35 Burst results for "Executive Editor"

Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

BBC World Service

00:44 sec | Last month

Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

"And I have a reporter arrested while covering a racial justice protest last summer has been acquitted of violating police orders. From Iowa Public Radio Grant Gerlach has the story. Andrews Story of the Des Moines Register was covering a protest at a shopping mall that turned violent, She testified. She was pepper sprayed and arrested while moving away from police. Defense attorneys told the jury she was there to do her job. Just his officers were there to protect property. So hurry says she's glad the jury recognized that. You know, I'm really, really grateful for them that they Upheld freedom of the press. And, of course, you know, Adjust democracy. The registers executive editor thank the during a statement saying Arresting reporters at protests denies people the right to know what's happening in their

Grant Gerlach Des Moines Register Andrews Iowa
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | Last month

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:40 min | 2 months ago

Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

"Denis muhlenberg has kept a low public profile since he left his job. Ceo of boeing at the end of twenty nineteen. But that's about to change me. Lemberg has teamed up with air finance founder. kirsten bartok tau and other aviation luminaries to fund a special purpose. Acquisition company called new vista acquisition corp. They're aiming to raise two hundred and forty million dollars through public offerings to acquire businesses focused on transformational technologies in areas. Such a space defense and communications advanced their mobility and logistics. What does that mean well. We'll let you hear directly from denison. Kirsten who have joined today also with us on my side of the table so to speak is aviation weeks. Technology specialists and urban air mobility guru executive editor graham warwick. Just one no we will. Not be talking about boeing past or future. If you're interested in that i'd like to refer you back to our january twenty nine podcast so let's get started a dentist. Tell us what you're up to. And why joe the good morning and thanks for the chance to talk about new vista. We're very excited about this. New endeavor and that excitement starts with a tremendous opportunity that we see right now as you know i had the privilege of being the ceo of boeing back in. We celebrated our centennial in two thousand sixteen and we. We did some work together on the age of aerospace and when we look back on the history of aerospace the opportunity in front of his right. Now i think it's the greatest one in that one hundred plus year history harris face. We're seeing this convergence of technologies in a way that we've never seen before technologies that span artificial intelligence autonomy new manufacturing techniques satellite technologies new types of vehicles and propulsion systems that set of emerging technologies. All at once has never happened before. Combine that with mega-scale changes in the market. You mentioned air mobility new waste. People are moving Logistics e commerce capabilities the revolution in space in the build out of the lower orbit ecosystem and next generation defense systems that combination of technologies and mega skill. Market ships creates an unprecedented opportunity. And that's what we're focused on at new vista kirsten. Let's hear from you. What brought you into team. Up with dennis and How are you approaching this. Thanks joe and as you know. I've been pretty focused on advanced ever ability for the last four or five years Having been based in silicon valley and kind of live through the internet growth and doing venture capital back then realized early that this transition was going to happen and just from the basic technologies with your talk about them. Electrification greeted propulsion which then goes to autonomy and an ad in hydrogen which has come on the radar lately These technologies are going to completely change Aerospace so that the next twenty years is going to look completely different in the last twenty years and even the is you know. The aircraft designs will look entirely different. Lucky enough i been working on this trying to figure out the right vehicle to investment doing a lot of my own personal investing some through our finance and then was Got on the idea of a spec realized that could be the optimal solution to help. These emerging companies crossed the chasm of death valley of death that we call where you got early stage venture capital money but they needed at large amount of growth capital. These are deep company's hardware and software at their capital intensive and then added that they've got the regulatory component of the faa and. they needed some good opportunities. For large amounts of crossover capital groups. Like softbank could have been that or sovereigns but the spac product has really come in to help. These company cost the valley of death and make it to the next level where they're commercialization occurs and their operational so i couldn't be more lucky to partner with such an incredible operators dennis someone who really pushed billing to be more. Entrepreneurial created horizon ex and necks and We put together a great team here. And we're excited to make a positive difference in the landscape. So so what are you thinking. I mean how do you take these technologies that we write about all time. I guess our listeners want to know and apply them to be like a real product. What what is really exciting. Talk about this this change in the next twenty years. What can we see in practical terms. What are we going to see. joe. I think you're gonna see transformation in these four market segments that we're talking about that's way beyond what we've ever seen before i take what's happening in the in. The lower orbits space ecosystem and extraordinary the number of technologies. That we're seeing that are coming into places real applications now. The build out a satellite infrastructure nanno sats micro sats we see a market for fifty thousand plus additional small sets on orbit or the next decade. We see a number of companies who are working on breaking the cost curve for access to space new launch capabilities that are coming to bear and then new applications in terms of how to use those satellite networks to create information at useful data earth observation New kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities connectivity. In communications i think the low earth orbit ecosystem. Build out that we're seeing now is just one example of the kind of massive transfer transformation that we're gonna see that's going to create economic value. It's gonna create new companies new jobs. it's going to create a new technologies that are on the innovation edge that are now ripple out into other business sectors. So it's an exciting time to be working on this leading edge

Boeing Denis Muhlenberg Lemberg Kirsten Bartok Tau New Vista Acquisition Corp Graham Warwick JOE Denison Kirsten Dennis Harris Silicon Valley Softbank FAA
Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

Airplane Mode

05:14 min | 2 months ago

Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

"Hi my name is era. I am twenty four years old and am from texas a small town in texas. So i hadn't really talked about therapy danny body or heard about their p for the most part because it's not something that was discussed in my family or at my school with my peers. There's such a stigma around in the black community is not something that i thought i'd ever need until i got to college. And so once. I went to college and i started struggling a little bit especially since i went to. Ap w i primarily why institution. I felt pretty isolated. And eventually i decided i e. I need to do something about this. Some of the things that i wanted to talk about specifically dealt with me being a black woman. And that's something that's hard to talk about with people. Who don that experience directly. Czar barnes executive editor. Here itself has written a lot about mental health in general and mental health black people specifically so when care wrote to us i was like i have talked is are we work together but we've never actually interviewed each other before so this is a new milestone zarin. I talk basically all day every day. Not in this context though pretty much constantly slacking constantly getting on zooms. But i'm excited to do this. Which is a little different for us back in june. Sarah wrote this incredible article. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive. In this country there are list of people and organizations to follow directories and her own words of encouragement and support. Let's tell the story from the beginning like what was happening that week. That made you decide. I have to write this. I mean it was just the constant flood of honestly traumatizing news about violence against black people. In this country this was right around the time. When the protests about george floyd stuff were really kicking off in earnest and in my role as the journalist over multiple years. I've had to cover news while also having a lot of feelings about the news but it has never been this intense for me as it was that week zara knew that if she was having a hard time finding mental health resources for herself and her friends after all her years of reporting on this. She probably wasn't alone. She wanted to do something to help. Change that. And to normalize the conversation. There still so much stigma when it comes to talking about health in our society in general. But there's also a very specific stigma that can come with talking about having a hard time with mental health black person we've talked about the strong black woman trope a lot at self. That was a big part of our cover story with trudgy p. Henson the idea that black women are kind of supernatural strong and we can handle anything and we don't suffer and we never have a hard time there is a corresponding trope for black men. And even though i feel like people have done a lot to break down those barriers culturally. There still is just this pervasive idea. That having a mental health issue as a black person is first of all not something that happens. And second of all if you're dealing with it it means you're abnormal or your weak or something's wrong with you and you need to hide what you're going through and i feel really proud when i even look at the headline of the story. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive in this country. Because i feel like it sends a couple of messages it first of all says if you are just simply trying to survive day to day as a black person that's completely valid and that's a worthwhile goal and then it also says there are all these mental health resources so you cannot be the only person going through this. There are not forty four mental health resources just for you. it's for everyone. it's because there are so many of us also dealing with us in her reporting zara focuses a lot on barriers to accessing mental health. Care the things that get in the way of people getting the help that they need and one of those barriers is the stigma as she says but there are other major stomach barriers to being able to access. mental health. services is such a tremendous privilege. I mean first of all you have the cost even if you have insurance absolutely adds up. I've seen a lot of people talk about having to see their therapist once a month instead of once a week because even their co pay is simply not affordable for them and dot is a travesty. At the cost of it is especially the fact that so many therapists don't accept insurance so that adds an additional barrier.

Danny Body Czar Barnes Zarin George Floyd Texas Zara Sarah Henson
Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

"Amazon's founder and ceo. Jeff bezos announced this week that he is going to become executive chairman of the company and the new ceo will be andy jesse. Currently the head of amazon web services amazon is twenty six years old. and obviously it's massive and has ideas to do everything from package delivery to television production too smart. Microwaves to artificial intelligence. And obviously it's huge an incredibly profitable cloud business amazon's ambition and reach is legendary but with betas taking on a new role. Could that change. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a look at big tech story. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg. He's written one book on amazon and has another one coming out this spring. I asked him if amazon might start to focus more on the gold. Mine of its cloud amazon actually has kind of two of those gold mines. You mentioned one. aws the other one is advertising. And it's been this kind of quiet force gobbling up market share in online advertising. And you know for the last ten years. It's investors have been wholly on board with amazon not returning that money to shareholders not showing you know a big profit although they've been getting better in that regard but investing and inventing new things to the extent that its shareholders continue to allow that to happen amazon. Continue to do it now. jeff bezos. He's going to continue to be active in the big decisions and working on new projects and executive chairman. There's a role that carry some meaning. He's still going to be andy jesse's boss in many ways andy jesse seems formed in the same mould as jeff visas and yet. There are real critiques about the company's treatment of its workers it's wages its approach to climate not even with and i trust. Do we have a sense of whether jazzy might be more responsive to some of those critiques. Right are we going to see a softer gentler amazon. Like a tim. Cook to steve jobs. That's right and in some respects. Maybe chelsea's is while he's sort of cleaved from jeff bezos rib and a lot of ways. He's also different. I mean he's more politically active at the same time amazon. Aws under andy. Jesse sold its face. Recognition software to law enforcement agencies and only paused for a year. When the blm movement became very loud and vocal. So i don't suspect it. I much change particularly with a very loud voice on the board with a lot of sentiment changing. Is that not a good thing. Should jesse be more open to change. Will shareholders have less tolerance for business. As usual i think they're gonna have to start listening more to the voices not only of their frontline employees in the warehouses who do have some real grievances particularly amid the pandemic but to the contractor workforce almost kind of invisible constituency who tries to amazon vans and drop software packages like a lot of companies amazon kind of indulgence itself of this contractor workforce where the healthcare protections fifteen dollar an hour wage protections don't exist and so i think yes i mean they're going to increasingly if they want to get to that next level of growth. Have to listen to some of these concerns brad. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Bloomberg Stone Steve Jobs Jeff Chelsea BLM Cook Jesse Andy Brad
Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

"From a business standpoint, I think things are going to remain much the same. That's Rob Smith, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine. Bezos has said he wants to focus on other projects such as Blue origin, his spaceflight company. Andy Jassy, head of Amazon Web services will take over later this year, Bezos will remain on as executive chairman. I'm Ryan

Seattle Business Magazine Rob Smith Blue Origin Bezos Andy Jassy Amazon Ryan
Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

"Announcement of the retirement of a man who's probably one of the biggest figures in current day journalism. Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron. He is retiring from the Washington Post after eight years on the job. No, no to a staff today. Baron says he'll leave at the end of next month. Caps of 45 year career in journalism, the post 1 10 Pulitzer prizes under his leadership. Baron calls the entire experience deeply meaningful, but it's 66. He feels he's ready to move on. You may remember Baron also edited The Miami Herald and the Boston Globe is working the Globe. Was portrayed by actor Liev Schreiber in the Oscar winning film spotlight about the Catholic Church sex

Marty Baron Washington Post Baron Pulitzer Boston Globe The Miami Herald Liev Schreiber Oscar Catholic Church
Washington Post's Marty Baron to Retire as Executive Editor

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Washington Post's Marty Baron to Retire as Executive Editor

"Some big news and local journalism. Marty Baron is leaving his post as executive editor of The Washington Post. Baron has been at the helm of the post for eight years and arguably transformed the paper into an even greater power house when he came aboard as executive editor. Staff was about 580 strong. Now it's more than 1000 under his leadership, the post 1 10 Pulitzer Prizes and now has some three million digital subscribers. A million of them signed up just this past year. Baron is sharing the news about US retirement in a morning email to staff he plans to leave at the end of next

Marty Baron Baron The Washington Post United States
Funimation Acquires Crunchyroll, Merging Two of the Biggest Anime Brands

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Funimation Acquires Crunchyroll, Merging Two of the Biggest Anime Brands

"This year has been big for streaming services with many people spending more time at home or just need a distraction from everything like many others. I watched a lot of anime. Japanese animation is having a moment earlier this year. The film adaptation for the popular series demon slayer became the highest grossing. Film premiere ever in japan and during a pandemic no less also earlier this month anime streaming platforms crunchy roll and fundation announced. They'll merge in a nearly one point two billion dollar deal so there's money and demand for the medium right now here to talk about it. We have lindsey loveridge executive editor at the anime news network. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me kimberly. So why is anime having a global moment right now. I know it's not just me. Oh no anna's been having a moment for the last couple of years. But i think it's especially increased during the pandemic people have been inside and looking through their q. And maybe they've watched other episodes of great british bake off and they wanna move on to something else. So anime is a global phenomenon. I would say it's definitely exploded and there's a little bit of something for everybody no matter what your tastes are. Yeah you've got sort of the action you've got the fantasy or or the john that they call slice of life with just sort of snapshots of how people live there every day. And there's just a huge backlog of content for people who are running out of things to watch. Oh definitely we get about thirty to forty. New shows out of japan every three months so in a year. You're getting a hundred and fifty different shows to pick from talk to me about the business landscape for anime and how that is changing since it is rising in global popularity. Anime has definitely made some major investment changes over time. As far as who's become interested in it and we've seen streaming services get a very deeply involved in the production of anime as far as getting series made just for net flicks or just for crunchy roll or just for fun of nation. They're putting the money forward to get on those production committees and make some of the decisions about what gets adapted based on what they think popular. Do you have any sense of how this global popularity of anime playing out among fans in japan All i can say about that. Is that whenever i talk to. Creators directors character designers but producers. They're always happy to see that. There is an international response to their art. And that it. Even though it's made in japan that's not limiting. Its appeal to kids in europe or south america. There's huge phantoms. For shows that it didn't really take off in the us. So there ends up being different touchdown series in different countries. All over. And i think that's great. What was the first anime. Show that you watched. And that got you into it. The first one that got me into it like hooked was sailorman. And that's around the when we got access to the internet in my house and there was all these fan websites. There's a whole culture like a social culture and for me. I was someone who had a hard time making friends and meeting people with similar interests but that was all online and i could have this online life with with friends who had that that interest. The big one for me was any asha on a network Was really and that one. Scott that one still has a lot of a lot of fans actually got a new spin off this year. it's a whole new entry point for fans. Yeah and i imagine from a business perspective a reason to sort of re license the back catalogue. Oh yeah for sure Somebody who's been into anime for really long time. You know you talked about sort of feeling a little bit lonely in that space when you were younger. What's it like sort of seeing it go mainstream. I think it's wonderful animates me. Was i think kind of eye opening started. As just you know cartoons i like to watch and characters that i felt a sense of connection with but it also opened up to other cultures. And you get curious about that. And that curiosity i think is is wonderful. Everyone should have a curiosity for things outside of their immediate circle however they happen to get that. Lindsay leverage is the executive editor at the anime news network. Thank you so much. Thank you

Lindsey Loveridge Japan Kimberly Anna John South America Europe Scott United States Lindsay
Questions asked of the New York Times after Caliphate

podnews

01:10 min | 4 months ago

Questions asked of the New York Times after Caliphate

"If the new york times gets any journalism wronged executive editor should talk about it answer for it and should have as his job to convince people that will being transparent open about it. Thanks growing criticism of the new york. Times is michael barbaro. After the newspapers discredited caliphate podcast barbaro conducted that interview about the show including examining the actions of its executive producer. Lisa tobin however barbaro was not as transparent as he might have been. He didn't disclose tobin is his fiancee. This is in contravention of the new york. Times editorial standards which prohibits start reporting on people with whom they have close personal relationships. Barbara has also reportedly told other journalists at the newspaper. Not criticize the podcast. While some point out that while caliphate reporter rukmini catenaccio was made to publicly apologize and forced to move to a different area. The podcast producer and reporter. Andy mills he made the podcast and accepted. Its peabody award was hosting the daily this week on twitter. Barbaro appears to be blocking those criticizing. The decision

Barbaro Michael Barbaro Lisa Tobin New York Times New York Tobin Rukmini Catenaccio Barbara Andy Mills Peabody Award Twitter
PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

AdExchanger Talks

05:17 min | 4 months ago

PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

"Hello everyone welcome. Back to the podcast. This is zach rogers. I'm the executive editor of ad exchanger. So pathetic went public today. I'm speaking to you on wednesday. December the ninth week for. Ipo's and it's not every day not every week lately. It's not every quarter you have an ad tech ipo. They've been scarce to to put it mildly in recent months and years. So i'm delighted to be talking with rajiv go l. The ceo palmach about his company going public. Welcome eve thank you. Act great to be here with you again absolutely so just to to sort of fill in some details for the audience before we jump in you filed last month to raise a what you hoped would be about seventy five million in public offering you. How did that. By a good margin you raised hundred nineteen million today. Congratulations thank you and I think that values you matt paramedic at about nine hundred and fifty million darn close to a billion dollar valuation. Is that right. Yeah that's right. That's exactly right super. So how are you feeling right now. While i'm feeling i'm feeling very good very proud. I would say of our entire team now. It's been just a huge effort over five hundred employees to help us achieve this milestone. You know we've been a private company for fourteen years and we really look at this as the opportunity for the next phase of the company. So we're incredibly proud of what we've achieved but we're also excited to get back to work and get back to our jobs of serving our customers and in growing our business. Yeah i have to admit. I'm i bet you're feeling that way. I'm a little stunned myself. Having observed pathetic over these fourteen years all of a sudden. You know you're going public and with the great outcome and So i i can only imagine how you must feel And indeed. I would love to hear a little more if you wouldn't mind developing that a bit on. What the last several months. Where like i mean first of all. You can't do a traditional roadshow what's it like doing. A virtual road roadshow and how much internal work was necessary to get ready for this moment while i call this the sweatpants ipo. Because i literally wore sweatpants to every banker and investor meeting and had a nice dress shirt and proper sweater on top. But i think it's a little bit of the sign of how the world is changing right. Which is an it feeds into into why we decided to go public now. Which is that. The world is very different now and i think into the future than it was back in january and we think the opportunity is much bigger for our business for customers because so much has changed around consumer behavior right so consumers are doing things on the internet that they've never done before things like seeing their doctor in an app fitness classes streaming online buying cars online not to mention work from home at school from home and then consumers also have a lot more time to spend on the internet. Because they're not commuting. They're not going out for other things and you know there will be a new normal. Maybe six nine twelve months from now but i don't think it will look like the old normal right. It'll be some some new state. Where i think the digital economy will be a much bigger share of the overall economy. And i think what we see is that digital. Advertising is really an essential lubricant of how the digital economy works okay. Great and so that speaks to kind of an accelerated Celebration of digital advertising. It was very bad cue to just from a business standpoint. however this year was Overall good news for any company in the digital ad space just just from the standpoint of people working remotely and doing everything remotely. It was a bad year in every other respect for all the reasons that we all know. Could you talk about when you decided. Oh now's the time to go public. Did it have to do with the acceleration. That came with the pandemic shutdown. Yeah you know we had this insight. I think pretty late in cute to where obviously every company pulled back significantly in late march. Early april right in terms of their whatever. Their plan was for the year. Right is obviously the world was going through this this cataclysmic event but what we found in the middle of q two is that because of our unique profitability. We were able to really think about the longterm opportunity in front of us so we never stop hiring or stopped investing even in the toughest parts of of late march and april. We shifted where we were investing in. What types of things. We were doing But we had an ability to continue to invest because even through that downturn able so as we extrapolated that into the future and we realized that the digital opportunity will be much bigger and we have a unique platform in terms of the innovation and the profitability. We we thought to ourselves that you know to be properly prepared for the opportunity in front of us. We needed to be public to have the most efficient access to capital.

Zach Rogers Matt Paramedic Rajiv IPO
Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:10 min | 4 months ago

Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

"We want to get you the latest on Exit now because hopes for a breakthrough on a trade deal seemed to be on again off again, almost by the minute. So for the latest, we're joined now by David Merrit, senior executive editor for Bloomberg News. And David. I've been watching, I think along with you. The flurry of headlines have seen in just the last hour on where things stand in the Brexit negotiations. Get us up to speed if you could. Yeah, that's right on an office is definitely the right way to describe it in the market, certain reactions that pound whip soaring around. I think it just reflects the really frenetic nature. Off the talks as we really are into this final stretch here, and officials on both sides briefing various bits of the media that things are looking good things looking bad, the most recent reports saying something is imminent this weekend that came out of this morning when there was a bit of uncertainty, the French threatening a veto if they didn't like this deal, saying there was still significant gaps. So you know who to believe. I think what we do know they're still in the room. The pace of the talks really has intensified. What we may need over the weekend is a final political push. That means Boris Johnson, prime minister having a phone call, perhaps with ocean of underlying the president, the European Commission so really broken those final compromises. Both sides probably need to give a few more inches to get this deal done Most of it, though most of the Texas there so we will be waiting. It could come this weekend, but I have. We're afraid I've given up painting, and he did. Deadlines on this, you know, they're only deadline. That really matters is probably the end of transition, and that's December 31st. Right. So we got, I guess just a few more weeks before that comes along. But do we have any indications at this point that we are going to get that top level meeting any time soon between the prime minister and the president of the Sea? We have don't have confirmation, but suddenly things look to be heading that way. And I think it's worth taking a step back here. You know, no. The reporting on the ground, both in Brussels and in London, despite some of the official comments that come out about prom Rooms, disagreements tensions. Those things are kind of normal at this station negotiation. What's really going on behind the scenes, we're told is that career progress is being made. But there are these still fundamental gaps is all the things we know about the fishing access the level playing field that they're calling state aid rules on there needs to be a bit of a barge, Mr Barnier and Mr Frost, the chief negotiators, they cannot do that themselves. They're going to need instruction from their bosses. That's the prime minister and the president the commission, so those two are gonna have to come together at some point. Maybe we're being set up for that as well. There's going to be a grand political gesture. Ultimately, to get this thing over the line. The incentive is there. Neither side wants to be blamed, of course for talks breaking down and for there to be any more economic disruption at this point in time, so we're gonna have to wait and find out the confirmation, But I think that would be the moment to look for over the weekend. All right, well, it is very interesting, though, that France really seems like it's taken an outsize role in these negotiations. I mean, what are the chances that France really could veto a deal of this? Stage of the game. Well, Mr Macron, the President Franz has got slight form on this, of course in not only in the Brexit talks and other big moments in European negotiations, the French going on record today. Say they, Yes, they would trash this deal if they didn't like it. They have actually said this fairly consistently, though, throughout this process, and the French had this big interest in the fishing. Uh, part of this question and also on this kind of state aid that the fairness between the two economies. It's our closest trading partner, the biggest one with Britain, so that relationship is very key. French officials have been touring from the fishing villages in northern France to make a big show of how they are ready for no deal. If it has to happen, But if no deal does happen, those fishing villages are going to be really impacted that they're not allowed to go in. They take the majority of the fish out of the English Channel. If that is stop, that's a big domestic problem. Mr Macron, But he has to be seen to be making us that It's his style, of course, and we've seen it before to make a bit of a stand at this moment in time. But as I said previously the expectations despite what people are saying in public, and he may well be talking to his domestic market, they're more than globally. Ultimately, the people in the room seemed to be making lots of progress. Only about a minute left in our conversation in just a few weeks left until that hard Brexit deadline as you mentioned, is there a sense that some of the sticking points here are just on the Margins or are both sides far enough? Apart from each other that this really could fall apart in the next couple of weeks? I mean, absolutely could fall apart. You know, the history of Britain in the year I'm afraid is ones of both parties talking at cross purposes and on these fundamental questions of sovereignty and who is going to adjudicate over the rules, you know, there is still a significant gap. Someone's got to budge. Someone's gonna blink. Both sides have got big domestic reasons why that is politically difficult for them to do so. Mr Johnson depends on the votes. You people got to me in that landslide last year to get Brexit done in a meaningful way, as he put it. So, yes, the there is a possibility that things fall apart. Both sides of preparing for that New Year's Eve is the deadline, Britain would fall back to the World Trade Organization rules. That means tariffs quotas back backed up Lori's at Dover, potential food shortages on the supermarket shelves and Britain it could be fairly chaotic. They want to try and avoid it, but there still remains a significant chance that that might happen in just a few weeks

David Merrit Mr Macron Mr Barnier Mr Frost Bloomberg News Boris Johnson France European Commission Brexit Brussels David Texas Franz Britain London English Channel Mr Johnson World Trade Organization Lori Dover
ACCOR and Ennismore Partner to Create New Lifestyle Brand

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:45 min | 5 months ago

ACCOR and Ennismore Partner to Create New Lifestyle Brand

"Europe's largest hotel company echo and the owner of the hawks. Ten are set to bring together a number of the boutique brands under a new umbrella. Following a cash free merger announced last week the group will retain the name the hawks transparent parent company. Ns more and include the hawks in gleneagles in scotland and ecorse ten lifestyle brands including montreal s. l. s. monaco's executive editor. Josh bennett spoke to sharon has richer who ceo and founder of ns more. We've had a busy last couple of weeks and months the lockdown and we're we're delighted to emerge creating new joint venture with i call. Who the europe's largest hotel company and part of this joint venture really is a merger of their lifestyle brands alongside our lifestyle brands and collectively. This new joint venture becomes the world's largest and fastest growing lifestyle hospitality platform which is incredibly exciting. Because i've spent the last decade building and this move from ground up piece by piece having taken the halston from one hotel. In east london to cross europe and across the us will recently and of course taking taking gleneagles and reimagined it to the glorious playground once was in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s the geneticists or the sort of discussions with our core started several months ago. What was interesting. As part of our discussions was really getting to know. Akwa chairman and ceo. Sebastian buzzer and core of lifestyle. And what was cliff for them was. They were very keen to create an autonomous entity because they realized early on that really have lifestyle brands flourish. Create lifestyle brands that authentic until stories. It needed to be outside of a larger web or larger corporation and the second we both aligned and agreed on that vision. It made the beginnings of this joint venture incredibly easy to form the basis of if you think about lifestyle generally or son hotels and these are hotels that have a mission they have a porpoise. They tell stories through incredible interiors. They have restaurants and bars that are local favorites. They are more than just a hotel. They have incredible cultural programming. They have amazing events and this segment which has now become lifestyle has been one of the faucets going segments across the hotel industry. You know somebody always had global ambitions and scale at mind. The second this pandemic hit. I knew i needed to do something that was created. I need to do something that was slightly out of the box. And that field my desire and more to create this joint venture with that cool because what it's now done is allowed us scale like we've never historically had an accessing kids and regions that would never be able to access. You guys have done a great job of i. Suppose bringing people together selling people to people in in beautiful spaces. The other day you talked about there was growth. And you've undertaken particularly with the hawks. Turn group impressive and dare. I say fairly aggressive growth already. I don't know rome's number ten. Maybe i've got my numbers wrong but a a tremendous surge in the number of hotels and the identity of that brand being built around the world. Could you may be hone in on that vision. Little bit i mean. How many hotels do you want to open the markets. That you find most alluring as you look out at the end of twenty twenty and i suppose into q one q two q three next year. If there's one thing. I realized over the last six seven months is brands with purpose brands with a mission matter. And we've seen that. Even though our revenues have been hauled and some of our some of our hotels had to reduce capacity way doing substantially better than any of our competitors in that neighborhood purely because off brand stands out and i think it's me so much confidence that as we come out of this pandemic that hotels that so of the local communities that are in hotels that have more than just a bed for a night hotels that a narped utilitarian law substantially longer in those brands will live a lot longer. And that's giving me a lot of confidence that what we managed do so successfully in ten cities around the world with our collection of oh tells if we can now take that formula. And i don't mean formula in the sense of you re create things in exact the same way. The forming of frost is more about the mindset. How do you create products. You create brands that kind of inspire inspire discovery. And we've learned so much all these markets that we've kind of grown and it's really allowed us to hone in on what each hawks ten means in each of those communities so now we've got an opportunity to take the hawks ten david larger platform and even more communities so they can get a sense of what these hotels what a culturally relevant hotel feels like in some of the most exciting destinations in cities around the world. What's exciting for me about the future. Is that all learnings. We've had about taking the oxygen from one to a dozen two dozen all the learnings. We've had about reimagining gleneagles to nineteen twenty s glorious past those are amazing skills that we can now hold on on a wider global portfolio. There's some incredible brands in this portfolio. Such as twenty five hours mama shelter. That are incredibly authentic that have found a lead and i'm incredibly excited to now work with those founders and the founding teams to make those brands the best they could be and there's a bunch of brands that core of created through the in house teams and i can't wait to work with them to make those brands the best they could be. So we've got a really unique opportunity on a global scale now to harness all the amazing ways of how we worked as more the last decade in terms of course curiosity intensive of obsessive design in terms of really rethinking the digital experience in terms of partnering collaborating with incredible designers and artists and makers around the world to take that insight that knowledge that skill base that process and now redo it all over again across the portfolio brands. And i'm incredibly excited to showcase that not with ten hotels at twenty zero tells but hopefully several hundred hotels that we could build around the world over the next couple of years.

Hawks Ecorse Josh Bennett Akwa Sebastian Buzzer Gleneagles Europe Monaco Echo Montreal Sharon Scotland S London Rome United States
Bahrain Grand Prix race review

The Autosport Podcast

07:23 min | 5 months ago

Bahrain Grand Prix race review

"Wants twenty. Twenty borrowing took place today in sakir circuit. There's max stop into the win but the race was really overshadowed by a horrifying crash. Perhaps driver rugova. We survived his car bursting into flames of being sentenced barriers on that one following contact with alfred driver via the race was red flagged immediately after the accident and thankfully it soon emerged that grows have been able to escape. The inferno is being treated by the f. as medical crew. You played a vital part. And he's escape from the fire. Gordon was taken to the track's medical center and was then airlifted hospital from which he was assessed to suffered no broken bones but does have burns to his hands and ankles goes without saying we wish him well in his recovery and express our sincere relief at seeing him survived the accident after delay of one hour and twenty minutes is the barriers were repaired actually replace concrete blocks the race restarted with another great start. Concern was able to regain easily lead away things quickly. Boil down to a two horse race between the mercedes driver. Invest happen with how it's appearing to have things under control. The second stint was the biggest moment of danger of hamilton match. Step up in space on the hearts or looking after he'd softer mediums. They both ended up on the hard after their second stops after which for stopping closed in despite his own stop being a slow one but he never got within three seconds of the mercedes driver up from rebel in fact opted to pit the doctrine for a third time. Giving you had a large gap in hand over sergio perez behind peres was in third of the voucher tacit made a poor start and slipped backwards at town one which had paid to spark a series of smaller incidents that ended later crash which is of course not to say that there was any blame any of them peres done a fine job to run alex album in the second way boat and he looked set for a second successive podium until his engine let go with four laps remaining the race therefore finished under safety car hamilton. Taking his eleventh win of the campaign album completed the podium so joining me to discuss all of that and more tonight motorsport dot dotcoms f. one editor noble or tie sports. Fm reporter leaks and keep racing's executive editor. Stuart coddling now is gonna come to you first because you and i were in pretty constant throughout the early stages of that racist so trying to piece together what was going on once. We need that. Romain grosjean was all right. We try not. That's make sure. I raced on facebook dot com dot com accuracy. Accurate as it could be when it comes. I just just if you don't mind you could. You could talk us through the first thought and ended up the crash at the end of it. I could almost look through a transcript of whatsapp messages. Couldn't i is Yeah it wasn't very pleasant work actually a a not particularly nice to at the time given that we began the price s Before we knew what happens actually to out and before we okay we were starting to pick over some of the details leading up to the accident and and like you say it's it's one of those shunts is an accumulation of snow events and people doing things that builds towards a conclusion and and it does start with valerie. Batas having a slough guess away. He seemed to get away. When the lights went out he go to wipe perfectly well but then in the second phase acceleration not so much He wasn't the person off. Com was slough away was passed by morrison and gas lay album perez and then ricardo got passed batas. And that just meant that. You had this situation wearing bahrain. Three calls can go through taiwan abreast. Really won't you can get through ten to breast so that that's an. That's a natural funnel point that sort of vestibule between two warm an intern take so so you had basically people sorting things out with each other just just looking at my notes this squeezes all the way down the field and so i you have lewis getting a clean gas away. The stepan going through as well and then album sort of makes it stick and get through and you have ricardo an album sort of alongside each other and sorting out between themselves. That causes potus to slightly cheque's pace. Maybe a little bit through through turn to and then further back you have squeezes. You have leclerc veterans stroll who are also three abreast through san juan clerk. Poor gas away and then sent for a deeply into turn one see. Have an awful lot of people who are trying to make up ground. Having got a poor start so you have the situation where bats seems to be a little bit. As as album gets ahead of riccardo norris taps ghastly science has to get out of the throttle to avoid that squeeze with with with having to check up ahead of him vattel. Who's then arriving. Kind of three abreast with strollers rights. The clerk and his right has to check very hard to avoid running into the back of what's ahead of him. Hey jinx right stroll goes rights and then creates a scenario where. There's a lot of slow moving traffic and grow. John arrives at that scene. Say's all those costs loving ahead. You have reichen going off track on the left in an attempt to go around the so the slow moving cars and i think garage unnaturally in the heat of the moment goes to the right May be of either forgetting or not observing the caveat. He's five o'clock almost an caveat sunny there because he's been in a squeeze with with the alfa romeo's he's been slide down because he's had pretty much guy over the apex turn to avoid clunking into magnusson. If if if my notes reflect this accurately so all circumstances kind of build into into what we saw happen of very very fiery accident and one that was very scary indeed it was becomes. Talk about the really terrifying. The copying on fire grudge having to escape the inferno league. I wonder if we could just come to you. What is the latest information. We have at the time of recording about jones conditioning hospital so gross on as seen on the world fit. He was transported from the Initially exciting the medical card in the ambulance and the medical center and he was quick. They were quick to report that he had some burns to his hands and his ankles and then reports that he was being taken to the barring military hospital with suspected broken ribs and they've been conducted all of the x rays and all the checks her quiet out those to the east number bones which is really good news and the diagnosed that come back with the burns to the back of his hand. Side of c will require treatment. He's gonna remain sel overnights. They can complete treatment and Keep them on vacation base. Leads sure everything is okay. But remind he's in good spirits. He spoke to consign. He spoke to his family on the phone as well and then he also put a video up on instagram. A couple of hours ago which was really really good. say any. i'm okay and he was like well. No convenient okay. And then showed his hands. Which kind of in these white gloves to the cough to them and seemed very chipper in very good spirits

Rugova Peres Sergio Perez Romain Grosjean Hamilton Batas Alfred Gordon Riccardo Norris Stuart Reichen Alex Valerie Leclerc Bahrain Perez Morrison
Embraers CEO on the Breakup With Boeing and Going It Alone

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:35 min | 6 months ago

Embraers CEO on the Breakup With Boeing and Going It Alone

"In April of twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred Embraer selected veteran automotive industry CEO Francisco Gomez NATO as its new leader, and if ever there was a baptism by fire, he has gone through it in two, thousand and twenty. First, the COVID nineteen crisis hit crippling air travel and decimating demand for new airplanes then Boeing. Pulled out a four point two billion dollar deal to acquire an eighty percent stake. Embraer's commercial operations after emperor had shut down its operations for forty days and torn the company apart for car route. So where does ember air go from here and how can it recover here to? Answer those questions as Mr Gomez. NATO in his first conversation with the trade media since taking the helm at. Embraer. Also, joining us from Frankfurt to ask questions with me is yen's photo aviation weeks executive editor for commercial aviation welcome. Francisco. Let's start with the obvious question. Why did the deal with Boeing collapse and what are you doing to put Embraer's commercial operations back together? First of all, he says measure to be here with you. Thanks for for the Vision for this guests. Well I mean. We need that. Boynton has wrongfully naked. Reasons for the whose possession be. As, you said before point two billion. Dollar purchase bronze. Of Visualization. Progressing up is fast all initial TV areas in the service there is our. bigly. Read the great in we. Him also updated our band recall Roy. Sweep one twenty five mile e Cudi Commissioning Gatien in thinking The covy nine. So how do you plan to return the company to profitability and and wh what initiatives are most promising? Okay so he s an old this year. We really with a big issue the I wa. Dropping no revenues of the back of the V ninety. So event, not Anita the nature of the point lead this machine was more challenging because. With this, wrong in revenues combine costs. And higher the more. Because all day costs League Office. So this year what we are. We are we demanded A. Crisis Committee, and defining fighting for your. help us open the. Office will be the communication blow so. I will. Soon. As fight for artists, one is to protect. The health people because of all, these Colby get along people working at Home Office, the one who brought pants. All measures we Brought back to their health. Sat, on the second yard. This project allegations. Falls or on. Our. Our expertise always, you reduce our investments on only boom, our the siebel payables. The everything we coons who protect. Our cash. Who Wins? The vast in four four son loans to help us with a Number, three. was. recaptured. Seniors. Said before I mean we we had to recover. These is we had because of the off process. process. BROISSIA's. We. Promoted a rightsizing the organization because of the. Back, but also because of the effects of the Kobe. Needed his response, your guys edition, only a reduced cost, the new dynamic for the Popham who prepared again Asian. Our other strategic planning, one, twenty, five, the four priority is tool and. Die Of. This To Have A. More efficient immoral Gile Open. I. Is was. Is Now who view the basis for our future road then. We Very. Very. Robust. Recalling. One twenty five. That's a note we want that will already enjoy. Eating very A. CENTURY OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE From. Linked to on. Any. Were democracy to. We expect. Enjoy rules any Mel Revenue Spike essentially, our financial. For.

Embraer Francisco Gomez Nato Broissia Boeing League Office Boynton Mr Gomez CEO Siebel A. Crisis Committee Home Office Kobe Frankfurt Anita Executive Editor Coons Popham
Los Angeles Times Top Editor Steps Down

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Los Angeles Times Top Editor Steps Down

"Top editor of the L A TIMES, Norman Pearl Stein has announced today He'll soon be stepping down. The nation's fourth largest daily metro paper is starting a search for a successor to Pearlstein's. After his two years as executive editor. Here's Casey Ar w smack, Gillom. Pearlstein's led the paper through dramatic changes. When he joined the Times in 2018, the paper was emerging from its ownership by Tribune Publishing. He went on a hiring spree to build back a paper that had nearly been streamlined to death. But strife inside the newsroom over the last several months came to dominate. Throw to some remark by calls for racial justice and equality. LATIMES, staffers Question management's commitment to diversity and inclusion and its coverage of communities of color. Last week, the owner of the Times, Dr Patrick Soon, Shong penned a letter to readers pledging a more diverse staff and acknowledging blind spots in the paper's coverage. In a note to LATIMES staff Pearlstein Road. He's proud of his time with the paper and recognizes it's the right time to find a successor that his case will be his Matt Dillon

Pearlstein L A Times Norman Pearl Stein Dr Patrick Soon Executive Editor Editor Matt Dillon Tribune Publishing Gillom Shong
Student Loan Debt Making It Difficult To Subscribe To The Topical

The Topical

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Student Loan Debt Making It Difficult To Subscribe To The Topical

"A study published today by the Public Radio Center. For Education, statistics found that student loan debt is making it even more difficult for millennials to enjoy basic amenities like subscribing to the. Patriot on despite the extremely low price membership tiers for more on this worsening financial situation we're joined now by Opie our executive editor Rachel. Lynn, thank you for joining US Pleasure Leslie Rachel of people can't afford a basic necessities. Like. This crisis is really gotten out of control that's right. Leslie according to the study you mentioned delinquency on student loans have doubled since twenty twelve with over thirty percent of young professionals reporting they are struggling to afford are extremely generously price tier options that started just five dollars a month and offer even more of the signature blend of news and analysis that listeners have come to expect from onion public radio. Real travesty.

Leslie Rachel Public Radio Center United States Executive Editor Lynn
Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 7 months ago

Freelance work grows amid Covid-19

"Going around these days, The future of work is now the pandemic has turned million's of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious permanent full time jobs, going freelance that severing ties between companies and employees as NPR's Orry, Berliner reports. Diana Gil was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning with the president? And then, of course, I knew what that meant. She was being laid off from her job as executive editor at Tour books. Gil was given a month's notice, and she had plenty of projects to keep occupied. So the new reality didn't register at first, but then May and I was like Well, there's Cove. It's so there's certainly not jobs right this minute. That's when it sank in. She was a freelancer. Her 24 year career as an editor at New York's top publishers was over. Now editing book, like Manuscript is a specialized skill. So Gil has been pretty busy so far. But she was thrown into the much less secure world of freelancing where the money and gigs are unpredictable, freelancing this feast or famine so kind of comes in waves, and I know at some point there'll be less of it, So I'm looking at that sort of what to do. I had to sort of make it. Work is a business making it work is a business becoming a free agent. That's the challenge predicament, however, you want to phrase it. Facing many Americans. The percentage increases are alarmingly big. That's Julia Pollock labor economists with the job site's IP recruiter. Zip recruiter tracks the proportion of job postings that are temporary rather than permanent, And it's kind of dramatically during the pandemic. The share of temporary job postings in communications, for example, was was only 12% prior to Kobe. It jumped up to 48% in April and May and though it's come down a bit, it's still very, very high. A similar story and feels like HR, and advertising and marketing. The junk was from about 8% historically, to 28% Post Cove. It part of the shift is predictable. When the economy is shaky and the outlook uncertain. Employers are reluctant to hire permanent workers and now tools like Zoom are creating more flexibility in the workplace. White collar jobs can be done anytime, anyplace by any capable person with a phone and a laptop work is untethered from the office. So workers don't build personal connections with their bosses. I think now you know, lots of companies are starting to think like, Hey, maybe we don't really need these full time employees. Stephanie Coddle is the founder of Black Girl Group of Freelance staffing agency. I think now you know these cos they're starting to see like, Hey, having these folks at home is saving me money. Hey, I don't see those people. So do I really need to be given them benefits as the recession dragged on the axis, fallen on a wide range of workers. And some workplace experts say a lot more white collar jobs will be done by contractors probably forever. But starting a freelance career after getting laid off isn't something people do by choice, says Connell. You almost begin a freelance out of necessity. You don't have time Tio, you know, cry or be down or depressed because you lost your job used to have bills to pay. And those bills don't care that you lost your job. The freelance economy was enormous before the pandemic. And has grown even larger during it. Two million freelancers have been added in just the past year. That's according to the freelancing platform upward upward study claims a majority of freelancers who started since the pandemic say no amount of money would convince them to take a traditional job. A very different picture emerges on the job site. Zip recruiter. Here's the company's labour economies. Julia Polic, the vast majority 90% of active Zip recruiter, job seekers are looking for a permanent full time position a job with benefits like health care. A job with a sense of purpose and mission where you make really connections with your co workers, Pollack says. That's what most workers want. Gauri Berliner

Diana Gil Gauri Berliner New York Executive Editor Julia Polic President Trump NPR Stephanie Coddle Julia Pollock Post Cove Editor Pollack TIO Connell Black Girl Group Founder
"executive editor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"David day and executive editor of the American prospect, if you can respond to this, and also why libra will be based in Switzerland that have to do with that being a banking centre tax haven. Yeah. So I mean, the truth is, is that if you were able to create some sort of digital wallet that could be used in any country and purchase and make micro transfers and things like that. It would be convenient. I mean, that's really what Facebook is banking on, right? I mean it right now are the US payment system is pretty clunky. Particularly with international transfers that take several days to clear there would be a convenience angle here. And of course, Facebook believes that if they can get you on their website and using their digital wallet. Which they controlled directly. I mean, there's this Lieber association that's based in Switzerland, as you say, probably for tax purposes, that is controlling the governance of the currency, but cuddly bre, which is, what David Marcus, we heard from the top is, is running is a digital wallet. That's run by. Subsidiary that's wholly owned by Facebook. So if, if Kaliba becomes ubiquitous if it becomes this thing that you, you really need to make purchases, then you have something like we chat. And we chat is the app in China that has become so much part of people's lives that it's very hard use paper money in China. I mean, this is social media. It's a chat tool, and also it's a purchase app. I it's something that you can use in that fashion. And that's Facebook's. I think end goal I if you add payments onto this social media application, that is incredibly dominant, basically locked people into Facebook. And if you've done that, then, you know, whether you're taking a little bit out of every transaction that two billion people make on a daily basis or whether you are just locking people onto the site knowing what purchases they've made and then. Selling very data rich ads based on that, you, you have a prospect of real domination. And you know, I really think that either this thing is going to not get off the ground because too many regulators and politicians will have uneasiness about it, or we'll look back in twenty years. And this will be the week where this thing was announced that created this, this dominant global company that is, you know, an indispensable digital partner kind of walking you through life and David day, the whole issue of, of security Facebook is currently poster child for the violations of privacy data rights of individuals. They're insisting that they're going to build a set this ca- libra will be a separate subsidiary that it won't share the user information Facebook itself with the this payments system that they set up. You talk about this issue because it almost seems like or does say, but Facebook is basically transferring its monopoly position social media to then enter the financial transactions world. Yeah. I mean first of all, do you trust? Mark Zuckerberg with anything around privacy at this point after years and years of these revelations and second of all, it's a bit of a red herring. So it's entirely possible. Let's take Facebook at their word that the financial data and the social data will be separate well in order to access. Purchases on libra. You're still going to have to make a click within the Facebook app or within WhatsApp or, or wherever to, to find your purchase, or to search for a business that you want to solicit or things like that. And that information is certainly going to be available to Facebook. So the idea that there's no, you know, extra data that you'd be grabbing here. If you're Facebook is, is really not true. I mean you're, if you're spending more time on the app if you're clicking around to find things to buy on the app, which is not typically at this point, what people do on Facebook, then that's just much more data that Facebook is going to be able to use to target ads at you and do whatever else it wants. So, finally, again, the title of your piece, the final battle and big text war to dominate your world. Fill that out. Sure. So we've been seeing over the last several months. The big tech companies Google, apple Amazon, and Facebook, try to figure out how to become that sort of one partner. I mean you have apple that put out this thing that's a credit card called the apple card. You have Amazon, partnering with other global payment systems on what they call world pay or what they call Amazon pay, I should say Google has its own digital wallet. And now you have Facebook with this thing that is who knows what it is a Bank prepaid cards, digital wallet is a global currency. So you have all these companies that were kind of competing separately. Are now all moving into the payment space and also moving into other spaces that are overlapping, like entertainment to become that thing that is sort of the only kind of dish. Digital tool that you will need so you can make all your purchases, you can talk to all your friends, you can access all your entertainment. You can do everything that you wish inside this world, whether it's Facebook, Google, Amazon Apple, and that's really their intention, and that's why I call it sort of the war of all against all this is like the final battle for global domination here. And you know how that shakes out is sort of indeterminate at this point. But what we know is that if you're creating this, we already have these, these, these companies that are monopolies in their own sort of personal spaces if they if they combined sort of together, a lot of different options for for you, as an individual than you have just this absolute dominant behemoth. And there are serious concerns around giving that much power to one company. Well, of course, we'll continue to follow this David day and exert. Editor of Merican prospect will link to your piece in the new Republic, the final battle and big. Tex war to dominate your world coming up we go to Zona to speak with an African American family held at gunpoint by police because their four year old daughter allegedly took a dull from a Family Dollar store. They're now talking about suing for ten million dollars. But first, we look at a highly contested district attorney's race here in New York in queens, where one of the candidates is making headlines by going to radically reshape the criminal Justice system. Her name is Tiffany Coban. She's with us. Stay with us. Off..

Facebook David day Switzerland apple US Amazon Google partner David Marcus China executive editor Mark Zuckerberg Kaliba Tiffany Coban Zona New York queens
"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

08:53 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Six. We're talking with Kelly lejos, the executive editor of the American conservative their website, the American conservative dot com, and does she executive editor of their magazine. In terms of assessing Trumpy in the foreign policy. We have of course, the efforts aimed at some kind of a quote deal with the Taliban. I view that rather sceptically to say the least, but nonetheless, there's a move in that direction of pulling out troops from Syria. And then sometimes moves in countering director of it, a little hard, I suppose to do exactly pin down a a direction a philosophy at an ideological. If you will focus just exactly where this administration is coming from a does seem at times that as I have caustically said of our president. He shows a great versatility of conviction. Do you see a common thread through his actions? I do and I forgive me. I I meant to say peace through strength. When I was quoting Ronald Reagan earlier that might have been a Freudian slip because I'll be honest with you Trump doesn't really talk about peace too often. So those words don't really come to that word doesn't really come to my wife, think Trump. But that's what I was trying to say that he was he was taking measures. In an effort to show strength, but not aggressively use military force like his predecessors. Do I see that as a common thread, many of us in the more realist, you know, foreign policy world who came at his word when he was running for president in two thousand sixteen and he he went to the National Center for the national interest. And he talked about wanting to bring troops home not wanting to get involved in foreign wars of choice that he felt that the wars and the war in Iraq was a mistake that you know, he did not want to repeat those mistakes of his predecessors. So I see some of his foreign policy moves whether it is announcing a withdrawal from Syria. I draw down troops. Maybe a full withdrawal from Afghanistan as part of those measures those those promises he made. On the campaign trail, I think he feels. That you know, that, you know, pushing back against Putin is is part of that. I don't I he does not seem to be interested in going to war in Iran. Even though personally, I think getting out of the Iran deal was a mistake. So I do I do I do. I don't see him getting us into wars putting troops on the ground in foreign countries. Like, I think Hillary Clinton would have. So I do see a common thread. It just does seem a little schizophrenic sometimes because he does he does speak aggressively. And he does make these categorical statements and ultimate homes which sound like, wow, he's right on the threshold of of some sort of forceful development. But I I do feel personally that so far. He hasn't gotten us in any wars. So he's not gotten this entity. That's that's true. I I certainly have serious doubts about just what will be accomplished by his summitry with Kim of North Korea. Certainly, of course, a note as as laughable his statement that his first summit led to the removal of the North Korean nuclear threat, which was against the kind of overreach that the fortunately this man is famous for he has begun a process, which might possibly maybe someday lead to possible lessening of that threat. But that'd be done as it may regarding Iran for a second here. I I had on George Mitchell. One evening about that deal. And I asked him to read the part of the deal, which prevents Iran from doing anything. And he couldn't of course, because there's nothing in there the does. And I said if it really is your view and the view of the administration that we. Can't prevent Iran from doing anything. But we can if we bribed them enough delay their nuclear program. Intellectually honest thing be to say, so I don't have the by that point of view, by the way, I genuinely subscribe to the view that a nuclear armed this Iranian regime, not a nuclear armed Iran is much, but this regime big nuclear armed as intolerable that this is not to be tolerated at all by any means necessary. Yes to add, including preemptive strikes. I review the possession of nuclear weapons by this regime. Simply not even remotely acceptable. But if it's your view the best we can do is bribed them into the process become the world's biggest funder of terrorist activities by giving them that much money Than Shwe's. Don't you just say so well, he didn't really have an answer for that either. And I I again, I. This prevented Iran from doing anything that might be one thing. It doesn't prevent a thing. Well it delayed. Okay. So you're talking about two things nuclear program and their activities their aggressive activities in the region and the aggressive activities in the region had nothing to do with the deal. You're right. It didn't stop them from doing their behavior in Yemen, and in Syria, Lebanon, what it did it was it was it was preventing them from increasing their nuclear capabilities. They still contend that. They don't have a nuclear weapons program. So this was basically restricting the center futures it was re restricting they're enhancement of uranium. And so I it's. You know, how many years it took the? But but but only for a fixed number of years if they lied perfectly with that. There would be a time in the very near future. When okay now, we're free to make all the nukes. We want to. Think it delayed delayed only. And that was my problem was the intellectual dishonesty of saying, it prevents anything it delays. And that assumes around the ins don't cheat that I think one of my main problems with that deal that it was sold as something that it wasn't. Yeah. It was definitely an imperfect deal. But I mean as as you remember has been in the works. I mean, it, you know, I remember when the Bush administration had started talks with the Iranians, which of course, we're we're we're we're stalled and did not return nobody returned back to the negotiating table until the Obama administration with this years in the making and you're right. It's an imperfect deal, and if it was sold as ending any of their capabilities forever that that was wrong, and that was a lie. Well, that's exactly how it was sold by the Obama. Ministration? I mean. I think I think they felt that they had finally reached a place where they could say, hey, we have got we've got around to like, you said delay their abilities until you know, twenty twenty four twenty twenty six I can't remember exactly which time I'm in terms of their enrichment that was that was the best that anybody has ever done that point honest, if they never sold it that way, what you just said was obviously assessment of what it would do if Iran complied they pushed it as preventing that I got to be more than anything else. If it's such a great deal was necessary to lie to sell it and the Obama administration lie anyway, not to spend all night. That that that that bothered me from day one. But, but we just heard a statement of exactly what it would have done from somebody who is at electorally, honest. We'll come back and talk some more in just a moment. Selling your home is one of the biggest.

Iran Syria president Obama Taliban executive editor Kelly lejos Trump Ronald Reagan Trumpy Hillary Clinton director Iraq North Korea George Mitchell Putin
"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Zero five four six two six US pulling out of the intermediate forces nuclear treaty with Russia after what? Appears to be years of violations by the Russians that would hardly be any big surprise the Russians have not exactly taken the spirit or would possible. Even the the precise wording most of their international agreements that seriously. Putin's efforts to resurrect the evil empire, which he has had undisguised nostalgia. Over the years. We're talking with Kelly hosts the executive editor of the American conservative magazine, their website, the American conservative dot com and something else that appeared in the report that we heard earlier, which was that. European officials have been urging the Russians to take the next six months to return to full and verifiable compliance to preserve the treaty, which makes it sound. As though until the next six months are out. This is not a done deal as such that. There's a there's a window here. Now, I doubt seriously that this will persuade Vladimir Putin. Do suddenly see the righteousness of that action and go the straight narrow, but nonetheless, I gather that this is not cast in concrete quite yet. Is that right, right? They have according to the tree. Eighty they have a hundred eighty days to rectify this. So either what what Trump is saying is that he, you know, he wants them to destroy violating missiles in this regard. I don't know. And the Russian say there is that there missiles are within the range of compliance. So were there's an impasse there. I don't know what's going to happen. I mean, some folks believe that the Trump administration is is basically pushing this I would hope that within one hundred and eighty days the Russians will comply like you said. Or you've suggested that the Russians probably are dead. That's not really in a car then. But there is that six month window where where something could happen some negotiation could happen. What's interesting is? This. This whole matter began way back in two thousand seven so the American intelligence have had wind of these missiles for a long time. The Obama administration did not push it. Although the intelligence community had pretty much connected all the dots that these missiles were not in compliance. If the Trump administration has decided and announced a year ago that it was going in this direction to really push push. The matter the Russians way up until recently had denied that these missiles had even existed now they say the exists, but they're within compliance as you know, this this kind of back and forth has been going on for more than a generation at this point would various. Treaties. And it is it is a dance that's been carrying on since the Cold War on this is just the latest chapter, but it could really escalate things either way. Like, you said earlier in terms of our security European security in the region. So it is an age of of satellites I mean to to question the existence of such missiles or or their capabilities. I mean, if the Russians of ever tested, these things, you know, that a US satellite is watched it and watched how far it went. I mean, we're really passed the euro, I think when you could can can make this stuff up. I mean, if you've got a missile, and it it is fired and tested within the the the boundaries of that treaty. Well, then the Russians have that. If those very same missiles are are seen deployed in such and such a location again there's little in the way of deny that at least with a straight face. Well, and I'll be fair because I'm not an expert. You know, I did talk to Scott Ritter. Be you know earlier today. Getting his take on it. You know, as we know what happened in the lead up to Iraq. Intelligence is not, you know, necessarily a smoking gun. So, you know, the what he believes, and you know, you might disagree intelligence community often has a sort of a pre narrative, you know, they they is in like would Iran they believe that something's going on. And they find the dots to connect it. You know, but scientists and sound and so there's a lot, you know, satellite. Images might come up. They might be testing wooden weapon. And it turns out it's another weapon. So I this has been going on since two thousand seven, you know, what he told me is that the Russians had often they had had repeatedly asked, you know, the Americans due to provide their evidence, and which they didn't. And so that little game is going back and forth for years on end. So. I'm not in any position. 'cause it's not really my, you know, my my field, you know, to tell you what the evidence they have. But I could probably say considering what we know about the intelligence community. And how it sort of builds narratives, you know, connected. I for what whatever agenda they have that this might not be a smoking gun. But on the other hand, we know the Russians and their history. And so it's not necessarily going to believe everything they say either. But do we get out of the treaty? Does that escalate things or does it puts the Russians to comply or come back to a negotiating table? I think that's the question. A lot of people in Washington will probably tell you that getting out of the treaty is probably is is a dangerous move. But we've seen this president kind of push people's hands before and get people to the table. So I think. It'll be interesting to see over the next six months. What happens it will that? We'll talk some more one eight six six five O, JIMBO one eight six six five zero five four six two six Kelley hosts executive editor of the American conservative magazine, their website, the American conservative dot com. We are not the US decision to pull out of the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty, a key pact with Russia, which have been a centerpiece of the European security since the Cold War back in just a moment. Mill why do so many Wisconsin businesses turned a Creston electric supply company. They've been around as long as Green Bay football starting out in nineteen nineteen. It's a small company in a.

US American conservative magazine Vladimir Putin executive editor Russia Trump Obama administration Green Bay Kelly Scott Ritter Wisconsin Iran JIMBO president Iraq Creston Kelley Washington
"executive editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Scooters were abandoned at the Pentagon following this year's nine eleven remembrances. Police say they'll begin impounding the unauthorized rides and they're gonna win impound bikes to just abandon these things. It's a story by Kevin Barron executive editor at defense one. Kevin what's up here? Not the electric scooters. That are take you over America's cities over the place. Some people love them and a lot of people really hate them. And just happened that the day the morning after the September eleventh remembrances this year. Always welcome to the Pentagon and got word that the Pentagon police had gathered up a few of them outside and check and see what's the deal and turns out. Yup. In the last few weeks. Police say this has been a problem people are abandoning them. You know, these are these are ductless scooters you download our app you find one hundred four hundred phone you walk to it. You get a code you hit the button and off you go when you're done, you can leave it anywhere you want. And so the Pentagon made sure to put out a word that these are unauthorized and not welcome don't bring him to the building. Wow. So there's no obviously payment penalty of some kind for just leaving them anywhere. The next thing. They said they would do this offense. These are seven scooters found near one of the main entrance says kinda just leaned up against some of the jersey barriers and the Pentagon called the company these birds scooters to a couple of the burden lime bird scooters. They told the company come get him within that day. The company sent somebody to gather them up of the Pentagon's. Now said any further ones that are left. They would just be impounded while which would be a financial penalty to the company to get them out of Hawkin. Sure. But but this is how these things work though. Right. I mean, you you leave them. And then what the do you indicate on the app where it is. And then the company goes and gets it or them if there are more than one yet. No they could there anyway. So the company does pay people you could sign up.

Pentagon Kevin Barron executive editor America Hawkin
"executive editor" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Breaking news as, it happens you're listening to Kevin McCullough radio So glad you're with us and very interesting I mean what what, we try to. Do is breaking news and what it means why it, matters that's kind of a simple format of Kevin McCullough radio and it's something that you obviously entertain because you have made us consistently the one of the most listened to, broadcasts of the entire day right here where. You finding us and we're. Glad to be here with you We've got a very interesting piece. Being developed, out of the federalist today the executive editor their joy Pullman has authored, a profound piece. Titled kids who had ten government preschool learned lesson misbehave, more and I know that in the good sensibilities of people that live in the northeast this is a shock to the system so I thought I'd have on to discuss, joy Pullman welcome back to Kevin McCullough radio Thank you Why did you want to write? About this Well to be, on well I mean education is my field but I also have five little kids and a little less one. Is a baby a toddler and a preschooler And the other two I'm guessing already in school so was preschool part of your two oldest kids programs Well we did a once a week enrichment and program. That, involve, me. Being there with my son, but so writing depends on whether you would label that, preschool right right right because in the McCullough house we've gone round and round and we try Christian preschool and then it turned. Out that one of my kids is a little too hyper, for that and they didn't have the resources so we ended, up going into the local school district preschool and it turned out to be a good experience for him but. I read and here a lot of questionable things about this, in your piece today really. Caught my attention so what what did you basically argue What about you just discussing, and explaining the results of the of the only the second high quality randomized controlled trial study of a government preschool program that has ever been conducted and what. That means is the only difference between you know. The kid studied in kids who are the control group is that the kids. Who, were study went preschool so it's pretty reliable kind of study in it found overall you know, that the kids who attended the government preschool program in Tennessee. By, the, time. They reach third grade after, some initial gains rate in the preschool kindergarten year by, the time the kids reach third grade if they had gone to preschool they were behind in math and science and they were. More likely to be labeled special needs then where the kids, who had mostly stayed at home with their parents instead of, going to the program now this is government preschool that you're talking about so obviously they didn't test kids that. Were in private or parochial preschool programs The kids that, were studied who had not gone to the government eat run preschool program about I think it was fifteen percent of them did go to a private preschool and..

Kevin McCullough joy Pullman Pullman executive editor Tennessee fifteen percent
"executive editor" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"We're back markers money program thank you for joining us bob ricker here our guest is brad stone brad is the author of the upstarts his new book uber airbnb in the battle for the new silicon valley brad is also executive editor for technology at bloomberg news i'm sure you hear a lot about this brad there's a lot of talk that goes around about culture and the silicon valley a lot we hear about him we've had authors talk about it in a lot of that culture is the culture of greed what say you i would call it but yeah i don't know if i would call the cultural agreed i think it's the culture of growth and a culture of success almost like obsession with success the founders of airbnb are kind of good example you know they went to this forum called the white combinator kind of stirred up school and all around them they saw success and they were idolizing facebook founder mark zuckerberg at the time and of course everyone idolizes jeff bezos these days and they wanted to emulate it you know they wanted back kind of success so they build a company very quickly they raise money very quickly you know they're taking they're taking advantage of their you know of of their heads starts on a good idea and when you move that fast you know and you suddenly you spread globally in your you've got the tiger by the tail and you're moving quickly and you're hiring hundreds or even thousands of people you know every month you make mistakes i mean is it that they were greedy and they wanted you know a billion rather than five eight hundred million i i don't know no actually like having done interviews you know with all these founders i don't think that's it i think they're they're builders they're building their empires and it's the obsessional is that you know that this is a historic moment in time and that new companies very valuable new companies can be created well there's an obsession with that and then they pass by all sorts of important things along the way like you know building you know diverse workforce or you know protecting you know their customers from harm's you know certainly we saw that again and again and the kids have mover they're moving fast and they're putting in rules and you know and and it's it's like the you know the the guardrail you know they build their businesses without the proper guardrails because they're moving too quickly and then people get hurt i don't think it's greed greedy but i think it's an obsession with earth at all costs some people are maybe there's an ex but that's okay some people wonder if a good idea is in the eye of the beholder and the reason i say that is because i'm gonna take a traffic app that sends rush hour traffic into residential communities to get off the congested highway and look at the effect that has on the residential community i mean forget about it it's no longer what it was and so this is happening in in various things that are changing in connection with the internet and it just seems to me that it's you know just get out of the way here we come you're you're not wrong but i guess i would kind of describe it a flight historic forces that can't be stopped you know the the the us was putting gps satellites up in space in the eighty s and ninety s and you know and when you have that and then we alter carrying around cell phones you know the fact that we would have mapping ask center phones wasn't inevitability and and then yes and then you have the unintended consequence people driving through residential areas or people driving around their they're driving their cars with one hand and one i on their phone because they're looking at the map you know i think that it's yes there's never been enough consideration paid to the unintended consequence or the secondary byproduct and and there should be you know and and oftentimes it comes too late but you know i think that like things have the characteristic of genie out of the bottle you know you're never gonna you know you're never gonna wasn't like the mapping at the air of the mapping app was a choice you know it was sort of an inevitability technological progress has led us let's get out to columbus ohio john you're on with brad stone go ahead thank you bob.

executive editor bob ricker brad stone bloomberg one hand
"executive editor" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"There is a former editor of the the new york times name bill keller by with his documentary out right now in the new york times and bill keller is featured at the time he was executive editor became executive editor i believe during the filming of the documentary he wrote a piece in two thousand fourteen about a man that i mentioned everything they william more mccullough headline an unsung hero of civil rights don't tell kanye west who may tweet this and who knows what percentage of twenty eight million followers may actually look up and read about this unsung hero of the civil rights bill without which according to bill keller the civil rights bill might very well never have been passed that i mentioned he's white clementines republican i mentioned he had the same seat it was held by john bainer somewhere in all this worthy commemoration we should pause and play and pay homage to a conservative white republican named william more mccullough never heard of him neither had i but there is a good case to be made that the civil rights act of nineteen sixty four with not have become law without him and there is a very good case to be made that washington desperately needs his example today end of quote this bill keller riding this in twenty fourteen new york times right the mccullough's district was two point seven percent black and therefore quote he had no political incentive to stick his neck out on something that's contentious that civil rights close people don't realize southern democrats absolutely adamantly opposed to it mccullough was descended from abolitionists and had been appalled by his exposure to jim crow when he worked as a young lawyer in florida this fortified him in a strong belief that the blessings of the constitution were not met exclusively for white men and it was the highest duty of the federal government to secure those blessing for all end of quote.

editor new york times executive editor john bainer william washington mccullough florida federal government bill keller kanye jim crow seven percent
"executive editor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"You know he could wait till four but if he does wait till four that's chance he's getting the second choice maybe even the third choice if you're committed to a quarterback i've gotta get one one or four why wait if you go at one and you know the jets are taking i believe it's mayfield but they're taking one of three that means you're still gonna get one of the two three four best prospects in the draft of before so i think they go with donald at one and then they come back at four and they take either barclay or chubb depending on the giants check out all of his stop and his staff stop with pro football weekly's week leading up to draft you get it's good draft information there as you will anywhere else how we always appreciate when share with us thanks buddy enjoy marcus from pro football weekly their executive editor also football insider farrar affiliate into six seventy to score and you can catch him on the westwood one broadcast in season does some sideline stuff interview stuff as well as being covering the league or forty years lent us some good insight right there i'll care my insight our run down my list i'll give you my rankings not same as hubs allen could be a bust he is hobbies seriously leaning toward the bust scenario of josh allen i'm trying to stay in the middle because i think upside is yet could quarterback in this draft so where kids it i'll tell you how that falls out with me on my rankings of top six give me yours on the telephone lines we'll get them reopened eight five five two one two four cbs join amac hanging you're on cbs sports radio are we ready to open next month.

jets donald pro football weekly westwood mayfield executive editor football farrar josh allen cbs forty years
"executive editor" Discussed on The IGN Movies Show

The IGN Movies Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on The IGN Movies Show

"You know mean laura anna lara prude on our tv executive editor and i did a conversation this week about sort of this the latest bunch of the latest star wars creative's hiring more white dudes what are you guys think of that i again i have a whole video talking about it but um um you know a lot of people are disappointed that you still no women being hired in key creative roles even though again as i just mentioned kathleen kennedy runs lucasfilm carry hardest one of their senior you know i i i don't know our actual title but she's one of the key story group people um but they're not uh obviously the screen writers or the directors so uh thoughts and all the on that we could they had just gone maybe a different direction this one yes of course they could end to end i think people are starting to get a little fed up with them lake yet we get it we get it you guys like working with white men like let's let's bring some other voices in um and obviously identified weiss in beni offer very talented but yeah i i think just because we're getting something good in uh in those two coming to the universe doesn't mean we can't get something better by bringing these more diverse voices in so i think i i think we gotta start kind of holding them to task for that a little more you know i'm gonna i'm gonna go for some puns here because in and tell you a little bit about how we try to come up with headlines we we had a freelancer submitted a piece the other day talking about the diversity issue it's star wars and they're hiring a filmmakers and we're trying to come up with a headline workers she didn't include one um or it was a little to walk here whatever but uh so we wanted something succinct and i was like uh.

executive editor kathleen kennedy weiss lucasfilm
"executive editor" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"You're worried by the way the obviously urgent ordered broker of a short bird viet of you including blood recall of we'll be one of the new year's day border oh how site we'll civil started dwell start 2018 together exactly you bet your old ruc bitter and across the country that is uh you know who on one hand there celebrating a tax cut in saying hail to the chief and the other people are same jail to the chief i mean there are people that loved donald trump and certainly on the left hand side of the aisle they don't like him one single bit was this 2017 of victory year for him does he do victory laps or is the left right of of the crew leftover guard curved but had over guagua executive editor of congress clearly after failing to repeal obamacare the central the republic of go into 2018 with public they can take back to the voters available we did of a tax reform bill will be that but the vast majority of the president's college but for all these old executive orders at uh you can't go with far with executive orders that good though so i hope that regard young for birth credits private do just about all that he could have by itself yeah i mean and the interesting thing was now they have a new video out called the art of the insult because it's with seems to have become more successful for him than almost the art of the deal labelling people as he has done whether it's a mainstream media person whether it's someone like hillary clinton or marco rubio or jeb bush has been proven to be very successful for him later the thought of burst of the break i could be without the thought of that of that i do believe that that twitter accounts to be placed of the blind trust to be with the hours of three am but eight eight by a governing by word i think it it is the sometimes maki donald trump is gone worst enemy but but on the whole uh yes tease the.

donald trump executive editor congress president the deal executive mainstream media hillary clinton marco rubio jeb bush twitter one hand
"executive editor" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Executive editor it's on hold dot com and someone who is also fox news contributor in who did a splendid job earlier today on the outnumbered broadcast as she always does and we find her somewhere between the beltway and manhattan in in that famous train of the the scenario there katie i don't know where your app it thank you for being here i am guilty of being are obvious sell a corridor however i will say it is the only profitable court over on the higher and so we do get credit for that well you know i've taken it many times and i actually love it it's a lot of work done in youth they're pretty quick hey let's talk about how big of an impression nikki haley made yesterday in kind of delivering president trump's message to the un this is very ill advised people don't do this well i mean i think that there's a lot of people who lately i agree with what she's doing the and a half of unity i express their two states day but you know the un for a very long time and i know liberal of all around the world action would agree with a statement has not been so filling its duties terms of peacekeeping and uh serving as examples of the world are hooked countries should behave and the idea that the un would kick us boats instead of just be grumpy and sitting back into criticizing would actually take a vote which could dallas for accepting reality of jerusalem being the capital of israel which congress eiseke kelly pointed out voted on in 1995 and they'll vote on the go um now we're thinking of paying a lot of money every year more than every other countries combined offer they're pet project eagle dictatorships and human rights abuses though think what they're doing is good yeah they didn't lessons learned truckloads changing their votes j but they might part listening lucky start pulling the funny and that's.

Executive editor nikki haley trump un dallas jerusalem israel manhattan president eiseke kelly human rights
"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I i was way you i was totally not him on board with wireless and i thought oh i want normal headphones i know i have given in about wireless had thought front runner you're the executive editor of seeing that don't have done was there make funny you back world the world guy some of us are are luddite even in this building i doubt it i get is about this thing shall recognition thing in the face id thing is it is the is the technology really there because they're saying you can pay with your face now you just yet so it's there it's yet another technology if they're having what we haven't tested it fully cnet my i would recommend you come back in a week to thea we hill but i it's definitely something apple what apple does and does something like this they don't do halfmeasures that's one thing apples known for and they're not always the first to do it and in this case samsung and a bunch of other people have had faith on for a while but we re not seen that we reviewed them they're not that great and so if apple if we can trust that apple really did the right job here and well no it a week whether or not that's true when she notes review ads author this is going to be a big just give me a big deal that they can actually do this and make it work and um it's probably going to change the way that a lot of us use our funds on why we use our divisive now when does it had stores so it's going to be a little while it's not the ten comes out november third you're going gonna be waiting a little bit of the iphone eight right which is the successor we didn't get to talk about but has a lot of the thing chips as the iphone 10 but it the older design as the iphone as the iphone 7 and it.

executive editor apple samsung iphone
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To come in cuba he is an equal opportunity employer that address once again is bloombergcomcareers ever wonder why weddings expensive white brexit was about china did you know that an economics professor uses broadway musicals to illustrate his lectures the bloomberg benchmark podcast is about that much join hosts dan moss kate smith in scotland month a weekly jargonfree dive into the top stories that drives the global economy find it on the bloomberg terminal bloombergcom itunes soundcloud and whatever app you prefer to browse your favorite podcasts this is bloomberg i mangila in hong kong the by the russian plan for syria is finding more takers saudi arabia might be coming around to the idea of no longer pushing for regime change these are executive editor for the middle east and africa area so interesting shift that we see a little bit of recalibration comes at a national transformation plan we'll talk about they go on the program also bit of recalibration when it comes to foreign policy in syria what are the new top lines here in what what's a priority for the kingdom when it looks at the situation the priority in for the kingdom is to keep iran out of syria as much as possible right now of course what is supporting such as ema other russians very much so dominantly but also the iranian says a large iranian presence in syria are now both militry but also increasingly economic invest something that to say that the saudis don't want and don't want to accept and they seem to be moving towards the russians they see it as a way to limit the iranian influence in serious relationship with russia over the last few years has been very difficult so this this is it too early to call it a told a new page that the saudis are looking to open with the russians in national interest in the interest of the saudi arabian priorities we'll see if the dress will be seen how far this will go but this clearly look i mean it has to be remembered that for example when it comes to oil policy with energy policy opec the talk have common interests so it's not like the russians and the.

russia energy policy saudi arabian iran africa middle east scotland kate smith dan moss bloomberg cuba foreign policy executive editor saudi arabia syria hong kong global economy professor china
"executive editor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Hi i'm ed thompson executive editor of the atlantic sitting across from me is atlantic staff writer david graham who has been covering hurricane harvey and its aftermath high david i met i am happy that you happen to be in dc uh so we can have this conversation in studio together there might not have been a disaster on the scale of harvey in america in our living memory major parts of houston are still under water rescue efforts are still ongoing and in the aftermath of the torrential wait rain people are still discovering nude terrors so in many ways it is way too soon to be talking about the aftermath of harvey but if this disaster is like any other than the nation's attention will already have moved on while the actual victims of the storm are only beginning to reckon with what it's left them right now we have way more questions than answers about what harvey's done to us but i wanted to use those questions david while houston is still leading the headlines what should we not lose sight of so i think a few things one is how fast can we get people back home in who are the people who return and who are the people who are unable to return how fast can we get money to those people how much money will they get whereas that money coming from whether it's the federal government state government insurance private aid charity who are the victims i mean i think that's an important question to we have been sure hinting mrs houston i i have done this a bunch but there are a lot of people outside of houston who are very much suffering from this as well who are liable to be lost simply because they're not in a big city who's in charge of the recovery again whether that's the state government or local government or the federal government or outside organizations.

executive editor david graham hurricane harvey david america houston ed thompson staff writer government insurance
"executive editor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"I i met thompson executive editor of the atlantic with me in the studio is my cohost jeff goldberg and the editor in chief of the atlantic in on the phone we have mark bowden whose coverstory inner july august issue how to deal with north korea has just gotten pushed rate back into the conversation by recent events i mark good morning so do very quickly recap some of what pusher recovery story back into the forefront of us anxiety the washington post reported on tuesday on an intelligence assessment from late july indicating that the that the country has successfully produced a miniaturize nuclear warhead they can fit inside its missiles a prior intelligence assessment the post reported estimated that there are far more nuclear weapons available to king kim jong un than we previously thought uh president trump followed up with a response that surprised a lot of observers with its bellicosity career best not lake anymore arrested in added faith they will be met with fire at fury life the world has never seen he has been very threat beyond a normal state and as i said they will be met with fire fury and frankly power the likes of which this world has never seen before this is the week that you're donald trump is was the be vacationing in bedminster right and an an and and laying off you know my question is an mark maybe you can you're you're the extra here my question is bill clinton in one of the unsatisfying rounds of negotiations with north korea made a statement wasn't quite as bellicose but he he basically threatened war on north korea if they crossed certain lines we've we've been in this drama before how new is uh how new and unprecedented is trump's level of rhetoric.

executive editor jeff goldberg mark bowden north korea washington post trump bedminster bill clinton thompson editor in chief nuclear weapons kim jong un president donald trump
"executive editor" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"The welcome to a special edition of theeconomistosk'si'mdanielfrank in the executive editor of theeconomist and on this episode we imagined the world if where we feed assortment of scenarios and possibilities whimsical projections and bold promises someelizabethdole unsolved not quite so plausible so what if emmanuelmackall revolutionize the french economy french society and europe to he gives his stop and trash it's a very symbolic name anti speaks about france mentality confidence and their success that his presidency has turned out to be what if blockchain's ran the world imagine a world where when a child is born instead of getting birth certificate it could get a digital birth certificate baked into a block what if we had successfully cloned humans very became much more popular begin much cheaper andy became kwy fashion for now and finally what would the world be like if we could well the weather would we stop moaning bautistsi may want to have sunday annual my yard by your next door to me you wanna have rain for your garden so the next thing you know we're having conflicts neighbour to neighbour stop by transporting use it to lie the 14th 20 26 best steel day in parisimagine the world if emmanuelmacron still the president of france and well into his second term revolutionized his country in the continent of europe over the previous night.

executive editor europe blockchain andy president france
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Start new subcommittee dean the majors this week the first by deepening spat between senior nations gutters sympathy for iran remains from saudi arabia after president trump said to run is the destabilize the influence in the middle east saudi arabia also lines with the foreign reserves falling below five hundred billion dollars for the first time since 2011 after the kingdom raised nine billion dollars recently from the international ponce of islam specifically south africa's controversial president survives an attempt to drive them out of office but remains under pressure the majority of the african national congress want jacob zuma out but i the growing tensions in the gulf with saudi arabia and the media continuing to attack cut over its ties to iran books executive editor for the middle east and africa covered this escalating rough resurgence as riots it's sort of came out of the blue a little bit because you may remember that in 2014 the three countries by the saudi arabia had withdrawn from cut the over some of this conflict over the support of the muslim brotherhood in egypt in particular of course supported after for the ccm egypt and now suddenly sort of exploded on the scene again after the trump visit to this show of unity to american support for the saudi line on iran they want to united front against iran the the they they really wanted americans support they'd be unhappy with obama on that front now they have obama support trump support on it and they see cut the sort of not toeing the line not being in line with this thinking on iran and this is all over some statements that appear on qatari webside that's been removed what what triggered this they're blaming.

iran trump saudi arabia president jacob zuma gulf executive editor egypt obama south africa middle east africa five hundred billion dollars nine billion dollars