Our thoughts go out to everybody in Louisiana. Hopefully, everybody can get home soon. The Saints included. Enjoy the game today and hopefully we can check in with you at some point on the line as well. Alright anytime. Thank you. There you go. It's Mike Triplett. He.

Mike Triplett Aaron Rodgers Jacksonville Louisiana Wisconsin Rob Lowe Miami Tampa Mike Gulf South Packers Saints Florida today New Orleans Jacksonville Jaguars this week Pakistan Arizona Expedia
Vaccine Passports Could Lead to 'Segregation

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:11 min | 11 months ago

Vaccine Passports Could Lead to 'Segregation

"Headlined. A new state of segregation vaccine. Cards are just the beginning. John whitehead as whitehead. Excuse me as agreed to join us on the program here on the dennis prager. Show talk more about this john. Thank you for the time. How are you today. Sir by busy is used the do and by websites run for dot org dot rose dot com apologies for that. Thank you for the cliff fan. I understand yeah. But i just want people to make sure they can get information and they should read this commentary on talk about the new type of segregation. Because you're absolutely correct sir. Where we we definitely in that direction. We've been we've been moving in that direction law for about twenty years. They've done the government's done it slowly. Clementi the now expedia very quickly. Yeah you know. I mean it was a great commentary that you wrote john which is why reached out to have you on today to talk about this. I want to quote you. In your article in the early portions of it by allowing government agents to establish a litmus test for individuals to be able to engage in commerce movement or any other right that corresponds to life in a supposedly free society. It lays the groundwork for a show me your paper society in which you're required to identify yourself to at anytime to any government worker who demands it for any reason. This really does remind me of leper colonies. They're going to take the unvaccinated into say you can't mix in and mingle with proper company. Those who have taken their government jobs as directed. You won't be able to go to the grocery store eventually. This continues though to restaurant You know i. I there are there. Those object to the mass. Yeah we we've I would say again. I doing this for forty years now fighting for civil liberties for people and finally cases and cars. I've never seen anything. This is the worst i've ever seen. I've talking to some older friends of mine. They're saying john. This is not the america. I grew up in. I don't wanna live here anymore. I've actually hearing more people. Say that. And i mean with a cancel. Culture was saying All of the things coming at people right now And the kids are growing up today. They're gonna they're gonna be afraid and clear

John Whitehead Dennis Prager Whitehead John Clementi America
JAR Audio's CEO Roger Nairn on When Branded Podcasts Need to Pivot

Podcast Movement 2021

02:17 min | 1 year ago

JAR Audio's CEO Roger Nairn on When Branded Podcasts Need to Pivot

"So perhaps your target audience is in need of a diverse superhero tale. Maybe it's a hard nose detective story or perhaps a newsy current affairs conversation at the end of the day as a brand. It's not about you. it's about them. And you absolutely need to consider this. The entire the during the entire production and throughout the life of the podcast. I'm waiting for the client. That will let me make a fantasy horse adventure. It hasn't yet but we're hoping that it will happen again. with expedia. they created a podcast that offers useful data driven advice. Tips and tricks to the overwhelmed traveler. And so during kovin we actually pivoted the podcast. A little bit to address new needs in questions. At the time expedia was getting absolutely inundated with people Looking to change their travel plans but also looking for information on how to travel safely. Drink ovid as well as a different different carrier Scenarios make money. I was calling them. Roger to try and get my twenty year old daughter back from thailand. That's right yeah. They were getting absolutely inundated and and so we wanted to pivot the podcast to be a support for their customer service team. And so the podcast became more about how to travel the online. Travels you know how to hack the online travel space in a coded world and when we did that the the audience responded so we saw an average consumption rate of ninety three percents. So that's ninety three percents. Listen through rate for an episode which are twenty to thirty minutes long. We increased our downloads. Two hundred fifteen percent and we climbed the charts. I mean we. We appeared in in the top. Two hundred apple podcast charts replaces and travel Each month we secured the number six position. Canada number nine in the united states And it was listed amongst the top podcast featured in travel and leisure lonely planet. The washington post pod drop and all access so new cast like old seattle seasons old. And so the podcast was delivering value that the audience was looking for and as a result the brands got the the benefit from that

Expedia Roger Thailand Apple Canada The Washington Post United States Seattle
"expedia" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

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"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

The Thought Card

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

"Thanks for listening to out. Travel the system. We'd love to hear your tips tricks and stories to email us at podcast at expedia dot com and to hear more about these tips and tricks. Be sure to come in. Find us on social media. we are expedia. you're listening to out travel the cistern and.

"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

The Thought Card

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

"I'm misri natasa and you're listening to out travel the system today. I've got amy cisneros director of revenue optimization at expedia. Hi amy welcome to the show. Thank you for having me so excited to have you on. This is a really really big topic. I think one. That's a lot of meat to it. I really appreciate you coming on in hoping to sort of give all of these travelers out there the low down and the four one one on how pricing really happens on expedia and even some of these other sites because i think a lot of what you're going to talk to us about today isn't necessarily specific to our website but it's pretty common for a lot of industry as well totally one of the biggest questions i get all the time is how come. We don't necessarily always have the cheapest price on our site. Well prices are really determined by suppliers and so pricing can vary from day to day. One day a specific flight might be available on a friday. Where that flight at a cheaper price is not available on the saturday. I would say maybe alter some of your search for amador's if you are open to a weekend to weaken travel look at that friday and look at that saturday leave date also look at different times to come back sometimes times. Play into it. I guess from your experience from what you've seen looking at the pricing on a regular basis is it cheaper to buy things sort of separately or would it be cheaper to buy things as a package or does it vary suppliers whether it's fighter hotel definitely will give better deals on the package path and they will if you were to shop the standalone and the reason being is there something that we have in the industry call the passivity which means it's kind of hidden to competitors so a certain airline might give you a price that's half off on the package pass for a flight. You would not see a standalone path and so everybody loves a package customer suppliers our customers to bundle and save and so they're highly incentivized to get better deals package paf okay but it can still vary depending on where you're going in that kind of stuff so it still probably might be worth for a customer to take a look at some of the standalone prices but then also look at. Maybe what it's showing in the package. Path this well on the package path. We have a strike throw so whenever you see a strike through on the price on the left of that strike through will show you how much you would pay if you searched for the standalone components. And so when you see that that means that. Hey there's a deal in here. Then you don't necessarily have to search for the standalone components. Okay i actually personally did not know that so that is frankly a really good tip. Because i would actually go in and i like. I'm one of those people that searches excessively. Because i just that's just who i am so that's actually a really good tip. That's probably can actually save me like a couple of hours of my life. Every time i go so that's a really good one and another thing about the strike. Pricing is it gives you what the total would be so in some cases you can see the package prices seven hundred and then the total would have been a thousand on this standalone for the flight in the hotel. So it's really a good indication on what kind of savings you're getting i to emit crazy sharper when it comes to travel being that i've been in the industry for twenty years. I always want to make sure but the more you are the more you save right. That's our value proposition. It expedient as all those options that we have and so i am a firm believer in bundling versus shopping standalone. So people can see those same type savings no matter what. Their combination is aflame in a car or a hotel car or anything along those lines. That's absolutely correct. So would somebody get more savings the more things that they add on. We don't have that capability today. That's definitely something that we're looking to build out but those different combinations to have different saving so flight plus car might have a different savings value than fight in hotel. It really depends on what dave week. What's the mentor. like for those suppliers. Obviously if it's super bowl weekend right suppliers are going to give not as good of deals if they would if it's just a regular weekend. Yeah that does not any holiday travel. Okay speaking of travel or special events or things like that. Obviously prices concert to really fluctuate so when those prices do change. That's still the supplier like the hotelier or the airline. That's still them adjusting. Those prices really just supply and demand at that point right. it's true. I can speak from an airline perspective. Since i have that background. At the beginning of the year those holiday periods are laid out you know when easter falls. And so maybe you'll save for these two weeks. Prices are going to be a little bit higher for the whole year. That's done and that really helps them. Manage what the demand is going to be because we know everybody travels in the easter. We know people travel on president day. We know people travel memorial weekend and so you set your pricing accordingly. Now close in what you'll see. Sometimes they'll make changes but typically they stay pretty holding fast is from an airline right. They like people to purchase further out now from a hotelier. It's a little bit different right. Because they've got a set of inventory. And so i think that when it's closer and they may be more apt to drop some prices but again it's gonna be really related to how well did i book from memorial or am i two weeks out or three weeks and then some of them also may raise the prices. Yeah so there's a lot of other myths out there when it comes to pricing. I've heard a lot of people say things like. Oh if you clear your cookies then you'll get a better price because they're watching. How many times you search and that means that they know how badly you want the ticket or i've heard things like if you book through a mac versus a pc. You'll see different. Prices are these actual myths or are these legitimate things that actually happen. They are absolutely miss that something that we cannot do. We don't consider anything on a person by person basis pricing that we do today is based on what type of hotel and what type of fight. So you can't actually tell who these people are nor. Do you set prices. Based on who these people are. No not where they're searching from not who they are not whether you have an apple phone or any of that that's data that we just don't have and it's not really legal to do those kinds of things so then what about cookies. Would it be possible if i came in and i searched for. I just said. I was like a crazy searcher so i'm searching for four hours if i clear my cookies. Will i get a different price. Just because i cleared my cookies. You should not get a different price because you cleared your cookies. The only thing that could happen as in the case of some kind of price change like with the flights changing or with the hotel. Maybe changing their inventory. You may see a difference there but not from clearing your cookies so that would just be like a coincidence. Then exactly okay. One complaint that i've seen come in a lot through social media channels and things like that is people will go through a meta search site or something like that and then once they actually get to checkout the price changes or sometimes they like step away from their computer they come back. They hit refresh and the price is completely different. But what's actually happening. In.

misri natasa amy cisneros expedia amador amy dave apple
"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

The Thought Card

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on The Thought Card

"One of the biggest questions i get all the time is how come. We don't necessarily always have the cheapest price on our site. Well prices are really determined by suppliers and so pricing can vary from day to day. One day a specific flight might be available on a friday. Where that flight at a cheaper price is not available on the saturday. I would say maybe alter some of your search for amador's if you are open to a weekend to weaken travel look at that friday and look at that saturday leave date also look at different times to come back sometimes times. Play into it. I guess from your experience from what you've seen looking at the pricing on a regular basis is it cheaper to buy things sort of separately or would it be cheaper to buy things as a package or does it vary suppliers whether it's fighter hotel definitely will give better deals on the package path and they will if you were to shop the standalone and the reason being is there something that we have in the industry call the passivity which means it's kind of hidden to competitors so a certain airline might give you a price that's half off on the package pass for a flight. You would not see a standalone path and so everybody loves a package customer suppliers our customers to bundle and save and so they're highly incentivized to get better deals package paf okay but it can still vary depending on where you're going in that kind of stuff so it still probably might be worth for a customer to take a look at some of the standalone prices but then also look at. Maybe what it's showing in the package. Path this well on the package path. We have a strike throw so whenever you see a strike through on the price on the left of that strike through will show you how much you would pay if you searched for the standalone components. And so when you see that that means that. Hey there's a deal in here. Then you don't necessarily have to search for the standalone components.

serena tassie
How Flight and Hotel Pricing Works With Expedia

The Thought Card

01:59 min | 1 year ago

How Flight and Hotel Pricing Works With Expedia

"One of the biggest questions i get all the time is how come. We don't necessarily always have the cheapest price on our site. Well prices are really determined by suppliers and so pricing can vary from day to day. One day a specific flight might be available on a friday. Where that flight at a cheaper price is not available on the saturday. I would say maybe alter some of your search for amador's if you are open to a weekend to weaken travel look at that friday and look at that saturday leave date also look at different times to come back sometimes times. Play into it. I guess from your experience from what you've seen looking at the pricing on a regular basis is it cheaper to buy things sort of separately or would it be cheaper to buy things as a package or does it vary suppliers whether it's fighter hotel definitely will give better deals on the package path and they will if you were to shop the standalone and the reason being is there something that we have in the industry call the passivity which means it's kind of hidden to competitors so a certain airline might give you a price that's half off on the package pass for a flight. You would not see a standalone path and so everybody loves a package customer suppliers our customers to bundle and save and so they're highly incentivized to get better deals package paf okay but it can still vary depending on where you're going in that kind of stuff so it still probably might be worth for a customer to take a look at some of the standalone prices but then also look at. Maybe what it's showing in the package. Path this well on the package path. We have a strike throw so whenever you see a strike through on the price on the left of that strike through will show you how much you would pay if you searched for the standalone components. And so when you see that that means that. Hey there's a deal in here. Then you don't necessarily have to search for the standalone components.

Amador
Expand Your World With Luvvie's Travel Essentials

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Expand Your World With Luvvie's Travel Essentials

"So if follow me on social media you know that travel a lot for work for play. I'm on a flight sometimes multiple times a week and are often post pictures of myself as i travel and i always get questions about Basically my travel central. So i'm dedicating this episodes of talking about it. So here's the thing is travel can be fine but when you do it a lot can be taxing on the body and the mind and that's why it's important to travel well with as many things to minimize your inconvenience and optimize circumstance right. So if you're on the road you wanna make sure that your life is not a difficult as it could be as you travel more and more certain things need to be routine. Certain things need to come with you because you wanna make sure that there's fewer things that could go wrong. Fewer things that make you uncomfortable. So yeah share a few tips. That can help you do better when you're traveling. I like to think about it. Like travels kind of like a project. So pre production production post production. Which in this case means before you go while you're on the go and possibly even after you come back from your trip and i'll get into details about that so the first thing about travel that is important in terms of When you wanna do it is Booking so you can book directly from airlines or you can go on websites like expedia orbitz kayak to find the tickets. Now this matters because If you book directly from a website it's from the website of the airline that you're gonna use. It is best because of the fact that they can make changes easier. It doesn't come often come with extra fees and it's just better to book direct. There's nothing wrong with booking on expedia orbitz but if you ever have to make a change to your ticket you can go through the airline. Also time they'll send you right back to that third website third party website obsolete. When you wanna book i recommend booking from the airline which you can do is search these websites the price comparison. And then you go to the website to book itself so you know delta american airlines united all of those

Expedia Orbitz Delta American Airlines
Expedia, Vrbo Implement Enhanced Screening Process for Washington, D.C. Bookings Ahead of Inauguration

Steve Scaffidi

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Expedia, Vrbo Implement Enhanced Screening Process for Washington, D.C. Bookings Ahead of Inauguration

"24 hours to go until Inauguration day securities ranching, ending up to another level in the nation's capital, CVS, and the only Rocco Expedia is stepping up screening for those who have booked travel in the DC area ahead of tomorrow's inauguration. The travel site along with its home rental service, v. R B O isn't canceling plans to cross reference all bookings against extremist watch lists. The move follows a similar measure by competitors air being The last week experienced and air being, people say users must present user government issued ideas to get their request fulfilled.

Rocco Expedia CVS DC
The State of Agile With Vasco Duarte, Ryan Ripley, and Chris Williams

Badass Agile

05:02 min | 1 year ago

The State of Agile With Vasco Duarte, Ryan Ripley, and Chris Williams

"One of the questions that came up. I is you know. Let's let's start angry. What pisses us off about. The current state of agile as we experience it daily today. I'm pissed off. And i'm not taking it anymore. I guess i'll i'll jump in here. I've you know todd. And i have been talking a lot lately about we. We've been working with a lot of companies who have been sold. These million dollar multimillion dollar transformations And you know people are slapping different frameworks and different methodologies on top of really deep rooted cultural issues and they're not getting anywhere and at once the money runs out the consultants go away and they're not better off and really tired of watching that play out over and over and over again It's just turned into this big money. Grab where big box consulting firms just slap a bunch of consultants and and others into place. They clear their bench charge as much as they can. They don't really do anything. And then leave and it just That is just perpetuated and over and over again. It leaves a just makes everything more difficult you know. I'm more than happy to come in and clean up and try to teach professional scrum and help companies kind of undo the damage of these big box consultants. But it's like oh. Can we just skip that step in and really learn how to work in new ways and i don't know what do you guys think so. I see the same happening Looking back. I saw the same happening in finland. Let's say late. Two thousand two thousand eight two thousand nine. We heard through the grapevine that accenture have created a natural practice and they had a two hundred page manual and then of course. I was working with At that time two thousand eight dollars working with the one of the first safe adoptions. It was called achard released train at that time. A rt which i thought was kind of a cool art right because his own about art. There's no science to working with people. It's all about leaving the moment understanding. What's going on and reacting and then of course failing but learning quickly and then adjusting right and if i think what what ryan is said and turn the to all the way up to eleven. I would say that we have lost our way we were talking about. The ryan was talking about bringing kanban back to its origins simply fight. Well i would like to remind everybody that this whole atul think did not start with -scriminate. Didn't start with condon either. It started with the small talk community. Doing what they called at that time. Extreme programming xp and if we go all the way back to the roots extreme programming was taking the best practices and just turning it all the way up to eleven. We hear a lot about how safe doesn't have a customer in the big picture. And so on juno that. Xp had a practice called customer in the room so every team had a customer literally. That's what they called it. The customer that told them whether they were going in the right direction. So if i go to what pisses me off is that we're forgetting what it was that we started back in the late nineties. Early two thousands. And i'm not talking about technical practices. We've forgotten those very much. That's for sure. But i'm talking about everything else. Even the the whole idea of what agile is about agile is not about delivering more crap faster. It's about delivering less but delivering what matters about focusing on value. It's about iterating quickly and so the theme in in my presence here on this episode is gonna be you know. How do we turn at all the way up to eleven. Just like expedia back in the in the late ninety s. I liked that. I feel that this thing about who buys the most agile right now. It's either banks or insurance. Companies tend to have the biggest budgets to put out jalen play and so they're of a certain size by their nature if you look at the startup community if you look at small enterprise small medium business if you look beyond tech and you look at how companies are are are pivoting and adapting now during covid nineteen. I still see a lot of really good. Agile really customer focused agile. They get it because they have to. They're hungry. It's easy when you go around a small business to see the customer desire to say. How do we want our customers to feel. That question is present in everybody's mind. We want customers to feel cared for special part of something good. We want them to have not features. Stop talking about features and buttons do but what capabilities we give them and again. I prefer to talk about that. In terms of feelings customers feel safe. Customers feel tend to cared for whereas the minute you bring into a large scale environment. Things start getting compromise. Things get lost in translation as we try to make this work at scale.

Achard Ryan Todd Accenture Finland Condon Expedia
Airbnb Tops $100 Billion on First Day of Trading

Geek News Central

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Airbnb Tops $100 Billion on First Day of Trading

"Aaron be airbnb. Open one hundred six dollars per share on his first day of trading on thursday more than doubling in the sixty eight dollars per share price set for its appeal the day before. This is a weird time to go public but did but hundred and forty six dollars per share. The company now has a market cap of eighty six point five billion dollars more than doubled. Evaluation company sought in the ipo. Just a day ago. That puts aaron. Bb passed the market cap of private chapel giant booking. Which has evesham eighty six billion competitor. Expedia has martin of eighteen. It also is market. Cap exceeds mary at hilton maria. An hilton so This is this is awesome. did very very well.

Aaron Expedia Hilton Maria Martin Mary Hilton
Airbnb is larger than all hotel stocks after its IPO

CNBC's Fast Money

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Airbnb is larger than all hotel stocks after its IPO

"One of these things is not like the other awards sesame street. Just take a look at the travel sox. Airbnb is market. Cap now. Stands at eighty six and a half billion dollars that is bigger than booking holdings marriott hilton and expedia and it goes beyond travel with. Today's gains. Airbnb is now bigger than target and goldman sachs. We could talk about money being left on the table. We talk about the huge. I stay pop but the question that we need to answer tonight is simply. Does that make sense. That i mean what you say. They're into four billion dollars in revenue. They're expecting double digit revenue growth. At least the analysts are start doing the math. I mean it's going to take in my opinion five years to deserve this valuation. And maybe that's the way the world is right now. Maybe people don't care maybe this sort of the grey fool theory thing but when you sort of look at this and look at jordache yesterday and save yourself. What am i missing i. It doesn't make any sense to me. It takes a long time to grow in these evaluations. And oh by the way we didn't even talk about but the employment Situation this country is not getting better. As a matter of fact that seems to be getting worse and although we can talk about know the summer of next year things getting back to normal a long time from here to there so in my world. It's ridiculously expensive melissa.

Airbnb Marriott Hilton Expedia Goldman Sachs Melissa
"expedia" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"With Expedia by my side after months finally take a trip outside saying hello to your next trip with the Expedia. Our boy meteorologist Chris Johnson, rolling out the sunshine. It's It's just feeling like a blanket of warm today. I love it. Hey, you said You said it. Just a moment ago, The Sunshine broke out, and it just did something to me, too. And I think a lot of folks would probably agree, Terry It's just good for the soul man. It feels good and it's good to get the cloud cover out of here. We've been somethin under this cloud cover. It feels like forever. In fact, it's been nearly a week. But let's forget about that. Sunshine continues this afternoon daily downfall. Chilly temperatures in the low to mid fifties. We look ahead through this evening dropping into the forties, it ends up being a pretty cold night. We're going to fall into the mid to upper thirties in many spots, some patchy frost will be a possibility waking up tomorrow morning. We get into your Halloween afternoon temperatures rebounding quite nicely. We're talking those upper fifties. Lower sixties for afternoon highs under mostly sunny skies. A weak cold front slides into town early Sunday. Moisture starved doesn't bring any rain chance with it, but it does bring a few clouds. And some court tempter Sunday afternoon with highs in the middle fifties. Right now, here in Louisville. Lots of sunshine break Now it is chilly, though, with temperatures sitting at 52 degrees. If you think we're just four wheels and a grill, think again. Jeep Grand Cherokee redefines freedom. What really makes cheap. It's finding the perfect balance between luxury and adventure without ever compromising, strutting across the country to see your family to make new memories. So what makes Jeep You do cheap. There's only one registered trademark of that. C u. S. L O. C. Riding a motorcycle requires quick reactions. Mistakes can be deadly. So if you're thinking about drinking and writing, you're not really thinking be the sober driver beat the driver.

Terry It Expedia Chris Johnson Louisville
How To Align Your Customer Experience

eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

05:45 min | 1 year ago

How To Align Your Customer Experience

"Now my guest and says, episode is Tim Ashe who is an acknowledged authority on evolutionary psychology and digital marketing. He's a sought after international keynote speaker and the best selling author of two books I one landing page optimization, and more. Recently unleash your primal brain actually just listened to recently on audible. Fantastic. We're going to dig into that one for sure Tim has been mentioned by Forbes as a top ten online marketing expert and by Entrepreneur magazine as an online market influence to watch. For nineteen years he was a CO founder and the CEO of site tuners, tuners dot, com and their digital marketing and optimization agency. Tim has helped create over one point, two, billion dollars in value for some amazing companies that I know. We all know Google expedia harmony facebook and American Express and cannon and Nestle there's massive list year semantic new to it and humanity Siemens anyways in countless direct to consumer brands. So exciting to have Tim today busy schedule. But please join me conversation with Tim Today. So. Tim Welcome ECOMMERCE battling. A Ha-. Very. Happy Veer Steve. So you've had quite an eventful career I might add keynote speaking around the world are writing bestselling books year you run international conferences, I guess pre cove in our doing some virtual events. So tell me a little bit about best can your entrepreneurial journey so far? Sure. Well, I've worked in a variety of high tech companies when I started university at UC San Diego my undergraduate majors were in computer engineering and cognitive science, and then I stayed there for graduate school and what would neural networks or what would now be called deep learning or machine learning or A. And this was early days We didn't have the big data sets that we do now with the Internet. So I switched Internet marketing and started my first marketing agency back in the early DOT com days and Never, let go of the Tiger's tail and twenty five years. Later I decided you know running an agency wasn't my highest and best use on the planet. So I decided to focus on what I really enjoy, which is the thought leadership in the form of as you mentioned, keynote speaking and writing my latest book and spreading knowledge out to people as opposed to working on client accounts. Right? and. So I did mention a little tiny bit of top of the show but you know you've worked with a lot of some really great ecommerce brands some of the largest brands I might add like what are some mistakes that you see kind of consistently some of these e commerce brands are making today will if we restrict people have different definitions of ECOMMERCE, I, just WanNa start there for some ecommerce anywhere. Any website that has as A. Checkout anything where you sell items directly and for others, it's more restrictive and I'd say it's a e commerce catalog and that's I think a more standard definition. If you also use a lots of different items, you have a homepage category pages, search results, pages, and product, and so on. It's not a website where there are two or three things for sale in those early incidental. Would I don't know is that a fair definition or how would you agree with that? Totally would agree with that yes. So In the case of large catalogs, I'd say the common mistakes that we I've seen in my careers one gratuitous use of motion and wasted real estate on the homepage in the form of giant sliders everybody seems to have those Sh. Yeah. That's a big known my book I talk about I have a whole e-commerce best practices section in my landing page optimization book and I devoted a page to why sliders. An evil that should be immediately removed from your site. While you know what part of it I think to is that it doesn't position the brand well, enough I think with having like motion and I think when people have a lot of different slogans, tag lines or kind of looks and things going out other different sections on the site they think they're trying to blast all of their bullets out on this highly sought after a piece of real estate versus maybe having a proper positioning statement or something. One thing that's very important. That's key to why someone should click. Through or why someone shown up on this particular website having one message and one brand image and go further than that I, would say that I'll numerate the reasons why you shouldn't have a slider on your homepage. The one that you mentioned is by far the most important our brains from an evolutionary perspective are designed to notice things moving in are visual field. It kind of has survival value. If you know what I mean here is coming to eat me I need to know what direction and how big is right So. they're they're an interrupt, their the nuclear option in the face of motion graphics won't get looked at and even in the face of graphics, text won't get read. So anything that's graphics or text on your site can't possibly compete with that atomic bomb of a slider on your homepage. And and another reason that really bad is because it's trying to pretend you have more real estate than you really do. So everybody wants a piece of the homepage and lurk. We can add another frame tour slider. Well Great. Thanks. So now have to sit through a longer commercial nobody likes to do that on broadcast TV. There's certainly don't have the attention span to sit through five three seconds sliders to make sure they saw every frame of the crap you're trying to throw them on your home page You don't really an editorial problem. You can't decide what's important. So you're trying to cram it all in there and make everybody happy except your site visitors that are trying to give you money,

TIM Tim Ashe Tim Today Entrepreneur Magazine San Diego Veer Steve Forbes Siemens Google Co Founder Nestle Facebook CEO American Express
"expedia" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"expedia" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The Expedia Resident Trumps campaign says his website was defaced Tuesday evening. Now working with law enforcement authorities investigating hurricane warnings posted along the Gulf coast of Louisiana and Mississippi is Hurricane Zeta approaches. Landfall likely Wednesday evening, Louisiana's governor John Bell Edwards, I know we're asking folks to manage a lot, and we've been talking about lots of Disasters and public health emergencies for a long time, But I know that our people are going to remain focused and do what is necessary to get through. This storm his state's still recovering from two earlier hurricanes this season. The school bus collided with the utility truck in eastern Tennessee Tuesday, killing a seven year old girl and the bus driver. Another boy reported critical in surgery. South Dakota's largest medical organizations, launching a joint effort to promote mask wearing to prevent the spread of the Corona virus, says the state suffers through one of the nation's worst outbreaks. It's an opposition to governor Christie Gnome who was cast doubts on whether face coverings are effective in limiting the spread of the virus. Keith Ranieri, the founder of a self improvement program turned sex cult, has received a virtual life prison sentence. A federal judge in New York City handed down a sentence of 120 years for the 60 year old Ranieri was convicted last year on several charges, including sex trafficking. His self improvement business next CM involved turning some of his followers into sex slaves who were branded with his Initials. Several of the victims talked about what happened during the sentencing hearing, Acting U S attorney for the Eastern District of New York. Seth Ducharme. Unfortunately, they had to endure.

Keith Ranieri Louisiana New York City Expedia Seth Ducharme Christie Gnome John Bell Edwards South Dakota Gulf Tennessee Mississippi attorney founder
Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

Business Wars Daily

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Despite the Pandemic, Airbnb Will Take the Company Public

"I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business worse daily on this Tuesday August Eighteenth David Brown is on vacation. There's no other way to say, this twenty twenty is a weird year and yeah, that's a whopping understatement particularly for the travel sector, the latest news and the beleaguered lodging industry. It looks like AIRBNB will go public before the end of the year. The multibillion dollar home sharing company has long been eyeing the public markets. Early, this year AIRBNB was planning its IPO even though twenty nineteen. had been a rough year to in the first nine months of that year and the company lost more than three hundred and thirty million dollars growth was slowing competition already rough was increasing from aggressive rival Expedia, which owns short term rental brands. We are be O- and home away as we reported here, last year the entry of Marriott into the luxury home sharing business didn't help either. When the pandemic hit things took a dramatic turn for the worse the company faced a Billion Dollars in cancellations its valuation dropped from thirty one, billion dollars in twenty seventeen to eighteen billion dollars. This April, the next month airbnb laid off. Two, hundred people a quarter of its staff. It also slowed down plans to expand into TV and transportation the verge reported. Things were looking dire enough that even though it had plenty of cash on hand airbnb chose to borrow money and take on new investment to get through the crisis in total. The company raised two billion dollars at what the verge called. The steep interest rate top executives cut their pay and the eight hundred million dollar marketing budget was slashed the New York Times reported. It all seemed like one gigantic headache I say O'Brien Chessy in his crew. And yet AIRBNB still plans to go public by the end of August. AIRBNB could file IPO paperwork with the SEC if it does shares could trade before New Year's. At first glance that sounds crazy. But it actually reflects a little good news for the travel business along with some dramatically new patterns of travel behavior both here and abroad what do I mean? We'll think about it if you were stuck in the middle of a crowded city, this spring or summer working at your dining room table, would you stay put? Beginning in May a certain number of US said Hell? No. They had a Derulo areas where they could rent other people's homes, AIRBNB bookings, both in America and overseas began climbing back from their black hole for the three weeks starting around Memorial Day vacationers reserved twenty percent more homes than they did a year earlier according to Bloomberg business was best far from the madding crowds in. June. Reservations in the countryside jumped twenty five percent hosts in rural areas earned more than two hundred, million dollars in that month alone payments DOT COM reported international travel is virtually impossible and of course many. Of US are still avoiding airplanes so more and more of us are taking vacations within two hundred miles of our homes about one tank of gas in many cases were also staying longer after all many people no longer have to get back by Monday to go to the office we just take our work with us in a meeting in July CEO Chesty expressed amazement at the rebound in bookings. There is something I never would have imagined telling you the New York Times reported a kind of defies logic, but in June reservations also grew at rival Vr be oh, the Motley fool reported. Optimists see these numbers as a sign of life for the travel industry as a whole but predicting the future of travel right now is best left to gambling halls AIRBNB is fortunes could change suddenly depending on the course of

Airbnb New York Times Elaine Appleton David Brown United States Dot Com O'brien Chessy Expedia July CEO Motley SEC Bloomberg Chesty Derulo America
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 years ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Expedia Revenue Sinks 82% Amid ‘Worst Quarter the Travel Industry Has Seen in Modern History’

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Expedia Revenue Sinks 82% Amid ‘Worst Quarter the Travel Industry Has Seen in Modern History’

"Group is reporting an 82% drop in revenue in the second quarter is the pandemic has just about shutdown. The travel sector, the Seattle Online travel company, reports a 90% drop in total gross bookings for the three month period that ended June 30th compared to a year ago. Expedia CEO Peter Kearns says the second quarter was the worst that the travel industry has seen in modern history. But they started to see bookings improved slightly in May and June.

Peter Kearns Expedia Seattle CEO
Michelle Obama to release show on Spotify

podnews

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Michelle Obama to release show on Spotify

"Join me for the Michelle Obama podcast. You can listen for free only on spotify. Bracken Michelle Obama's higher ground production company is launching the Michelle. Obama podcast on July. The two thousand, nine, hundred, another exclusive show to spotify that new exclusive apple news today podcast that we reported on yesterday. It has an RSS feed after all can expedia added to some podcast APPs including Overcast Marco Armand describes that as a hack. However, the RSS feed is hidden from third parties in Apple's API and it's mirror. Your L. has also been disabled, and so the intention appears to be. Be that it's an exclusive. And the verge described it as such now we discovered a May many radio fronts. PODCASTS also withholds. There are s feed address. If you use the apple API and at the time, apple declines to confirm this or comment on how this achieved Dan Meisner has spotted than apple is self hosting the Audio? Other apple shows are hosted by art nineteen. An evoke terror suggests in article that we linked to today from our show notes and our newsletter this could be the beginning of the end of the feet and possibly podcast hosts, too. In other news apple is hiring for a US and Canada and deter for apple podcasts. Go go go jobs dot net. Sin Has announced a new distribution agreement with. An Indian music podcasts and video service with one hundred and fifty million active users and to radio DOT COM has a new distribution agreement with twitch, which will bring live radio programming to twitch his video streaming platform on me cost media. somethingyoushouldknow has joined Westwood One podcast was formerly signed to DAX. Captivate has an agreement with songs for podcasters toward our podcast to licensed songs from independent musicians I'm an adviser to them. Radio Days Africa had a session about podcast in. You can read up on the topics discussed for watch the whole. Whole thing if you like four soccer ventures is a new company launching a podcast network. It plans to spend six figures growing shows. It's also partnered with a girls soccer network following on from its launch of a secure podcast distribution. Yesterday on me. Studio has posted an in-depth blog piece at our private premium and secure podcast feeds and the school of podcasting Dave Jackson has updated his big list of podcasts about podcasts. We're hoping he does a podcast about it and titles it the podcast about the list of podcasts about podcasts podcast. Sorry. And, in Podcast News Entrepreneur. John Roya has launched John Rowe show row sold his former company to salesforce in two thousand and fifteen in the first episode. He's interviewed by Jordan Harbinger and jury duty trial of Robert. DURST changes the game for true crime podcasts according to crime story media. WHO's making it? The podcasts launched earlier this week and is to follow the trial of billionaire Robert Durst as it happens,

Apple Bracken Michelle Obama Barack Obama Spotify Soccer Michelle Robert Durst Dave Jackson John Roya Africa Marco Armand Expedia Captivate Dan Meisner United States John Rowe Jordan Harbinger Canada
Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

Marketing School

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Why Learning to Say "No" Will Accelerate Your Success

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric. Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're GONNA. Talk about why learning to say no will accelerate your success. Let's reframe this real quick and early days Neil when you're starting out as an entrepreneur. You would always look at the newest opportunities. And what would you do about those opportunities? I always said not always what most cases I said. Yes, and that's what ended up causing me to do one too many things derailing my focus and funny enough 'cause less success over time I think what Neil's also saying is a lot of us become more and more successful. You're going to have more and more opportunities coming your way, and you can either accept the fact that you're. You're drowning in opportunity, or you can do something about it and say no more and funny enough Steve Jobs said this in the past. He says what's really lead to apple. Success was the ability to say no. They said no way more things than they said yes to. And when he first came back to apple after he was fired, he shut down many different product lines, and that's just the basis of it. It's really saying no all the opportunities that you're drowning in. When you say no, and you end up focusing on the stuff that really matters. That's when you double down I was once talking to entrepreneur name Brian Lee, and he created a company called shootout with Kim Kardashian before that was legalzoom, and the most recent one was honest company with Jessica Alba. And I remember years and years ago I. Don't know Bryan while at all I. don't even know him really by interviewed him for my blog years and years ago, and he mentioned one thing that really resonated with me, and he said you need to have super laser focus only tried to do one thing at a time and the moment your growth slows down and you can't get it to keep growing. That's when you expand until then you just stick with what you're doing. Yeah more Buffett and Bill Gates when they first met I believe this is a story, or this wasn't when they first met someone albums. Like what's the secret to your success? They both wrote down one word on a piece of paper and flip it over, and they said focus was the main obey. And the other thing to do just to give more examples. You look at Zillow. You look at glass door. You look at all those companies it's who's the one guy that started all those companies again rich partner. Expedia, glass, door and Zillow, yeah, but he focused on each one. He didn't try to do all of them. At the same time, he took the domain expertise that he had is like I. Know How to build a two sided marketplace. I know how to take advantage of Joe I know that there is a gap in the marketplace attack that so he used the same thesis three times, but he didn't try to do them all at the same time and I can tell you. These guys are older and more experienced than I. can say Neal My. We're getting older. We're not up there yet with them. We don't have the. The experience that they have yet, but I can tell you as Neela I've gotten older. We've gotten better at saying. No, I'll say better than before, but still trying to get better at it. It's hard because we all have the shiny. Object Syndrome. And when you learn to say no, it'll make you really understand what you should be focusing on. Because there's so many opportunities out there. In many cases, we missed the ones that are the best ones because we say. Yes, to so many that we don't spend enough time uncovering the true potential of anyone, business or anyone, strategy or anyone concept, and the same goes with your marketing. Even in the air. Can I talk Omni Channel? Yes, you should go omni channel, but focus on one or two marketing tactics out once doom, really well before you expand into all in because there's not enough time in the day to do everything perfectly well, unless you have a massive team, the other thing is I would google the T. sheets, marketer, and really understand as a marketer that you should try to go deep on one. One thing and then you try to expand and get a little more breadth, but the depth is what you really want to folks when people talk about what Neal's known for Seo or what I'm doing for I think largely people was. This is weird, sometimes WANNA go speak at a conference. They don't know what to call way, so they called me an seo extraordinary and I don't know where the hell they got that from. The same problem yeah. Seo Eric. All right. Put into this box, but I guess that's what we know and Belize pisses me off sometimes when I'm lying. Put into a box, but you have to be okay with that because you try to be everything being nothing

Neil Patel Steve Jobs Zillow Eric Neal My Apple Bryan Joe I SU Bill Gates Jessica Alba Kim Kardashian Brian Lee Partner Belize Expedia Buffett Omni Google
"expedia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Before you jump on Expedia to book a trip with the family to the Capitol Hill Thomas stone now known by the way as Chas the country's tourism and economic development department is calling it that you should know that there are no beaches in chats this is a tiny nation it's smaller than Liechtenstein the entire country extends only six city blocks so who no beaches so tiny so they've they've they've said you've now left the United States there are signs that that when you go into that couple block area there in Seattle right including a police precinct the police are no longer at according to the mayor this is what it's like we've got four blocks in Seattle that is more like a block party atmosphere it's not an armed takeover it's not a military junta we will we will make sure that we can restore this but we have block parties and and the like in this part of Seattle the time it's it's known for that there is no threat right now to the public we have block parties were the police are driven from the precincts all the time sure because I think that's what it sounds like happened according to this person it was actually in in Chas you're calling it I'm calling it anti for Stan Waukee on does not mean was this a block party well it was unlike any block party I've ever been to as we approach the precinct that it's been abandoned the east precinct in Seattle's been abandoned since Monday as we approach that precinct we actually witnessed first hand as about a dozen officers attempted to walk through the blockade the come back to work at the precinct and saw about a hundred protesters flocked to them barricades and physically forced them out of the cell and so is we're seeing from the mayor who's saying oh this is a peaceful.

Expedia Capitol Hill Thomas stone Liechtenstein United States Seattle Chas Stan Waukee
Growth in Turbulent Times

a16z

07:00 min | 2 years ago

Growth in Turbulent Times

"Begin by describing a typical growth model and discuss how that fundamentally drives a company's business strategy the first voice who here is Brian's followed by Andrew when we think about a growth model. The question is how does one court of users lead to another cohort of users? And how are you answering that question? In a way that describes not only how you acquire users but the actions they take in your product what those actions generate and how you reinvest whatever that output is back into generating more new returning users so within this model you have hypotheses around the who the what the why who were doing these actions. What are the actions that they are doing and why they are doing them? These are all fundamental hypotheses whether you have it written down or not. I think like a very very simple simple shortcut version of this might be something like I find yelp because I searched Best Dumplings San Francisco and then a yelp page comes up. I'm excited about yelled at some point. Some percentage of those users end up actually than leading reviews and those of us get index like Google and then they end up in Google listings and more people find it right. And so that's kind of how one group of users might indirectly than lead to another group of users versus something like linked in which is focused on getting people to invite their colleagues at people that they're meeting through professional networking and is very focused around getting you to send invites and that's a very different type of loop? It turns out that there is like many many many flavors of this. This is kind of like a verbal version when you go deeper. You're actually able to translate this set of hypotheses and ideas into spreadsheets and numerical models for what's actually happening business and understand with lows right. You're operating against this hypothesis right. That hypothesis gets stronger over time. As you run experiments you validate them. You see the data in data kind of feeds the quantitative version of this in this environment. A lot of those hypotheses are thrown out the window. And what we validated in the past might have changed as a result. You might have tailwinds or headwinds right. The quantitative variables behind these things. Either get stronger where they get worse. But the only way that you actually get a decent picture about is by going through each one of these individuals steps asking those squash right once. You drill down into a spreadsheet. What kind of data are you tracking? What are those metrics? Like if you're a travel company right now I think you're seeing very specific metrics Right if you start with the end of the funnel. What you're saying is a number one. There's going to be fewer people actually like booking and converting like if you're expedia our king regardless of whether or not are looking at flights my guess is percentage of people who actually look out the flight versus. Actually Book. The flight like that conversion rate is probably down. You probably have folks that doing research. Because they're not quite sure. Like when defy or the wafted shut the State Department website where I can actually go and then all the way to the demands question of how many people are in that activity versus. I guess. Light if you're you're inside of you know one of these collaborations tools what's going to happen. Is All of a sudden every is going to be sending more invites other users. Because we're the meetings in right now and says results of that all of those metrics go up when it's happening is if you think about the verbal version of the growth model as a series of events that chained together than what you start to realize they're going to be certain steps that are. GonNa go way way up. 'cause the entire growth models like really radically amplify or there's going to be ones that dramatically tempings out and if step one or two is the growth model start hitting a lot of friction than of course. It's just going to get harder and harder because each group of users going to produce fewer and fewer users if you think about it from an acquisition standpoint saint big engagement well. There's a couple things about this though one is that. I've seen a ton of categorical data out there. People saying this is what's happening to be to be south or this is what's happening to this category and I think I specifically founders. Who Probably. Let's do this. The category is interesting. But it's actually not that helpful. Everybody sits on a spectrum of people who are experiencing extreme headwinds class pass for example would probably seen what ninety percent of their business disappear overnight. And there's people who are seeing extreme tail and if you're sitting on one of the spectrums your job is easier the data's clear it's immediate of what is happening and what the net result is but the founders who are in the middle of the spectrum the hard job you actually have to look at each one of these individual steps to understand what might be changing. What might be happening to build specific. Hypotheses of how. Your Company should act and respond. Most companies will need to go back to basics and reassess their businesses from the bottom up if you are a travel company or an in person fitness company. How do you go about completely? Revamping and reevaluating your growth model. How can founders be proactive rather than reactive? I know it's like Old Silicon Valley message of talk to your customers but honestly this is one of those times where you need to be talking to them at least a couple of customers at a couple times. A day founders. Ceos executives the leaders of the team. Because the only way that you're really going to be proactive is going to get a sense. For what is going on in your customers. Lives and how things are changing what questions they're asking and how their behaviors are changing. And by the time that comes through the data. It's just GONNA be too late and so if you WANNA be proactive. You'd have to go back and rely on a little bit of basically founder intuition in the way that you build that founder. Intuition is just by having lots and lots of conversations very close to it. I think a really big thing strategically. That's changing right now. Is there's a whole discussion for flex? Even be the output goal at the moment. I think this is where the growth model overlays with. Some of the financials the company wildfire. You know we've had several years where it's all been about top line growth and you have a lot of companies that are looking for two x three x five outs year over year growth and then the growth model ends up meeting to support that but I think the whole industry is saying okay. Well maybe actually top line growth of that type of several hundred percentage points. Italy is actually not the focus. Is Everything so uncertain you? We have to watch our cash. So then what I've seen in conversations I've been in is then. Your growth models are actually as much about. How do you grow efficiently from a cash standpoint? And so if you're thing about okay. We need five x growth. And that means that people need to invite each other as at a certain rate. And if they're not then maybe you need to make that up with a marketing spent with financial incentives for users to use the product whether that's in the form of free subscriptions or in the form of a lower priced lane or if your marketplace company you might give people discounts that are dropped into. All consumers

Founder Google Yelp San Francisco State Department Brian Expedia Andrew Italy
With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

Business Wars Daily

03:49 min | 2 years ago

With Travel at Historic Low, Investors Buy Billion-Dollar Stake in Expedia

"How does a little holiday in the Scottish highlands sound lovely? Even during this lockdown plenty of people thought so and reserve properties for rent on the global travel website booking dot com in fact so many tourists continue to putter about the Scottish countryside that it alarmed the locals like rural residents all over they feared travelers might bring Kobe. Nineteen with them at overwhelmed. Small hospitals and so in Blackford. The areas presumably exasperated member of parliament asked booking dot com to quit offering reservations for the bucolic countryside. Finally last week the giant travel company complied. Now you can't get a reservation at a cottage in the Scottish highlands until may ninth or later at least not on booking dot com so reports the Scottish newspaper the National. So why am I telling you this? Little story well because it offers a small taste of the big problems facing the travel industry like so many other industries. Covert nineteen is upended everyone in the travel business from tiny. Bnb's to the largest players that's especially true of booking dot coms biggest rival expedia travel and its parent company. Expedia group in addition to owning. Its namesake reservation site. Expedia group owns other household. Names including travelocity ORBITZ HOTELS DOT COM B. R. B. O. And home away just to name a few the multibillion dollar travel conglomerate however is far less steady than it had appeared to be back in December it ousted. Ceo REPORTEDLY DUE TO DISAGREEMENTS WITH CHAIRMAN. Buried diller and the board over Corporate Strategy Diller who also runs entertainment giant. I A C took over day to day responsibilities along with board vice-chair Peter Kern in February prior to the couvert nineteen onslaught in the US. The company announced what it called disappointing twenty nineteen earnings. It announced plans to lay off three thousand people or about twelve percent of its workforce at the time diller called the company's Sclerotic in bloated sclerotic by the way means rigid or slow to change. Not exactly a compliment. He planned to streamline the business which he believed had become too large and complex by the end of February. The company had put plans in place to save three hundred to five hundred million expenses annually and then the virus which had already been wreaking havoc globally hit the US hard. The effect on the travel industry is beyond devastating the US Travel Association estimates losses of more than five hundred billion dollars in direct travel spending. That's nine times worse than the impact on the travel industry after nine eleven according to Forbes sadly the travel association predicts more than eight million. Us travel industry workers will have lost their jobs by the end of this month. And if the pandemic is devastating most businesses those with fragile foundations like expedia are scrambling to ensure they'll survive last week. Expedia received a promise of a rescue package to private equity firms Apollo global management and silverlake are buying a stake in the company for one point. Two billion dollars that alone however may not be enough to help it withstand the travel slump. So expedia is also borrowing another two billion dollars to give it more liquidity. The company says along with announcing the deal expedia also named Peter Kern as CEO observers say. Kern who has roots in private equity will be well suited to the moment meaning. He'll be comfortable cutting jobs and expenses. The big question of course is not just who will survive. But who will thrive after the pandemic crisis abates and investment in a travel business? Even at CEO prices could be seen as a positive sign. Long-term read Raymond a partner at Apollo Management said in a statement. Expedient is a world class company with an unparalleled collection of online travel brands. He added that the firm which will take a seat on expedience. Board looks forward to collaborating on expedia growth and innovation

Expedia Us Travel Association Peter Kern Diller CEO United States Blackford Corporate Strategy Diller Apollo Global Management Kobe BNB Orbitz Raymond Vice-Chair Chairman Partner Forbes
Upstream w/ Dan Heath

Developer Tea

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Upstream w/ Dan Heath

"In the book you get into these details a little bit more mechanically Specifically talking about you know uniting people and What are the changes? Actually that you need make to assist them. How do you determine some of those things Finding Leverage One thing I'd like to talk about specifically is how do you know when this is succeeding in the point of no when we're talking about the The children that are that are drowning. It might make sense that if you had a rate of children drowning when every five minutes in that drops to one every twenty four hours then that might make a good measurement but it's not always that easy right. No it's not and I think the reality is. We live in a world where in the fictitious parable world. I mean my guess is that enormous corporate America. What people would be a measured on is? Is the speed of Rescue You know it and in fact. There's there's an example in the book. I think illustrates this. Well it's about expedia the online travel site and back in two thousand twelve. This guy named Ryan O'Neal is studying some data about the call center at Expedia. So if you book a flight or hotel or something in something goes wrong with your reservation you call one eight hundred number. What he found made his jaw drop. He found that for every hundred customers. Who booked a transaction? Fifty eight of them ended up calling the call center for help. Which which would pretty much seem to nullify the whole point of having an online self service travel site and so he starts digging into figure out why are so many people calling us in the number one reason people are calling. I mean to the tune of twenty million calls in two thousand twelve was to get a copy of their itinerary was twenty million calls. Can I get a copy of my tannery? And so he and his boss. Just they're like this is madness. We've got to do something about this. And they make the case to the CEO to create a special team to work on this and they do and The technical solutions as you might expect are pretty simple. They changed the way they send. It's not like they forgot to send the itineraries. They were always sending them. It's just they would end up in spam or customers would delete them thinking they were ads or the sort of thing so the change their strategy and emailing they added a self service tools on the VR and online and so forth and they basically took twenty million calls and whittled them down to zero so from from a technical perspective. This is a trivial problem. But I think what's interesting about? This story is is why this problem got to this level like you would think that there would be an alarm bell. That would go off somewhere. Once you reached like your your three million call for hi Tenora like people would start to take this seriously but but the deal is that expedia like like virtually every other company has to organize itself or chooses to organize itself in in silos. And so you got a marketing team whose job it is to to attract customers to expedia versus. Kayak or someone else. And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make the site so smooth and intuitive that the customers are funneled toward a transaction. Then then you've got the tech team that makes the plumbing run and keeps up time high. And you've got the call center that's trying to minimize you. Know the the response. Time to fueled a customer issue and to keep them happy via net promoter score or something like that and from a silo perspective like all of those goals make sense but but the problem is when you ask a very basic question. Like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call us. The answer was nobody. Yeah Yeah and it was even worse than that like none of those silos even stood to benefit if the number of calls went down and so. That's something I think that that's really interesting. About upstream problems is that it's often very easy to find owners for downstream problems like your house catches on fire. It's the fire departments problem at that point. Like It may not be an easy problem. But it's an easy problem to define an owner for verses if you flip things around and you say whose job is to keep customers from calling or whose job is to keep your house from catching on fire will. That's a very different

Expedia Ryan O'neal America CEO
Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

Marketing Over Coffee

07:23 min | 2 years ago

Mark Irvine on the State of Marketing

"Good Morning. Welcome to marketing over coffee. I'm John Wall today. Our guest is Mark Irvine. He's the director of strategic partnerships. At Word Stream. GonNa talk to us about what's going on in the advertising space and we are going to focus a lot on cove nineteen in what's going on. He's done a bunch of research on how this has affected searches. And what's going on with all the ad networks so we're excited to have him with us here today. Mark thanks for joining US John. Thanks for having me. This really exciting. Let's take a step back. Talk to us about Word Stream. What do you do and how did you get there? So Word Stream is an online advertising software that agencies and advertisers alike use to manage their advertising across Google search display Microsoft Bing facebook and instagram and so effectively. A lot of what people do online is a lot of repetitive tasks. In terms of how you go about managing ad campaigns what we do is we try to supply. Yeah that's really the big thing for me when finding out about you guys and talking about what you do is just that as a marketing department gets bigger. You reach that point where you've reached the first milestone where you have one person that you're just kinda like okay you become the ads guru and they're the ones that are doing the testing and learning what's working and not working but then they hit a point where they have to roll them across all the different networks the different channels and it reaches this point where it's completely unmanageable you know. They're spending like an hour of each day in each of the tools and you guys are an alternative to that. Did you see a specific point when somebody finally just cries uncle and comes to talk to you? Is there any specific place where you tend to see people give you a call? Yeah you know. It's really interesting. Because a lot of the businesses we primarily work small businesses and a lot of the people who are working with. They're not just in charge of that one ad campaign but they're also doing email and they're also doing seo and quite frankly a lot of these small businesses they're oftentimes the owner or someone who's out in the field at the same moment in time what you can't do as you operate business what. I've learned I can't do effectively. I can't manage. People manage business manager ad campaigns and do a task all at the same time. If you're just learning paid search or if you're just learning online advertising we specifically focus on okay. Here are the seven things that you need you every single week to be successful on Google Bing facebook and as you go about adding to that yes of course google and being or Google and facebook. They all share similar concepts online. But how you go about making sure. That your touching all of your advertising equally in effectively is a learned task. Yeah I do love that idea of. It's not just. It's not a system for experts where it's a power tool that someone would go in and do all of this kind of stuff but it's really an expert system in that it's reaching out proactively using okay. Here's the things you gotta get wrapped up this week if you want this to work and and it kind of puts people on the right track. That's interesting to me though that it does go all the way down to kind of smaller businesses and people who that's not their whole job so I actually Kinda come in a lot earlier in the cycle that I thought was the case. Are there any guidelines as far as spend or like how much of the marketing mix is coming from advertising? Are there any stats there? As far as when somebody can reach this point you know we often see. We do have people who've never advertised before we have agencies who are just beginning to offer paid search to their Seo clients or what have you. They're just beginning to get in the paid search space. Broadly across the board. When I talk about thirty thousand accounts we see an average spend of about a thousand dollars a month so it's still relatively small across all of their networks but beyond that we take small businesses and we also have some some larger guys as well who use the platform for for time management just for honesty and credibility. It's one of those things that paid searches so simple to get started at so simple to feel like you know what you're doing and in that same process just dangerous enough to be bad at one of my favorite hobbies to do a google search for hotels and in your local city and then go and do the same search on bing and you'll see like expedia or priceline or these large brands off have very different ads across those two networks oftentimes inaccurate ads between the two. So it's very easy to have a large budget and still be unsuccessful on a network. Yeah Yeah I can understand that you are kind of all over the place and it's interesting to me to that it's great. That is all the way down at that thousand dollar a month price point. Because that's definitely doable for for small businesses. Especially if they're able to get a return it only a thousand dollars then. Yeah it seems like you WanNa get up and running as quickly as you can and get to the point where you're not worried about the logistics. But you're actually you know testing ads and getting some useful tweaking exactly. Logistics isn't the thing that gets anyone who has a bed in the morning. So whatever you can do to make sure that you're going in and making changes that are effective in your ad copy rather than just pressing a series of buttons and Google ads or facebook. How can you go about making change? That's GonNa Affect Your Roi. Okay now another interesting thing with your background that I wanted to touch upon love to hear about just kind of how you got to where you are but a big part of it. Is You know your data scientist for a number of years. So you have the background that that we love to talk about people kind of getting in playing with the number so tell us a bit more about your role as data scientists and how you got over there. Yeah it's really interesting. I at ridgely had no interest in marketing when I first started my career. I actually majored in math because my mother told me that. If you'd be willing to do people's math you'll always have a job. And so lo and behold I found my holden in marketing a world where traditionally people were not mathematically your data and I joined word stream about seven years ago and at the time word stream had a still a whole lot of thousands of individual clients. We had a lot of data. But what were we doing with? That data was unique to the individual account. My role as it is. Scientists was really investigating not just the role with an individual accounts. But what was going on across thousands of accounts win at change happened when the Google Surp- changed when new ad copy was tested. When they google start running out with new tests or started watching new ad formats. There are changes that people see in terms of the numbers and anecdotally. Everyone has some sense of what's going on their own account but what's going on at large. We suddenly became the largest data repository outside of Google to begin to run those numbers so I spent six seven years at word stream really just running the numbers under saying the trends in terms of what made someone successful with their online advertising our own client set and as a had all that data as I understood all of that started working closely with the individual ad networks with our partners at Google with partners Microsoft with their partners that facebook. And so now. I'm having Lengthy conversations about the changes that they're having and how I think it's going to impact our SNB's sweet

Google Word Stream Facebook John Wall Director Of Strategic Partners Microsoft Mark Irvine SNB Business Manager Scientist Ridgely Instagram Holden Expedia Priceline
"expedia" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on KOMO

"Based Expedia the online travel giant plans to lay off twelve percent of its work force about three thousand employees five hundred workers in Seattle will be among them Taylor Soper has been tracking developments for geekwire crosscut reports in most cases no charges are filed because the victim does not disclose it and medical here's a Taylor Soper out from of the water so this is part of their plan to simplify and streamline as they say laid off workers will be offered severance packages including extended healthcare a group of nurses and police officers in Spokane are on a mission to educate medical staff and first responders on the importance of screening domestic violence victims for strangulation polls calling Johnson reports oftentimes victims may not show immediate visible signs of having Majo crosscut reports in most cases no charges are filed because the victim does not disclose it and medical staff or police don't ask terror was strangled several times by her boyfriend before getting out of the relationship her stories in a video on the training institute for strangulation prevention remember with his hands around me kind of turning to less he's on top of me they didn't have to see him and that he didn't end up being the last thing that I look at when I died last year a group of nurses rally the Spokane police department the sheriff and other representatives to roll out a programme of the multicare deaconess emergency room visit most patients won't say they've been strangled and less you directly ask when they are asked most will disclose it according to the training institute a person's strangled is seven hundred fifty times more likely to be killed by that same abuser calling Johnson como news a fourteen year old boy and three other teens in custody after at least two armed robberies early this morning in north Seattle Sheila brashly tells commercially and a friend were in the parking lot of his the mark on Aurora at about one AM when they were approached by a group of teens these kids however cynically by some lady and a friend of mine went to the movie and they pulled guns on him rationally say that they ran and says that they ran and got on a bus and call nine one one police soon spotted the vehicle and tried to stop but the three suspects took off running they were soon tracked down a fourth suspect was arrested nearby the group was identified at least one other armed robbery overnight the boys in custody are ages fourteen sixteen and two seventeen year olds like here in Washington state lawmakers in Idaho are taking up various pieces of legislation related to gun rights at a hearing Monday a man who showed up to testify got the attention of everyone when his eleven year old granddaughter walked up with him carrying a fully loaded A. R. fifteen over her shoulder she stays shooting since she was five years old she got her first year with this weapon is nine she carries it responsibly she knows not how not to put her finger on the trigger Charles Nielsen urging lawmakers to approve a bill extending the same open carry laws to nonresidents in Idaho as the residents enjoy as the law reads now Idaho residents can carry concealed without a permit but not visitors to the state the vast majority of states require a person getting a permit before carrying as concealed gun in public straight ahead the new grocery store experience no cash or cards required I'm Corwin hate with Amazon's high tech supermarket ten thirty four and we check driving every ten minutes of four so let's go to Kieran Jordan for the latest on the drive most of the drives are doing very well right now but a couple of exceptions we have had a long term crash.

Expedia
"expedia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Coming in and ushering in the in the world and it's also Expedia report that at this moment there are approximately ten plagues but every bit of it reported that are now ravaging the earth coincidentally after year of major near earth object activity twenty nineteen was the year of the comments a year of not uncommon for the year the media yours the year of the what last year pastor Paul we we actually had a happens are shaking gathering and it was because of the fact that the heavens were shaking they were they haven't run fire they were bringing writing down fiery rocks in those last year was a banner year for that sort of thing it really was and and even there in the Bible in the book of Matthew you know Jesus said in in Luke twenty one it said in the last days of the fight in the sun the moon the stars distress of nations with perplexity the three of the wave of the roaring MM hard to fill them for fear for looking after those things coming on the earth for the Hadley shall be shaken so yeah and we had that year last year big time yeah I was used to that could believe how many times I was doing shows about asteroids and maybe yours everything but never did really get into the idea panspermia but now it just seems that with a lot of people theorizing about these diseases and plagues and the idea that you know what's funny is you go back and you say you know look at history look at comments you look at me to yours you look at you know big meteor showers and and and how they would trigger diseases and they would also trigger dado other pestilence like will like bugs fleas flies locust right now I mean I think last night I had said that there were three hundred sixty billion locusts that have been swarming the earth and they have now reached the Chinese border as you say Honda course swarms of been so great that a black of the sky you've talked about the sky darkening farms in Africa been devoured in as little as thirty seconds can you can you believe something like that you're working your whole year to make your farm work coming your you worked extremely hard on your farm are you all year long and then you watch it completely be consumed by these these bugs in less than one minute can you even imagine that this would be an absolute part of the moment to see that swarm coming I I I the sheer terror it must have been a farmer cartel leave things will they'll just come and when they do they eat every day and when they're done they all live together and they might fly fifty mile it all the pearly spot another area Ellen from buddy somebody here that the you know you might want to be prayed up and and talking to god a lot if if if the if you live in Canada because I will take my chances on the things form in my way you know it's hard I mean I don't think we understand the devastation I don't think we gave it a more magic three hundred and sixty billion think about that for a moment they have what a billion is I don't think you can picture billion let alone three hundred and sixty real yen locus okay and the Bible talks about locus USAID cut out a bottle of pills I'm cut and those local pick out how much they got scorpion tail that shoot bear the hurt member five months flags that are yet to come upon the earth are are beyond our imagination and they're coming do you think that when they speak of that when John spoke of that in the book of of the apocalypse it talked about the low because they had the stingers they were able to play man for five years do you think that he was talking about a simultaneous appearance of locus of a disease that would that would plague us for five years I do I think you hit I think you know there are people talk about it Bailey verify and their leader these are little robot from faith no no no it's gonna hurt for five months because it's going to be doing it or infected with viruses that we can't hear eight gonna hurt if they're gonna hurt people LA a call and calmer than and and and I. E. L. IV drip images can be disastrous and I don't think we really realised deliver what the Bible talks about the beginning of sorrow and a great trouble and tribulation coming upon the earth and part of it we might we might have been involved in the bio weaponry we still not sure what created the corona virus in Wuhan China I mean you got politicians like Tom cotton in Arkansas the demanding that China show it that it wasn't about weapons so I don't know if it was or not well I did they hired a blue body lay there was a there was a tremendous solar eclipse yeah and after that solar eclipse and a major major I love by they had the little bonnet played it for a while they do have a copy it was comic negra when that happened was back in the thirteen hundreds I believe that fourteen hundred there was a either comical negra they passed over and they said that this comet had a strange characteristic it had dust coming down from the sky it would pop and crackle it explode like little little you know bright lights and you're watching this it was like watching the heavens come a year of the reign of fire from heaven and that's what they were watching when this comet passed over right around the time the black death arrived on this planet killing you know what sixty percent of the population yeah and and right now I just solved today they will on China forty nine brand new generators portable generators they rely on a month in a row the gas do you take any insulin some of the blood flowing down you don't bring in forty one Frederator different out of control we surpassed two thousand last night and I think it's going to get worse certainly.

Expedia
"expedia" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on WTVN

"We're starting to see those folks come in in an intricate man and and spending that money can buy that gun or that say for a new bow that they've been looking at maybe use it for down payment on a boat but it's that time of year and you know look at what to look at what we've got on sale in command and whether still little crappy outside so it's great day to be inside but we're seeing those those people come in and use that tax money for those things they've been trying to save up for all year but the government took it from there you go well by boat yeah we we we we can say anything we sell from from pleasure boats now we've got a new line of four wins pleasure boats out of the Hebron location and they're beautiful clothes if you haven't seen some stop out and take a look at him we've got all the new stuff coming in from the shot show in the trade shows are coming in in the next couple weeks and months and great time to be here alright this is shooting range what's the back upper how's it going to someone comes and how long's it take to get a range all right at the moment there's no wait good morning there's no wait during the day please come up with ways to Expedia eight things and try and make a little quicker to get it yeah I can't guarantee you won't have weight but that most days you're gonna be able to walk right in and shoot Saturdays and Sundays maybe a little weight but we've got a comfortable lounge here some refreshment machines in a great place to walk around and shop and pick up what you need right so ray in the old days when your SP I'm going to go over the speed limit you pull me over a over the speed limit are you going to give me a ticket yeah I don't know how many times we've talked about what if I show some leg then you get to it I don't know I'd probably get sick Hey but here's here's the truth that was so let us assist evaluate that situation it's not so much how fast you're going it's the conditions that you're traveling yeah okay so what most police officers don't do is sit there and say wow I really want to get out of my car a crappy rainy day and write a speeding ticket what they do is a she's turned a look at all around traffic what's going on it is at a safe speed and if in that officers opinion he determines that eight over in a crowded area where your weapon in and out of traffic almost clip a couple cars is a good violation it's a good.

Expedia
"expedia" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on KOMO

"B. scam tracker Tom and within a matter of weeks this can actually spanned across six states in the Canada units because consumers more than ten thousand dollars and what's happening is that consumers are going online searching ways on how they can reach out to Expedia to change their travel plans or make adjustments or get a refund and phone numbers that they are finding online actually are linking them to scammers who are imposters pretending to be with Expedia Expedia customer service reps and the phone calls get pretty crazy to that extent were the consumers are talking to this fake Expedia rap and are told that the site is down and that the only way that they can make changes to their travel plans is that they go to the store get a gift card or green dot money card loaded up and then tell them the number there's been cases where the scam artist stays on the phone with the consumer the entire time the drive into the store H. buys the ad buys the gift cards and then does the exchange over the phone so it's happening a lot of money is being lost are you working with Expedia right now yeah we are we are working with Expedia Expedia as an a plus BBB accredited business obviously this is a company that does not conduct business in this way so they wanted to work with us to get the message out an alert and protect consumers that this is happening Expedia's also working with certain search engines to make sure that these phone numbers do not appear in search of consumers can't find them or call them okay and and what steps can you take to prevent this from happening to you I guess one thing to be make sure you get the legitimate Expedia phone number yeah that that's definitely a first at because again how trustworthy legitimate business is not going to conduct business that way and so it starts with trust find out research a business is much you cannot go directly through them don't necessarily believe everything you find just because you search to search it on the internet price pulls up the stuff to do your research that way use be be scared track I know some like a broken record but it is a good tool it's free it's available to the public so you can find scams in your neighborhood in real time to those are those are good ways in time what's interesting too is some of the phone numbers being used in this scheme are actually the same numbers being used in the IRS tax scams all my daughter or tax scams sorry so these are the same phone numbers being repurposed L. be curious to see what's the next game come around the corner no we appreciate you giving us a little heads up on this and we'll talk again soon thanks.

Tom Expedia Expedia BBB Canada Expedia IRS ten thousand dollars
"expedia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Sabri Benesch or in for David Brancaccio. The heads of two of the world's major central banks. Have a warning it is not about inflation or debt or interest rates. It is about climate change and the financial risks it poses Bank of England. Governor Mark Carney and Bank of Francis. Twelve view while got wrote in an open letter that if some companies and industries failed to adjust to this new world they will fail to exist, and they say companies and their boards need to make climate change related financial risk a daily concern. My marketplace colleague, the BBC's end is here to talk this through high new good morning. Why are central banks talking about climate change? Climate change causes disruptions. Just to give you one example Sabrina last year the Bank of England delayed rate rise in the first quarter because they just couldn't tell if a slowdown they were experiencing with temporary because of bad weather, or if it was more sustained, and so therefore, they weren't sure whether they should use monetary policy to counteract it. That's why the central bankers want more data, and they want more of these risks to be assessed and part of the planning risks, of course, climate change going unchecked. But also risks of governments moving too fast. If a government set to target that is so severe that it requires huge disruption to companies to Connie's, then of course, you'll get a destabilizing economic impact. Now in this letter, they suggest companies keep an eye on how financial risks from climate change affecting their business how prevalent is that do companies do that much. Well, there's financial risk in this moral imperative, and I think. It's fair to say that right now, there's more moral imperative financial risk isn't being calculated as much and that financial risk can come from climate damage, but also from regulatory changes. And I think what the central bankers are arguing is that both financial risk and moral imperative need to come together. The marketplace colleague, the BBC's Anant good to talk to you pleasure. United Airlines is breaking up with Expedia starting later this year. United says it's flights will no longer appear on the travel booking site. Marketplace has been Bradford reports that this is a sign of how power has shifted to the airlines and United's move could be the start of an industry wide shunning of third party booking sites. A decade ago. Struggling airlines like United felt they needed third party travel booker's like Expedia and Priceline. But now airlines are doing better analyst Maggie route should focus right says the dynamic has shifted. The airlines now have something that expedient needs. They have this gateway travel product that brings travelers in the door. So that Expedia can then sell higher margin hotel rooms. Meanwhile, airlines would rather sell more expensive tickets, but the third party sites typically emphasized the cheapest route says major carriers had to create the miserable basic economy fare just to appear on travel sites. Airlines don't actually want travelers to ever purchase those. They want to offer customers upgrades and extras through their own websites. Says claimed Becker at Cowan United can sell that lowest fare just as easy as Expedia can sell it and more importantly United dot com can upsell some airlines like southwest are already doing without booking sites. And Becker says. She wouldn't be surprised to see the trend exceleron. I'm Ben Bradford for marketplace. Let's take a look at the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial average is up ten points that is tenth of a percent less than ten percent. The S and P five hundred is down two tenths of a percent. And the NASDAQ is down five tenths of a percent. The ten year treasury yield is two point five six percent..

United Airlines Expedia Bank of England BBC Ben Bradford United Governor Mark Carney Sabri Benesch David Brancaccio Becker Sabrina Maggie route Connie Cowan United analyst
"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Johnson's booming drug business also United health raising their outlook. So get an update on all things healthcare. Also, speak with Phil Orlando chief equity market strategist at federated investors, and his I would say bullish year end outlook for the S and P five hundred. But first, let's go to Greg Jarrett. Bloomberg news with a Bloomberg business flash. Greg. Thank you. Start your edging toward all-time highs Paul as investors sift through group of high-profile earnings twos. On the strength of the American economy modem Mahajan eons, global invest. Cheers, US investment. Strategist tells Bloomberg key thinks there are still places to make some good money. Yes. In stocks technology, sectors, discretionary sectors, still public. Hold up. Very well. A lot of them have long term secular themes behind them, you know, cloud computing mobile payments, AI robotics etcetera, but on the other hand of that spectrum really is some of the sectors that have lagged this year, healthcare and Staples, which notably are pretty defensive do well in decelerating growth environment, and perhaps have some room for catch up which the markets every fifteen minutes of trading day and be five hundred up two tenths of a percent of five thousand to shut up forty seven and the NASDAQ is up four tenths percent up. Very one ten years down seven thirty seconds. The yield is two point five seven percent, which Texas intermediate crude has moved from the red into the green. It's up a tenth of a percentage sixty three forty nine a barrel. Comex gold's down one point one seventy seven thirty announced valor Yan stands at one eleven ninety eight euro. Thirteen one the British founded art, thirty sixty one Expedia group has reached an agreement to acquire liberty Expedia holdings in an all stock transaction.

federated investors Bloomberg Greg Jarrett Expedia Johnson valor Yan Phil Orlando US Texas Paul AI robotics Staples seven thirty seconds five seven percent fifteen minutes
"expedia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"expedia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The online travel company Expedia and one of its subsidiaries are being sued over alleged failure to pay overtime to hundreds of customer service representatives across the country. The complaint was filed in US district court is Seattle by Laurie Krause of Melbourne, Florida. Who's worked with a subsidiary agency LLC's is two thousand fourteen her complaints is she another customer service representatives have been misclassification is independent contractors rather than employees es and at the companies failed to pay overtime. Even though they routinely work more than forty hours a week, one of her attorneys said that violates federal labor law correspondent, Jeremy house. The California Department of transportation says the northbound lanes of US one on one of idle route between Los Angeles points north and west have been reopened from state route one fifty two Mel pass several miles of US wanted one had been closed because of flooding from heavy storms. Breaking news analysis at townhall dot com. The police have cracked in Albanian visa ring which falsified documents to allow Albanians to travel illegally to countries in western Europe Britain and the US and Canada, according to police thirty people were arrested with full sit on the run. One of the detainees is a border policeman full wax up so also seized in which police discovered equipment to produce documents to traffic people throughout Bena Montenegro that great city grace, Francois Norway police say migrants paid about thirteen thousand dollars to get Britain and up to twenty three thousand dollars to get to the US Canada. Albanian citizens can travel to Macy nations without visas, but require visas to get to Britain the USO Canada. I'm Karen Shammas. Falsely claimed to have a bomb and menace to woman with a knife forced evacuation of Brisbane international airport for more than two hours Sunday police out of the standoff by shooting the fifty year old man with a non lethal beanbag. Shotgun rounds at arresting him more on these stories at townhall dot com. I'm Patrick fos. To paraphrase Thomas.

US Britain Canada Expedia Laurie Krause Patrick fos Bena Montenegro Seattle California Department of trans agency LLC Florida Melbourne Jeremy house USO Los Angeles Karen Shammas Brisbane Francois Norway Thomas Macy