25 Burst results for "Executive Vice President"

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:17 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Think red 7 15. Here's Dave Johnson. The greatest trophy in sports. The Stanley Cup fight at some point soon be coming back to D. C R Potomac with Jeff Halpern. Halpern is an assistant coach with the Tampa Bay Lightning. And last night the Lightning shut out The Dallas Stars to nothing. The with the Stanley Cup in six games. Halpern grew up in Potomac played You thought with little capitals and then play with the NHL capitals was even team captain back in 2006 Albert. In fact, the first youth hockey player for the D C area has ever play for the caps. So maybe when Halpern gets his day with the Stanley Cup, he will bring it back here for a visit. Again. The debate lightning in the Stanley Cup champs. You know the Ravens. Lamar Jackson is a spectacular player, but he's now over three against a chief's last night passed for a career low 97 yards. The Chiefs of 34 20 win over the Ravens to the Washington football team, but to get head coach robbery, very expressing the confidence of Dwight Haskins, But he also needs to see you progress. He's going through this process growing. He's developing We've got to continue to see positive growth can see a regression. The one thing he has to understand is there's a certain point you're no longer a rookie. I mean again. To me. He's still learning and growing. But there is a point where you know what you should be being more positive with your place. And that means no more. Four turn over days and on the state 1913 senators legend Walter Johnson. Shut out Philadelphia What? Nothing. That was his 36 win of the season. Dave Johnson over you Tell B sports Coming up on w t o P A D. C patient on being in a hospital with a network outage is caught Everybody off Mike Barilla 7 16, Today's military forces air trying to fight and win across all domains. Air Land Sea space in cyber Desperate systems and outdated technology cannot keep up with the demands. Lance Spencer AT and T Client executive vice president for the Air and Space Force sheds light on the challenges for the military in the fifth installment of our Air Force Enterprise as a service. Siri's one of the key objectives for all the military services joint, all demanding command to control As you can imagine, the military depends on numerous complex systems for daily operations around the globe. Many are desperate and today's mobile war fighter needs to interconnect and share information in a timely manner. The Eye tax program provides scalable and highly secure network infrastructure that enables the air force to work more efficiently. So they can achieve Jackson to catch the new Siri's delivering the airforce Network of the future. To hear more from a T and T leaders go to federal news network dot com slash ight As now with Wells Fargo Mobile Deposit, Mom Khun Seamlessly deposited birthday check before grabbing ice cream with the family..

Jeff Halpern Dave Johnson Dwight Haskins Lamar Jackson Ravens Tampa Bay Lightning D. C R Potomac Walter Johnson Siri Wells Fargo Air Force Enterprise Airforce Network Dallas Hockey NHL Philadelphia Mike Barilla Robbery
Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

02:12 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"And a civil fraud investigation of the Trump family business. I've been talking to Eric Larson, Bloomberg Legal reporter tells First of all what is her investigation about? Well, her investigation is really looking into allegations that were made. And who congressional testimony by President Trump for former lawyer and fixed for Michael Cohen on the force, he said In his testimony, he made some serious allegations that Trump and his company had engaged in various Means the bank and insurance being by devaluing are undervaluing at various assets and trying to get out of the past payments or get Expected past break young what they deserve, and they're given the nature of those allegations. The New York attorney general Open an investigation at the time over a year ago on DH has been conducting this investigation in secret. Essentially the This whole time, and it really only came to light officially that this investigation was with underway when she sued in New York Bay Court. Ah Earlier this month. Two and 47 subpoenas seeking documents and testimony from the Trump Organization, as including from Fo. It was an executive vice president of the company. What was his reason for not being able to testify on October? 7th? Is it? Well, it depends who you ask. The New York G has been seeking his testimony for months now and initially he had plans he had agreed Teo be deposed in late July. And they're just with a few two day notice. He backed out of bath, giving an explanation that he felt that the Ah, the purpose of the investigation wasn't necessarily limited to a civil probe. And stated some concerns around there. But Eric Trump said in court filings in response to the lawsuit thinking, Tio Compel. Ah, the subpoenas that he really wasn't refusing to be the post. He just won a certain assurances about the questioning and the New York and he said that was not what we fall. Said that Eric Trump had categorically refused to Ah Appear for the patina, which is illegally issued subpoena. So there was some disagreement over his initial refusal, But he After this suit was filed, he did agree that he would be the code. He told the judge that he wanted to do so after the November 3rd election. He said he was too busy with his father's campaign. You know, working every day the week that he did not have time to prepare with deposition and the judge didn't buy that and ordered him to fit for the deposition by October. The judge said that the attorney general is not bound by time lines of the national election. So now October 7th is the date. Can he appeal this and get it? An extension of some kind before October, 7th Well, I suppose anything is possible. He could feel it. You haven't done so yet. Something might also decide Tio just next to that fund in order and and do this deposition, lawyers indicated that they needed a lot of time to prepare. But it's been months ago that the depositions were thought. The material, but they're going to ask about it is known to him already so of I think that the G believes and the judge into except that he has funny of time to prepare the deposition, even with him his busy schedule and that if you have to Take some time out of the campaign to prepare that that he conduce that appeal off though, could you know? Keep this, You know, in the headlines right up through the election anyway, so It's potentially, you know, One could argue that if he did this deposition got it over with that it would be less disruptive potentially than having to deal with and kill but will fear So you said that there was a concern that he might be in criminal jeopardy. So then he might actually take the fifth and then that would be a lot of news before the election. Yeah, that's true. That is another way that it could go. But right now it is a civil investigation and the reason that Eric Trump the lawyers had said, You know, we're concerned about this. Actually, it might be a criminal query is because of the questioning in a deposition for another Trump organization employee that happened just before that. When that person got up and you know that we need to call it off right now. We need to discuss they felt that it was going into criminal territory, and I think that's what raised concerns the air, pumping his lawyer when they decided to back out of that deposition, originally in July. The judge referred to something as being the £800 gorilla in the room. Yeah. He was talking about one of the three main trump properties that are a centre of this investigation. One of them is Trump. Hotel power in downtown Chicago at the the property had received. Ah, substantial, but forgiveness on alone about $100 million reportedly And the question that the attorney general had was that the forgiven amounts declared income is that need to be so the G has asked for has subpoenaed documents. To demonstrate that that is that that would happen that the forgiven amount was declared and Eric Trump and the Trump Organization. They say that They argue that this hearing last week that someone in the company was prepared to hit and testify under oath that Amount had been properly declared and the judge it's basically the judge said. Well, why Why should we take your word for it?.

President Trump Donald Trump Trump Organization Eric Trump Attorney New York Eric Larson New York Bay Court Fraud Executive Vice President Bloomberg TIO New York G Michael Cohen Reporter TEO Chicago
Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:42 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"Our this's when you came to the White House to pay $50 a year tax. They are not releasing what they're not publishing attacks showing that out there saying to protect their sources in your dresser. Does that sound? Why were paid a couple $100 here? A total fake news? Maybe we went through the same stories you, conversely, the same questions for you. I had a litigate this and talk about it. Totally fake news. No, actually paid tax. But you ll see that assumes my tax returns its underlying They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me well. They treat me like the tea party like they created a tea party. They don't take me well treatment very badly. You have people in the way they treat me very, very badly. But the under audit and when the Not I would be proud to show but that's just use the loo. Times tried it something they want to create a little bit of a story a little bit of their doing anything. They can not only that's the least of it. I mean, the stories that I read are so fake there, so no, I didn't know anything about it. I think somebody said they were gonna do a negative. They always they only don't you get it? I don't think I used to get good service in your eyes when I ran for office, and I happened to be conservative Republic. I don't think we've had a good story. They've predicted my lost four years ago. They then apologize for their bad reporting. Then they predicted the FBI in all of these things that's now proven to be a hoax. A complete hoax. They got Pulitzer Prizes along with Russian Post. They should give all those Pulitzer prizes back because everything was wrong, and it was so bad that if there were problems, so they were, it was exactly the opposite. No, there are people that should get Pulitzer Prizes. Solomon Carter. I mean, not in the business of surprises, but Sean Hannity got it. Right. Lou Dobbs got it right. Laura got it right. Many people that Tucker got it right. Many people that got it right. I don't know what they get other than a great salary in great ratings. I mean, I don't know what they get President Donald Trump in the White House briefing room Sunday night. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's campaign, posting a video comparing how much in federal income taxes Americans such as teachers, firefighters and nurses typically pay compared to what The New York Times said the president paid. $750 Donald Trump Jr. Executive vice president of the Trump Organization. Appear today on Fox News. Listen, It's ridiculous. My father's paid tens of millions of taxes. If he does things in certain years where you get appreciation when you get right off where you get historical tax credits, like we did when we took on the risk of building the old post office in D. C. It's the perfect example. That was literally a government contract. We've been against every hotel company in the world Historical tax credits that you usedto offset tax payments for.

Donald Trump Jr President Trump Donald Trump White House Trump Organization Pulitzer Sean Hannity Executive Vice President Lou Dobbs Fox News Russian Post FBI Joe Biden IRS Solomon Carter Tucker Laura
Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:42 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"Don't know anything about it. I think somebody said they were going to do a negative. They always they only get upstairs. I don't think in the I used to get good sirs in New York Times when I ran for office, and I happened to be conservative Republic I don't think we've had a good story. They protected my lost four years ago. They then apologize for their bad reporting. Then they predicted the F B. I and all of these things that's now proven to be a hoax. A complete hoax. They got Pulitzer Prizes along with Russian Post. They should give all those Pulitzer prizes back because everything was wrong. I mean, it was so bad that they reported that they were wrong. It was exactly the opposite. Now. There are people that should get Pulitzer Prizes. Solomon Carter. I mean, not in the business of Pulitzer Prizes, but Sean Hannity got it. Right. Lou Dobbs got it right. Laura got it right. Many people that Tucker got it right. Many people, They got it right. I don't know what they get other than great salary and great ratings. I mean, I don't know what they get President Donald Trump in the White House briefing room Sunday night. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's campaign, posting a video comparing how much in federal income taxes Americans such as teachers, firefighters and nurses typically pay compared to what The New York Times said the president paid. $750 Donald Trump Jr. Executive vice president of the Trump Organization. Appear today on Fox News. Listen, It's ridiculous. My father's paid tens of millions of taxes. If he does things in certain years where you get appreciation when you get right off, or you get historical tax credits like we did when we took on the risk of building the old post office in D. C. It's the perfect example. That was literally a government contract. We bid against every hotel company in the world Historical tax credits that you usedto offset.

The New York Times Donald Trump Jr Pulitzer Donald Trump President Trump Trump Organization Executive Vice President Sean Hannity Lou Dobbs Russian Post Joe Biden Solomon Carter Fox News White House Tucker Laura
Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

00:43 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "executive vice president" discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"I've done is I've used brilliantly the laws of the country and not personally just corporate, and if you look at people like myself, that are the highest levels of business, they used many of them have done it many many times the. Average Americans pay the price though I'm running a business you have to come running a business. I'm running a business on my cell phone, my company for my employees and for my family. Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen talking about his use or abuse rather of the tax code to prop up his businesses and issue that's haunted him throughout his entire public life. I. This new reporting from the New York. Times undercutting his image as a financial whiz kid which by two thousand sixteen had begun to crumble. In fact, the time reporting that his financial condition some credence to the notion that has long shot campaign was at least in part a gambit. Torri. The marketability of his name Georgia me now is Barbara rush she was an executive vice president at the trump organization Barbara. Great to have you with us this hour. Do these New York Times revelations Match your experience working with.

Executive Vice President Donald Trump New York Times New York Torri Barbara Georgia
"executive vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:11 min | 2 weeks ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"They GONNA stop because if they can't trust the information, they're saying that he's GonNa decide to go. Back to pipe, and so with finding that it's this combination of technology talent that's critical. So use the technology where you can get his officiant as you possibly change but then if there's a gap, so you've got an insurer that still completely type of com handle electronic enquiries in have a backup team that can get on the fun with that insurer enclosed caps and taking up to August. Yeah not a one size fits all you gotta do Combo of Tech and talent. Absolutely. Yeah. No, that's interesting. So as you think about how you guys are improving outcomes in, you know making business better it's so clear now I appreciate you walking us through that. What's one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced and a key learning that emerged from that sure I. I think probably the one of the biggest surprises for me was discovering that the biggest competitor in we had to adoption was the fax machine. This libere technology that we must be daily remember it's still despite which unification technology healthcare and so that that was a big surprise in the other piece was attention. So when we think about the software that we also to doctor's office said, the specialist writes the prescription is usually a team of office stuff involved in processing all of this pipe work out the I should get started. So we're really trying to help back team of office. And those folks are so hard working and you go into one of these officers and even if you've got an appointment team both it's there was in the field as well as a team on the find calling on these offices and helping them to get educated about a software and how to use it, and we found that just getting attention is is incredibly difficult and so what we have to do is not just provide a solution that's going to help them. Along run it, it's gotta be immediately apparent to them that it's GonNa, make life easier, and so we found that once they start using the software and they get they love it. In fact, we've been doing product market fit surveys am funny. Really high percentage of folks to be really hard disappointed was no longer available says great use. Yes. No product market fit but I would go to get on it and and that's been the challenge. So for example, we have A. A reverse Haitian solution that loads the patient risks like it's. So this says you know all of these patients because typically at the end of the year, you got going check everybody's insurance again and I think particularly in in the current situation as well. We saw people changing their job situation's constantly to evaluate whether insurance has changed and so that loading that patient looks like a to do list of me makes life a lot easier because nagging go okay I'll go to govern and check this set of patients to see whether their insurance China working at anything we can do to make an started easier is really the big lesson that's so interesting, and so what's been the key to adoption them? Yet really really this sort of looking at the redesign. So can we import data? Can we look at every aspect of getting started log in registration etc, and just trying to find ways to reduce that amount of effort because if it if it looks like it's going to be hotter than scooping on a piece of paper in fact, they not gonNA, do it and So that's really the challenge is is continuing to refine that that front end Ui and and trying to help them to just give it a guy so that they can understand how they lost can be a little bit easier and the patients can get better results. Yeah. That's a good call out reducing the friction thinking about the overall workflow. How can it? Meet, year than scribbling on paper. You know it some I do facts through my phone now like new rare instance an you know they've got these facts apps now. Yeah. Yeah, and so I'm wondering if you know you mentioned that fax machines are one of the biggest competitors is there a software optimization where you use digital facts technologies to make the overall process simpler? Yeah and that's be one area that we think looking at because it's GonNa. Take a while to the people over from facts instance. So that's your the money to buy by the way. I don't. Amazon to get whatever I want tomorrow. Yeah. So What of course? Many. Between the healthcare and at other districts right? Vagit. Koga at airplane. You know they alighted say. Can. I have a slight tomorrow on the airline says, well, I don't know when I have no idea how much it's GonNa cost you. So, looking at digital technology. Yeah. especially. Periods hike is a you know we were talking earlier about this problem of somebody's falls come in with missing information. So can we can we take those vaccine electrically use optical character recognition soon to read our keep hospitalized forms and load that information in so it makes it easier for staff but it will say if there are issues and get on top of straight away straight back to the providers of. Painting on Shia form missing EXA why can FELETI and send it back? That's powerful. That's that could be really powerful. Right? Especially, if that is the case, right? He put on one away. Fax Machine let's digitized at least. Yeah. Yeah. funny is pandemic I. Mean It's not obviously it's a terrible situation, but we had office stop with hives and they've had no access to facts. Receiving Christie interest from providers, offices, and manufacturers in in the software tell my Gosh. Wow Amazing. Well, you know what these things while very challenging and and painful also pushes to be better and. Faster, so you know hope it's helped you guys and and so what what are you most excited about today rich I would say needs it's really this next generation patient supports said continuing to find wise that we can leverage. Much amazing innovation happening in digital health and I think particularly now missing a lot with virtual healthy remote patient monitoring and growing on the backs of telehealth and so that's one key pace. I think the other areas really the continue ever wish by spice and how do we leverage tiring get smarter? So you know when you look at I support solutions today, it's been very much a one-size-fits-all approach. You know every patient is sign and I'm just very excited about how we can get smart and say, let's really assess each patient as unique individual and right sizes supports I need and monitor how they doing justice. As we as they go three and that's exciting. It is. Yeah I mean for example, would looking at social determinants, the health and saying we blade that deny typically nestled welcome coal to assess patient and see what the challenges up if we can blend that with died or about social determinants of health, we provide that noticed.

patient monitoring China Amazon Koga Christie
"executive vice president" Discussed on WWL

WWL

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WWL

"Network. Executive vice president and general manager, Mickey Loomis, speaking to the media via Zoom earlier today ahead of Saints training camp that should be on the way here shortly after some testing it centers and protocols. He was asked. Can you simulate preseason games in practice? Now we know we haven't really discussed that. I think the intention here is we've got we've got this testing period. We've got the ramp up period. Going to have some, um OT level practices, and then we're going to get into our normal training camp practices. You know, at some point down the road here, but both those are intense practices. They always have been Look, you're always trying to get us close as you can be a mite situations and that'll evolve. I think as we get a dream camp here Bobby, That's that's something that Man, these young players. How are they think that I trust the saints? I do. I really do about evaluating some of these younger players that they normally would have more time on task. Evaluating Well, you still could miss on him, sir. I mean, no, there's gonna be a lot of teams. They're going to miss on players, and it's still going to play in the National Football League. You might have players that the Saints let go. You're like them. He was an outie. Look, what he's doing is not a team and then we're going to get a player for another team. Now there's nobody even dealing with the pandemic. Recovery. Good Taysom Hill. Now, now, indeed. And these days, the Packers could protect him. And you couldn't swipe from of the practice squad, But But look how we got him, So you're gonna have cases. Where all of a sudden we have it in a wide his player in OT, a Tai practises. Even there's no preseason, and then they might've been another team. They just look out is it takes some luck. Fit to come about, but Chris Zac's tree. Hey, was doing interview? No. He's talking about what he Is gonna witness because you can't call preseason games all of a sudden the regular season and you look at the final roster. He said, and I agree with him 100%. You can see 1000% because 100% is all you can get high 100 He said. There's no question That guys who run drafted this year. Guys who were late draft picks having uphill battle. Hello? Yes, To say the least. Especially on a team like the same now. If you're trying to make the Saint's right now, when you want more opportunities, OT H many cat pretty season game. Because it's hard to make the same. It is hard to make the cheese is hard to make the 40 Niners the Ravens now be trying to make a team that Jaguars are the afterthought. The jet. Where, my dear, you have a better chance, considering they're looking for those prospects, But it could be hard to make the Saint's right now any. It's even tougher but evaluation because there's no preseason games. So we might miss on some, but I trust us guarding the farmer who might missile some. Then we're going to maybe find a diamond in the rough that might be on another team that that team missed on and we brought on board. That's just where we're at right now. But his 2020 seasons I trust the saint scouting staff. More than I trust. Most teams scouting staffs. Yes. What will it be like in the Superdome this season without or limited fans in attendance? Mickey Lewis Um, well, I don't have an answer that I just don't know. I don't know how many fans will be ableto have, if any, that you know, that's That's a decision that will be made by obviously ST ST and and, uh, you know my ownership. Quincy. Yeah, he went on to say, Look, you know the tremendous advantage that who Dat Nation brings the home field advantage for the Saints on Game day and well Well, a crested No excuse. Let me tell you why I have no excuse. Who else has an unbelievable home field advantage like the Saints and who are relevant? The world dances thingies. An arrowhead. Um, the Seattle Seahawks. So when you look at teams who are truly relevant, no Christian to me, that might be The biggest thorn in our side, because but the one thing I'm optimistic we've been road warriors. Sean Payton has had the team ready to win on the road. You're not disappointed in with this season. There's nothing in the history of saints football 50 plus years. This might have been the greatest opportunity as far strength of schedule. Who was coming to town, Christian Look at the games and who was coming to the Mercedes Benz Superdome. Tricia. I want to see if you have a home days. Five out of date. We're all relevant in the playoff picture. The only game on the road and thing was picked him. We've got to go to Philadelphia, and there's a pick up game, so that's what disappointing because I think the atmosphere come amiss that atmosphere. But the fans and the Mercedes Benz Superdome truly have a don't feel advantage. Now that hinders the same human about what hinders the saints. All this other crap was going on. That hint is the saint to maybe beat at number one seed. Because I look at that adversity and I'd be able to have that. Don't feel advantage. A Christian is gonna start weak. Want to get Sam A. Bean and Tom Brady? I could think about this that there's no fans. He's gonna build to communicate and what he wants to do with all those officer weapons because there's really no crowd, boys. Maybe there might be piped in crowd noise that might be legal now and how they're going to do all that. But to me, that's where the Saints have a disadvantage because they're not able to exploit their truly homefield. Don't do advantage with the fans because we'll be dealing with the same thing with the Seahawks. And that he's also I will wrap up the community Coffee Saints our next year on New Orleans States radio network. Let's say you just bought a house. Bad news is you're one step closer to becoming your parents. You'll probably moved along. Ask if anybody noticed you,.

saints Seattle Seahawks Executive vice president and g Mickey Loomis Mickey Lewis Um Bobby National Football League Packers Taysom Hill Sean Payton New Orleans Quincy Chris Zac Benz Philadelphia officer Sam A. Bean Niners Tricia football
"executive vice president" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:44 min | 8 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WTOP

"Executive vice president Steve o'donnell Ryan Newman had been in the lead on the final lap racing fan chart Chuck mobile was there with his son you know number one it's amazing that you know he's doing okay and you know number two is just with families it was my son's birthday you know he swore up about it you know and he's a Die Hard race again just turned thirteen you know so it hits hard there were get well tweets for Ryan Newman from president trump and other famous people in the race itself it was a third Daytona title for Denny Hamlin his second one in a row CBS news update on top forty it's two thirty two new this morning the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy protection early yesterday the first step to creating a massive victim compensation plan that's according to a press release Wall Street journal reporter and use Garia explains what the Boy Scouts are hoping to do with this filing the Boy Scouts are using bankruptcy to try to get a handle on hundreds of lawsuits are from people who are alleging that they were sexually abused or molested by employees or volunteers of the Boy Scouts most often decades ago the group is expected to be forced to sell off significant property holdings to finance the compensation fund which could surpass a billion dollars China reports new virus cases and more deaths from the virus cold mid nineteen AP correspondent Mike Crossey our reports but Tuesday update from the Chinese center for disease control and prevention reports eighteen hundred eighty six new virus cases and ninety eight more deaths the new numbers raise the total confirmed cases in mainland China two seventy two thousand four hundred thirty six the Chinese health officials say more than eighty percent of the people infected had mild illnesses and cases of new infections seem to be on the decline the disease named covert nineteen emerged in Wuhan China in December I might cross yeah it's two thirty three early voting has begun for the Nevada caucuses which will be held this coming weekend and in the wake of what happened and I what there is concern among Democrats W. T. O. P.'s Mitchell Miller has more from Capitol Hill Virginia senator Tim Kaine once served as the Democratic National Committee chairman and knows how complicated things can get out some states have primary some states have caucuses and primaries in some states have hybrid models and so everybody's got their own quirks keen agrees that the mass in the Iowa caucuses means questions need to be asked and answered and some Democrats worry that Nevada could repeat some of the earlier mistakes when the caucuses are held on Saturday Kane says if he had his choice more states would have open primaries like Virginia I've been in presidential primaries in Virginia and watch people come in and they say you went to Republican Ballard democratic ballot I Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news it's two thirty four U. S. intelligence agencies are racing to stay ahead of increasingly hostile adversaries and not only are they aggressive they've got serious weapons to back them up every day Deirdre Walsh chief operating officer in the office of the director of national intelligence it's the ground running literally out the door try to get some exercise as much as I can to get the cobwebs out and in the office between seven and eight a clear head is important because you have your big for China Russia Iran North Korea the common denominator nukes malware and bots many of these are hardy perennials are the kinds of things that come back every year but in twenty twenty there especially difficult problems and whatever happens our role is to make sure that intelligence is there read more at WTOP dot com search national security JJ green WTOP news it's two thirty five the daily rides of thousands of northern Virginia bus passengers may be in jeopardy Thursday unionized workers for Fairfax connector or threatening a strike Fairfax connector carries up to thirty thousand passengers a day the county's privatized bus system is operated by the France based company Transdev and labor dispute simmering from late last year have boiled up in the new year active going and what they do best store only and not a bargain fair again amalgamated transit union president John Costa accuses Transdev of cost cutting at the expense of workers riders in the community more than five hundred drivers and maintenance workers are threatening to walk off their jobs as soon as Thursday Dick you only on WTOP news it's two thirty six some Maryland man looking to meet up with a date were made instead by robbers Greenville police officer George.

Ryan Newman Executive vice president Steve o'donnell
"executive vice president" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

06:23 min | 8 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Sports Las Vegas Clark County County Frank mccord in his in his acquisition of the L. A. Dodgers and the Learner family in its succession acquisition. Excuse me successful successful acquisition of the Washington nationals throughout his professional career. Mike has had the opportunity to lecture and speak in extensively only at a number of universities and to Graduate Students of Columbia University Business School. Georgetown University School of Business uh-huh amongst other major universities currently along with his duties with the Pacific. Mike Is Consulting for the development of a Multi Sports Academy in Marin creating multiple minor league teams in the North American Baseball League and is teaching sports management at the University of San Francisco's Graduate Sports Management Program. He has also writing a novel in two thousand twelve. Mike along with you you you Jean Luc. PARO and Steve Allen bought a share of the pacifics and now serves as a minority owner in the ballclub club. Mike is married to his wife Jane. They live in quarter Madeira with their two sons Harry and Jackson. This is the second part of a two part conversation the station with Mike and Continuing our conversation that we started from last week's show but they're they're playing for the love of the game and and for for the hope somebody will see them the passion to play. I mean that's what it takes. They're doing it for the same reasons. We're doing it because we love being part of baseball and we do it because We love this community. Munity that we live in most your players they lived here local About two thirds of the players. Do not come from this area but but we marry them up with host families so they live with local families who may have kids and they love having a professional baseball player in their home for the summer. Well Yeah No I. I met this one woman who who asked me for two players so go figure that out but no you know. It's it's about integrating the team the community and that includes putting the players in a host families it means taking the players and going out to the to the hospitals goes into the senior centers and community events and integrating the team. So you're you're telling me that there's a Japanese girl that's pitching. Yes in Hawaiian Wyan League. So is there. has there ever been a woman or a female that wants to come onto your team We have not had anyone There's no barrier there is there no no I think it was. I had a sixty five year old man pitch for us last year Former major league player. Bill Spaceman Baseman. Lee Who who set a record. He's he's from San Rafael set. A record as the oldest man ever to win a professional baseball game last year this year we brought in Russ Columbo who's the president and CEO of the Bank of Marin and he even pitched to one batter in a professional game picture. Yeah so we have fun with it and we try to break barriers and it's wonderful for the community and the fact that you were Yoshida that this this young young woman who From Japan who pitches for the Maui team and should be pitching here again on on July six The fact that she's pitching in this league is wonderful wonderful and and I think it's one of the things one of the statements were trying to make about breaking down the barriers and trying to make Baseball more accessible to more people. I mean yeah if a female and of course. I'm speaking for them. If they're if they have the passion to play and they're up to it. Why not why not I mean she throws a knuckleball so she doesn't try to overpower the hitters? With you know I mean I think physical size makes it a little bit difficult to try to compete. But she found a niche where she can throw this wonderful knuckleball. That is just difficult for big men even hit and and she's been very successful. Wow I guess we'll see what happens when you come here and play. Oh that's great so Well it sounds like you have your just fulfilling your dream and and for the viewers. I you know. I just liked to show examples temples that you can't fulfil dream and money isn't everything you know if you're if you're paying your bills and you can do the things you WanNa do financially and your most of all happy because you will live longer because you're you're fulfilling your dream. Well I had to learn some painful lessons along the way and again for as many of those high places that I was fortunate enough to get to. There's always the other side of that and that is there. There's you you you do see some very low places as well and so. My life has been a roller coaster. Ride in in many respects and I wouldn't trade it for anything but some of the painful lessons that I've had to learn about the acquisition of an loss of wealth in in financial sense. Right Right Led Me To the conclusion that I'm at somewhat now and that is that is vastly vastly unimportant to one's happiness into the satisfaction of one's life And if that's all if that's all there is and I have known A couple billionaires that that's all that they were after. I mean nate there. There's an emptiness inside that you know if they're if they're just after money. Yeah well I mean that's the pursuit of an illusory goal. Hello Oh yes and and it took me a long time to learn that I. It took me a lot of painful lessons to learn that I had many opportunities where you know I think I it was or could have even been more so financially well off and for a variety of reasons lost those resources and and and lost those opportunities and had to struggle through A lot of angst over what.

Mike baseball North American Baseball League Las Vegas Clark County County Georgetown University School o Graduate Students of Columbia Washington PARO Hawaiian Wyan League Multi Sports Academy San Francisco L. A. Dodgers San Rafael Marin Steve Allen Russ Columbo Jean Luc nate Bank of Marin
"executive vice president" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

WOW! I want to take that class!

10:31 min | 9 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

"Transcript as opposed to a school. I mean you got to get this right. You can make mistakes along the way. But yeah the declaration towards the students the first step you know we have institutions that are there for the institution institution century. Needed that come out in the industrial age award to you. Don't need that now because again. They're going to demand personalization customization incision. And then you don't have it. They're going to go somewhere else to get it right right. I just keep thinking about work in order costly. That's so in. Many ways has been as also other ways to use up to us through fiscal cap. I think build brain so so you know building it had incentivize each each each room in this on your campus to be used east from eight in the morning till nine at night right so the boy scouts running around war the FFA. Or even if they're only recommend for fifty dollars to air conditioners he's just right exactly exactly right. So people were coming up was very creative very creative wasted yes well. Hey this is short. But I'm telling you you are going to Kiva thinking along times right inspiring though we really appreciate take your time thank you thank you take care. Okay Gotcha turn. It's winter and you know what Doctor Levin it's a bittersweet moment because this is our last. Wow I want to take that class up. It is really bittersweet because I'm telling you. This is a huge learning experience. Yes my south getting to talk to absolutely standing faculty here Lynnwood University about what they do and how they do it. Yes we are my gosh. We've learned so much from so many wonderful people such a diverse group and You know I know. We've we've talked about this one on one but we really WANNA put a book together. Yes how else something will. Because we've talked about so many common themes that have emerged from all all the wonderful people that we've talked to in different themes to but really So many people just putting students at the center and you know I know I'm I'm kinda getting us off topic but we're just so thankful to all the wonderful faculty and administration That we've been able to talk to and and Are Very very special guests that we talked to a few weeks ago. We'll samp and that's so ludicrous of this episode. We wanted to just have a follow up after after his wonderful presentation. Yes absolutely to talk about some of his ideas and kind of put some reality. I oh I think to some of the ideals that Dan put into contact because there was so much we only had a short time with him Because he has such a busy schedule he had just presented when he came to talk to us and it was so nice of him to give as time so we didn't WanNa take too much of his time but we wanted to reflect on on some of his thoughts that he had shared. I do boy. You know I think we've talked about this before something that he began talking about. Was the students today. Grow up with the Internet Internet. I mean they grow up with the Internet very different. Yeah right in my time and you're a lot younger. Yeah I know the Internet developed when I was in college and Yes yes when I was in college and I remember we would start going to the computer. Labs it was this new idea of you could look things online email and it was just completely different but yeah I mean it's it's a new type of teaching when you uh-huh students can look up anything in a split second so it's really. What is the role of education? What's the role of teacher in this new? Mm Society where knowledge is literally at your fingertips exactly and the teacher isn't the the the person who knows it. All right right it used is to be ice yes. All you did was at Teacher's guide that I'm the only way you're going to find out is if I tell you yes it's really a different world. Yes and so how does it. How does that Change Institutes of higher? Ed like Linden Gene Wood to rethink what they do and how they do it particularly in teacher education because that's the world we live in all the time. Yeah you know. How can we've talked about? This is that how can faculty who aren't in the classroom on a regular basis have a real understanding in a of the needs of today's children. Yeah that that's hard is very typical. And I think if you don't have children yourself if you don't have young children If you're if you're a teacher of the teachers and you are not in it with with children of your own on a daily basis. I E you gotta get out there and see what's happening because it's it is a whole new world from went when we were in in a teacher education yes in college jazz When we were in school obviously but it's a completely different learning environment It is collaborative labid workspaces about sharing. Guess out you're on the cloud my nine year old Charlie. WHO's third grade raid? I told him something I'd give him something that is he said. I don't have a place to put us. Just put it in your desk. Said I don't have a dust you just if these things things you just think kids have in their you know you. Just think of classrooms operating the way that they did and they just don't they have cubbies for their stuff in they're everywhere. They're moving their grooving. They're collaborating And oh I think we often think about is that does that work for every child right and I think teachers today in this is something to teach right right individualized learning which is huge. This if that's not working for a child how do you assess that. And what do you do yes right yes I because it doesn't set right some kids. I remember you know. I had a student who researched this for her dissertation. She researched urged. Flexible arenavirus Dr Stephanie. limpert shooting a wonderful job at I actually got to assist her in her research. which was huge? Because I got to go into the elementary schools and I got to see You know I was in there and I got to see the teachers Talk to the teachers. I was able to interview the teachers and see Z.. And listen to their reactions to this flexible seating many of them were super excited about it but some were. What do I do without desk us had is this? Where where are the kids but there where do they say the question? Some kids I know need a desk with was this. How so is this going to work? And what do I do with the children who need a desk. And it's you have a desk for them their you know. Have you will have avid desk for the kids. That really need it and you make it work but you know overall it was. The kids are learning better with the choice in with the movement in the standup seating. And you know even talking to my husband who who raw getting older back starting to hurt ow God but he would love a stand up desk right where he can stand up and move and groove. You know what I mean why you're working while you're working every for hours. They sit I just want to put this in research every Farsi. You said. It's like smoking a cigarette. Oh that's interesting. Yeah tell me how the nasty because he works from home and he said Slavko Eh Peter. That's his job and I keep telling him it's like goodness. We have a dog and home that he gets up and walks periodically day. Because yeah for every four hours smoking cigarettes and you will have to get up and you had to. But it's the same with getting you know with kids sitting all day. Yeah and then you're like what's what's the point. Why are you acting out little job right and I think it's kind of one of those things that we've come to learn about kids is they liked to get up? They like to when you're out there you know it's one of those things. I think that that's something that's evolved with learning and you knows something that will talked about his Presentation was this idea of really bringing experiential learning at all levels even at higher education Russian into the classroom so yet I think this is worth well in public education right and so this is your question right so what. How do we did prepare the teachers for that world that we have now? Yes almost in that experiential way. Yes so they're ready for it well and I often think and I. I wish I was the way that we could do that. There's if there's somebody out there who would love to like entertain this idea. I think it's I think it's worth taking a look at that Faculty and Higher Education. I think it's it would be really helpful that they that they collaborate with local school district. And we really spend maybe two days out of our work out of our week actually within a school district. Yes yes actually working. Whether that's co teaching with the teacher you know within our certifications specialty area But but we we. We need to do that. We need to experience.

Higher Education Linden Gene Wood Doctor Levin Lynnwood University Dan Dr Stephanie. limpert
"executive vice president" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:36 min | 10 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WWL

"Have fired executive vice president Tom Coughlin it used three seasons with the club Jaguars general manager Dave Caldwell and head coach Doug Marrone will now report directly to team owner shot con on an interim basis dak Prescott it suffered a right shoulder injury this past Sunday it hurts he's going to be limited does the cowboys begin their prep for a crucial NFC east game against the eagles meanwhile giants rookie quarterback Daniel Jones ran with the first team today put some on track to start Sunday in Washington the Oklahoma Sooners will be without at least three players for the peach bowl their college football playoff semifinal against Ellis you that because of suspensions starting defensive and Ronnie Perkins running back Remond Droege Stevenson and receiver treasure on bridges we'll all sit hi to the NBA we go over you know over time in DC wizards and bowls are tied at ninety eight meanwhile we do have finals on the board Cavaliers get just their seventh win of the season they beat the Hornets one hundred ninety eight the he'd take out the Sixers one await what all four raptors beat the pistons one twelve ninety nine meanwhile third quarter in Oklahoma City Grizzlies lead the thunder ninety three seventy four pelicans trying to snap a thirteen game losing skid they lead the Timberwolves seventy one fifty with six minutes to play in the third quarter.

Remond Droege Stevenson Oklahoma City general manager Jaguars executive vice president Timberwolves pistons raptors Sixers Hornets Cavaliers NBA Tom Coughlin Ronnie Perkins Ellis Oklahoma Sooners Washington Daniel Jones giants eagles
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:17 min | 10 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Good version of the book So it took about a year and a half and a lot of rights and and actually the thing that was most surprising to me. Is You know I was a creative writing a business book and I thought I needed to speak in business. Speak and she's like tell your stories. Your story will end up. I guarantee you finding its way into a business book so so I was like. Oh Okay I got tons of stories that I can talk about and indeed that I think that's what made the book interesting for people because it was an unlikely source of insight that it can be layered into Corporate work that Thomas. Oh you know Acquainted with and I know this now hosting the podcast that you know I I do. I've done about our we at like about two hundred interviews and so I read all these business books and I can tell the ones that are like. Here's the ten point stance or something And they're fine. They sell well but then the the ones that really come to life is where I'm the author is speaking of their experience. Sure You know the mistakes in their in their fiascos And those are the ones that are the best. Because it's like oh great. I get to know you and I get to know your insights and then and my my biggest question then is like is this part of my actual evidence or is this your opinion right and I it this is the University of Chicago has a rub off on me. which is like I'm less interested in your opinions unless backed up by evidence? So that's a I. I'm a guy who reads footnotes now. And that was not the case. You know for Kelly Leonard. Five years go Kelly that brings up a really interesting point because For many creatives who are creating or writing alone or maybe who have just like adventured out in the world but just just like got some direct experience that is You know maybe very different as a creative. Obviously you're just running an experiment where it's an N.. Of One and very very difficult to collect evidence along the way or keep polishing your creative work until you can have proof. Maybe how it's going to do in the marketplace. or how how it's already doing or whatever. So as you're going about that process of like gathering proof or creating a vision for your creative project how how do you go from one to You know a hypothesis that professionals are going to respect. It's hard right. I mean I look. I don't think it's the artist's job necessarily to then go back and compile the evidence. I think I think again that this is why we love our collaboration aberration which is to my earlier point. which is the you know? The artists shouldn't be the accountant. The artist is to be the scientists. Let's go find a scientist. You know if you need that and not everyone needs that either you know but but the insights are out there right so one of the things that We talk a lot about we talk a lot about. Its second science project is. Is You know the reality is almost all science. Replace itself so almost. All scientists ends up being untrue at some point and then replaced by something else sure And what we also know. Is that just because you have evidence that this phenomenon exists in this this way that you tested this thing. There are just eons of different context that that could render that untrue in another in another world so so scientists perfect either. They're definitely like A. There's a hunch aspect to all this so we're really trying to do and we think we've hit a sweet spot with it. which is what is the best evidence what is the most? What is the most cutting edge insights that we've got from academia that when paired with improvisational practice the the idea of testing it out we test out the evidence if we can just give people wisdom to improvise with then they're going to be able to make those leaps and changes in their variety of contexts? They're going to be like. I tried it this way with this and I tried it this way with that. I think the situation was Kinda. You know let's go that way so it really is all about you know it's the best we have at the moment and then we've practiced practiced with our wisdom. Then I think we're going to probably do okay a in the world wise words. Yeah and I think it's important everything you said Reflect on I'm going to go back and listen to this interview. This has been awesome. But something you said I think is so important about science and it's generally about phenomenon that can be repeatedly triggered with the same type of environment and setting and everything whereas comedy or art you're trying to create a singular phenomena that can't be replicated it can be copied it can be remixed it can be you reported but ultimately you're GonNa make a work that stands on its own in some ways. So would you agree with that. And would you agree with the statement. It meant that art needs to lead science and not the other way around. I think what are is as a reflection of the human condition That's how it started whether whether it's cave paintings or you know shadows on the wall. So what art does is allow US another way to look at life That then what scientists do is. TRY TO UNPACK unpack well. What is the DNA of that writer? You know what's the phenomenon going on underneath that I think it's intriguing to think At times of what's the science And what is the artistic expression of that science. Because what's happened over. Time is the back science. This is very difficult to communicate. Because it's extremely honest which means Sir saying well we think in the situation we surmise and it could be problematic over here are you know. And that's why when you have someone like Malcolm glad well come along and talk about ten thousand hours and recognize that that you know. He wasn't presenting the The idea in its fullest and that research has also been you know looked at with more scrutiny. Now and I m defend this the other Dan his podcast and a very sort of like you know off hand away. Ram like Malcolm the the problem is. You're incredibly good storyteller and the truth doesn't make for really great stories all the time because there's so many caveats arm. Trump doesn't always lead to YEP blockbusters. Let's just say that. Yeah no no no I mean the the truth is really murky and muddy. And it's not clean and it's not until you're yeah Again looking at the unblemished photos of any of us like move yeah. I'm afraid that's what we look like. But that's also in the greedy areas is the places I like to play and I think they're fun And so you know having worked now in with all these different academic communities you know the thing I I I strive to make them understand is look I get it. We want to be close to the truth as possible. But you know if we can't say this in a way that could be understood and It will not be enacted upon and then. Why are you doing this? Why why are you even wasting your time for learning these insights if they can't be used boost And so I really hope if I'm looking at the work I want to be doing for the next you know. Let's just ten years it's going to be. How do I make the ivory tower accessible and I think we've got a really good medium for doing that? We have a comic voice That we can apply to that and we have these improvisational practices. That can put stuff in play and you know we can get people you know. Five percent of you know any population to suddenly have this work at their fingertips to use it in their lives. I think that's GonNa make you huge differences. I we have a field day in a in a meeting where we said if we could improve listening by two percent in every early childhood class in the city. Do you think that would have an effect Matt Matt right massive. So that's like that's doable. We can do that. You just need to re just need to get off harassers talk to the right people and you know and and and get it going So yeah that's the work. I want to do very cool and when it comes to life outside of work right right now if you get a chance to relax I'm curious. What type of fiction or nonfiction are you enjoying is TV series is a book? What are your favorite mediums? And what are you you enjoying right now. Yeah so I read so much for work and I used to be just fiction so huge Don delillo. Fan Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The PALACASINO Now I read. I read basically two books a week of mostly nonfiction so and I love reading so that that. That doesn't feel like work to me. Some watching the Ken. Ken Burns Country Documentary Right now Which which I'm very much enjoying I like to go see music And so I've got tickets to a Frank Turner Concert In a couple of weeks and then my wife and I have this like incredible garden in our backyard in Chicago and I really sort of learned the joys of sort sort of sitting in the garden play. I love music. So you know making a spotify playlist drinking a bottle of wine and she's a great cook So it's sort of communing with nature You know all the kids are out of the house. It's just her and I right now And that's recent and so we're just kind of learning like. Oh how does how does this work. So there's a little bit of of guilty pleasure in that we're kinda able to sort of be uninterrupted in our garden with our music with our wine Not have to tend to little ones or you know other problems or driving. You know kids around or that sort of thing so that and then you know get and the other thing I've ever have to do is because I don't want to sit around. All the time is push myself to take more coffees with people that I haven't seen in a while. Push myself to invite a couple over that you know you and that's not something that we initially did a ton of before but you know those relationships are important and this idea of meaning maintaining connections. So that's kind of my world. It sounds like a great way to recharge the only and Kelly final question here for anyone. That's listening right now. Either wants to come to a show get involved help out follow your work or Yeah just see what you're up to. What's the best way for them to get involved with you in every thing and everyone at second city so our website is second city dot Com and and in the works division which presently houses me second city works dot com And you can subscribe to my podcast there I'm on twitter at tale second city..

scientist Kelly Leonard Malcolm University of Chicago Thomas spotify twitter Gabriel Garcia Marquez Don delillo accountant Ken Burns Matt Matt Trump writer Dan Frank Turner Ram Chicago
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:57 min | 10 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"You know and then how is the business is GONNA recover and and it it. It doesn't it did at this point. It's funny where we're I. An invitation just came out yesterday that we all got internally because it'll be my thirty first anniversary Austrian October and we didn't get to celebrate my thirtieth Because I wasn't around Feeling the family medical crisis. So you know this picture of me at twenty twenty four which my son who's twenty two. It looks like him more than it actually looks like me and you know unlike gag. I'm here this is I mean. At this point it would be ridiculous to leave and and and I love it. I don't think things are preordained. I don't think there's such a thing as faith. I think there are lots of accidents and mistakes that if one can lean into them they can turn them into gifts And I think I think that's what happened with me here. I think every time it got uncomfortable comfortable for me and it felt like maybe it's time to go. It required me to figure out the way that I stay. And that means you dig for meaning and purpose and so that was always there. That wasn't going to be a problem. I work hard. That's not gonNA be a problem but allowing yourself sort of you. You know. See it differently or allow and I gotta give props to Andrew. Alexander are owner. He always challenged me. I mean he he would basically the minute. I got really comfortable and good at something. He he kicked me out of it and say there's something different and I'm like wait a second. I just want to bathe in the glory of the thing I created get like. Why can't I do that? I realize now it was like nope. NOPE that's not who you are are you. You need now to get your hands dirty and be frustrated for a while and then you'll come out the other end with something and so you know that that's I think how how it works. At least that's that's how it worked for me and then you know I. It also helps that. It's a little bit of a family business. Certainly for the Alexander's in Stewart's who own up. Who whose families very entwined here in mine? I mean my my wife's offices just about you know ten feet away from me right where I'm sitting right now and my son worked Here in the box office over over the Summer Mer and you know it's a little bit of legacy but also the thing I love about is second city is not about resting on florals and to not about what was happening yesterday. Yesterday we can crow about the chievements of the alumni. But the work that's being done right now is by the next group of like twenty four to twenty nine year olds who think and feel deal and operate very differently than my generation generation before. So you kinda get sounds like tech upgrade your your your consistently consistently as you as you age. It's second city if you remain open to it allowing allow your own thinking to upgrade culturally to at least be in touch and understand with what makes this next generation kick and that's a really special. That's a special gift I think definitely so I'm curious just to shift gears for moment. Yep so obviously you know creatives we have our own neurosis and everything like that and for many of us were trying to find the right balance between maybe two thirds time scripted and one third take time unscripted in our creative life and for a lot of us who are introverts and sometimes the type of work required to do. Do the two thirds part That scripted work can be an so exhausting. You don't really get to a place where you're maybe in the mood for Improv. And and I know that I can't wait for the mood to strike and everything like that But for any creatives out there that are kind of like going through that struggle right now. What are some ways that you've got yourself out of those FUNK's or out of those situations where you felt like you just didn't have the energy or the well to get up there and You know do something. That's UNSCRIPTED unscripted. Yeah so you talk about sort of waiting for inspiration to strike that dangerous. It's a mess. It doesn't exist Unique to create create. A practice for yourself to do your art and if that means you you know you're gonNA say three hours for writing and you end up writing a paragraph graph. That's it fine. You've written the paragraph but worst thing you can do is not do the art and over and over again. I see people. People make so many different excuses to not do their creative work. I mean I've got. I've got a twenty two year old. He's a senior in college He's got a beautiful singing voice he can act. He can improvised is he. Can write He's directed a little bit and he eye witnessed the conversation between him and his mom where he's like. Well so you know what do I do. And and she's like ah you do the work. And by the way the thing the thing about The industry now is that no one just identifies as a writer or orne actor. I mean ever if polymath across the board you want to be able to walk in a room and be able to do any of the jobs should those jobs the available and by the way what you WanNa do is not wait around for someone to cut you a check. You want to do the work. And if that means you know uploading your own videos or writing writing pieces and sending them out to get a put up you do that and there's a thing that I live in the world where I often say the words both things can be true. So Here's a both things can be. True artists deserve and should be paid for their work But there is not a world that has ever been lived in where or someone who is newly becoming. An artist is waiting for a check to do their art Rape Painter started painting Great improvisers start improvising. The developed wasn't captured or created until many years. Later years. You after you got to you do it and you do it publicly in spaces and and men and then you get paid so again you if both things are true you need to do that work and then you need to be paid for that work so you shouldn't let yourself be taken advantage Anna Jovan. I mean people are all I like. I worked here so sixteen sixty years old. I've worker thirty one of those years in all in every year I've worked here. Someone has called me me. WHO's wanted us to do stuff for free for good exposure? I'm like I don't know what you talking. Bout like we have. We have the best exposure already. Pay Us for our work and then I also worked here for thirty one years realized that all the new artists who are coming in and starting here are doing free Improv. All of the city of Chicago. I really do think that you you know you have to create a practice for yourself to not just do the work Do the work and then share the work you know and then there's other stuff after that but if if you start from there and you have gifts I'm pretty sure you're GONNA you're GonNa get somewhere definitely an you're gonna get faster feedback right and I think for anyone listening to. It's like if you look at the services and products that you buy in a daily basis you typically encountered them in some type of free medium fashion or you didn't have to pay until after you got got the experience and it's up to the person delivering the experience. How much effort or how much practice they WANNA put into it to turn it into art? And it's you know. Oh it's a marketplace that just because somebody's Uber driving or whatever like that's that's prime time for Improv or its prime time for is maybe taking some conversational risks six and the worst thing. That's going to happen. You know you're GONNA drive for lift or whatever the next day and that's I think the sharing economy has opened up some opportunities for you people. Because there's no longer an excuse that you know the worst case scenario is you'RE GONNA end up working in the sharing economy which might be rough but compared to some of the things. I'm sure you saw creatives doing coming up to make ends meet. Is it that bad or is it. Are we living in a golden age creators. What do you think I'm not GONNA call the Golden Age because I think that you know one of the things that I know about a creative work is that it it actually thrives in constraint It it it sort of you know. Sometimes it's like that's the stuff that actually makes there's a great story That Tim Harford. tells he's a British writer and it's about Keith Jarrett who is a renowned both classical and jazz pianist and he has this famous album called the Cohn concert and it was. It's the it's the best selling Solo Jazz Album of all time. Amazing improvised pieces of art. I listened to all the time growing growing up and Harford Tells the story which I did not know about the making of that album. which was that when Jarrett showed up in calling Germany to do the concert This teenage girl was in charge and the piano was just broke. The pedals were really hard to get to work. The ends of both both the high and the low were not working. And he's like I'm not going on and she begged him and she basically said okay. Do you have the recording equipment that I asked for as part of my ratios. Yes we do. 'cause okay okay. I'm GonNa do the concert. You'RE GONNA record it and I'M GONNA pick that recording and give it to every single person before they book me to show them. What will happen if you know this? If I'm pander this crap you know piano so he goes out and he does the concert and jet realizes he does want to entertain the audience in front of him so he starts hammering on the pedals and he's playing in the middle of the instrument worth the most odious and he created a great album. That was a complete surprise. The thing I love about that is like oh it was actually these. You know constraints. He couldn't have imagined that allowed him. Then find something new so I think that when you look at sort of past cultures and different decades you know we all have the sort of monsters that were were dealing with and trying to get by Komo. The creative people do is figure out a way to use them to their advantage And I don't think that in humankind I don't think that that changes and and we never know until we're looking in the rear view mirror fifty years sixty years one hundred years to see you know how great we were. We were but I do think this generation in has that opportunity as much as past generations. Yeah it's it's such an important lesson for creatives because like the example you mentioned when those opportunities come up when you're playing hurt or in sub optimal conditions or whatever that's when you have new material that you would not have voluntarily chosen. How do you go about not letting resentment build up but but just translating that into art or processing it or whatever you consider it How do you go about doing that? I mean it requires a few things things you have to. I mean one is gratitude so living with gratitude especially when things are going poorly is hard but automatically Recognized that without great suffering great joy wouldn't exist like anyone can anyone who's falling in love. I can relate to this right. You know you you it. It can be the worst thing you've ever experienced and the best thing that ever experienced and if your choices to go through that or never love I mean Count me out. I'm going to go through the tough stuff and that's just life so one being able to sort of lean into I'm going to be grateful for this and then not falling isolation so the other thing that's hugely important is maintaining connection. So you know those times where you I just want to curl up on your blanket and hide from the world and sometimes you need to do that for a little bit. You gotta get the blanket off. You've gotTa push yourself out and you got to meet other people where they are And this is you know. The introverts are widely misunderstood. And and in fact that what they really do is after their you know out in public with people they need to recharge and someone like myself. Who is the? My wife is an introvert. I'm the opposite obviously I get charged by being out with people but then also I I need time to like simmer down under that occurs. I hate going to parties..

writer Keith Jarrett twenty twenty Summer Mer Chicago Alexander Andrew Stewart Rape Anna Jovan orne Harford Germany Tim Harford. Cohn
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:49 min | 10 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Welcome to mission daily. This is producer Rachel today. Chad has joined by Kelly. Leonard Executive Vice President of the second city an improvisational comedy enterprise based in Chicago that produces work with some of the world's leading comedians hands such as Stephen. Colbert Tina. Fey Steve Carell. Seth Meyers Amy Poehler. And many others on this episode chatting Kelly take a deep dive into Improv. Why it is the core of what it means to be human and how we can use this practice to enhance our own? Creativity in connection with each other mission daily is created by our team at Michigan Dot Org Kelli. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. Where.

Seth Meyers Amy Poehler Kelly Leonard Executive Vice Preside Steve Carell Colbert Tina Rachel Chad producer Stephen Chicago Michigan
"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

16:00 min | 11 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris and welcome to today's guest interview. Our guest interviews are long-form interviews with leaders from around the world. They've each previously sent an answers to questions we provided provided and were selected to join us because listener engagement around their content has been high today. We're joined by Scott Miller executive vice president of thought leadership at Franklin Covey. Welcome Scott please introduce you yourself to our audience. Hey Chris thank you for the platform. Yeah I it's a it's a pleasure to have you here today After your your guest your series launched a few weeks ago We had so many people call sentas. DM's messages are on how much they impacted them. And how much they wanted to see more content from you and so we thought this is the the best way to go. Forward is to have August interview so The first thing I wanted to ask you is tell me about your your leadership background like what. How did you get to where you are today where you can look back and have how a platform on leadership the goodyear or the bad years all of the above? Chris I started my career. I'm fifty one. I started my career. Back with the Disney Development Company Orlando where I'm from and was an individual producer for about four years at Disney Disney. Invited me to leave. which is a nicer way to take it out and you were promoted? I exactly I'd never heard that. I like that. And then believe it or not. The Franklin Covey company had their eye. I on me picked me up and move to Utah Twenty three years ago and I've now but in a formal leadership position for Gosh about twenty one of those those twenty three years you know a couple of steps forward couple steps back I started as a frontline salesperson and was promoted a couple of times and then eventually seven times and now I just I just finished a seven year actually an eight-year appointment as the chief marketing officer for the company and now I moved in to become the executive vice president of thought leadership I report to the CEO. Joe And so I've led teams as big as thirty and forty and right now as small as seven so I've got lots of experience Probably more lessons learned than I do. Successes is which is why I've written a couple of bucks now on leadership development and a few more in the pipeline because I think leadership is harder than most people portray it and I think People Are Lured Lourdes oftentimes as opposed to lead into leadership roles. And I just believe Ashley not everyone should be a leader of people perhaps including not me. Yeah Yeah my relationship with your organization is casual but goes back a long time. I remember. I'm about ten years younger than you but I remember in the nineties having seen my on my father's bedside table the seven habits book That is you know I guess in amongst the top ten You know business. Leadership books ever written top top top. Two Okay Yup and so there's that and then when I was a kind of a burgeoning leader in earlier part of my career I had a very influential leader in my life take me to office depot depot and buy me a Franklin Covey planner because he was speaking about the importance of scheduling time with your people and taking notes about the conversations. You have with them because your job as a leader is to help them get where they need to go or. They won't buy into what they're being asked to do for their job. And that was a I still have that. I don't use it today because I've outgrown it but I still have it in my closet. AUSE IT and So it's it's a it's kind of a cool thing when when When we had this introduction happened so I love that Tell me about when you realized you had a passion for four leading people or for influencing the leadership of others. You know Chris to be perfectly honest. I don't know that I had a passion for leading others. I think like most people the next step on the career ladder was to move up into leadership. And I that's the way you earn more money. It's the way you move up to the organization. He kind of choice right as you know lead or get out great organizations if you don't team you can't move up so I'll be honest. I didn't have a natural passion for it. I think I liked the idea of being in charge. Sure I like the idea of being responsible and being the boss and I think I can relate to a lot of people before me and people after me as well so once I got into it I realized well you know the skills that made me a great individual producer. Were not the same skills that make a great leader. I think that is a profound thought right right there you know. oftentimes what makes the Great Dental hygienist or the best digital designer or the best sales person Those are rarely the same skills that make the the best sales leader in fact often. They're the opposite. Chris yes and so I I really started to appreciate and learn that to be a great leader. You've got a fundamentally change your mindset your skill set your tool set what got you here isn't going to keep you there so I don't think I had a passion to lead. Once I became a leader in La damage two people and did a lot of great things as well. I started to realize the impact could have positively. I've learned a lot and I've shared a lot of my books. And My articles Nicole for INC magazine weekly and so now I think I have a lot of experience under kind of do this. Don't do that say this. Don't say that I think what you just articulated. There is a conundrum the impacts a lot of industries out there and that's that in order to have the credibility to lead a team of say engineers. You have to be an engineer. A lot of leaders leaders believe they have to be able to do the jobs competently of all of their people in order to lead them or have credibility. And I think that's what leads a lot of companies to promote people out of a doer to the leadership role and they end up shooting themselves in the foot. How how do we get out of that? Yeah I think I think recognizing what you just said is the future of business right. I mean I could lead a team of neurosurgeons if I had to cause. Leadership isn't about expertise. It's not about being the smartest person in the room. You know a good friend of mine. Liz Weisman authored authored. The seminal book multipliers an amazing book. Everyone should pick up a copy of multipliers and the premise of multipliers has as a leader. You're either multiplying people all all your accidentally diminishing them and that. The role of a leader is not to be the genius. It's to be genius maker of others and if I can take get a step further Chris you know I was probably fifty like last year till I realized my job was not to be the smartest person in the room but I think for the bulk of my career Chris. I tend to hire very smart people but not at least perceived by me smarter than me just smart enough but not smart enough to eclipse me. That's for my kind of Insecurity was bolstered. If you will and now I realize goodness what idiot I was for. Oh my gosh. Thirty years. My job was to hire the smartest people possible I could find in the industry smarter than me. Bring them in in. My job was to build a culture where they're not just shows to the they choose to come but they choose to stay in the take it one step further not hoard them in my division but to step back and kind of survey the organization sation say where are all those people now. How many people that I hired are over in operations are in the supply chain finance out in the field and not horrid on my team mm-hmm I think I've really came to that? Twenty years later than I should but better fifty-one than seventy one. Right completely agree with that. I think there's it's an important thing because is if you operate in in that way it ends up being a game of telephone. It's like it's a race to the bottom. How each each generation is a little bit more degraded than the one before? And if everybody Belo's you below you does is the same thing you end up with these. The people who actually interact with the with the customers in the client's organization just being the bottom of the barrel Laszlo bock talks a lot about that on the hiring strategy Google how they actively sought to not hire people that were lesser than them by reaching outside of of their of their silos in and having other people being involved the talent acquisition process. I think it's a phenomenal insight to that Chris. What is going to make that come? True in organizations is more senior leader sitting down with newly promoted. People and having articulate conversation on a chart pad here are the fourteen thing Scott that you did really well as a sales person. We are so grateful rightful. These are great. Twelve of these fourteen are not going to be valuable for you when you become a sales leader you need to pack them up. Put them away and not do those again. And now we want you to learn these five new these seven new traits and one of them is. You're not the smartest person in the room. You need to have confidence devote he to admit you. Don't have all the answers. Your job is not to have This idea that you've got to solve everything in art marriage. The chief marketing officer about thirty five people that report to me. There was a common refrain. Best idea wins as long as it Scott's although it was a joke I don't think it was really that funny because I felt like I always had to be the most creative the most well read the most connected know everything about Seo or marketing automation. Of course I cut it. Of course I couldn't but no one sat me down me my boss. Maybe he thought I should have no lert at by then right but along the way take the time mine. Don't assume people understand what you need from them. Have a high courage conversation and say these are the things we now need you to stop doing. It's the reason we promoted did you. But I do not want to see these behaviors and you starting tomorrow. Here's some skills that you're gonNA have to stretch. You're going to get it wrong. You're going to say it wrong. You're GONNA feel insecure. It's okay we got your back. Let's build it together. That's a powerful transitional conversation to have with every new leader. I've spoken about opening the PODCAST. That my first leadership role I was nineteen eighteen or twenty years old. But I'd almost got me fired for my organization because the skills that got me promoted. I was the best at what I did but I could not leave. The people who I was entrusted to lead. That was me..

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to your leadership guest series while we explore leadership and culture through the eyes of leaders around the world that's right Chris we hand selected leaders that we believe are Tivoli influencing leadership in their industries we sent them four questions we think are important in gaining insight to their leadership beliefs and style if you'd like to be part of the hacking your leadership guest series you're just an email to guest at hacking your leadership dot com and let's talk and now today's guest my name is Scott Miller and thanks for listening into the hacking your leadership podcast guests series who has been the most impactful leader mentor in your life and why I'd say it's David Covey one of the sons of Dr Steven in our covey when I was the general manager of Franklin Covey's region in the Chicago area Dave was my boss he was my manager might leader mentor in many ways my friend of all my leaders in Life David who gave me permission to run with my strengths many of you are probably aware of Gallup's book discover your strengths the strengths finder assessment my strengths were around converting people making friends influencing people speaking mentoring people I very much had to manage the PNL cost of goods as supply of all of our guide books and things is that role in that role in David gave me permission to really focus on what I was passionate about is still had to manage the Ebitda I had to meet the revenue for the quarter but David really inspired me to uncover discover really align my passions mitalent and he gave me voice what I'm doing now which is writing and speaking around the world and not necessarily leading and managing people I'm fairly adept at that but I don't think my troop Ashen anymore is leading people I think it's aspiring others to understand should they be leading people what is the first mistake you made a good leader of people and what did you learn while when I became a leader of people I had this illusion that great leaders were loud and charismatic and had all the answers in informed other people in their own likeness reason I was promoted to leadership was because I was the top salesperson so why wouldn't I become the best sales leader I mean that's insane and quite frankly the competencies that make the best dental hygienist or the best digital designer or the best salesperson they're rarely the same companies competence sees that make a great leader so the mistakes that I made was trying to think that what got me here will get me there that sounds a bit cliche ish but it's true rarely are the same talents that make you successful as individual producer the same skills and talents that make you a great leader in this mistakes I made were trying to force people into my image there's many ways to skin a cap there's many ways to meet your revenue goal there's many ways to create a website everyone has to follow the same process great leaders are those that recognize that your job is not to be the genius but to be the genius maker of others that comes from my dear friend lives Wiseman who of course authored the book multiplier so I think as a leader the big lesson that I learned was I don't try to form other people in my likeness or image find out what are their strengths their skills their talents and my job is to help pull them out of them now I'm response bill at the end of the day for results within through other people but it's not forced into my format helped define their own instead what is the difference between a good leader and a great leader I think it's that very concept is that you don't have to be the smartest person in the room what I learned over time was that I'm not as you're responsible for having all the answers I don't have to be the smartest the most creative the best educated the best well read in fact my job is none of those things and I the first fifty years of my life thinking I had to be the smartest person in the room it's the opposite my job is to find the smartest people to join me in the room people who are smarter than me if at I think I did the service to a lot of people in my career I hired smart people for ninety five percent of my career but not smarter than me I was very deliberate on making sure that I maintained my stature that I maintained my vibes organization bye-bye my insecurity by thinking that I had to be just a little bit smarter than everybody else and then I realized that's not my job my job as a leader for is to recruit and retain talent recruit and retain they aren't the same because people don't WanNa work for not all they don't want to work for a genius they went to work for someone who brings out there genius in them I think Liz Wiseman in this book I mentioned multipliers has it right I think it's one of the best leadership books ever written that your job is to multiply talent not to accidentally diminish it through your ego through your lack of of confidence through your arrogance has a leader your.

Chris ninety five percent fifty years
"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the Playbook I have Jerry Jones junior the executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer of the Dallas Cowboys and we're going to learn do things one nobody understands the stage theory better than the Dallas Cowboys from Jerry Jones down and secondly how did the greatest athletes celebrities and entrepreneurs to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in what made them champions on the the old and in the boardroom I'm your host and CEO of Sports Marketing David Meltzer Meltzer with entrepreneurs booked and I am so excited.

Jerry Jones officer Dallas Cowboys CEO David Meltzer Meltzer executive vice president and c
Longtime Zimbabwe leader Robert Mugabe dies in Singapore at 95

America's Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Longtime Zimbabwe leader Robert Mugabe dies in Singapore at 95

"Robert Mugabe the long time leader of Zimbabwe has died at age ninety five Robert Mugabe was the first head of government of Zimbabwe after independence in nineteen eighty until November twenty seventeen when the military seize control of the country he first served as prime minister until nineteen eighty seven when parliament made him the executive president his new position effectively placed a stranglehold on government assuring that parliament was less relevant and independent he led the Zimbabwe African National Union to overthrow the white minority government and bring independence to the territory that will go on to be recognized as Zimbabwe in nineteen

Robert Mugabe Zimbabwe Prime Minister Executive President Zimbabwe African National Unio
"executive vice president" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WTVN

"Reporter executive vice president of the hell art so you're saying that the second report again Thursday we expect the call me stuff which we pretty much already know there might be right on the the systemic leaking that separate and apart from one I had known was going to be a part that we got the fight is a inspector general report which will show premeditated fraud after numerous warnings that the information paid for by Hillary was false and they purposely misled a FISA court on multiple occasions arm but I also know that there is an undertaking that has been going on all through Europe and that in this undertaking we might be getting to the origins of the Russia trump conspiracy and it might involve top intelligence people that work out sore sourcing intelligence gathering spying on Americans to our allied spying agencies are things that they knew would be illegal for them to do and that these agencies fully participated in and there was some type of reciprocity going on which means the powerful tools of intelligence were turned on the American people by some very high ranking intelligence people yeah listen I have a few weeks ago Attorney General Barr use a very specific term I've never heard used before political surveillance as it turned it doesn't belong in the lexicon of the justice department or the FBI or the intelligence community here in America there is some suggestion that in efforts were initiated overseas either with the encouragement a wink of by the United States to spy on certain political figures bring intelligence and that would create the basis for an investigation a lot of work needs to be done before we nail down the facts on that but there is clearly an inquiry looking at this sort of loose network of foreign private foreign country intelligence agencies were working loosely with US intelligence perhaps to carry out this dirty trick that was carried out on Donald Trump during the twenty sixteen action I have some breaking news for him just a few minutes ago the justice department has released the memos that now your prepared for her husband Bruce to give to the justice department and the FBI when people read these memos are going to roll their eyes you wanna talk about tinfoil hat conspiracy data the spread sheets that were put together on manta Ford and Donald trump's hideous connections to Russia they're portrayed in there have laughable most of them are locked out of the box by the mother investigation but for the first time we now know exactly what now your contractor for fusion GPS and Hillary Clinton provided her husband used her husband as a conduit to get dirt on trump to the FBI during and after the election and when people read what it is you'll wonder why the F. B. I. ever accepted this information in the beginning it's very troubling stuff another example that conflict of interest we've been talking about stay right there John Solomon investigative reporter executive vice president of the hill will keep them on to the other side of this break want to remind everybody by the way that my pillow is well pretty much by myself Asian because I have insomnia everything I tried wouldn't work I wasn't falling asleep and I was tired all the time but now I fall asleep faster and the better part is I stay asleep longer now Michael and that was so thankful for for all the business that we.

Reporter executive vice president
"executive vice president" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

10:20 min | 2 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"I'm a mentor, and I'm also the executive vice president of lifestyles unlimited. It is an absolute joy to be associated with lifestyles changed my life. And I hope today that we'll be able to get you on track to your personal financial freedom to be able to retire and our government for probably two three generations. Now has convinced us that retirement is an age. And they keep bumping that age up. Right. So at one point it was sixty and then it was sixty five now they're recommending you wait till what sixty seven sixty eight and have done a great job of marketing this. So when you ask somebody when are you going to retire, the answer is typically, well, I think I can retire at and they're gonna nail one of the ages that they have heard that typically is associated when day can begin to take social security, or when their financial planner has recommended. They take social security because the big thing now is hey, everybody. Wait, wait to take your social security. So yesterday, I posted on Facebook that I was going to be doing the radio show today. And I got a bunch of articles that differ friends on Facebook sent to me and let my flame. Started doing some research because it's been a long time since I've looked into retirement plans, and what financial planners are saying. And I have to tell you folks that the biggest scam. At least one of the biggest scams perpetrated on the American people is the 4._0._1._K and the IRA and I'm going to take that on today. It might be painful for you. But stay with me through the entire show because I do have a solution for you. But before I roll out the solution. I'm going to roll out what this really looks like. And I think this is going to be one of those experiences for you that as soon as someone says it you realize it's true. But up until that point you haven't thought much about it as a matter of fact, we're trained not to think about it. What else are we trained? Not to think about we're trying not to think about the taxes we pay why how did the IRS accomplish that? But the IRS and 4._0._1._K plans accomplish it exactly the same way. They take this money out before it reaches your pocket, you'd feel very differently. Adopt. Both your taxes and your contributions to your 4._0._1._K. If you had to write a check every month. To fund both of those. You'd be very aware of what you're paying every month. You would be asking yourself. Does this make sense? Should I be doing this? Where is this money going? What is happening to it? What is my return on it? From taxes point of view, our return on it as the public services that we receive. How are those potholes in your community? They're getting better in my community in far north Dallas. But boy. Still you wonder where is all this money going, right and all the other myriad of services that are provided. For our taxes. But you'd be much more critical about the efficiencies of government. If you were writing that check every month instead of it being taken out of your pay the four you get a hold of what's left same with the 4._0._1._K. If you had to write a check. Or do you want ick deposit to your 4._0._1._K every month, you'd be looking at those returns much closer, you'd be much more aware that the gains on your 4._0._1._K or the money. You're putting in every month. Not necessarily what you're earning. So if you have a 4._0._1._K, if you have an IRA, if you know someone who does and you care about them or your intimidating starting to contribute to a 4._0._1._K or an IRA this show is for you. So before I really get rolling. This is the best time to give me a call and ask a question. The number is eight seven seven seven eleven fifty to eleven that's eight seven seven seven eleven fifty to eleven. So I read one article that just lit my fire and out of all of them that I I looked at. I think this is the one that really highlights what the problem is and the lack of critical thinking, and folks if we don't bring critical thinking back to our everyday decisions, we are all going to have a future that we're not prepared for and it isn't going to be the one we're hoping for. So this article was published by the motley fool. Cool. And it's a writer named Selena Marin John, and I'm just going to reach a little bit about what she says. I give you my color commentary as we go through this. She says that a whopping forty six percent of Americans say they will not have enough money in retirement. I'd argue with you that that's actually hire. These are the people who are aware they won't have enough money doesn't really count for the people who. See rainbows and unicorns and think somehow they will have enough money and that one in five Americans older than sixty five or still working because they can't afford to retire one in five again, I think that number might be a little higher, and she goes on to give some tips about preparing for retirement and our first tip. I actually agree with its to make a plan. We just have a different opinion about what an effective plan for retirement is. But Selena suggest that you start by estimating. How much income you'll need each year and retirement, why do agree with that? But we talked about lifestyle planning. The first thing to do is to figure out what kind of lifestyle you wanna live. What are all the components? What do you wanna do where do you wanna live? Do you want to stay in your current home? Do you have a mortgage on that home? How much is that? How much is your property taxes? How much is upkeep and maintenance you got a plan to replace. HVAC systems and water heaters and all kinds of things over time in your home. So what are those expenses? Look like over the span of your retirement. Do you wanna vacation? Do you want to take the grandkids on fun trips? What kind of cars do you wanna drive? How often are you going to replace them right on and on and on you design that lifestyle? So she doesn't go into that here. But we'll give her credit for having the insight that if she was actually working with you. She would go into that lifestyle. Designing you come up with a number. How much do you need on a monthly and yearly basis in order to enjoy your retirement to have the retirement of your dreams? And she goes on to encourage you to be conservative hating case, you encounter some unexpected expenses or your estimates. Turn out to be a little too rosy. Good advice, then she says to tally up your various income sources such as social security any pension income. Well, how many people have pensions at this point? Not very many usually public workers government workers may still have pensions, but they're chopping away. At those. And to see how much income you'll need to generate on your own. Alright. So again, her vision is that most of Americans. She's probably right are dependent upon social security. And then a small handful of folks comparatively have some sort of pension coming the rest you've got to figure out. So the average annual social security she says is seventeen thousand dollars a year. That's fourteen hundred dollars a month. Hey, I I think everyone is aware at this point that if you're going to try and live off social security you're going to have a lifestyle vastly reduced from what you're used to living. So she goes on to say that if you think you'll need a total of fifty thousand dollars a year to get by in retirement, and you expect to get twenty thousand from social security, so already she warns us to be conservative, and then she's bumped up that average of seventeen to twenty thousand that's an eighteen percent increase. So she's already using a number from social security. That's eighteen percent higher than the average social security benefit. But we'll just go with her numbers for the sake of of this analogy. Then you need to figure out where the other thirty thousand is coming from. All right. And remember the fifty thousand dollars they'll be taxed at regular income income tax rates. So in two thousand eighteen the effective tax rate on fifty thousand dollars the federal tax rate. K forget state is just over eleven percent. That's five thousand five hundred dollars. So now, you're actually living on forty four thousand five hundred dollars pay. We began the exercise by saying you need fifty thousand to live on that should be what you clear after all expenses. Right. All taxes and insurance and medical right? But all ready, we're down to forty four thousand five hundred because you're going to be taxed on your social security, and you're going to be taxed on the money. You take out of your 4._0._1._K? That's the whole point is deferred taxation. It's not tax free money. All right. And then to get an idea of how big of a nest egg, you'll need to generate the income you need you can use the imperfect, but still helpful for percent role for those of you who haven't heard this from your financial planner, the ideas that you're gonna live off four percent of your IRA every year. So you're going to start drawing down that IRA by four percent. A year. You're gonna have inflation. But hopefully, you're making something in that IRA, and hopefully you won't hit a market crash. But just for simplicity we won't talk about that. At the moment. Then you're going to calculate that nest egg.

Facebook Selena Marin John executive vice president IRS Dallas writer fifty thousand dollars eighteen percent four percent forty four thousand five hundr five thousand five hundred dol seventeen thousand dollars fourteen hundred dollars forty six percent eleven percent
"executive vice president" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

10:20 min | 2 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"I'm a mentor, and I'm also the executive vice president of lifestyles unlimited. It is an absolute joy to be associated with lifestyles changed my life. And I hope today that we'll be able to get you on track to your personal financial freedom to be able to retire and our government for probably two three generations. Now has convinced us that retirement is an age. And they keep bumping that age up. Right. So at one point it was sixty and then it was sixty five now they're recommending you wait till what sixty seven sixty eight and they've done a great job of marketing this. So when you ask somebody when are you going to retire, the answer is typically, well, I think I can retire at and they're gonna nail one of the ages that they have heard that typically is associated win day can begin to take social security or win. Their financial planner has recommended they take social security because the big thing now is hey, everybody. Wait, wait to take your social security. So yesterday, I posted on Facebook that I was going to be doing the radio show today. And I got a bunch of articles that different friends on Facebook sent to me and let my flame. Started doing some research because it's been a long time since I've looked into retirement plans, and what financial planners are saying. And I have to tell you folks that the biggest scam. At least one of the biggest scams perpetrated on the American people is the 4._0._1._K and the IRA and I'm going to take that on today. It might be painful for you. But stay with me through the entire show because I do have a solution for you. But before I roll out the solution. I'm going to roll out what this really looks like. And I think this is going to be one of those experiences for you that as soon as someone says it you realize it's true. But up until that point you haven't thought much about it as a matter of fact, we're trained not to think about it. What else are we trained? Not to think about we're trying not to think about the taxes we pay why how did the IRS accomplish that? But the IRS and 4._0._1._K plans accomplish it exactly the same way. They take this money out before it reaches your pocket, you'd feel very differently about both your taxes and your contributions to your 4._0._1._K. If you had to write a check every month. To fund both of those. You'd be very aware of what you're paying every month. You would be asking yourself. Does this make sense? Should I be doing this? Where is this money going? What is happening to it? What is my return on it? From taxes point of view, our return on it as the public services that we receive. How are those potholes and your community? They're getting better in my community and far north Dallas. But boy. Still you wonder where is all this money going, right and all the other myriad of services that are provided. For our taxes. But you'd be much more critical about the efficiencies of government. If you were writing that check every month instead of it being taken out of your pay before you get hold of what's left same with the 4._0._1._K. If you had to write a check. Or electronic deposit to your 4._0._1._K every month, you'd be looking at those returns much closer, you'd be much more aware that the gains on your 4._0._1._K or the money. You're putting in every month. Not necessarily what you're earning. So if you have a 4._0._1._K, if you have an IRA, if you know someone who does and you care about them or your antiques painting starting to contribute to a 4._0._1._K or an IRA this show is for you. So before I really get rolling. This is the best time to give me a call and ask a question. The number is eight seven seven seven eleven fifty to eleven that's eight seven seven seven eleven fifty to eleven. So I read one article that just lit my fire and out of all of them that I I looked at. I think this is the one that really highlights what the problem is. And the lack of critical thinking, and folks if we don't bring critical thinking back to our everyday decisions, we are all going to have a future that we're not prepared for and it isn't going to be the one we're hoping for. So this article was published by the motley fool, and it's by a writer named Selena Marin John, and I'm just going to reach a little bit about what she says. I give you my color commentary as we go through this. She says that a whopping forty six percent of Americans say they will not have enough money in retirement. I'd argue with you that that's actually hire. These are the people who are aware they won't have enough money doesn't really count for the people who. See rainbows and unicorns and think somehow they will have enough money and that one in five Americans than sixty five or still working because they can't afford to retire one in five again, I think that number might be a little higher, and she goes on to give some tips about preparing for retirement and our first tip. I actually agree with its to make a plan. We just have a different opinion about what an effective plan for retirement is but Salina's suggest that you start by estimating. How much income you'll need each year on retirement, why do agree with that? But we talked about lifestyle planning. The first thing to do is to figure out what kind of lifestyle you wanna live. What are all the components? What do you wanna do where do you wanna live? Do you want to stay in your current home? Do you have a mortgage on that home? How much is that? How much is your property taxes? How much is upkeep and maintenance you got a plan to replace. HVAC systems and water heaters and all kinds of things over time in your home. So what are those expenses? Look like over the span of your retirement. Do you want vacation? Do you want to take the grandkids on fun trips? What kind of cars do you wanna drive? How often are you going to replace them right on and on and on you design that lifestyle? So she doesn't go into that here. But we'll give her credit for having the insight that if she was actually working with you. She would go into that lifestyle. Designing you come up with a number. How much do you need on a monthly yearly basis in order to enjoy your retirement to have the retirement of your dreams? And she goes on to encourage you to be conservative hating case, you encounter some unexpected expenses or your estimates. Turn out to be a little too rosy. Good advice, then she says to tally up your various income sources such as social security any pension income. Well, how many people have pensions at this point? Not very many usually public workers government workers may still have pensions, but they're chopping away. At those. And see how much income you'll need to generate on your own. Alright. So again, her vision is that most of American. She's probably right are dependent upon social security. And then a small handful of folks comparatively have some sort of pension coming the rest you've got to figure out. So the average annual social security she says is seventeen thousand dollars a year. That's fourteen hundred dollars a month. Hey, I I think everyone is aware at this point that if you're going to try and live off social security you're going to have a lifestyle vastly reduced from what you're used to living. So she goes on to say that if you think you'll need a total of fifty thousand dollars a year to get by in retirement, and you expect to get twenty thousand from social security, so already she warns us to be conservative, and then she's bumped up that average of seventeen to twenty thousand that's an eighteen percent increase. So she's already using a number from social security. That's eighteen percent higher than the average social security benefit. But we'll just go with her numbers for the sake of of this analogy. Then you need to figure out where the other thirty thousand is coming from. All right. And remember the fifty thousand dollars it'll be taxed at regular income income tax rate. So in two thousand eighteen the effective tax rate on fifty thousand dollars the federal tax rate. K forget state is just over eleven percent. That's five thousand five hundred dollars. So now, you're actually living on forty four thousand five hundred dollars. K we began the exercise by saying you need fifty thousand to live on that should be clear after all expenses, right? All taxes and insurance and medical right, but already we're down to forty four thousand five hundred because you're going to be taxed on your social security, and you're going to be taxed on the money. You take out of your 4._0._1._K? That's the whole point is deferred taxation. It's not tax free money. All right. And then to get an idea of how big of a nest egg you'll need to generate the income you need you can use the imperfect but still helpful for percent rule. So for those of you who haven't heard this from your financial planner, the ideas that you're gonna live off four percent of your IRA every year. So you're going to start drawing down that IRA by four percent. A year. You're going to have inflation. But hopefully, you're making something in that IRA, and hopefully you won't hit a market crash. But just for simplicity we won't talk about that. At the moment. Then you're going to calculate that nest egg.

Facebook executive vice president IRS Dallas Salina writer Selena Marin John fifty thousand dollars eighteen percent four percent forty four thousand five hundr five thousand five hundred dol seventeen thousand dollars fourteen hundred dollars forty six percent
Inside Motor Sport

Inside Supercars

03:33 min | 2 years ago

Inside Motor Sport

"You knew the risks when you decided to drive drunk. There could be a crash people could get hurt or killed, but that didn't stop. You did it. You knew you could get arrested, you can incur huge legal expenses and you could possibly even lose your job. You were well aware of the consequences of driving drunk, but one thing's for sure you were wrong. When you said it was no big deal drive, sober, forget pulled over. This message brought to you by nitsa. Thing, and we're in the business of gone five. So the teams and the push it to the absolute limits and sometimes Ivor and that that's what happens. Just just merged into the into the family. If between the whole, I'll even Barrett for that right to greet dot, intense mania. Some like that. That just is an acceptable from the race trips across the strategy at he is inside supercars. Welcome to inside civic is it's tiny, went lockers fondly back behind the microphone, Craig. It's great to be back. I didn't make engage Thailand band, but you had a good time today in Dadar did, and it's a portion of heavy back in the driver's seat once again on such because I watched from the distance. As you may or may not be aware. I don't get folks hillsdale's any watching the edited all lights. It was a Donut performance by triple eight of both days. Qualifying one two's both days races, the Qasr certainly had massive speed and they did they usual thing which something that have been doing for some years. And of course, now back on top of the championship with Shane grabbing that lay there with a second Bryce on Sunday, and one thing of coming up in the weeks ahead spoken at length with mocked up in the belt, the satisfaction of going to a new trek like that and having that sort of success that certainly if it's not next week, it'll definitely be the week after on the show just before we go into what he's on the show this week. Interesting to see that the Team Penske were floundering, almost certainly in was no way Scotty was doing his best. But really not making much of an inroad into things. It was the worst and first of all, rhodium since humble, she in two thousand sixteen. So that's a long time for them to of now former met distance. The other very obvious thing was the Spade. The Bayrak has now, obviously, to degree that's echoing the Zayd, be performance of the triple eight guys. Great to see Brad and came with a pair of drivers in an of course, running four cars in the main game this weekend, but to save Nick and Tim in the top five, that was a fantastic result. It wasn't a Tim slide mentioned early in the wakened that the Bayrak has do like that super smooth, low deg taught of rice trek, which is exactly what we head tail and bend. So I guess he was extremely disappointed on Saturday when the result didn't come his, why that he was expecting after good pay some Friday. And then as you said, bench. Back with both. He and Nick perk head on Sunday, but obviously they have got a great setup. And if you think back to when the series went overseas and they're on the tinkle circuits by always did seem to be able to rise an extra, an extra step in those of instance, well. Oh. Until he tracks that would be three years. And of course, I also also very well album pack that same type of very fast corners, service mood surface. And as you say, low degradation of the ties, you had ninety weekend because the the nice car people were down. That's Steve o. Donnell Jose executive president and chief racing development officer and also Joan was there who's also involved in? So you spoke to both of those gentlemen to stay Donald respect, civil Donal on the record. We said Hello to. To miss the pros. But we Tom Howard it on Tom, how'd from speak Hefei dot com. Headed an opportunity to speak with Steve Donal about why they were there and about motorized boating. And also we, we talked a little bit about the supercar series and its relationship with NASCAR similarities that

Kale Mangin Es Streit Greg Craig Micra Cuny David Reynolds David County Twitter Beth One Kilometer
Liu Xia, wife of late Nobel Peace Prize winner, leaves China

BBC World Service

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Liu Xia, wife of late Nobel Peace Prize winner, leaves China

"Hello i'm anemic with the bbc news the widow of the nobel peace prize winner joe xiaobo has been allowed to leave china after eight years in unofficial detention neo she is on her way to berlin following a campaign to secure horrendous steven mcdonnell reports according to her friends use shah has been allowed to leave china she had been under effective house arrest since her husband's won the twenty ten l peace prize but after you shall board died in chinese custody a year ago her health deteriorated she's now since we've boarded a flight and is due to arrive in berlin in the coming hours despite never being charged she was not allowed to leave for home and could only rarely receive guests human rights groups of long cold for her release health officials in thailand say the first group of boys rescued from a flooded cave have received visits in hospital from their families don't turn your sada choky dumrong suk said the boys will stay in hospital for a week for observation the man leading the rescue has said he hopes today's operation will be completed more speedily than on the first two days sophie long explains the divers entered the cave at ten oh eight this morning the final four footballers will be making that very perilous journey diving down deep narrow jagged passageways with guides and making their way hopefully back into the outside world for the first time in eighteen days withhold by the tile therapies that they are going to bring the four boy that plus the coach plus the doctor who's been with them and then three navy seals as well who've been keeping them company you get the feeling that there really is a race against time here now though a huge heavy downpours last night and it's been raining pretty solidly today president trump has chosen a conservative appeals court judge to fill the vacancy at the us supreme court he called brad kavanagh one of the finest legal minds of our time john cavanaugh he said he would approach every case with an open mind he now needs to be approved by the senate only meatball reports the nomination of brett cavanaugh will make the hearts of democrats and social liberals in the us sink but it is precisely the kind of move that conservatives and evangelical christians would have hoped for when they voted for donald trump the protests that have already started outside the supreme court a focused mainly on judge kavanagh's ideological views on abortion gun control and the environment right cavanaugh was an aide to george w bush and before that a key member of the legal team the made a case for the impeachment of bill clinton since then he said he doesn't think presidents while in office should have to worry about investigations and criminal proceedings against them india's supreme court has started hearing petitions which call for the scrapping of a law which criminalizes gay sex prosecutions are rare but activists say it can be used to intimidate people in same sex relationships the court rejected a plea by the central government to delay the hearing this is the world news from the bbc in afghanistan at least ten people have been killed in a bomb attack in the city of jalalabad in the east of the country officials say a suicide bomber approached the local headquarters of the afghan intelligence services and detonated explosives large blast damaged nearby cars and shops it's unclear who was responsible but jalalabad the capital of nangahar province and close to the border with pakistan has seen a surge in militant attacks turkey's leader reggie typer one has begun his first day with the enhanced role of executive president by issuing a number of decrees focusing on banking and how officials are appointed is given himself the power to choose the central bank's governor and deputies as well as the monetary policy committees members for the next four years researchers in australia say they've managed to reduce the numbers of mosquitoes in a town in queensland by eight percent using a new technique the team hopes many diseases will become more controllable he's phil mercer mayo mosquitoes were bred in elaborate tree in northern australia and infected with a bacteria that made them sterile they were then released into the wild in the town of innisfail in queensland's over three months they mated with females who laid eggs that didn't hatch causing the population to fall sharply the type of mosquito used in the trial is responsible for infecting hundreds of millions of people around the.

Joe Xiaobo BBC Eight Percent Eighteen Days Three Months Twenty Ten L Eight Years Four Years Two Days
"executive vice president" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Thank you thank you you're the executive vice president and chief operating officer of the new york times the first coo in over a decade i i think so i process that i feel very lucky to be there i feel particularly lucky to be there in this moment at your the person really whose figured it out i mean you and your team are the ones who have figured out the model that makes money in that business i i would i wanna clarify i am not the person um the new york times i think as well as anyone hands has figured out the necessity of expeditious digital transformation i think we've figured out that um news as a relationship business and we're on a journey to be a world class consumer brand um but it's you know the collective of a lot leaders at the times and the family um the souls burger family that m has figured it out so not just me mighty but it's an important distinction because for so many years people just assumed that you needed to give it away for free that if someone was going to click on your articles online there's no way people would be willing to spend any money and the new york times that collective wisdom that you are a part of and apart your job is really charged with figuring that component out has figured out how to get people to pay for it yeah i always say you can described the business model not the journalism not mission but the business model of the new york times and five words make something worth paying for and you know yet assesments when most of the alternatives are free and i think this year in particular i think the times has had you know century to half of proving that it does that and i think about the year two thousand seventeen october v two thousand seventeen the day jodie kanter and meghan to we publish their peace on harvey weinstein i really think the world changed that day.

new york times coo jodie kanter harvey weinstein executive vice president and c meghan
"executive vice president" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"245 will be joined by stephen espinosa who is the executive vice president general manager of showtime sporting event programming talked about me other mcgregor talked about the production talked about the build up the aftermath where they go from here all that are more he'll be joined uh or i actually i say we'll be joined in studio by him he'll be right over here talking to us i'm looking forward to that a brilliant mind and one of the major players involved in that fight so that should be a lot of fun a 245 225 own roddy these striking kotra one conor mcgregor will stop i talked to him about the fight and what's next for conor mcgregor 205 page ran zandt is going to stop by it's been awhile since we've talked to her and she has a fight a 216 against just guy 145 patty the batty pimlott a uh a favorite of a lot of you out there including our own page he will be stopping by the former cage warriors featherweight champion 130 thirty will talk to francis and guy who but first let us go to these guy machine or the phone i don't know i'm confused scott machine let's go to these machine welcome in one of our favorites friend of the program the one and only joann calderwood joining us from which other she is joann how are you right i'm calling because quite okay that's it because he because quiz eric by guy told me phone and skype in so got me very confused uh but the scot connection is fantastic any sound great so i appreciate you going the extra mile and i know you just finished training as well so thank you very much for.

stephen espinosa executive vice president gener roddy conor mcgregor zandt francis joann calderwood eric guy scott skype