21 Burst results for "Executive Vice President"

"executive vice president" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

"Is just been such a treat. And thanks so much for your time sandra. It's been wonderful. Thank you george care. Bye-bye thanks for listening. If you enjoyed this conversation please take a moment to rate our show. If you haven't already be sure to subscribe to the work inspired podcast so that you don't miss. Any of the incredible guests we have planned for. Upcoming episodes will continue to find the best and brightest minds and business so that you can learn grow and succeed and so that we can all work inspired.

"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the playbook. I have incredible. Peter o'reilly the executive vice president of club business and league events for the nfl. This is our super bowl edition of the playbook and we're going to talk about what changes are made for this super bowl especially because of the pandemic who's being honored how they're being honored how we can share the super bowl with so many more people. Virtually join me all this and more on the playbook this is entrepreneurs the label each week. I bring you some of the greatest athletes celebrities and entrepreneurs to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success. What made them champions on the field and in the boardroom. I'm your host.

Peter o'reilly each week super bowl more people nfl so
Pop star Bobi Wine’s party fears Ugandan elections have been rigged

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:01 min | 7 months ago

Pop star Bobi Wine’s party fears Ugandan elections have been rigged

"Polls have closed in uganda in an election which had been dogged by violence and where the government has this week. Shut down the internet. Preliminary results suggest a strong lead for you wairimu. Seventeen who's kept an iron grip on the country for nearly three and a half decades. His opponent is bobby. Wine singer turned politician. Final results are expected tomorrow. The contest as revealed deep fissures between the rich who support mr who seventy and a younger generation. Who back mr wine. These tensions reflect a wider political unease in the region where concerns are growing about threats to democracy is don don gotten as bobby wind. Leeann taylor writes for the economist and his base. In kepala. he'd come out to speak to the press just moments ago instead the election the worst rigging in bandon history. He could scott himself as the president. Elect president-elect said he's winning by so he sent me this he's one is and has he won so some ugandan media station to putting preliminary results from the votes which come in so far. Just being. The incumbent president stephanie. A very healthy league. But it's very hard to verify likely what's going on because incident has been shut down across the countries night before the votes. Which makes it very difficult to know what's happening. And that's why we're speaking to you by phone today. But why has that shutdown happened. So one reason why is because the filled up to the fights probably wine had launched and supporters encouraging them to take pictures of the results forms meeting the vigil polling station upload them under app and so then the opposition were able to produce their own alternative results. The government is trying to clamp down on that Also the government is trying to clamp down on communications generally. Because they're very worried that there's all these executive president of seventy that will be a unrest parts. The streets come product.

Bobby Wind Leeann Taylor Kepala Don Don Uganda Bobby Bandon Government Scott Stephanie
"executive vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:11 min | 11 months ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"They GONNA stop because if they can't trust the information, they're saying that he's GonNa decide to go. Back to pipe, and so with finding that it's this combination of technology talent that's critical. So use the technology where you can get his officiant as you possibly change but then if there's a gap, so you've got an insurer that still completely type of com handle electronic enquiries in have a backup team that can get on the fun with that insurer enclosed caps and taking up to August. Yeah not a one size fits all you gotta do Combo of Tech and talent. Absolutely. Yeah. No, that's interesting. So as you think about how you guys are improving outcomes in, you know making business better it's so clear now I appreciate you walking us through that. What's one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced and a key learning that emerged from that sure I. I think probably the one of the biggest surprises for me was discovering that the biggest competitor in we had to adoption was the fax machine. This libere technology that we must be daily remember it's still despite which unification technology healthcare and so that that was a big surprise in the other piece was attention. So when we think about the software that we also to doctor's office said, the specialist writes the prescription is usually a team of office stuff involved in processing all of this pipe work out the I should get started. So we're really trying to help back team of office. And those folks are so hard working and you go into one of these officers and even if you've got an appointment team both it's there was in the field as well as a team on the find calling on these offices and helping them to get educated about a software and how to use it, and we found that just getting attention is is incredibly difficult and so what we have to do is not just provide a solution that's going to help them. Along run it, it's gotta be immediately apparent to them that it's GonNa, make life easier, and so we found that once they start using the software and they get they love it. In fact, we've been doing product market fit surveys am funny. Really high percentage of folks to be really hard disappointed was no longer available says great use. Yes. No product market fit but I would go to get on it and and that's been the challenge. So for example, we have A. A reverse Haitian solution that loads the patient risks like it's. So this says you know all of these patients because typically at the end of the year, you got going check everybody's insurance again and I think particularly in in the current situation as well. We saw people changing their job situation's constantly to evaluate whether insurance has changed and so that loading that patient looks like a to do list of me makes life a lot easier because nagging go okay I'll go to govern and check this set of patients to see whether their insurance China working at anything we can do to make an started easier is really the big lesson that's so interesting, and so what's been the key to adoption them? Yet really really this sort of looking at the redesign. So can we import data? Can we look at every aspect of getting started log in registration etc, and just trying to find ways to reduce that amount of effort because if it if it looks like it's going to be hotter than scooping on a piece of paper in fact, they not gonNA, do it and So that's really the challenge is is continuing to refine that that front end Ui and and trying to help them to just give it a guy so that they can understand how they lost can be a little bit easier and the patients can get better results. Yeah. That's a good call out reducing the friction thinking about the overall workflow. How can it? Meet, year than scribbling on paper. You know it some I do facts through my phone now like new rare instance an you know they've got these facts apps now. Yeah. Yeah, and so I'm wondering if you know you mentioned that fax machines are one of the biggest competitors is there a software optimization where you use digital facts technologies to make the overall process simpler? Yeah and that's be one area that we think looking at because it's GonNa. Take a while to the people over from facts instance. So that's your the money to buy by the way. I don't. Amazon to get whatever I want tomorrow. Yeah. So What of course? Many. Between the healthcare and at other districts right? Vagit. Koga at airplane. You know they alighted say. Can. I have a slight tomorrow on the airline says, well, I don't know when I have no idea how much it's GonNa cost you. So, looking at digital technology. Yeah. especially. Periods hike is a you know we were talking earlier about this problem of somebody's falls come in with missing information. So can we can we take those vaccine electrically use optical character recognition soon to read our keep hospitalized forms and load that information in so it makes it easier for staff but it will say if there are issues and get on top of straight away straight back to the providers of. Painting on Shia form missing EXA why can FELETI and send it back? That's powerful. That's that could be really powerful. Right? Especially, if that is the case, right? He put on one away. Fax Machine let's digitized at least. Yeah. Yeah. funny is pandemic I. Mean It's not obviously it's a terrible situation, but we had office stop with hives and they've had no access to facts. Receiving Christie interest from providers, offices, and manufacturers in in the software tell my Gosh. Wow Amazing. Well, you know what these things while very challenging and and painful also pushes to be better and. Faster, so you know hope it's helped you guys and and so what what are you most excited about today rich I would say needs it's really this next generation patient supports said continuing to find wise that we can leverage. Much amazing innovation happening in digital health and I think particularly now missing a lot with virtual healthy remote patient monitoring and growing on the backs of telehealth and so that's one key pace. I think the other areas really the continue ever wish by spice and how do we leverage tiring get smarter? So you know when you look at I support solutions today, it's been very much a one-size-fits-all approach. You know every patient is sign and I'm just very excited about how we can get smart and say, let's really assess each patient as unique individual and right sizes supports I need and monitor how they doing justice. As we as they go three and that's exciting. It is. Yeah I mean for example, would looking at social determinants, the health and saying we blade that deny typically nestled welcome coal to assess patient and see what the challenges up if we can blend that with died or about social determinants of health, we provide that noticed.

patient monitoring China Amazon Koga Christie
"executive vice president" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WTOP

"Executive vice president Steve o'donnell Ryan Newman had been in the lead on the final lap racing fan chart Chuck mobile was there with his son you know number one it's amazing that you know he's doing okay and you know number two is just with families it was my son's birthday you know he swore up about it you know and he's a Die Hard race again just turned thirteen you know so it hits hard there were get well tweets for Ryan Newman from president trump and other famous people in the race itself it was a third Daytona title for Denny Hamlin his second one in a row CBS news update on top forty it's two thirty two new this morning the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy protection early yesterday the first step to creating a massive victim compensation plan that's according to a press release Wall Street journal reporter and use Garia explains what the Boy Scouts are hoping to do with this filing the Boy Scouts are using bankruptcy to try to get a handle on hundreds of lawsuits are from people who are alleging that they were sexually abused or molested by employees or volunteers of the Boy Scouts most often decades ago the group is expected to be forced to sell off significant property holdings to finance the compensation fund which could surpass a billion dollars China reports new virus cases and more deaths from the virus cold mid nineteen AP correspondent Mike Crossey our reports but Tuesday update from the Chinese center for disease control and prevention reports eighteen hundred eighty six new virus cases and ninety eight more deaths the new numbers raise the total confirmed cases in mainland China two seventy two thousand four hundred thirty six the Chinese health officials say more than eighty percent of the people infected had mild illnesses and cases of new infections seem to be on the decline the disease named covert nineteen emerged in Wuhan China in December I might cross yeah it's two thirty three early voting has begun for the Nevada caucuses which will be held this coming weekend and in the wake of what happened and I what there is concern among Democrats W. T. O. P.'s Mitchell Miller has more from Capitol Hill Virginia senator Tim Kaine once served as the Democratic National Committee chairman and knows how complicated things can get out some states have primary some states have caucuses and primaries in some states have hybrid models and so everybody's got their own quirks keen agrees that the mass in the Iowa caucuses means questions need to be asked and answered and some Democrats worry that Nevada could repeat some of the earlier mistakes when the caucuses are held on Saturday Kane says if he had his choice more states would have open primaries like Virginia I've been in presidential primaries in Virginia and watch people come in and they say you went to Republican Ballard democratic ballot I Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTOP news it's two thirty four U. S. intelligence agencies are racing to stay ahead of increasingly hostile adversaries and not only are they aggressive they've got serious weapons to back them up every day Deirdre Walsh chief operating officer in the office of the director of national intelligence it's the ground running literally out the door try to get some exercise as much as I can to get the cobwebs out and in the office between seven and eight a clear head is important because you have your big for China Russia Iran North Korea the common denominator nukes malware and bots many of these are hardy perennials are the kinds of things that come back every year but in twenty twenty there especially difficult problems and whatever happens our role is to make sure that intelligence is there read more at WTOP dot com search national security JJ green WTOP news it's two thirty five the daily rides of thousands of northern Virginia bus passengers may be in jeopardy Thursday unionized workers for Fairfax connector or threatening a strike Fairfax connector carries up to thirty thousand passengers a day the county's privatized bus system is operated by the France based company Transdev and labor dispute simmering from late last year have boiled up in the new year active going and what they do best store only and not a bargain fair again amalgamated transit union president John Costa accuses Transdev of cost cutting at the expense of workers riders in the community more than five hundred drivers and maintenance workers are threatening to walk off their jobs as soon as Thursday Dick you only on WTOP news it's two thirty six some Maryland man looking to meet up with a date were made instead by robbers Greenville police officer George.

Ryan Newman Executive vice president Steve o'donnell
"executive vice president" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Sports Las Vegas Clark County County Frank mccord in his in his acquisition of the L. A. Dodgers and the Learner family in its succession acquisition. Excuse me successful successful acquisition of the Washington nationals throughout his professional career. Mike has had the opportunity to lecture and speak in extensively only at a number of universities and to Graduate Students of Columbia University Business School. Georgetown University School of Business uh-huh amongst other major universities currently along with his duties with the Pacific. Mike Is Consulting for the development of a Multi Sports Academy in Marin creating multiple minor league teams in the North American Baseball League and is teaching sports management at the University of San Francisco's Graduate Sports Management Program. He has also writing a novel in two thousand twelve. Mike along with you you you Jean Luc. PARO and Steve Allen bought a share of the pacifics and now serves as a minority owner in the ballclub club. Mike is married to his wife Jane. They live in quarter Madeira with their two sons Harry and Jackson. This is the second part of a two part conversation the station with Mike and Continuing our conversation that we started from last week's show but they're they're playing for the love of the game and and for for the hope somebody will see them the passion to play. I mean that's what it takes. They're doing it for the same reasons. We're doing it because we love being part of baseball and we do it because We love this community. Munity that we live in most your players they lived here local About two thirds of the players. Do not come from this area but but we marry them up with host families so they live with local families who may have kids and they love having a professional baseball player in their home for the summer. Well Yeah No I. I met this one woman who who asked me for two players so go figure that out but no you know. It's it's about integrating the team the community and that includes putting the players in a host families it means taking the players and going out to the to the hospitals goes into the senior centers and community events and integrating the team. So you're you're telling me that there's a Japanese girl that's pitching. Yes in Hawaiian Wyan League. So is there. has there ever been a woman or a female that wants to come onto your team We have not had anyone There's no barrier there is there no no I think it was. I had a sixty five year old man pitch for us last year Former major league player. Bill Spaceman Baseman. Lee Who who set a record. He's he's from San Rafael set. A record as the oldest man ever to win a professional baseball game last year this year we brought in Russ Columbo who's the president and CEO of the Bank of Marin and he even pitched to one batter in a professional game picture. Yeah so we have fun with it and we try to break barriers and it's wonderful for the community and the fact that you were Yoshida that this this young young woman who From Japan who pitches for the Maui team and should be pitching here again on on July six The fact that she's pitching in this league is wonderful wonderful and and I think it's one of the things one of the statements were trying to make about breaking down the barriers and trying to make Baseball more accessible to more people. I mean yeah if a female and of course. I'm speaking for them. If they're if they have the passion to play and they're up to it. Why not why not I mean she throws a knuckleball so she doesn't try to overpower the hitters? With you know I mean I think physical size makes it a little bit difficult to try to compete. But she found a niche where she can throw this wonderful knuckleball. That is just difficult for big men even hit and and she's been very successful. Wow I guess we'll see what happens when you come here and play. Oh that's great so Well it sounds like you have your just fulfilling your dream and and for the viewers. I you know. I just liked to show examples temples that you can't fulfil dream and money isn't everything you know if you're if you're paying your bills and you can do the things you WanNa do financially and your most of all happy because you will live longer because you're you're fulfilling your dream. Well I had to learn some painful lessons along the way and again for as many of those high places that I was fortunate enough to get to. There's always the other side of that and that is there. There's you you you do see some very low places as well and so. My life has been a roller coaster. Ride in in many respects and I wouldn't trade it for anything but some of the painful lessons that I've had to learn about the acquisition of an loss of wealth in in financial sense. Right Right Led Me To the conclusion that I'm at somewhat now and that is that is vastly vastly unimportant to one's happiness into the satisfaction of one's life And if that's all if that's all there is and I have known A couple billionaires that that's all that they were after. I mean nate there. There's an emptiness inside that you know if they're if they're just after money. Yeah well I mean that's the pursuit of an illusory goal. Hello Oh yes and and it took me a long time to learn that I. It took me a lot of painful lessons to learn that I had many opportunities where you know I think I it was or could have even been more so financially well off and for a variety of reasons lost those resources and and and lost those opportunities and had to struggle through A lot of angst over what.

Mike baseball North American Baseball League Las Vegas Clark County County Georgetown University School o Graduate Students of Columbia Washington PARO Hawaiian Wyan League Multi Sports Academy San Francisco L. A. Dodgers San Rafael Marin Steve Allen Russ Columbo Jean Luc nate Bank of Marin
"executive vice president" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

WOW! I want to take that class!

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

"Hand. This is our wonderful podcast. While I wanNA take this class right and the purpose of this podcast they have so many wonderful faculty and administrators That are doing innovative things in their classes. And it's a chance to talk to them and we have very very very special gas today. We're so lucky. Dr Wilson is the Executive Vice President and Chief Strategy and Innovation Officer at southern New Hampshire. University take your city. Thank you so have your we. We just have the opportunity. Listen for an hour to cash so many ideas yes too much like to almost wrap if you're getting meals like two days after I just thought about it all and here's my question. It is true so I'm sure that'll be US still. Here's in so I. We came up with a couple of questions for you because we know you're short on time today so we really appreciate you taking the time. One thing I was thinking of when you were speaking there are so many great things for one thing I was thinking of. You said one thing you said was you don't have to be attack or innovation expert to begin building toward the needs of future learners. I thought that was great. I just wondered if you could talk more about that or anything that you could talk to. Our Higher Education are professors. Bright students at their in the heat over one by this pretty quick right and then everybody wants the silver bullet answer when actually it's going to come from heaven flow of understanding instead it's is GonNa come from empathy so emotional intelligence and empathy is kind of the first step. So it's not. You don't have to be a technologist to do that now. You'RE GONNA get skills along the way to understand the world that Turin. But it's more it's more of the the human element. And because these these millennials were one thing in we. We were off guard as institutions. I think as an industry but Gen Z.. Is GonNa come in with demands. They're going to be the first digital generation like from the beginning we see. Now you have three year olds are walking to the television. Have answered does wiping Sir Nicer. They they are going to be more technologically advanced than probably from the beginning so so. It's not don't try and catch up with that but we you know. How do they harnessed that? Lets the same as you would have any kind of business skill or teaching skill or something like that and that's GonNa come from a keen understanding of what they need. The other end is we have to. You know if you have five dollars spins three dollars there and the other two has to be out with employers because there's a file risi mistranslation between clean What we're seeing the tail in the wheels in the workforce and like a recruiter from from say From just a big business the big chain right right so I think I need this. They're like we haven't seen that in ten years. The student is in a student probably knows exactly Lafley what they need right on the job that hasn't been invented yet or it's it's it's the other way it's way advanced where the program ended. The student was in for the four year. College was geared towards the late nineteen ninety s workplace. That's happening it's hepatic. Okay so issues. There is a fear so now there's recognition so now we can do in. That comes from empathy right so I gotTa have you know so so so you know I used to able not to talk to. If I'm if I'm a professor or Dean you know half of my time should be with having someone in the classroom or kind of place based learning or simulation with an actual employer is trying to solve yes Make make learning really meaningful. It is where it sounds like right. He so much of it isn't built that way we don't necessarily build classes awesome to really incorporate real world situations that now more than ever. It really needs to happen alley right in the power. Simulations in the reduction in price price of making good situations Is it it's it's proven so Surgeons you know their time on a simulator is actually more valuable their time in an actual surgery because tools are so precise now so you don't make his mistakes but in a simulator you can make take something can go wrong same thing. With the pilot to fly a Boeing jet plane but people in it. You really have to fly it for about you know For very minimal time. Everything else can be done simulators. So why can't you come out of business program with With something on your resume is as I said. Two certified negotiations with these companies. Think of our field McKay. Twelve education is our world. Just think if we simulated classrooms were student teachers going in and I can refer to experimenting the with with live. That's basically what they're doing. Yes we can have a simulated classroom where students neely is is it. Doesn't it doesn't the people that are doing it. Don't always seek technology. There they get a like a like a group of five actors and right in one. One day they're going to the business department and pretending like their executives that you have to pick something to acting like fifth graders or something Sharon it's kind of weird the beginning but people are showing up for their Students are showing up for their jobs Teaching Year that are prepared. Yes yeah and then the city you take away student teaching. No but I can sure as heck make it more impactful awful. They're not tripping over themselves clumsy in India place based learning to wire the already in the classroom before there awhile for wrote down. Yeah I mean it's it. That is the number one. I think student complaint Who are in a bet field is why am I only in a student teaching experience for one semester? Why has it been this late and You know I think that's probably the same for many programs where there's just one internship experience wiser just one experience like this. As opposed to all of these experiential experiences could be having an every class. And that's what I know. That's that's where technology can help you. Can you know you can credential that and that can stack up into a degree or the concentration. Or you know you can get something that formalizes and says that you can do what your degree says you can bite size chunks on these are the innovation and we're going to unleash faculty so if you look at what's happened to the faculty role in particular over the last ten years you know it's actually become become The catchall so they are they're ab person they are advisor. They are so we've tapped all this stuff onto them in. You know what was going to change. You know it's GonNa get rid of technology that's come out but you can't unbundle unbundle. It can free them up because the funny thing about faculty is most if not all really care about students and if they have twenty more minutes in the day they're gonNA transplantable astute. I'm saying is you can unbundle it. Give them the resources they need and allow them to make the time that they do have students more impactful for guess well in while you're giving your presentation I just kept thinking about. We are so far behind today. Eight I feel like we are I. Do I need to change that. It's like it's like I I want I want you I. How quickly can we catch up to two? Maybe where we need to be. How you do that? Fixer of your successful. Hello if you're going to be successful so recognition and they use gotta start some of the problem so right now we have lots and lots of experts on the issue so that brief today I mean. There's that stuff's happening. That's not my ideas. That's not my opinions. That is happening. What are you gonNA do right right? And then in Begun Investments If if you guys are pretty good or any schools in a pretty good financial state now's the time to make the investments because once once you get into crisis yes to your already on business is what win. Will that APP and then you just really not serving seven students at that point because the upheaval of closure college you know what happens to base. That trusted their future with you. You know it's pretty pretty basing to have to go into an employer employer and they have to go to the state to get your.

Executive Vice President and C professor New Hampshire US Dr Wilson Turin Boeing neely Sharon India advisor Dean
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Good version of the book So it took about a year and a half and a lot of rights and and actually the thing that was most surprising to me. Is You know I was a creative writing a business book and I thought I needed to speak in business. Speak and she's like tell your stories. Your story will end up. I guarantee you finding its way into a business book so so I was like. Oh Okay I got tons of stories that I can talk about and indeed that I think that's what made the book interesting for people because it was an unlikely source of insight that it can be layered into Corporate work that Thomas. Oh you know Acquainted with and I know this now hosting the podcast that you know I I do. I've done about our we at like about two hundred interviews and so I read all these business books and I can tell the ones that are like. Here's the ten point stance or something And they're fine. They sell well but then the the ones that really come to life is where I'm the author is speaking of their experience. Sure You know the mistakes in their in their fiascos And those are the ones that are the best. Because it's like oh great. I get to know you and I get to know your insights and then and my my biggest question then is like is this part of my actual evidence or is this your opinion right and I it this is the University of Chicago has a rub off on me. which is like I'm less interested in your opinions unless backed up by evidence? So that's a I. I'm a guy who reads footnotes now. And that was not the case. You know for Kelly Leonard. Five years go Kelly that brings up a really interesting point because For many creatives who are creating or writing alone or maybe who have just like adventured out in the world but just just like got some direct experience that is You know maybe very different as a creative. Obviously you're just running an experiment where it's an N.. Of One and very very difficult to collect evidence along the way or keep polishing your creative work until you can have proof. Maybe how it's going to do in the marketplace. or how how it's already doing or whatever. So as you're going about that process of like gathering proof or creating a vision for your creative project how how do you go from one to You know a hypothesis that professionals are going to respect. It's hard right. I mean I look. I don't think it's the artist's job necessarily to then go back and compile the evidence. I think I think again that this is why we love our collaboration aberration which is to my earlier point. which is the you know? The artists shouldn't be the accountant. The artist is to be the scientists. Let's go find a scientist. You know if you need that and not everyone needs that either you know but but the insights are out there right so one of the things that We talk a lot about we talk a lot about. Its second science project is. Is You know the reality is almost all science. Replace itself so almost. All scientists ends up being untrue at some point and then replaced by something else sure And what we also know. Is that just because you have evidence that this phenomenon exists in this this way that you tested this thing. There are just eons of different context that that could render that untrue in another in another world so so scientists perfect either. They're definitely like A. There's a hunch aspect to all this so we're really trying to do and we think we've hit a sweet spot with it. which is what is the best evidence what is the most? What is the most cutting edge insights that we've got from academia that when paired with improvisational practice the the idea of testing it out we test out the evidence if we can just give people wisdom to improvise with then they're going to be able to make those leaps and changes in their variety of contexts? They're going to be like. I tried it this way with this and I tried it this way with that. I think the situation was Kinda. You know let's go that way so it really is all about you know it's the best we have at the moment and then we've practiced practiced with our wisdom. Then I think we're going to probably do okay a in the world wise words. Yeah and I think it's important everything you said Reflect on I'm going to go back and listen to this interview. This has been awesome. But something you said I think is so important about science and it's generally about phenomenon that can be repeatedly triggered with the same type of environment and setting and everything whereas comedy or art you're trying to create a singular phenomena that can't be replicated it can be copied it can be remixed it can be you reported but ultimately you're GonNa make a work that stands on its own in some ways. So would you agree with that. And would you agree with the statement. It meant that art needs to lead science and not the other way around. I think what are is as a reflection of the human condition That's how it started whether whether it's cave paintings or you know shadows on the wall. So what art does is allow US another way to look at life That then what scientists do is. TRY TO UNPACK unpack well. What is the DNA of that writer? You know what's the phenomenon going on underneath that I think it's intriguing to think At times of what's the science And what is the artistic expression of that science. Because what's happened over. Time is the back science. This is very difficult to communicate. Because it's extremely honest which means Sir saying well we think in the situation we surmise and it could be problematic over here are you know. And that's why when you have someone like Malcolm glad well come along and talk about ten thousand hours and recognize that that you know. He wasn't presenting the The idea in its fullest and that research has also been you know looked at with more scrutiny. Now and I m defend this the other Dan his podcast and a very sort of like you know off hand away. Ram like Malcolm the the problem is. You're incredibly good storyteller and the truth doesn't make for really great stories all the time because there's so many caveats arm. Trump doesn't always lead to YEP blockbusters. Let's just say that. Yeah no no no I mean the the truth is really murky and muddy. And it's not clean and it's not until you're yeah Again looking at the unblemished photos of any of us like move yeah. I'm afraid that's what we look like. But that's also in the greedy areas is the places I like to play and I think they're fun And so you know having worked now in with all these different academic communities you know the thing I I I strive to make them understand is look I get it. We want to be close to the truth as possible. But you know if we can't say this in a way that could be understood and It will not be enacted upon and then. Why are you doing this? Why why are you even wasting your time for learning these insights if they can't be used boost And so I really hope if I'm looking at the work I want to be doing for the next you know. Let's just ten years it's going to be. How do I make the ivory tower accessible and I think we've got a really good medium for doing that? We have a comic voice That we can apply to that and we have these improvisational practices. That can put stuff in play and you know we can get people you know. Five percent of you know any population to suddenly have this work at their fingertips to use it in their lives. I think that's GonNa make you huge differences. I we have a field day in a in a meeting where we said if we could improve listening by two percent in every early childhood class in the city. Do you think that would have an effect Matt Matt right massive. So that's like that's doable. We can do that. You just need to re just need to get off harassers talk to the right people and you know and and and get it going So yeah that's the work. I want to do very cool and when it comes to life outside of work right right now if you get a chance to relax I'm curious. What type of fiction or nonfiction are you enjoying is TV series is a book? What are your favorite mediums? And what are you you enjoying right now. Yeah so I read so much for work and I used to be just fiction so huge Don delillo. Fan Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The PALACASINO Now I read. I read basically two books a week of mostly nonfiction so and I love reading so that that. That doesn't feel like work to me. Some watching the Ken. Ken Burns Country Documentary Right now Which which I'm very much enjoying I like to go see music And so I've got tickets to a Frank Turner Concert In a couple of weeks and then my wife and I have this like incredible garden in our backyard in Chicago and I really sort of learned the joys of sort sort of sitting in the garden play. I love music. So you know making a spotify playlist drinking a bottle of wine and she's a great cook So it's sort of communing with nature You know all the kids are out of the house. It's just her and I right now And that's recent and so we're just kind of learning like. Oh how does how does this work. So there's a little bit of of guilty pleasure in that we're kinda able to sort of be uninterrupted in our garden with our music with our wine Not have to tend to little ones or you know other problems or driving. You know kids around or that sort of thing so that and then you know get and the other thing I've ever have to do is because I don't want to sit around. All the time is push myself to take more coffees with people that I haven't seen in a while. Push myself to invite a couple over that you know you and that's not something that we initially did a ton of before but you know those relationships are important and this idea of meaning maintaining connections. So that's kind of my world. It sounds like a great way to recharge the only and Kelly final question here for anyone. That's listening right now. Either wants to come to a show get involved help out follow your work or Yeah just see what you're up to. What's the best way for them to get involved with you in every thing and everyone at second city so our website is second city dot Com and and in the works division which presently houses me second city works dot com And you can subscribe to my podcast there I'm on twitter at tale second city..

scientist Kelly Leonard Malcolm University of Chicago Thomas spotify twitter Gabriel Garcia Marquez Don delillo accountant Ken Burns Matt Matt Trump writer Dan Frank Turner Ram Chicago
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"I mean this is just like the but we all experience life in different ways. So I think doc gratitude and connection and then we have a phrase and improvisation when the senior in not the senior. WanNa be in Which is about teaching presence in in the moment not catastrophes ing about the future or the past Recognizing that if we can you know there's a sort of mindfulness aspect to this if we can really stay present where we are right now with gratitude with connection We can weather a lot of storms so after you weather that storm and As a creative. You're starting to have success. I'm sure one of the things that you've noticed is for creatives. You know often you go through a period or maybe even a decade where you're making minimum wage or less Or maybe no money for for time periods and all of a sudden you're able to sell a creative project project or you're able to find someone or a sponsor or patron to finance a project and you actually have money for the first time creatives aren't the best at at managing money. I've heard other any stories or pieces of wisdom that you can share for creatives who are approaching or maybe at a project where they have more money for the project than they ever thought they would and they WanNa do good for the sponsor they WanNa do good for themselves Any tips for how to avoid those landmines. Yeah don't don't handle the money literally go get someone else to handle the money. I mean I don't handle my. My wife handles. Those are money I do not I I should not be allowed anywhere near it And even a second city like I can name I could name you like ten women Who have worked worked with me who've been my second in command Except for working over man and they were really good with money and they were good with you know organization And then I was able to sort of do what I do. Best in a room like you know the the idea of the well rounded Individual also a mess. We are not all all good at everything and like you could put me in a class and I would still like. I'm not GONNA do it. I'm not going to be okay at this so it is okay. You should focus your people will So that ninety percent of their time. They're doing what they're good at recognizing the ten percent of the time they probably gotta do mediocre work in another aspect of that someone else can't yeah pick up. It's it's really really important. Don't try to be something that you aren't especially when it comes to the financial stuff because that's hugely important You you know in terms of your own making sure looks. We're all fighting scarcity in some way or another scarcity of time scarcely of relationships but scarcity of of means and. And you know like I'm not gonna be able to do good work for you if I can't eat and I'm not going to be able to do good good work if I'm worried about the fact that I've got to retire at component and I don't have the money so you know getting help and there are people out there who do this kind of work who manage people's money and and help them basically go live in a way where they can really be their most creative south as opposed to being like the worst accountant For the greatest artists Dabur and your excellent points So my wife is our coo here at the business and it were small team Fifteen people several contractors growing rapidly. And we're starting to think about comedy more so I'm curious. Have you worked with many creative shops or companies that maybe have done very well and original content in other areas that are interested in moving into comedy. And if so is this something that you like cringe when you hear. Is it exciting. Good for you any any device for us as we start to dip our toes into those waters. Yeah so we. We work with a ton town companies primarily who want to who recognize that comedic storytelling comedic content is very sticky. There's a reason that the super bowl commercials are seventy percent comedy ads Because there's so much evidence out there of How comedy cut through the noise? Good comedy but it's good comedy. That cuts through noise So I often. I'd say first foremost Don't practice comedy without a license It is so many people think they can do it And those are the people who sent out that terrible tweet that then you know sends them into a PR tailspin. You do want to work with experts in the medium who know the difference between what is a good joke. Doc on twitter What is representative of a piece of storytelling? That might work better on Youtube To something that is better audio medium or alive medium They're all the difference. The thing that's a classic story around this was about. I don't know ten years ago or so This ethics group showed up. They did ethics and compliance work And then this idea around creating sort of live training models and we do a lot of that work and We talked to them and the wasn't exactly right. But it led us to shoe develop this product called real shorts Where we created really funny short digital content that was there to support the ethics and compliance training That everyone had to take at all these different businesses and we're talking everything from like banks to insurance houses to legal. You know people have to take this training It's really boring But it's really important. And this became like a multimillion dollar business for us because this comedy is most often needed where it's the least expected and certainly compliance training. No one is expecting comedy and and that's why it works so well so often when we get in a Rut of like what are we going into next or like what would be a cool area to start thinking of all the places that no one would expect us the B.. Where's the least likely place because first of all that's GonNa be a fun phone call to make? I'm and you know and likely there's really fertile ground so it's a I I I was. I interviewed an author of the other day around innovation and they told the story about in World War Two. They were trying to figure out when planes would get shot down Why and what could they do to better enforce the planes to not be shocked out so what they do? Is that planes. That would make it back They would study where the bullet holes were and they're often looking like okay. Well let's reinforce these areas and let's do that but it never correlated to success. They'd never correllated that they were. They're doing and things right so they brought in this guy from a completely different field. I think there's a statistician or whatever and they're like this guy's smart we just come in for the day and look at this and he showed up with five minutes he said you guys shouldn't be re reinforcing where the bullet holes are. You should be reinforcing where they aren't because these are the plans that survived and I was just like Oh that is amazing. mazing it it really is sort of getting out of your own bubble To sort of look at what isn't or look at what is and and often we are bad about especially the more success. We have so especially for successful people you have to find ways to Look at the world differently recognizing that just because this pattern work for you right now doesn't mean it's going to work for you in every medium every context or in every year because life changes So that that's something. I was really taken with that story. Because I think it illustrates so well that point. I love that I love that story. And so as a as a veteran as somebody who's creative I've written books on things built this company company and it's been a struggle along the way not with other people but it's of course you know always with myself at the end of the day and in in connecting and in working with other creatives. It's it's very exciting now because as the team grows you get to choose people who you would want to be friends with anyways. So it's it's really exciting and There are a number of other people on the team that I would say. Are you know just as good if not way. Better than me at being creative or creating a different mediums. And it's really exciting however it's clear that you know. Obviously all of us came to the table with our own baggage right so as creatives. Who are trying to create together Is there any advice you have for helping creatives understand each other. Maybe and because you know you don't want to just jump I've been to well. Here's all the trauma and crap. I've been through. What have you been through How do you get there and be patient along the way of discovering who other people are so you can relate with them better so Very specifically We were higher by the University of Chicago to develop their orientation workshops for every incoming freshmen based on ideas around Implicit bias On what we knew about the way people all sort of quickly size up other people How they You know tribe up and stereotypes and that sort of thing and so one of the very first exercises the first exercise we do in this program. is we have a group of freshmen. Let's say it was like twenty five in a room. They get in a circle and then the instructor they says look. I'm GonNa read out a prompt if you identify with that prompt. Just move to another place and so I said I am someone who's wearing jeans and there's I am someone who identifies as a A straight woman. I'm someone who identifies as Catholic I identify as a hunter. I'm identifies Vegan. I I don't high as pro-life and then what happens slowly over time. You're like wait a SEC. The VEGAN is pro-life and from you know Chicago and like you just recognize that these people who probably made a stereotype on the first time they moved the second time they moved multitudes. Yeah yeah this is just you you know and and then we we sort of unpack the the evidence and the insights and the academic papers the stuff all comes from and I remember the end by the end of that workshop. All these people are trading trading their emails with each other and they're very unlikely friends right but just experience the sort of intimate sharing details and what the scientists is that we do. Think other people don't want to hear the details are life but they do and what it also does is requires it also makes us try up more quickly. So this is really interesting way to bring groups of people together Start unpacking their assumptions. And I'll bet you that this would even be true with people who worked together for five years you know. Like how much do we really know exactly and yeah so so I that I just loved that exercise and I think it's such a great example of a practical the coal lived way We can experience another person's Fulbe in. That's so cool. Yeah I definitely agree Kelly when you were writing the book yes. And how long did that process take where you compiling notes for years. And the Genesis of that book like yeah so This is how that went down. There was a woman who is very briefly in charge of second city but managed to sell a book. Deal to Harpercollins But then she left the company company And the and the and she was about to write the book and you know so so we got asked a bar. Owner my collaborator Tom. Yordan and I So I was running their to your side business. Thomas running the harp side of the business We met we flew New York met with the publisher totally hit it off and she she was like we'll come your idea for a book and we he served as well on the plane. We came up with this idea. Orienting around the SAN principle of improvisation and she's like right go right the book so then Tom and I took a year our To write a really bad version of the book where she says great? You wrote the really bad version of the book. Now go right..

Tom Youtube Harpercollins twitter University of Chicago Chicago accountant Yordan New York coo Thomas representative instructor Kelly publisher
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"You know and then how is the business is GONNA recover and and it it. It doesn't it did at this point. It's funny where we're I. An invitation just came out yesterday that we all got internally because it'll be my thirty first anniversary Austrian October and we didn't get to celebrate my thirtieth Because I wasn't around Feeling the family medical crisis. So you know this picture of me at twenty twenty four which my son who's twenty two. It looks like him more than it actually looks like me and you know unlike gag. I'm here this is I mean. At this point it would be ridiculous to leave and and and I love it. I don't think things are preordained. I don't think there's such a thing as faith. I think there are lots of accidents and mistakes that if one can lean into them they can turn them into gifts And I think I think that's what happened with me here. I think every time it got uncomfortable comfortable for me and it felt like maybe it's time to go. It required me to figure out the way that I stay. And that means you dig for meaning and purpose and so that was always there. That wasn't going to be a problem. I work hard. That's not gonNA be a problem but allowing yourself sort of you. You know. See it differently or allow and I gotta give props to Andrew. Alexander are owner. He always challenged me. I mean he he would basically the minute. I got really comfortable and good at something. He he kicked me out of it and say there's something different and I'm like wait a second. I just want to bathe in the glory of the thing I created get like. Why can't I do that? I realize now it was like nope. NOPE that's not who you are are you. You need now to get your hands dirty and be frustrated for a while and then you'll come out the other end with something and so you know that that's I think how how it works. At least that's that's how it worked for me and then you know I. It also helps that. It's a little bit of a family business. Certainly for the Alexander's in Stewart's who own up. Who whose families very entwined here in mine? I mean my my wife's offices just about you know ten feet away from me right where I'm sitting right now and my son worked Here in the box office over over the Summer Mer and you know it's a little bit of legacy but also the thing I love about is second city is not about resting on florals and to not about what was happening yesterday. Yesterday we can crow about the chievements of the alumni. But the work that's being done right now is by the next group of like twenty four to twenty nine year olds who think and feel deal and operate very differently than my generation generation before. So you kinda get sounds like tech upgrade your your your consistently consistently as you as you age. It's second city if you remain open to it allowing allow your own thinking to upgrade culturally to at least be in touch and understand with what makes this next generation kick and that's a really special. That's a special gift I think definitely so I'm curious just to shift gears for moment. Yep so obviously you know creatives we have our own neurosis and everything like that and for many of us were trying to find the right balance between maybe two thirds time scripted and one third take time unscripted in our creative life and for a lot of us who are introverts and sometimes the type of work required to do. Do the two thirds part That scripted work can be an so exhausting. You don't really get to a place where you're maybe in the mood for Improv. And and I know that I can't wait for the mood to strike and everything like that But for any creatives out there that are kind of like going through that struggle right now. What are some ways that you've got yourself out of those FUNK's or out of those situations where you felt like you just didn't have the energy or the well to get up there and You know do something. That's UNSCRIPTED unscripted. Yeah so you talk about sort of waiting for inspiration to strike that dangerous. It's a mess. It doesn't exist Unique to create create. A practice for yourself to do your art and if that means you you know you're gonNA say three hours for writing and you end up writing a paragraph graph. That's it fine. You've written the paragraph but worst thing you can do is not do the art and over and over again. I see people. People make so many different excuses to not do their creative work. I mean I've got. I've got a twenty two year old. He's a senior in college He's got a beautiful singing voice he can act. He can improvised is he. Can write He's directed a little bit and he eye witnessed the conversation between him and his mom where he's like. Well so you know what do I do. And and she's like ah you do the work. And by the way the thing the thing about The industry now is that no one just identifies as a writer or orne actor. I mean ever if polymath across the board you want to be able to walk in a room and be able to do any of the jobs should those jobs the available and by the way what you WanNa do is not wait around for someone to cut you a check. You want to do the work. And if that means you know uploading your own videos or writing writing pieces and sending them out to get a put up you do that and there's a thing that I live in the world where I often say the words both things can be true. So Here's a both things can be. True artists deserve and should be paid for their work But there is not a world that has ever been lived in where or someone who is newly becoming. An artist is waiting for a check to do their art Rape Painter started painting Great improvisers start improvising. The developed wasn't captured or created until many years. Later years. You after you got to you do it and you do it publicly in spaces and and men and then you get paid so again you if both things are true you need to do that work and then you need to be paid for that work so you shouldn't let yourself be taken advantage Anna Jovan. I mean people are all I like. I worked here so sixteen sixty years old. I've worker thirty one of those years in all in every year I've worked here. Someone has called me me. WHO's wanted us to do stuff for free for good exposure? I'm like I don't know what you talking. Bout like we have. We have the best exposure already. Pay Us for our work and then I also worked here for thirty one years realized that all the new artists who are coming in and starting here are doing free Improv. All of the city of Chicago. I really do think that you you know you have to create a practice for yourself to not just do the work Do the work and then share the work you know and then there's other stuff after that but if if you start from there and you have gifts I'm pretty sure you're GONNA you're GonNa get somewhere definitely an you're gonna get faster feedback right and I think for anyone listening to. It's like if you look at the services and products that you buy in a daily basis you typically encountered them in some type of free medium fashion or you didn't have to pay until after you got got the experience and it's up to the person delivering the experience. How much effort or how much practice they WANNA put into it to turn it into art? And it's you know. Oh it's a marketplace that just because somebody's Uber driving or whatever like that's that's prime time for Improv or its prime time for is maybe taking some conversational risks six and the worst thing. That's going to happen. You know you're GONNA drive for lift or whatever the next day and that's I think the sharing economy has opened up some opportunities for you people. Because there's no longer an excuse that you know the worst case scenario is you'RE GONNA end up working in the sharing economy which might be rough but compared to some of the things. I'm sure you saw creatives doing coming up to make ends meet. Is it that bad or is it. Are we living in a golden age creators. What do you think I'm not GONNA call the Golden Age because I think that you know one of the things that I know about a creative work is that it it actually thrives in constraint It it it sort of you know. Sometimes it's like that's the stuff that actually makes there's a great story That Tim Harford. tells he's a British writer and it's about Keith Jarrett who is a renowned both classical and jazz pianist and he has this famous album called the Cohn concert and it was. It's the it's the best selling Solo Jazz Album of all time. Amazing improvised pieces of art. I listened to all the time growing growing up and Harford Tells the story which I did not know about the making of that album. which was that when Jarrett showed up in calling Germany to do the concert This teenage girl was in charge and the piano was just broke. The pedals were really hard to get to work. The ends of both both the high and the low were not working. And he's like I'm not going on and she begged him and she basically said okay. Do you have the recording equipment that I asked for as part of my ratios. Yes we do. 'cause okay okay. I'm GonNa do the concert. You'RE GONNA record it and I'M GONNA pick that recording and give it to every single person before they book me to show them. What will happen if you know this? If I'm pander this crap you know piano so he goes out and he does the concert and jet realizes he does want to entertain the audience in front of him so he starts hammering on the pedals and he's playing in the middle of the instrument worth the most odious and he created a great album. That was a complete surprise. The thing I love about that is like oh it was actually these. You know constraints. He couldn't have imagined that allowed him. Then find something new so I think that when you look at sort of past cultures and different decades you know we all have the sort of monsters that were were dealing with and trying to get by Komo. The creative people do is figure out a way to use them to their advantage And I don't think that in humankind I don't think that that changes and and we never know until we're looking in the rear view mirror fifty years sixty years one hundred years to see you know how great we were. We were but I do think this generation in has that opportunity as much as past generations. Yeah it's it's such an important lesson for creatives because like the example you mentioned when those opportunities come up when you're playing hurt or in sub optimal conditions or whatever that's when you have new material that you would not have voluntarily chosen. How do you go about not letting resentment build up but but just translating that into art or processing it or whatever you consider it How do you go about doing that? I mean it requires a few things things you have to. I mean one is gratitude so living with gratitude especially when things are going poorly is hard but automatically Recognized that without great suffering great joy wouldn't exist like anyone can anyone who's falling in love. I can relate to this right. You know you you it. It can be the worst thing you've ever experienced and the best thing that ever experienced and if your choices to go through that or never love I mean Count me out. I'm going to go through the tough stuff and that's just life so one being able to sort of lean into I'm going to be grateful for this and then not falling isolation so the other thing that's hugely important is maintaining connection. So you know those times where you I just want to curl up on your blanket and hide from the world and sometimes you need to do that for a little bit. You gotta get the blanket off. You've gotTa push yourself out and you got to meet other people where they are And this is you know. The introverts are widely misunderstood. And and in fact that what they really do is after their you know out in public with people they need to recharge and someone like myself. Who is the? My wife is an introvert. I'm the opposite obviously I get charged by being out with people but then also I I need time to like simmer down under that occurs. I hate going to parties..

writer Keith Jarrett twenty twenty Summer Mer Chicago Alexander Andrew Stewart Rape Anna Jovan orne Harford Germany Tim Harford. Cohn
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"I was I was in love with comedy I did not know. That's second city had an improvisational pedagogy. That was so important to its work. What was ironic about that was I was steeped in improvisation in every other? They're fast my wife. I was a dead. I loved jazz music. I did my thesis in college on Spontaneous Jazz writing of the beach. I was a soccer player. And I I mean those nineties bowls teams which moves so incredibly improvisational way inside the triangle. Awesome so yeah so like so Ben. Finding I'm like Oh this is impromptu and so you know we'd watch. The show was in like the people on stage at that time. Were on Hon. Jane Lynch Joel Murray Billy's brother and then Chris Farley Tim Meadows were in the touring company. And you'd go and see what they're doing with like feel like magic and then I'm like God this match match. This is actually a practice that these people evolve overtime Mike Myers was not cast that funny. I forgot him. So then I worked in the Of seeing the room and worked in the box office and then left to go work for Bernie's theater which failed miserably after like three months. So I found my way back here and I I was writing plays During the day or night that I wasn't working and then I was working submitting my place around town. I was making friends here. And then in nineteen ninety two but this time I am the director of sales I'd like invented this position out of the box office and I was assisting our AH executive producer and jog zander and the woman who started legendary producer at that time choice phone had had a series of really health scares And couldn't couldn't really do the demands of the job but there was no. We were such a mom operation. There is no No one was in place to take that job and and I I mean I. I was twenty six years old Andrew causing his office. He's like I WANNA ask you the job of like associate producer. The second city. Like you are punking like that you. You can't be true. Come completely not qualified for this. It was such a lucky thing for me because the with with zero expectations and in a time where it's not like we weren't doing budgets we weren't you know what I was looking at sales in a certain way I mean like you know they will look at the month but no one was breaking taking stuff out I had. I had this like clean slate to just Kinda play at being a leader and figure out the business and I had some hunches that turned out to be correct. And and but the key to all of that looking back was I always put my relationships. I which meant not that I valued the people above me below me next to me. I respected artists and knew how to speak in their language but I was not not uncomfortable and perfects of. I'm the youngest of six grew up in this. You know high really high profile family in Chicago and signed talking to bankers and I was fine talking to media people on you know so I think that ability to recognize that if you can build trusting relationships and if you're smart enough to listen and surround yourself with people who are brighter than you are you can kind of do anything You know the other stuff you know comes and goes but you know ah I cast. Was Steve Carell Stephen. Colbert and Amy Sedaris. I mean kind of hard to fail when you've got that group And I'm married. Well you know my my wife and runs the first ever be a comedy writing and performance in the country college which has also a junior and senior. Her Year Program called Comedy Studies. That's tied to the second city And so you know we're we're steeped in this. You know. I think looking back Jack. I've always been curious and I think that That is something that everyone should value. More is their own innate curiosity and where it can lead them but yeah the gift of being able to fail a lot and to make discoveries and in higher well right I mean right now get get the best possible people role sometimes you and and this is not a thing like you know i. I wrote a book called. Yes and two thousand fifteen and that was very much about how we take our improv principles into businesses in one all the things that we talked about in the book. Is this the importance of diversity inside your ensembles that you really want to You will benefit if your teams have a Lotta people Different viewpoints which means there's going to be friction And you have to learn as as a leader how to manage that friction so that it is successful in creative creative rather than toxic And that that can be not easy but it if you have sort of a true north star and there's a great thing about Improv. There's there's just so so much stuff we can lean on which is like an Improv. You have to make your partner look good. You have to be focused on others needs if you do all that stuff and it can even be lip service you. You don't even have to believe it's fine just do it say yes and no Focused on On other seizure. Need to be right if you do all that you will. We'll do good work Inside your team or your Tom. I guarantee I've seen a thing. We've been open six years sixtieth anniversary or and we've never not had a hit show. We've never closed all the shows. Run into one another and take take a minute. Realize I'm not talking about us. Just running greatest hits shows because we don't do that every single show on the second city is an original piece of work so I I don't think you can name me another commercial entity Eh. That has been successful for this long only doing original work. There's something incredible in that dynamic and and and I I know what it is and it is improvisational practice put into the creation of commercial content as simple as that. There's other stuff that goes on. That makes it work. The environment's behavior is all that really. That's it and that's that can be a microcosm for for any company when you're looking at like what do you do. How do you do it and how are you successful at it? Sure and it sounds like you know across the course of Your Business Career and getting started and then following this hunch is that panned out in the beginning you were kind of an expert at building partnerships whether it was with your wife or would that I cast or really with you know so many different stakeholders that what are vital to supporting second city. So I'm curious you know when you got started you mentioned. You didn't feel qualified for the job. What gave you the courage to keep going? Was it like you know. Early lessons from your parents did the fact that you saw them. Taking courageous artistic risks being actors and things like that. What led you you to have the courage to just you know go for it and start building partnerships a little bit of arrogance and people who worked in the United might say a lot of arrogance a little bit of luck and others might say a a lot of luck but also at second city there literally is a framework for jumping into for basically making something out of nothing together? As you're asking the question I was like well. Let me actually seriously consider those. I know one of the things early on that I did. Was I got out of the building. so there's a Harvard professor Gary Pizano talks about in these sort of innovation field. We have to be careful of homecourt syndrome When and you know you're successful and you're really cause old home and you end up? Never leaving home and then one day you find that you know Innovation has passed you by so I was an early. We advocate inside like the League of Chicago theaters. which meant I was starting to Meet and collaborate and talk to the people who lead all the various theaters and building those relationships and and then you know travel You know making sure I'm getting out and seeing everything different people are doing whether it's you know out of state out of country three or even visiting the sort of Danke theaters in Chicago and see. WHO's doing exciting cutting cutting edge work? So success begets success. Right so you know we. We started doing collaborations on the theatrical side with groups like Chicago. Shakespeare theater or Hubbard Street dance or the Toronto Symphony A and we realized that you know Or lyric opera. That was a huge one that I it Renee Fleming. I helped developed a thing called the second city guide to the opera when she came to a show so she came to a show and heard her own recordings being illegally sampled in the context of show and she goes backstage musical director. Whose like sweating like the guy in airplane She's like. I'm not here to sue you. I'm interested in collaborating. They had my car back. There's like you've got Kelly and what we talked about. was you know. She used a- At that point a consultant for lyric opera Here in Chicago. And she's trying to Find ways to develop new audience and she was looking around our identities like your audience is like fifty years younger than the opera audience. And and and when I heard my voice I'm like Oh wait that works with the material here and so we got funding to play for year where we started decide is like the can't this isn't GonNa work. If it's just like some commissioned work we have to we have to be in each other's Worlds we have to sort of live in the bones of the art forum and we did that and made this incredible collaboration that turned into it was is a two nights sold out gala hosted by Patrick Stewart and Rene turned into a multi year run as a cabaret show and then led to other stuff that we collaborated on on over the years. So I think this idea of get out of your home court build relationships across different platforms different media. You know who who else can oh you play with so I'll get a a good example. I did that for the theatrical side for years and then after my book and I was sort of like trying to figure out what was next for me we had had this fire. Hire a second city where the theater was saved by the Chicago. Fire Department but my office and the Corporate Divisions Office and Accounting's divisions office. Those were all destroyed so I got kicked kicked out of the building and stuck in this terrible rental office complex. I won't name the name Regis. They they would yell at us for laughing too much. It's just so man God forbid like their jobs but yeah so but but I realize I talk a lot about how discomfort is important part of creative work and innovation and champion office with the Corporate Division of all places. And they're like hey like you know if you were to do something with us. What would you do And indeed that led to was building collaborations but for the group that brings the content and Improv to the business swirled and so one of the first thing I did was Collaborate with the Center for Decision Research at the Booth School of business at University of Chicago and my friend had a CRUSOE Who I met? There's a behavioral scientist and we created a thing called a second science project which looks at Behavioral Science through the Lens of improvisation so now we're jamming with academics. And and saying you know. What evidence do you have for this thing that we do? And what a phenomenon are you studying that. Perhaps we can create an improvisational exercise for right to get underneath and so we do. Research do executive education programs. And it's been an incredibly rich way to re imagine what the work can be. And you mentioned Silicone Valley earlier. I started hosting podcast Myself getting the ESPN road interview. Different kind of our artists in thought leaders and academics hammocks about their work. And I had on Kim Scott who wrote the terrific book radical candor about her experience at Google and apple and this especially this feedback grid that she created and I gave it to my wife. I'm like you've got to read this book. This stunning stuff. Well Lo and behold over the conversation and then more conversations later. We're now collaborating with Kim. And we've got at this new product coming out which is called improvising radical candor Where we we already created these live workshops that we teach together but now we're creating these digital assets so that you know so you can basically take the workshop that was live in the room for fifty people and give it to fifty thousand people early elements of it and so again it is? It is not unlike what we doing on the theatrical side of the building. We're good collaborators. That's what Improv makes you. And so then all you have to do is fine really cool. People Ulta collaborate with very cool so Kelly. I'm curious as you're going about your day to day job and as you're building the future of the business. It's clear that you're highly motivated to do this work right like you wouldn't Pick something else or you're not thinking about like retirement or your second career. No maybe you are but You're clearly this is a case where the work and the artist and the business I you know. It's like Kinda like it. Sounds like a match made in heaven. I'd be curious to know. Doc You know was it always like that Was it always a situation where you wanted to keep going. Have there been any dark nights of the soul of the absolutely. I mean Matt that's just You know there there's many inflection points where I thought I guess is that this ago or I made a colossal colossal mistake and got yelled Adam like oh all right and or or you know I mean walking into the theater you know on nine eleven when we were supposed to open a show called embryos on ice or fetus. Don't fail me now on nine Gel In route realizing completely irrelevance..

Chicago Corporate Divisions Office and soccer Kelly Mike Myers Steve Carell producer Jane Lynch Joel Murray Billy Ulta Kim Scott Renee Fleming Bernie Andrew director of sales Chris Farley Tim Meadows Shakespeare theater Jack ESPN partner
"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:49 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Welcome to mission daily. This is producer Rachel today. Chad has joined by Kelly. Leonard Executive Vice President of the second city an improvisational comedy enterprise based in Chicago that produces work with some of the world's leading comedians hands such as Stephen. Colbert Tina. Fey Steve Carell. Seth Meyers Amy Poehler. And many others on this episode chatting Kelly take a deep dive into Improv. Why it is the core of what it means to be human and how we can use this practice to enhance our own? Creativity in connection with each other mission daily is created by our team at Michigan Dot Org Kelli. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. Where.

Seth Meyers Amy Poehler Kelly Leonard Executive Vice Preside Steve Carell Colbert Tina Rachel Chad producer Stephen Chicago Michigan
"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

13:07 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"And that's counterintuitive because we're all facing more pressure faster more more is not better better is better against profound. I think I think there are a lot of people out there. Nowadays that fall into that same trap when when it comes to their personal lives. It's the the desire is to check off the box. I got this done. I got this done the the trip to ask him. Probably got this done and and getting it done is not the goal the goal is the is the interactions that happen and the jokes that were told delay table. Yes and the fight that occurs between them when they're fighting over who gets hold. Hold your hand walking and you have to tell them why take turns. And you're a Dan lessons. Oh absolutely you're a great dad. You know what I I used to be the Dad Robert Threat my son. If you don't hold the ice cream straight up it's going to go off. I'm not going to buy a new one. I'm not going to buy a new one and I'm like what am I doing right. Dr Covey had this great metaphor about It's a story in seven habits called Green and clean. That's about his son. You know taking care of the yard and mowing the grass and raking the trash and Dr Covey said you know what I am. I raising grass or my raising boys and I have to get out of that efficient mindset and say oh it fell off. It's okay. What flavor do you want the same flavor or or you want different flavor you know I gotta calm down and realize again? Most things in life are better done slow. I think a lot of the people who do it the other way who do it. The the efficient way. They're not bad people. They're not doing out of malice. They think they need to do. Yeah Yeah Yeah so how do we. How do we convince people the when it comes to their people that that is the wrong way because there are a lot of really well-meaning leaders out there who do treat their relationships like like a commodity like something you check a box on what's what's a mindset? You either believe it or you don't or you come to believe it or you don't and you may have to be a transition figuring your culture because your organization may not have reinforced that through whatever whatever whatever policy procedure breach of. Trust how they treated you whatever she got a check your mindset. We're all deeply inculturated right with belief systems and paradigm types typically Forced on us by our parents are pastors our principles our first boss so you gotta check your mindset. Do you fundamentally into we believe that your key contribution as a leader is to develop high trust high reward reciprocal relationships if and when you come with that methodology you've got to challenge yourself and say you know what so then is what I believe also the way I behave and you know I'm actually big into into techniques weeks. You know I'd say when someone comes into your office take your laptop. Close it right then in their mid email close it. Take off your glasses. Turn over your phone. Do some things that might feel techniques for you. But they'll become habitual and able send an unmistakable sign to that person that you're focused on them. Don't ask a bunch of questions as leaders were taught to get to the root cause. Peel the onion. Ask More questions tone. Ask questions because your questions are always. He's on your narrative your time. Line your agenda through your Lens. Don't ask questions just listen. Don't try to solve their problem. Always let's just listen. It's so tough for leaders because we're all trained to communicate and talk and clarified repeat step out of your comfort I zone you know I tell people and I'm passionate about this. I will often ask and and my keynotes and I give three or four keynotes week around the nation. I'll say who here you can tell me why Jim four cubicles over is eating popcorn for lunch on Thursday. WHY IS JIM eating popcorn corn for lunch on Thursday it inevitably someone says he loves popcorn or popcorn day? No because payday is Friday in Jim just put his last three dollars in his gas tank to get to work on Thursday and Jim has no money for lunch at midnight tonight. Either Jim him or his spouse is gonNA drive down to Kroger and buy milk and Cheerios because direct deposit hit because their kidneys breakfast tomorrow morning. And if that surprises you you you are disconnected from ninety percent of this country. Everybody's got something going on. Everybody's got a bill. They can't pay everybody's got a teenager teenager whose vaping everybody's got a parent or an in-law who's moving into dementia. Nobody's family or marriage looks as good as mine does on facebook including including mine slowdown reconnect and understand that. Everybody's a person with struggles and fears in wants. Everybody wants to do a good job Bob for the most part if people are not producing and they're not living up transportation it's often not because they're lazy or selfish or they're an idiot. Something is going on in their life. Try to understand it at help. Them that is your legacy. Your legacy is not. Did you hit your second quarter Ebitda. Oh your third quarter cost of goods or your annual revenue. You gotta do those things to keep your job but your legacy is. How many people did you build up? And lift and pollinate build their 401K's builder. Confidence is build their skill sets and transition them into confident producing people. I'm sorry for that. That sermon but passionately Ashley believed that. Don't apologize for anything. That was absolutely fantastic. I think everybody hopefully at some point in their life has that moment where they realize that each person on earth is the own protagonist of their own story and everybody else is just supporting characters of the earlier in our lives that we realize is that the more we realize that what we do to help others is our true calling in life the people who get to through their entire life thinking that everybody on earth is just a supporting character character of their own story. Those are the ones that never are able to operate in what you just said. You have a podcast. You're good I'll consider that thank you are there. Are there. Leadership Practices that you see today that are really widespread. Maybe even practiced by people who you respect but that you cringe when you see it happen. Well one comes to mind immediately. I don't ever change but I'll shed some insight into it. I think as leaders we don't have to just give feedback to people that by the way that's crucially important. I was on the radio this morning where we spent most of the sixteen minutes talking about one concept and that is having high courage conversations as a leader. Your job is to move out of your comfort zone discussing undisguisable 's and have high courage conversations give feedback to people but the opposite is true. You have to be open to feedback. Feedback yourself that you've gotta make it safe for others on your team to tell you their truths and I say their truth versus the truth. Because they're truth may not always always be the truth but as leaders. We tend to build a bit of a divide between us and our people and it's not very safe to tell your boss that her forty powerpoint deck was thirty two slides too long or the seventh longitudinal graph from. HP Are. Put everybody into an ECLECTIC. EXC Leap Right. I mean what person's GonNa Create a career cul de sac for themselves by telling the boss at the presentation sucked or boss. You always have to be right or boss. You drive the agenda for every meeting. Why don't you tell us what you want from US versus dragging US along on this raid for two hours convincing us? It was your idea idea. Just just stayed up front. We're going to integrate this division in that division. That decision has done. It is not open for debate. What it is absolutely open for debate? How we do it when we do it? Who should lead it? What's in all that? Don't don't so anyway grew. I think the leadership skill but it's still lacking in every organization cross every culture is having leaders who are vulnerable enough correct confident enough to ask people for feedback and not just refute it or dispute it or dismiss it but to say Gosh. Thank you for sharing that. I had no idea I do that. Can you share a couple of examples when you've seen it in the past when I do it in the future classic you favor. Could you clink your pin against your glasses asses so I am whatever it is right just whatever it is. Show your people that you're not trying to be perfect that you also want to improve. And then don't like I said don't dismiss it. Don't lure someone to the side of the pool and push them in rikers. Dune will never give you feedback again. Now whether or not you implement it. That's your choice But you ought to have open dialogue with your people and by the way I host a radio program. A PODCAST I. I've written several books. I read articles. I get lots severe back like lots of feedback right. There are blogs that are dedicated to my hair and my glasses and glass door. Don't go there on me on glassdoor Astore Writing Needle. It'll it'll make you take your life so I have to be very discerning. Who Do I take feedback from because not all feedback is about me? Sometimes it's about their ex husband or it's about their father or it's about their former boss. Who Acts like me? Sometimes so I had to be really discerning but all of that is to say as is a leader. You've got both give high courage feedback and also solicited and implemented when appropriate. I think there are a lot of people out there who believed that that requires some altruism like yourself must sacrificing of your own self in order to do that for people and I would argue that you are or hurting your own career and potential by not doing that. Because you'll find yourself surrounded by people who tell you that everything's great all the time. Oh my God and you'll wake up to find out so you've lost your your all your credibility eventually your job and the entire time. You're going what happened. I thought everything was great. The emperor has no clothes. Yeah it is incumbent upon you due to solicit feedback and don't you and then don't say what they said everything's Okay are you kidding me. Every no one goes home to their spouse and tells you how great you today today trust me that like never happens ever which is why very few spouses ever come to my dinner parties. Because I'm sure they hate me because you know. The person never tells them that that I had to forgive them for a ten thousand dollar mistake right or they held out that the deal wasn't GonNa Close for twelve weeks. I had to go find eighty grand somewhere else to meet my number all right. Everybody tells their spouse. How bad you are you got to open the channels? You've also gotTA recognize that if you're vulnerable and you admit your own foibles. You talk about your own own insecurities which is a massive culture builder sunk. People are going to use it against you people will weaponize it and they'll use it to tease you or take you down. Who Cares I got detractors over the place? Outnumbered by supporters tend to one because of my vulnerability. I very strong stutter. I very pronounced stutter cutter. And I've struggled my whole life. I've had speech pathology for fifteen years. I have to speech coach. I've had braces twice I were retainer most of the time he by t straight and some people use that against me or tease me. Whatever you know what I don't care? My vulnerability is my superpower. I like that I a lot of people out there. Who Don't have the wherewithal to start from where you started and then and have it? Have it be something that drives you as opposed to something that that takes you back power. Everybody yeah I is that sounds clicheish ongoing to empower everyone right now one of my dear. Your friends from Indiana said something profound. Her name is Rebecca Hessian. She said she heard from somebody else. You think they don't know they they do. Everybody knows most things about you. They know if your credit scores five hundred or eight hundred they know if your marriage is on on the rockets great. They know who's Gay. They know who's straight they know his confrontation who's WHO's incompetent. Everybody knows just caught to it. Be Comfortable with who you are. Most most people don't care most people just want to relate to you and I'm telling you you can be too vulnerable. This book that I wrote recently called Management Mess is to leadership success. I confess Kinda thirty horrifying mistakes. My wife's convince I'll never work again because I'm unemployable now so this kind of speaking writing things got to work out for me. I'm fifty I don't care. Everybody knows ever short attention span. Everybody knows that I have stutter. Everybody knows that I talked to fast. I mean hello not newsflash just own your mess and as a leader when you own your messes you make it safe for others to own. There's that's a great culture and you take away their power to you. Take away the power of the things you think. You're trying to hide. The thing isn't the thing the cover up is the thing that's right but more importantly lately the vast majority of people they don't want you to.

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

16:00 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris and welcome to today's guest interview. Our guest interviews are long-form interviews with leaders from around the world. They've each previously sent an answers to questions we provided provided and were selected to join us because listener engagement around their content has been high today. We're joined by Scott Miller executive vice president of thought leadership at Franklin Covey. Welcome Scott please introduce you yourself to our audience. Hey Chris thank you for the platform. Yeah I it's a it's a pleasure to have you here today After your your guest your series launched a few weeks ago We had so many people call sentas. DM's messages are on how much they impacted them. And how much they wanted to see more content from you and so we thought this is the the best way to go. Forward is to have August interview so The first thing I wanted to ask you is tell me about your your leadership background like what. How did you get to where you are today where you can look back and have how a platform on leadership the goodyear or the bad years all of the above? Chris I started my career. I'm fifty one. I started my career. Back with the Disney Development Company Orlando where I'm from and was an individual producer for about four years at Disney Disney. Invited me to leave. which is a nicer way to take it out and you were promoted? I exactly I'd never heard that. I like that. And then believe it or not. The Franklin Covey company had their eye. I on me picked me up and move to Utah Twenty three years ago and I've now but in a formal leadership position for Gosh about twenty one of those those twenty three years you know a couple of steps forward couple steps back I started as a frontline salesperson and was promoted a couple of times and then eventually seven times and now I just I just finished a seven year actually an eight-year appointment as the chief marketing officer for the company and now I moved in to become the executive vice president of thought leadership I report to the CEO. Joe And so I've led teams as big as thirty and forty and right now as small as seven so I've got lots of experience Probably more lessons learned than I do. Successes is which is why I've written a couple of bucks now on leadership development and a few more in the pipeline because I think leadership is harder than most people portray it and I think People Are Lured Lourdes oftentimes as opposed to lead into leadership roles. And I just believe Ashley not everyone should be a leader of people perhaps including not me. Yeah Yeah my relationship with your organization is casual but goes back a long time. I remember. I'm about ten years younger than you but I remember in the nineties having seen my on my father's bedside table the seven habits book That is you know I guess in amongst the top ten You know business. Leadership books ever written top top top. Two Okay Yup and so there's that and then when I was a kind of a burgeoning leader in earlier part of my career I had a very influential leader in my life take me to office depot depot and buy me a Franklin Covey planner because he was speaking about the importance of scheduling time with your people and taking notes about the conversations. You have with them because your job as a leader is to help them get where they need to go or. They won't buy into what they're being asked to do for their job. And that was a I still have that. I don't use it today because I've outgrown it but I still have it in my closet. AUSE IT and So it's it's a it's kind of a cool thing when when When we had this introduction happened so I love that Tell me about when you realized you had a passion for four leading people or for influencing the leadership of others. You know Chris to be perfectly honest. I don't know that I had a passion for leading others. I think like most people the next step on the career ladder was to move up into leadership. And I that's the way you earn more money. It's the way you move up to the organization. He kind of choice right as you know lead or get out great organizations if you don't team you can't move up so I'll be honest. I didn't have a natural passion for it. I think I liked the idea of being in charge. Sure I like the idea of being responsible and being the boss and I think I can relate to a lot of people before me and people after me as well so once I got into it I realized well you know the skills that made me a great individual producer. Were not the same skills that make a great leader. I think that is a profound thought right right there you know. oftentimes what makes the Great Dental hygienist or the best digital designer or the best sales person Those are rarely the same skills that make the the best sales leader in fact often. They're the opposite. Chris yes and so I I really started to appreciate and learn that to be a great leader. You've got a fundamentally change your mindset your skill set your tool set what got you here isn't going to keep you there so I don't think I had a passion to lead. Once I became a leader in La damage two people and did a lot of great things as well. I started to realize the impact could have positively. I've learned a lot and I've shared a lot of my books. And My articles Nicole for INC magazine weekly and so now I think I have a lot of experience under kind of do this. Don't do that say this. Don't say that I think what you just articulated. There is a conundrum the impacts a lot of industries out there and that's that in order to have the credibility to lead a team of say engineers. You have to be an engineer. A lot of leaders leaders believe they have to be able to do the jobs competently of all of their people in order to lead them or have credibility. And I think that's what leads a lot of companies to promote people out of a doer to the leadership role and they end up shooting themselves in the foot. How how do we get out of that? Yeah I think I think recognizing what you just said is the future of business right. I mean I could lead a team of neurosurgeons if I had to cause. Leadership isn't about expertise. It's not about being the smartest person in the room. You know a good friend of mine. Liz Weisman authored authored. The seminal book multipliers an amazing book. Everyone should pick up a copy of multipliers and the premise of multipliers has as a leader. You're either multiplying people all all your accidentally diminishing them and that. The role of a leader is not to be the genius. It's to be genius maker of others and if I can take get a step further Chris you know I was probably fifty like last year till I realized my job was not to be the smartest person in the room but I think for the bulk of my career Chris. I tend to hire very smart people but not at least perceived by me smarter than me just smart enough but not smart enough to eclipse me. That's for my kind of Insecurity was bolstered. If you will and now I realize goodness what idiot I was for. Oh my gosh. Thirty years. My job was to hire the smartest people possible I could find in the industry smarter than me. Bring them in in. My job was to build a culture where they're not just shows to the they choose to come but they choose to stay in the take it one step further not hoard them in my division but to step back and kind of survey the organization sation say where are all those people now. How many people that I hired are over in operations are in the supply chain finance out in the field and not horrid on my team mm-hmm I think I've really came to that? Twenty years later than I should but better fifty-one than seventy one. Right completely agree with that. I think there's it's an important thing because is if you operate in in that way it ends up being a game of telephone. It's like it's a race to the bottom. How each each generation is a little bit more degraded than the one before? And if everybody Belo's you below you does is the same thing you end up with these. The people who actually interact with the with the customers in the client's organization just being the bottom of the barrel Laszlo bock talks a lot about that on the hiring strategy Google how they actively sought to not hire people that were lesser than them by reaching outside of of their of their silos in and having other people being involved the talent acquisition process. I think it's a phenomenal insight to that Chris. What is going to make that come? True in organizations is more senior leader sitting down with newly promoted. People and having articulate conversation on a chart pad here are the fourteen thing Scott that you did really well as a sales person. We are so grateful rightful. These are great. Twelve of these fourteen are not going to be valuable for you when you become a sales leader you need to pack them up. Put them away and not do those again. And now we want you to learn these five new these seven new traits and one of them is. You're not the smartest person in the room. You need to have confidence devote he to admit you. Don't have all the answers. Your job is not to have This idea that you've got to solve everything in art marriage. The chief marketing officer about thirty five people that report to me. There was a common refrain. Best idea wins as long as it Scott's although it was a joke I don't think it was really that funny because I felt like I always had to be the most creative the most well read the most connected know everything about Seo or marketing automation. Of course I cut it. Of course I couldn't but no one sat me down me my boss. Maybe he thought I should have no lert at by then right but along the way take the time mine. Don't assume people understand what you need from them. Have a high courage conversation and say these are the things we now need you to stop doing. It's the reason we promoted did you. But I do not want to see these behaviors and you starting tomorrow. Here's some skills that you're gonNA have to stretch. You're going to get it wrong. You're going to say it wrong. You're GONNA feel insecure. It's okay we got your back. Let's build it together. That's a powerful transitional conversation to have with every new leader. I've spoken about opening the PODCAST. That my first leadership role I was nineteen eighteen or twenty years old. But I'd almost got me fired for my organization because the skills that got me promoted. I was the best at what I did but I could not leave. The people who I was entrusted to lead. That was me..

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to your leadership guest series while we explore leadership and culture through the eyes of leaders around the world that's right Chris we hand selected leaders that we believe are Tivoli influencing leadership in their industries we sent them four questions we think are important in gaining insight to their leadership beliefs and style if you'd like to be part of the hacking your leadership guest series you're just an email to guest at hacking your leadership dot com and let's talk and now today's guest my name is Scott Miller and thanks for listening into the hacking your leadership podcast guests series who has been the most impactful leader mentor in your life and why I'd say it's David Covey one of the sons of Dr Steven in our covey when I was the general manager of Franklin Covey's region in the Chicago area Dave was my boss he was my manager might leader mentor in many ways my friend of all my leaders in Life David who gave me permission to run with my strengths many of you are probably aware of Gallup's book discover your strengths the strengths finder assessment my strengths were around converting people making friends influencing people speaking mentoring people I very much had to manage the PNL cost of goods as supply of all of our guide books and things is that role in that role in David gave me permission to really focus on what I was passionate about is still had to manage the Ebitda I had to meet the revenue for the quarter but David really inspired me to uncover discover really align my passions mitalent and he gave me voice what I'm doing now which is writing and speaking around the world and not necessarily leading and managing people I'm fairly adept at that but I don't think my troop Ashen anymore is leading people I think it's aspiring others to understand should they be leading people what is the first mistake you made a good leader of people and what did you learn while when I became a leader of people I had this illusion that great leaders were loud and charismatic and had all the answers in informed other people in their own likeness reason I was promoted to leadership was because I was the top salesperson so why wouldn't I become the best sales leader I mean that's insane and quite frankly the competencies that make the best dental hygienist or the best digital designer or the best salesperson they're rarely the same companies competence sees that make a great leader so the mistakes that I made was trying to think that what got me here will get me there that sounds a bit cliche ish but it's true rarely are the same talents that make you successful as individual producer the same skills and talents that make you a great leader in this mistakes I made were trying to force people into my image there's many ways to skin a cap there's many ways to meet your revenue goal there's many ways to create a website everyone has to follow the same process great leaders are those that recognize that your job is not to be the genius but to be the genius maker of others that comes from my dear friend lives Wiseman who of course authored the book multiplier so I think as a leader the big lesson that I learned was I don't try to form other people in my likeness or image find out what are their strengths their skills their talents and my job is to help pull them out of them now I'm response bill at the end of the day for results within through other people but it's not forced into my format helped define their own instead what is the difference between a good leader and a great leader I think it's that very concept is that you don't have to be the smartest person in the room what I learned over time was that I'm not as you're responsible for having all the answers I don't have to be the smartest the most creative the best educated the best well read in fact my job is none of those things and I the first fifty years of my life thinking I had to be the smartest person in the room it's the opposite my job is to find the smartest people to join me in the room people who are smarter than me if at I think I did the service to a lot of people in my career I hired smart people for ninety five percent of my career but not smarter than me I was very deliberate on making sure that I maintained my stature that I maintained my vibes organization bye-bye my insecurity by thinking that I had to be just a little bit smarter than everybody else and then I realized that's not my job my job as a leader for is to recruit and retain talent recruit and retain they aren't the same because people don't WanNa work for not all they don't want to work for a genius they went to work for someone who brings out there genius in them I think Liz Wiseman in this book I mentioned multipliers has it right I think it's one of the best leadership books ever written that your job is to multiply talent not to accidentally diminish it through your ego through your lack of of confidence through your arrogance has a leader your.

Chris ninety five percent fifty years
"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the Playbook I have Jerry Jones junior the executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer of the Dallas Cowboys and we're going to learn do things one nobody understands the stage theory better than the Dallas Cowboys from Jerry Jones down and secondly how did the greatest athletes celebrities and entrepreneurs to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in what made them champions on the the old and in the boardroom I'm your host and CEO of Sports Marketing David Meltzer Meltzer with entrepreneurs booked and I am so excited.

Jerry Jones officer Dallas Cowboys CEO David Meltzer Meltzer executive vice president and c
Longtime Zimbabwe leader Robert Mugabe dies in Singapore at 95

America's Morning News

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Longtime Zimbabwe leader Robert Mugabe dies in Singapore at 95

"Robert Mugabe the long time leader of Zimbabwe has died at age ninety five Robert Mugabe was the first head of government of Zimbabwe after independence in nineteen eighty until November twenty seventeen when the military seize control of the country he first served as prime minister until nineteen eighty seven when parliament made him the executive president his new position effectively placed a stranglehold on government assuring that parliament was less relevant and independent he led the Zimbabwe African National Union to overthrow the white minority government and bring independence to the territory that will go on to be recognized as Zimbabwe in nineteen

Robert Mugabe Zimbabwe Prime Minister Executive President Zimbabwe African National Unio
"executive vice president" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on WTVN

"Reporter executive vice president of the hell art so you're saying that the second report again Thursday we expect the call me stuff which we pretty much already know there might be right on the the systemic leaking that separate and apart from one I had known was going to be a part that we got the fight is a inspector general report which will show premeditated fraud after numerous warnings that the information paid for by Hillary was false and they purposely misled a FISA court on multiple occasions arm but I also know that there is an undertaking that has been going on all through Europe and that in this undertaking we might be getting to the origins of the Russia trump conspiracy and it might involve top intelligence people that work out sore sourcing intelligence gathering spying on Americans to our allied spying agencies are things that they knew would be illegal for them to do and that these agencies fully participated in and there was some type of reciprocity going on which means the powerful tools of intelligence were turned on the American people by some very high ranking intelligence people yeah listen I have a few weeks ago Attorney General Barr use a very specific term I've never heard used before political surveillance as it turned it doesn't belong in the lexicon of the justice department or the FBI or the intelligence community here in America there is some suggestion that in efforts were initiated overseas either with the encouragement a wink of by the United States to spy on certain political figures bring intelligence and that would create the basis for an investigation a lot of work needs to be done before we nail down the facts on that but there is clearly an inquiry looking at this sort of loose network of foreign private foreign country intelligence agencies were working loosely with US intelligence perhaps to carry out this dirty trick that was carried out on Donald Trump during the twenty sixteen action I have some breaking news for him just a few minutes ago the justice department has released the memos that now your prepared for her husband Bruce to give to the justice department and the FBI when people read these memos are going to roll their eyes you wanna talk about tinfoil hat conspiracy data the spread sheets that were put together on manta Ford and Donald trump's hideous connections to Russia they're portrayed in there have laughable most of them are locked out of the box by the mother investigation but for the first time we now know exactly what now your contractor for fusion GPS and Hillary Clinton provided her husband used her husband as a conduit to get dirt on trump to the FBI during and after the election and when people read what it is you'll wonder why the F. B. I. ever accepted this information in the beginning it's very troubling stuff another example that conflict of interest we've been talking about stay right there John Solomon investigative reporter executive vice president of the hill will keep them on to the other side of this break want to remind everybody by the way that my pillow is well pretty much by myself Asian because I have insomnia everything I tried wouldn't work I wasn't falling asleep and I was tired all the time but now I fall asleep faster and the better part is I stay asleep longer now Michael and that was so thankful for for all the business that we.

Reporter executive vice president
Inside Motor Sport

Inside Supercars

03:33 min | 3 years ago

Inside Motor Sport

"You knew the risks when you decided to drive drunk. There could be a crash people could get hurt or killed, but that didn't stop. You did it. You knew you could get arrested, you can incur huge legal expenses and you could possibly even lose your job. You were well aware of the consequences of driving drunk, but one thing's for sure you were wrong. When you said it was no big deal drive, sober, forget pulled over. This message brought to you by nitsa. Thing, and we're in the business of gone five. So the teams and the push it to the absolute limits and sometimes Ivor and that that's what happens. Just just merged into the into the family. If between the whole, I'll even Barrett for that right to greet dot, intense mania. Some like that. That just is an acceptable from the race trips across the strategy at he is inside supercars. Welcome to inside civic is it's tiny, went lockers fondly back behind the microphone, Craig. It's great to be back. I didn't make engage Thailand band, but you had a good time today in Dadar did, and it's a portion of heavy back in the driver's seat once again on such because I watched from the distance. As you may or may not be aware. I don't get folks hillsdale's any watching the edited all lights. It was a Donut performance by triple eight of both days. Qualifying one two's both days races, the Qasr certainly had massive speed and they did they usual thing which something that have been doing for some years. And of course, now back on top of the championship with Shane grabbing that lay there with a second Bryce on Sunday, and one thing of coming up in the weeks ahead spoken at length with mocked up in the belt, the satisfaction of going to a new trek like that and having that sort of success that certainly if it's not next week, it'll definitely be the week after on the show just before we go into what he's on the show this week. Interesting to see that the Team Penske were floundering, almost certainly in was no way Scotty was doing his best. But really not making much of an inroad into things. It was the worst and first of all, rhodium since humble, she in two thousand sixteen. So that's a long time for them to of now former met distance. The other very obvious thing was the Spade. The Bayrak has now, obviously, to degree that's echoing the Zayd, be performance of the triple eight guys. Great to see Brad and came with a pair of drivers in an of course, running four cars in the main game this weekend, but to save Nick and Tim in the top five, that was a fantastic result. It wasn't a Tim slide mentioned early in the wakened that the Bayrak has do like that super smooth, low deg taught of rice trek, which is exactly what we head tail and bend. So I guess he was extremely disappointed on Saturday when the result didn't come his, why that he was expecting after good pay some Friday. And then as you said, bench. Back with both. He and Nick perk head on Sunday, but obviously they have got a great setup. And if you think back to when the series went overseas and they're on the tinkle circuits by always did seem to be able to rise an extra, an extra step in those of instance, well. Oh. Until he tracks that would be three years. And of course, I also also very well album pack that same type of very fast corners, service mood surface. And as you say, low degradation of the ties, you had ninety weekend because the the nice car people were down. That's Steve o. Donnell Jose executive president and chief racing development officer and also Joan was there who's also involved in? So you spoke to both of those gentlemen to stay Donald respect, civil Donal on the record. We said Hello to. To miss the pros. But we Tom Howard it on Tom, how'd from speak Hefei dot com. Headed an opportunity to speak with Steve Donal about why they were there and about motorized boating. And also we, we talked a little bit about the supercar series and its relationship with NASCAR similarities that

Kale Mangin Es Streit Greg Craig Micra Cuny David Reynolds David County Twitter Beth One Kilometer
Liu Xia, wife of late Nobel Peace Prize winner, leaves China

BBC World Service

04:28 min | 3 years ago

Liu Xia, wife of late Nobel Peace Prize winner, leaves China

"Hello i'm anemic with the bbc news the widow of the nobel peace prize winner joe xiaobo has been allowed to leave china after eight years in unofficial detention neo she is on her way to berlin following a campaign to secure horrendous steven mcdonnell reports according to her friends use shah has been allowed to leave china she had been under effective house arrest since her husband's won the twenty ten l peace prize but after you shall board died in chinese custody a year ago her health deteriorated she's now since we've boarded a flight and is due to arrive in berlin in the coming hours despite never being charged she was not allowed to leave for home and could only rarely receive guests human rights groups of long cold for her release health officials in thailand say the first group of boys rescued from a flooded cave have received visits in hospital from their families don't turn your sada choky dumrong suk said the boys will stay in hospital for a week for observation the man leading the rescue has said he hopes today's operation will be completed more speedily than on the first two days sophie long explains the divers entered the cave at ten oh eight this morning the final four footballers will be making that very perilous journey diving down deep narrow jagged passageways with guides and making their way hopefully back into the outside world for the first time in eighteen days withhold by the tile therapies that they are going to bring the four boy that plus the coach plus the doctor who's been with them and then three navy seals as well who've been keeping them company you get the feeling that there really is a race against time here now though a huge heavy downpours last night and it's been raining pretty solidly today president trump has chosen a conservative appeals court judge to fill the vacancy at the us supreme court he called brad kavanagh one of the finest legal minds of our time john cavanaugh he said he would approach every case with an open mind he now needs to be approved by the senate only meatball reports the nomination of brett cavanaugh will make the hearts of democrats and social liberals in the us sink but it is precisely the kind of move that conservatives and evangelical christians would have hoped for when they voted for donald trump the protests that have already started outside the supreme court a focused mainly on judge kavanagh's ideological views on abortion gun control and the environment right cavanaugh was an aide to george w bush and before that a key member of the legal team the made a case for the impeachment of bill clinton since then he said he doesn't think presidents while in office should have to worry about investigations and criminal proceedings against them india's supreme court has started hearing petitions which call for the scrapping of a law which criminalizes gay sex prosecutions are rare but activists say it can be used to intimidate people in same sex relationships the court rejected a plea by the central government to delay the hearing this is the world news from the bbc in afghanistan at least ten people have been killed in a bomb attack in the city of jalalabad in the east of the country officials say a suicide bomber approached the local headquarters of the afghan intelligence services and detonated explosives large blast damaged nearby cars and shops it's unclear who was responsible but jalalabad the capital of nangahar province and close to the border with pakistan has seen a surge in militant attacks turkey's leader reggie typer one has begun his first day with the enhanced role of executive president by issuing a number of decrees focusing on banking and how officials are appointed is given himself the power to choose the central bank's governor and deputies as well as the monetary policy committees members for the next four years researchers in australia say they've managed to reduce the numbers of mosquitoes in a town in queensland by eight percent using a new technique the team hopes many diseases will become more controllable he's phil mercer mayo mosquitoes were bred in elaborate tree in northern australia and infected with a bacteria that made them sterile they were then released into the wild in the town of innisfail in queensland's over three months they mated with females who laid eggs that didn't hatch causing the population to fall sharply the type of mosquito used in the trial is responsible for infecting hundreds of millions of people around the.

Joe Xiaobo BBC Eight Percent Eighteen Days Three Months Twenty Ten L Eight Years Four Years Two Days
"executive vice president" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"executive vice president" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"245 will be joined by stephen espinosa who is the executive vice president general manager of showtime sporting event programming talked about me other mcgregor talked about the production talked about the build up the aftermath where they go from here all that are more he'll be joined uh or i actually i say we'll be joined in studio by him he'll be right over here talking to us i'm looking forward to that a brilliant mind and one of the major players involved in that fight so that should be a lot of fun a 245 225 own roddy these striking kotra one conor mcgregor will stop i talked to him about the fight and what's next for conor mcgregor 205 page ran zandt is going to stop by it's been awhile since we've talked to her and she has a fight a 216 against just guy 145 patty the batty pimlott a uh a favorite of a lot of you out there including our own page he will be stopping by the former cage warriors featherweight champion 130 thirty will talk to francis and guy who but first let us go to these guy machine or the phone i don't know i'm confused scott machine let's go to these machine welcome in one of our favorites friend of the program the one and only joann calderwood joining us from which other she is joann how are you right i'm calling because quite okay that's it because he because quiz eric by guy told me phone and skype in so got me very confused uh but the scot connection is fantastic any sound great so i appreciate you going the extra mile and i know you just finished training as well so thank you very much for.

stephen espinosa executive vice president gener roddy conor mcgregor zandt francis joann calderwood eric guy scott skype