35 Burst results for "Executive Editor"

Chuck Schumer Pens Letter to Fox News Executives

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:39 min | Last week

Chuck Schumer Pens Letter to Fox News Executives

"To Rupert Murdoch, the chairman of Fox corporation. Lachlan Murdoch executive chairman and CEO of the Fox corporation. Suzanne Scott, CEO of Fox News media, and Jay Wallace, the president and executive editor of Fox News media. Those executives at Fox received a letter. From one of the most powerful U.S. senators in the country today. New York's Chuck Schumer. He writes dear mister Rupert Murdoch at all. I write to urge you to immediately cease the reckless amplification of the so called great replacement theory on your network's broadcasts. Proponents of this white nationalist far right conspiracy theory believe that a complicit or cooperative class of elites are advancing a plot designed to undermine the political power and culture of white Americans. A recent AP poll found that nearly a third of American adults believe that a group of people is trying to replace native born Americans with immigrants for electoral gains. I urge you to take into consideration the very real impacts of the dangerous rhetoric being broadcast on your network on a nightly

Fox Corporation Fox News Media Lachlan Murdoch Suzanne Scott Jay Wallace Mister Rupert Murdoch Rupert Murdoch Chuck Schumer FOX U.S. New York AP
Pulitzer winner Walter Mears dies, AP's 'Boy on the Bus'

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Pulitzer winner Walter Mears dies, AP's 'Boy on the Bus'

"Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Walter Mears who was featured in the book the boys on the bus has died at age eighty seven died Thursday in North Carolina he had cancer according to his daughters he was the Associated Press Washington bureau chief and the wire services executive editor and VP over four decades Mears covered eleven presidential campaigns winning the Pulitzer for writing about Jimmy Carter defeating Gerald Ford in two thousand and three he wrote his memoir deadlines passed and in the boys on the bus Mears ability to find the essence of the story while it was still going on and get it out became a legend among peers with a catch phrase what's the lead Walter of his journalistic ability a colleague once said Mears writes faster than most people think I'm Julie Walker

Walter Mears Mears Pulitzer Prize Associated Press North Carolina Gerald Ford Pulitzer Jimmy Carter Cancer Washington Walter Julie Walker
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"Hope you're right because I'm not going anywhere. I'm going to be in this industry and I want it to thrive and be great and I'm a firm believer in the poker world that a rising tide raises all ships. If something's good for the game overall, it's good for all of us. It's good for us from industry side of things. It's good for players. It's good for operators and I love nothing more than to see the game of poker. Succeed. I always try my best to help it succeed. And it always hurts a little bit to have to write one of those stories that reflect badly on this game that we love because unfortunately there are like I said villains in this game and what have you. So but you're right, poker is not going anywhere. It's been around a long time and it offers live poker, especially an opportunity for people to have scratch that competitive itch and socialize. And as long as you have those sort of things, I think there's always going to be people who want to participate, maybe in one of them. Yeah, and as long as the dreams alive, right? The poker dream. I think that's something that the online poker platform specifically as time passes on and the U.S. market opens back up. Yeah, selling the dream, right? The dream that you can aspire to be a professional poker player that you can make money that this is a game that can be beat. Is something that just should be evangelized because it's a driving force for a lot of us. You know, I wouldn't be in poker without this idealized dream that I could have made it. And for future generations, that just is something that without it, I think poker dies. Like, that would be the death of poker when people stop believing that they can learn enough, grow enough to be able to beat the game. I think that that would.

U.S.
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"And yeah. All right, so yeah, let's just ask a couple of lightning round questions and then we'll So if you could gift all poker players one book to read doesn't necessarily have to be about poker. What book would you give them? Be a poker book just because that's primarily what I read nowadays. And it wouldn't be a strategy book because as we've talked about a lot on during this interview, you know, poker strategy always changes. Do you remember the Dan Harrington books were great? They're no longer really applicable. I wouldn't recommend those. So I think I would choose a poker biography. I think those have kind of the best lessons. And I think you would probably be actually maybe I would gift and I actually did just give this, so I'm gonna go with this. I just gifted this last month to a guy I work with. I found it at a thrift store, just couldn't let it sit there even though I have a copy, so I gifted it to a minute was Jim McManus's positively 5th street. Arguably the best poker book ever written talks about his run in, I believe it was the 2000 one or 2000. I think it was 2001 World Series of poker main event. He was a journalist who got in advance to write a story and used it to buy into the main event and went on to make the final table. And he intersperses it with the story of the murder of Ted binion, the son of Benny binion, the founder of the World Series of poker. And so it's just there's a lot of poker history there, but it also mixes in this dream of playing the World Series of poker main event and chasing chasing poker greatness like Jim McManus did. And so I think every poker player should read that, especially every poker industry person reporter should. It's just a beautiful book. Nice. If you could wave a magic wand. And change one thing about poker, what would you change? I.

Jim McManus Dan Harrington Ted binion Benny binion
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:51 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"Through poker news and your journey through the world of poker, what is your life look like now? As it relates to poker news, what are your responsibilities? Sure. So from 2010 to 2016, I was really just like a live reporter, I traveled all around the world, reporting tournaments, all different continents and countries that were some of the best years of my life for sure. I did get a little burnt out and so from 2016 to 2018, I took a new position with the mid states poker tour, the MSP T, which is based in the Midwest where I live and I was the media director and reporter for that tour, which was great, and then in 2019, poker news brought me back into the fold. They wanted somebody who was really focused on the U.S. market. And so now I have kind of transitioned out of the live reporting. I was U.S. live reporting manager for several years and now have recently transitioned into executive editor for the U.S.. So basically, overseeing all U.S. operations for poker news from the content that we put up on the website to the reporting that we do, the relationships that we have, and then of course the online poker landscape here in the U.S.. And in between, I'm still writing articles. And that's what I am good at. That's what I'm passionate about. And also co hosts the poker news podcast with Sarah herring, which is also a lot of fun and, you know, just kind of a Jack of all trades within poker news. I've been around a long time..

U.S. Midwest Sarah herring
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:38 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"And I think that stems through my childhood and then that's kind of hard coming back to what you just asked about self sabotage. For me personally, I know one of the things that I struggle with is my life circumstances. So I'm not married. I don't have kids. I don't have a family. So a lot of the behavior that I may engage in from time to time isn't hurting anybody, but myself. And I was okay with that for a long, long time. As I'm getting older, I'm trying to learn and develop the necessary tools to appreciate myself more, love myself more, not hurt myself more through my decisions and actions and things like that. So it's an ongoing thing. You know, it's a growing process, but I feel like I'm doing all right as I'm approaching 40 at least. Yeah, I take our 30s or the times to I read a quote a while ago. I probably going to butcher it, but basically it was something along the lines of in your 20s, it's really exciting, learning things. You're just learning all these things and it's just like a super exciting time and you're 30s. Are the times of your life when you get excited about unlearning things. Evolved beyond the learning stage to where now it's like, oh, wait, let's challenge this belief that I have. Let's challenge these things that I do. Like maybe I don't need to do them anymore. And yeah, just I think most human beings mature and there's a lot of danger in poker. And even for someone like me, I think that in my 20s, I was quite risk averse, like I never had a pit problem, I never had a drug problem. I never had like a stripper problem. The problems that can break a lot of poker players that kind of come and go throughout this world..

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"It didn't lead to a full-time thing straight away. You know, they reached out to me and said, would you be interested in writing a few articles and they asked me if I'd be interested in going to an LAPD and Argentina said, of course, you know that was a phone call. I'll never forget. And all the while I just tried to work really hard and showed them that I was reliable and eventually that did lead to a full-time position with poker news and opportunities to travel around the world and so I just kind of have always balanced work with playing poker. You know, I do still like to play. I still take my shots. Obviously, in 2013, when I had the opportunity to play the casino employees event and ultimately won that for a WSL pre bracelet that was life-changing, just both personally. You know, achieving that dream and then professionally just gave me kind of a rocket boost if you will. You know, it's just your average reporter to all of a sudden maybe in the reporter who just shifted bracelets. So that was definitely a life-changing experience. Yeah, tell me about that, you know? Tell me about playing down to the final table and then winning the bracelet. How did you feel what emotions were kind of going on through that experience? It was very interesting because it was about a week before the WSOP started that year. I was in New Orleans back in New Orleans for the global, it wasn't the global casino championship. It was the national championship of the World Series of poker circuit. So it was the culmination of the season long. WS will be circuit. I was down there for poker news to do updates and they had a player party and I remember we were on this river boat, having drinks and there was a circuit grinder that I knew and was friendly with named Nancy Berg. She plays a lot in self Florida now and we're having drinks and she kind of said, you know, are you playing anything this year? And I said, well, we just learned the World Series of poker is going to let us play the casino employees event. We weren't exactly casino employees, but Caesars was hiring us to do the updates so they considered us employees and gave us the opportunity to play that event, so I said, oh, I hadn't really thought about it, but I probably play that. She said, well, what's the buy in? Said $500, which at the time was about what I was comfortable playing with, you know, in my own bankroll. And she says, well, do you want me to put you in? And usually I'd probably say nah, that's all right. It's only 500 bucks. But I thought I'd ask, what are you thinking?.

LAPD Argentina New Orleans Nancy Berg WSOP Caesars Florida
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:24 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"Now it's time to get serious. And so I started going to school to get my teaching certificate to teach high school history. And it was an accelerated one year program. And so in 2010, I had taken all my courses and I just needed to do student teaching. And so I was thinking there was about 6 months of student teaching. I was about four and a half months in. I was about a month and a half away from getting my teaching certificate when the 2010 World Series of poker was rolling around. And I decided, you know, what the heck? Let me just put out some feelers just to see what's going on and I had met a Mickey doth. Nikki doff is a longtime poker tournament reporter. He's been around for a longer than me. And I met him in 2009. He was working for poker news. I didn't know what poker news was at the time I was interning with bluff, but he told me what poker news does. So I said, well, let me reach out to Mickey. So I said Mickey email, which changed my life, really because I said, hey, I'm what spoken is doing this year. He's like, you need to get in touch with Gary Gates. Gary Gates was in charge of poker news at the time. Listeners might know him from finishing fourth in the WSOP main event a few years back in 2019. And it's been playing quite a bit. He's pretty well known in the poker industry. Well, Gary was transitioning out of poker news. And so he said, well, you need to talk to Matt harvest, who was coincidentally transitioning from bluff who had just hired me as an intern to poker news. So Matt parvas was familiar with me and gave me an opportunity to come out to the World Series in 2010, and this was a very different circumstance than the year before. They were actually going to pay me. Really well, you know, to compare it to what I had gotten the year before. So I left student teaching short of getting my actual degree went out to the World Series again and just had a couple of goals I wanted to work hard, make a good impression and hopefully get invited back for other opportunities and here we are now 12 years later about and I'm still working for poker news. There's been some ups and downs and different gigs in between, but yeah, that's kind of my poker origin story, if you will. Yeah, I think it's just kind of lined up in perfectly to set the stage for you spending the last 12 years doing doing what you do in the world of poker. Going back to your origin story..

Gary Gates Mickey doth Nikki doff Mickey Matt harvest Matt parvas Gary
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"So when I graduated, I really didn't know what I was going to do and one of my Friends was going to college at a two year campus to get his associate's degree and I kind of thought to myself, well, if he can do it, I can do it. And so I followed in his footsteps and got my associate's degree. And it was one thing led to another, like, okay, you're getting your associates degree. What's next? I guess I'll transfer to the four year campus and get my bachelor's degree and I was always kind of knowledgeable in history, so that's what I majored in. And when that was nearing its end, it's like, all right, what do you do with the history degree? Law school. All right, that sounds like the next logical step. So let's go to law school. And so I went to law school at tulane in New Orleans for about a year. This was in 2007. And it was really then where I started to kind of take poker more serious. I'd been playing through college, but only as a hobby, never to make a living free games and that sort of thing. But when I went to New Orleans, Harris, casino was right there, Don Tom by bourbon street. And so I remember the second day I was there. I wrote in my bike down there. And started playing there. And again, this was 2007. So back then it wasn't if you knew what you were doing. It wasn't really a matter of if you were going to win, it was how much you were going to win. It really was a different game and I remember I set out with this goal. I had $400 left over from student loans. And my goal was to take this $400, play really cautiously, really patient really tight and grind it up to $1200 over the course of a few months so that I could buy a new flat screen TV, you know, back in 2007, the flat screens were very.

Don Tom New Orleans tulane Harris
"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

Chasing Poker Greatness

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Chasing Poker Greatness

"And today's guest on the podcast is a winner of AWS gold bracelet, a nationally syndicated poker columnist and is the poker news USA executive editor, Chad Holloway. If there's a major poker event or news story anywhere in the world, you can be pretty sure Chad is covered it. His career in the world of poker as a writer, editor and player, now spans nearly 15 years. And as you're about to learn chats foray into the world of cards, began pretty normally while he was schooling it up at tulane university, but instead of immersing himself in the world of poker through daily grinding on the green felt, instead he integrated the world of poker into his life through his writing, creativity and genuine love of the game. Today, you're going to learn all about Chad's origin story in the world of poker. How he felt when he won his WSOP at gold bracelet and near the end of the episode about an incredible project he's working on that involves a former WSOP main event champ and nosebleed regular who has mysteriously fallen off the grid over the last couple of decades. Being a human being who loves all things poker history and lore, you won't be surprised to learn that our discussion into Chad's passion project went on at least 30 minutes after the recording stopped. So now without any further ado, I bring to a man who routinely chases poker greatness and does everything in his power to spread his love of this beautiful game far and wide. Chad, Holloway. Chad, good morning, sir. Welcome to chasing poker greatness how you doing? I am doing well. Thank you for asking and for having me on. I have been a long time listener and appreciate everything you've done, so it's an honor for me to join you in chat a little bit about poker. Yeah, it's my pleasure. My pleasure. And yeah, typically just start out, you know, let's dive deep into how you enter the poker world, like what is your journey into poker look like? My poker origin story. So to speak. It goes back quite a ways. I actually don't remember when I first learned poker. I just remember I always played card games growing up as a kid. And my earliest poker memory is me and my Friends, we grew up in a small town in Wisconsin with about 500 people. We had one restaurant and this is back, probably around 1990, give or take when I was about 8 years old. During the summers when there was no school in the small town, every day we would go to this restaurant and order a plate of French fries. I remember it cost a dollar 26 and the cook would just give us this mountain fries on a plate and we would sit for hours in the booth playing 5 card draw poker four French fries. We were anti French fries..

Chad Chad Holloway tulane university USA Holloway Wisconsin
"executive editor" Discussed on Ageless

Ageless

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Ageless

"So if you're not someone that owns your own bike, you can go to a crunch gym, use one of theirs and do one of these classes together with people who are logging in virtually as well. So a lot of innovation happening in the fitness space to marry the convenience of that home workout with that kind of community feel that you get from going to a class. Yeah, we actually had Rachel katzman on from people and she was talking all about how their classes are amazing in New York, but they're also really great with their online platform. And I think it goes, it's the same. It's like peloton is having ways to connect in real life. And brands like evolve and SoulCycle are really expanding what they're at home universe looks like. You can still do your favorite classes and work out with a trainer, but have that relationship with an at home workout and an in class. In class workout. I think it's sort of reinforces the idea that going to a class is a great social activity in a way to connect with your Friends. And so making that more of a thing, you know, a place to connect with friends. And then you're still moving your body at home. I also think it's like to me now it's really going to a class is really like a luxury and I feel like it is, I treat it more like how I mean, I don't get massages, but I would assume people get massages because I'm like, okay, you know, it's like a once in a while a little treat, great for my mental health great for my body. And it will get me out of my workout rut kind of. And I think that's something that has absolutely changed because I feel like 2019. I was going to four classes a week. And I think that not only was it extremely hard on my body, it was like so expensive and just like, I think there's a lot of new platforms that I am loving trying that I can just do at home that are like monthly memberships way more affordable and just better for me in general and better for my body..

Rachel katzman New York
New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet Caught Admitting Leftist Bias

The Larry Elder Show

01:20 min | 5 months ago

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet Caught Admitting Leftist Bias

"And I'm reminded of something that dean bakke dean McKay is the executive editor to The New York Times. Happened to be black. Said there's a couple of years ago. We're at a moment in the country right now, which I think the left should do some soul searching too, right? We don't want to hear anything that we've long said this about the right. But I think the left, we don't, I'm not we. Notice he caught himself. He said twice, we don't want to hear. Of course you're on the left. The New York Times is on the left. He's just being honest. What do you mean we don't want to hear? Of course. We don't want to hear. Are you kidding me? We're at a moment in the country right now, which I think the left should do some soul searching to, right? We don't want to hear. Anything that we've long said this about the right, but I think the left, we don't, I'm not we, I'm a journalist. But the left is a rule does not want to hear. Thoughtful disagreement. The left as a rule does not want to hear, thoughtful disagreement. I didn't say it. Dean Mackay executive editor The New York Times, said

Dean Bakke Dean Mckay The New York Times Dean Mackay
James Poulos, Executive Editor of the American Mind, Describes 'Transhumanism'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:48 min | 6 months ago

James Poulos, Executive Editor of the American Mind, Describes 'Transhumanism'

"I listened to the American mind podcast, which is phenomenal from the Claremont institute. And I was listening a couple weeks ago. And I was texting Conor in the midst of the episode and I said, we have to have this guy. It was just so interesting to me. It's doctor James pulos. I hope I did okay with that, pronunciation. He's the cofounder and executive editor of the American mind at the Claremont institute and author of the new book human forever, and the digital politics of the spiritual war. And so let me just first kind of start with James. If you could introduce yourself to the audience then also introduce to our audience, what is transhumanism? So it's great to be with you. Thanks for having me on. The best way to think about transhumanism, I would say is in the following way, once upon a time, technology was firmly on America's side, the electric age was very good to us, the telegraph, the spread of the incandescent bulb, radio television, really the time when America became the world's leading power, superpower that was so, so powerful, not just in terms of military might, but also in culture, you know, in mass communications and every all the ways that that shapes people's inner and outer lives. Europe did pretty poorly during that time. Everyone's empires fell apart, massive world wars, genocide, disillusionment, loss of religious faith, really just kind of a wipeout of that of that civilization. It's just still barely trying to hang on in some ways. And so there was this big sense of optimism and triumphalism around the Internet when it came into being in the United States. You know, of course, we thought we created these technologies. They're super powerful. We have a huge head start on everyone else. And so they're really just going to fulfill our consummate. America's role as the most important country in the world, the country that can sort of turn the world into something that's American and its essence and its civilization. And that's not what these machines did. You know, the elites, the folks in charge, were really shocked by the way people use these technologies to put opinions on the Internet that they didn't like. And ultimately to elect a president that they didn't like very much. And so once that happened, there was this real kind of head check. Suddenly everyone had a smartphone and this technology wasn't just a cumulative. It wasn't just a progressive addition to the technological advancement of the past. But it was really something fundamentally different. A new medium, a new form of technology. And the way that it's reshaped our inner and outer lives, their senses, their sensibilities, maybe even our souls. Has already been super profound. People are now sort of realizing that every day is they look at the news that's coming out on a regular basis around the clock. And so what effect are these technologies having on who we are as human beings? And I think the effects very

Claremont Institute James Pulos America Conor James Europe
Executive Editor of The Federalist, Joy Pullmann, on the Amazon Web Crackdown

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 9 months ago

Executive Editor of The Federalist, Joy Pullmann, on the Amazon Web Crackdown

"We haven't you guessed from the federalist she is executive editor joy. Poelman welcome to america first. Thanks for asking me so guys. You've gotta follow lady on twitter at joy pullman. You've got to read the articles at the. Federalists going to bookmark the federalist first things first. I couldn't believe the article you just published as if parlor wasn't a less than enough for everybody. Could you tell us what the latest intricate development is with amazon. Their web services and Sites like patron and substitute joy. Well i mean. Put it simply Amazon web services as a as a web hosting service that controls forty percent of the internet in the world and they reportedly a ho spe- Supposedly independent sites Patriarch and sub stack. Which are basically kind of ways. No ideally for independent creators to find an audience and get paid from them. I think most listeners would be familiar at least with one of those two Anyway writers reported last week Before labor day weekend that the company basically is planning to content cracks down To you know more strictly enforced basically their thought police policies In that would put sites like those in the crosshairs so we're not talking about trying to identify and track child pornography or jihadi terrorists. What are we talking about his joy money. We've seen amazon do this before. So as you mentioned they were fame. Infamously the folks who picked parlor off and they also have been behind a number of other Significant platforming just like twitter just like facebook. Basically you know what what we see. Is that when internet giants get too much control over speech they use it to shut people down absolutely and guys if you haven't learned their lesson yet if you're a conservative who's building built some kind of platform fuel using amazon. You might as well just burn your money

Poelman Amazon Twitter America Facebook
Europes Travel Restrictions and the Fate of Aviations Recovery

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:57 min | 9 months ago

Europes Travel Restrictions and the Fate of Aviations Recovery

"This summer began on a high note for the aviation industry in the us. Kobe nineteen infections were declining. Dramatically and air travel was rebounding sharply europe even reopened to us tourists. Some analysts saw it as the beginning of a fee shape rebound in air travel but as we head into september. The clouds are back cove is surging again in the us because of the highly. Contagious delta variant. The european union has proposed new restrictions on american travelers and the biden administration stubbornly refuses to let europeans in even though europe now has higher vaccination rates and fewer cove infections than north america as the moody blues would sing has the sunshine. We've been waiting for turn to rain here to discuss this all aviation weeks. Executive editor for commercial aviation jens float. He joins us from frankfurt germany. Also joining us as kevin michael's managing director of aerodynamic advisory and irregular. Aviation we calmness jens. Let's start with you. Tell us what's going on in europe with all these new restrictions it's complicated. That's the kind of the bad news part of it. So the european commission has proposed new restrictions for transatlantic travel given the high infection rate that we see in the us basically. It's saying that all nonessential essential traveled from the us should be stopped. Except if you're vaccinated and that the caveat is important because that obviously means that a lot of people will not be affected by this new mechanism. The other uncertainty in this is of course. European member states have to are in charge of zero and rules so the just proposal and it's not always that they all fall. Follow these proposals.

Biden Administration Europe Jens Float Kevin Michael United States European Union North America Frankfurt Jens Germany European Commission
Behind the Headlines at Boeing and Airbus

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:05 min | 10 months ago

Behind the Headlines at Boeing and Airbus

"Boeing last week wild wall street with its first profitable quarter in a long time but ceo dave. Calhoun seem less excited about when the company might launch. Its next clean sheet airplane in fact some believe he was signaling. It could be a long ways off for its part. Airbus's looking to aggressively ramp up production to cement. Its formidable lead over. Boeing in the narrow body market while embarking on a long and expensive are effort to develop a hydrogen-powered aircraft but twenty thirty five aviation week editors listened in on earnings calls and tried to make sense of where the two companies are heading. It was truly an exercise in reading. The tea leaves joining me to discuss. That are two of them. Senior editor guy. Norse an executive editor. Yen's floto guide. Let's start with you. Dave calhoun had been saying for a long time. If boeing launched a new clean sheet aircraft. They couldn't wait for the propulsion makers the propulsion wouldn't be ready would have to be other advances to to make the business case now. He's talking about the importance of propulsion advances. Is that a signal that this next airplane which originally was called anna may is not coming for a long time. is that what. He's gently telling us. Well so really good question i mean the point is is that we simply are in the dark so we just we should admit that up front to to start with so we are as you say. Having to look at the tea leaves along with everybody else so so what do we know. We do know that as of june as you mentioned calhoun told us you know he said. Look you know. We're sticking to his message. whatever comes next. We're not talking about big leaps in propulsion. You know we're just going to. All the savings are going to be made to the airframe technologies like that which was was fine near that made sense but something has changed and of course the big news from the propulsion side is the emergence of the cfm rise program. The open fan open rotor technology demonstrator.

Boeing Ceo Dave Dave Calhoun Calhoun Airbus Anna
The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

Morning Edition

02:05 min | 10 months ago

The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

"Are no strangers to receiving negative feedback on their stories. Recently, the Miami Herald's executive editor, Monica Richardson, who is the first black journalists to hold that position in the papers, 117 year history. Says she received a racist email. It was really brutal because of the language and the tone and and really the hatred that it portrayed and how this resonates with Different communities at different moments In that email, the sender expressed anger over the Miami Herald's coverage of recent Cuban American demonstrations, which shut down in Miami Highway. It noted that no one had been arrested despite a new anti riot law. In a message permeated with racist commentary, the sender referred to Richardson with a misogynistic slur. And use the phrase your people, Richardson wrote an open letter. In response in it, she writes, Like other moments of coming face to face with racism, it will sit with me for life. Martinez spoke with Richardson about why she felt compelled to respond. Now, these protests are there about something that we all care about their about fairness. And so that was not the question that I was trying to raise. It was really about people how they handle Being under pressure and that tension on issues of race and so this one was particularly as I said, the word I used. I like to think of was brutal. And so I decided to respond. Monica and you know, there's been a discussion last few years about how much of someone's humanity can go into their job when they are journalists. And it sounds like in this case your humanity came out when you read that email. It did. In fact, I wrote two versions of the column in the first version was very polite, and I came back to it and just wrote it strictly from the heart. Overwhelmingly the response that I got the positive response that I got was from the human community. So the it resonated not just with me as an African American woman, but it resonated with the Cuban community as

Miami Herald Monica Richardson Richardson Miami Martinez Monica
36 States, DC Sue Google, Alleging Antitrust Violations in App Store

Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

01:12 min | 11 months ago

36 States, DC Sue Google, Alleging Antitrust Violations in App Store

"Of states are set to sue Google and an antitrust case joining us now, as Tom Giles, Bloomberg's global tech executive editor. Tom Tell us about this lawsuit. What's the basis of it? Well, this is yet another action by U. S. U. S regulators against Google And these this is yet another sign of concern. That Google has grown too powerful and that it's and that is wielding that power in a way that sports competition in particular. This focuses on the Google play store. So this is the store that you have to go to in order to download apps on your android device on And so the concern is the fees that they charge APP developers for distribution of your apps. And these developers have they've they've said Enough is enough. They've complained to to regulators. And so what you've got is three dozen states Attorneys general from 36 States and Washington D. C coming together. And leveling a lawsuit against Google alleging alleging anti competitive

Tom Giles Tom Tell Google U. S. U. Bloomberg Washington
Interview With ULA's Tory Bruno

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:16 min | 11 months ago

Interview With ULA's Tory Bruno

"Hello and welcome to the czech six. Podcast i'm jen. Damasio executive editor for defense and space. I'm here with space editor. Irene clots a very special guest tori bruno the president and ceo of the united launch alliance. That means he's the principal strategic leader of the organization overseeing all the business management and operations but the real reason why. We're very excited to have him with us. Today is that you a. Is on the verge of launching. Its new vulcan centaur rocket and that might be a good place to start the discussion the upcoming launch. So maybe you can open with that and tell us a little bit about the vulcan in this particular mission sure so woken is is in fabrication right. Now we've actually built the first booster already. It's not the first one that will fly. It's the first one we built a can fly in its down at cape canaveral annette's brand new mobile launch on the recall. The vlt vulcan mobile launch platform in its path. Finding for us in tanking tests. It's making sure all of the software and launch hardware and support equipment. That is involved as working properly. One of the things people probably would never guess maybe they would if they thought about it but the launch pad is actually win more complicated than the rocket. there's all kinds of pneumatic hydraulic systems and electrtonics and whatnot. So that i booster has down there doing that. It's been doing that for several months. The actual booster that we will fly first gazette. One will go back into line when it's done in flight later the one that will fly. I is in the factory right now being built. We've just put the tanks together so it looks like a booster in getting the other things that will go on it. The the pacing item. I think i've shared with irene before is still the beef or blue origin rocket engines and to sort of. Put it in context. You know whenever you develop a new rocket. You're pacing item is always software unless you have a new engine and it's always engine

Damasio Tori Bruno United Launch Alliance Irene JEN Cape Canaveral
Giving Autonomous Aircraft a Moral Compass

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Giving Autonomous Aircraft a Moral Compass

"Hello and welcome to this week's check six podcast. I'm greg mark aviation executive editor for technology. Today we're going to ask. Will we ever be able to trust an autonomous aircraft. Nasa is working to ensure that we can and joining us to find out. How a my colleague. Guy norris aviation weeks western. Us bureau chief and our special guest. Marc scoop the principal investigator for at nasa strong flight research center in california a lot about tony and artificial intelligence in aviation particularly in the context of urban taxes an unmanned cargo aircraft. Tony and i are not same thing but they are potentially very complimentary using machine learning to train algorithms to automate takeoff and landing autonomously plan optimum flightpaths recognized obstacles and avoid collisions and identify safe. Landing sites along a route has tremendous potential to make aviation safer. But there is a problem. And here i will grossly oversimplify impart to avoid showing my own lack of real knowledge. The software used in today's avionics such as those pilots and digital flight controls is deterministic. That means the same in input always produces the same output and three rigorous analysis on testing. We can prove to the regulators like the faa that our system will always be safe machine. Learning algorithms non deterministic. Same input doesn't always produce the same output because of some change in the environment inner around an aircraft. It might decide to turn left. not right. And because we fully understand what goes on inside a machine learning algorithm. No amount of testing can guarantee to the regulated. The system will always behave safely. So how do we safely unlock all those great capabilities. That me and i promise.

Greg Mark Guy Norris Marc Scoop Nasa Strong Flight Research Ce Nasa Tony California United States FAA
Interview With Smithsonian's Ellen Stofan

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Smithsonian's Ellen Stofan

"Hi and welcome to the aviation week. Check six podcast. I'm jen damasio the executive editor for defense and space. And i'm here with aviation weeks. Space editor irene. Clots and a very special guest ellen. Sto fan the under secretary for science and research at the smithsonian institution. Ellen comes here after leading the air and space museum and previously from nasa where. She helped plan to get humans to mars. But we're here today. Because of a really thrilling development. This morning nasa flew ingenuity. An aircraft for the first time on another planet in mars is very thin atmosphere. So i'm going to turn this over to irene. Who ensure has a lot of questions for ellen about this historic achievement. Thanks jen and welcome allan. This was all a very long time coming and I know that it's a significant step. For future. exploration of mars been likened to the ninety seven landing of the pathfinder mission with the prototype rover sojourner and we see what that led to colluding ingenuity is ride to mars ellen. Can you talk a little bit about as planetary scientists. what aerial abilities bring to the exploration table. Yeah well i. I will say on this day where. I'm still frankly just overcome by the immense this morning. It's i put this in an even broader context as having had responsibility for a while of caring for the nineteen. Three right flyer is. This is the first powered flight on another planet. Just let that blow your mind for a minute because this is huge historically and so it's really exciting so if we go to that fundamental level. Oh my gosh what we did on mars. It's incredibly exciting. But this idea of having multiple modes of mobility rovers or great especially when you want to go from rock to rock and analyze the composition. And we're looking for past life on mars. We really need that rover capability but you also want the ability to go longer distances more rapidly and you can only do that by air but mars is such a challenge because of that thin atmosphere but you know the ingenuity team. They show perseverance and ingenuity and they did it.

Jen Damasio Ellen Nasa Smithsonian Institution Allan JEN
Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

BBC World Service

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

"And I have a reporter arrested while covering a racial justice protest last summer has been acquitted of violating police orders. From Iowa Public Radio Grant Gerlach has the story. Andrews Story of the Des Moines Register was covering a protest at a shopping mall that turned violent, She testified. She was pepper sprayed and arrested while moving away from police. Defense attorneys told the jury she was there to do her job. Just his officers were there to protect property. So hurry says she's glad the jury recognized that. You know, I'm really, really grateful for them that they Upheld freedom of the press. And, of course, you know, Adjust democracy. The registers executive editor thank the during a statement saying Arresting reporters at protests denies people the right to know what's happening in their

Grant Gerlach Des Moines Register Andrews Iowa
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 1 year ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

"Denis muhlenberg has kept a low public profile since he left his job. Ceo of boeing at the end of twenty nineteen. But that's about to change me. Lemberg has teamed up with air finance founder. kirsten bartok tau and other aviation luminaries to fund a special purpose. Acquisition company called new vista acquisition corp. They're aiming to raise two hundred and forty million dollars through public offerings to acquire businesses focused on transformational technologies in areas. Such a space defense and communications advanced their mobility and logistics. What does that mean well. We'll let you hear directly from denison. Kirsten who have joined today also with us on my side of the table so to speak is aviation weeks. Technology specialists and urban air mobility guru executive editor graham warwick. Just one no we will. Not be talking about boeing past or future. If you're interested in that i'd like to refer you back to our january twenty nine podcast so let's get started a dentist. Tell us what you're up to. And why joe the good morning and thanks for the chance to talk about new vista. We're very excited about this. New endeavor and that excitement starts with a tremendous opportunity that we see right now as you know i had the privilege of being the ceo of boeing back in. We celebrated our centennial in two thousand sixteen and we. We did some work together on the age of aerospace and when we look back on the history of aerospace the opportunity in front of his right. Now i think it's the greatest one in that one hundred plus year history harris face. We're seeing this convergence of technologies in a way that we've never seen before technologies that span artificial intelligence autonomy new manufacturing techniques satellite technologies new types of vehicles and propulsion systems that set of emerging technologies. All at once has never happened before. Combine that with mega-scale changes in the market. You mentioned air mobility new waste. People are moving Logistics e commerce capabilities the revolution in space in the build out of the lower orbit ecosystem and next generation defense systems that combination of technologies and mega skill. Market ships creates an unprecedented opportunity. And that's what we're focused on at new vista kirsten. Let's hear from you. What brought you into team. Up with dennis and How are you approaching this. Thanks joe and as you know. I've been pretty focused on advanced ever ability for the last four or five years Having been based in silicon valley and kind of live through the internet growth and doing venture capital back then realized early that this transition was going to happen and just from the basic technologies with your talk about them. Electrification greeted propulsion which then goes to autonomy and an ad in hydrogen which has come on the radar lately These technologies are going to completely change Aerospace so that the next twenty years is going to look completely different in the last twenty years and even the is you know. The aircraft designs will look entirely different. Lucky enough i been working on this trying to figure out the right vehicle to investment doing a lot of my own personal investing some through our finance and then was Got on the idea of a spec realized that could be the optimal solution to help. These emerging companies crossed the chasm of death valley of death that we call where you got early stage venture capital money but they needed at large amount of growth capital. These are deep company's hardware and software at their capital intensive and then added that they've got the regulatory component of the faa and. they needed some good opportunities. For large amounts of crossover capital groups. Like softbank could have been that or sovereigns but the spac product has really come in to help. These company cost the valley of death and make it to the next level where they're commercialization occurs and their operational so i couldn't be more lucky to partner with such an incredible operators dennis someone who really pushed billing to be more. Entrepreneurial created horizon ex and necks and We put together a great team here. And we're excited to make a positive difference in the landscape. So so what are you thinking. I mean how do you take these technologies that we write about all time. I guess our listeners want to know and apply them to be like a real product. What what is really exciting. Talk about this this change in the next twenty years. What can we see in practical terms. What are we going to see. joe. I think you're gonna see transformation in these four market segments that we're talking about that's way beyond what we've ever seen before i take what's happening in the in. The lower orbits space ecosystem and extraordinary the number of technologies. That we're seeing that are coming into places real applications now. The build out a satellite infrastructure nanno sats micro sats we see a market for fifty thousand plus additional small sets on orbit or the next decade. We see a number of companies who are working on breaking the cost curve for access to space new launch capabilities that are coming to bear and then new applications in terms of how to use those satellite networks to create information at useful data earth observation New kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities connectivity. In communications i think the low earth orbit ecosystem. Build out that we're seeing now is just one example of the kind of massive transfer transformation that we're gonna see that's going to create economic value. It's gonna create new companies new jobs. it's going to create a new technologies that are on the innovation edge that are now ripple out into other business sectors. So it's an exciting time to be working on this leading edge

Boeing Denis Muhlenberg Lemberg Kirsten Bartok Tau New Vista Acquisition Corp Graham Warwick JOE Denison Kirsten Dennis Harris Silicon Valley Softbank FAA
Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

Airplane Mode

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

"Hi my name is era. I am twenty four years old and am from texas a small town in texas. So i hadn't really talked about therapy danny body or heard about their p for the most part because it's not something that was discussed in my family or at my school with my peers. There's such a stigma around in the black community is not something that i thought i'd ever need until i got to college. And so once. I went to college and i started struggling a little bit especially since i went to. Ap w i primarily why institution. I felt pretty isolated. And eventually i decided i e. I need to do something about this. Some of the things that i wanted to talk about specifically dealt with me being a black woman. And that's something that's hard to talk about with people. Who don that experience directly. Czar barnes executive editor. Here itself has written a lot about mental health in general and mental health black people specifically so when care wrote to us i was like i have talked is are we work together but we've never actually interviewed each other before so this is a new milestone zarin. I talk basically all day every day. Not in this context though pretty much constantly slacking constantly getting on zooms. But i'm excited to do this. Which is a little different for us back in june. Sarah wrote this incredible article. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive. In this country there are list of people and organizations to follow directories and her own words of encouragement and support. Let's tell the story from the beginning like what was happening that week. That made you decide. I have to write this. I mean it was just the constant flood of honestly traumatizing news about violence against black people. In this country this was right around the time. When the protests about george floyd stuff were really kicking off in earnest and in my role as the journalist over multiple years. I've had to cover news while also having a lot of feelings about the news but it has never been this intense for me as it was that week zara knew that if she was having a hard time finding mental health resources for herself and her friends after all her years of reporting on this. She probably wasn't alone. She wanted to do something to help. Change that. And to normalize the conversation. There still so much stigma when it comes to talking about health in our society in general. But there's also a very specific stigma that can come with talking about having a hard time with mental health black person we've talked about the strong black woman trope a lot at self. That was a big part of our cover story with trudgy p. Henson the idea that black women are kind of supernatural strong and we can handle anything and we don't suffer and we never have a hard time there is a corresponding trope for black men. And even though i feel like people have done a lot to break down those barriers culturally. There still is just this pervasive idea. That having a mental health issue as a black person is first of all not something that happens. And second of all if you're dealing with it it means you're abnormal or your weak or something's wrong with you and you need to hide what you're going through and i feel really proud when i even look at the headline of the story. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive in this country. Because i feel like it sends a couple of messages it first of all says if you are just simply trying to survive day to day as a black person that's completely valid and that's a worthwhile goal and then it also says there are all these mental health resources so you cannot be the only person going through this. There are not forty four mental health resources just for you. it's for everyone. it's because there are so many of us also dealing with us in her reporting zara focuses a lot on barriers to accessing mental health. Care the things that get in the way of people getting the help that they need and one of those barriers is the stigma as she says but there are other major stomach barriers to being able to access. mental health. services is such a tremendous privilege. I mean first of all you have the cost even if you have insurance absolutely adds up. I've seen a lot of people talk about having to see their therapist once a month instead of once a week because even their co pay is simply not affordable for them and dot is a travesty. At the cost of it is especially the fact that so many therapists don't accept insurance so that adds an additional barrier.

Danny Body Czar Barnes Zarin George Floyd Texas Zara Sarah Henson
Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

"Amazon's founder and ceo. Jeff bezos announced this week that he is going to become executive chairman of the company and the new ceo will be andy jesse. Currently the head of amazon web services amazon is twenty six years old. and obviously it's massive and has ideas to do everything from package delivery to television production too smart. Microwaves to artificial intelligence. And obviously it's huge an incredibly profitable cloud business amazon's ambition and reach is legendary but with betas taking on a new role. Could that change. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a look at big tech story. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg. He's written one book on amazon and has another one coming out this spring. I asked him if amazon might start to focus more on the gold. Mine of its cloud amazon actually has kind of two of those gold mines. You mentioned one. aws the other one is advertising. And it's been this kind of quiet force gobbling up market share in online advertising. And you know for the last ten years. It's investors have been wholly on board with amazon not returning that money to shareholders not showing you know a big profit although they've been getting better in that regard but investing and inventing new things to the extent that its shareholders continue to allow that to happen amazon. Continue to do it now. jeff bezos. He's going to continue to be active in the big decisions and working on new projects and executive chairman. There's a role that carry some meaning. He's still going to be andy jesse's boss in many ways andy jesse seems formed in the same mould as jeff visas and yet. There are real critiques about the company's treatment of its workers it's wages its approach to climate not even with and i trust. Do we have a sense of whether jazzy might be more responsive to some of those critiques. Right are we going to see a softer gentler amazon. Like a tim. Cook to steve jobs. That's right and in some respects. Maybe chelsea's is while he's sort of cleaved from jeff bezos rib and a lot of ways. He's also different. I mean he's more politically active at the same time amazon. Aws under andy. Jesse sold its face. Recognition software to law enforcement agencies and only paused for a year. When the blm movement became very loud and vocal. So i don't suspect it. I much change particularly with a very loud voice on the board with a lot of sentiment changing. Is that not a good thing. Should jesse be more open to change. Will shareholders have less tolerance for business. As usual i think they're gonna have to start listening more to the voices not only of their frontline employees in the warehouses who do have some real grievances particularly amid the pandemic but to the contractor workforce almost kind of invisible constituency who tries to amazon vans and drop software packages like a lot of companies amazon kind of indulgence itself of this contractor workforce where the healthcare protections fifteen dollar an hour wage protections don't exist and so i think yes i mean they're going to increasingly if they want to get to that next level of growth. Have to listen to some of these concerns brad. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Bloomberg Stone Steve Jobs Jeff Chelsea BLM Cook Jesse Andy Brad
Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos stepping down as Amazon CEO

"From a business standpoint, I think things are going to remain much the same. That's Rob Smith, executive editor of Seattle Business magazine. Bezos has said he wants to focus on other projects such as Blue origin, his spaceflight company. Andy Jassy, head of Amazon Web services will take over later this year, Bezos will remain on as executive chairman. I'm Ryan

Seattle Business Magazine Rob Smith Blue Origin Bezos Andy Jassy Amazon Ryan
"executive editor" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"executive editor" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"A nonpartisan nonprofit public forum dedicated, tearing diverse views on important topics of the day. This week, we explore the high stakes world of national security and politics from two people who've been there and have the scars to prove it. On August 10th 2018 veteran FBI agent Peter Struck was fired. After the release of his personal text messages from 2016 that included disparaging comments about then candidate Donald Trump as president. Trump attack struck a CZ a fraud who worked on a rigged investigation about possible collusion between government of Russia and Trump's campaign. Struck came to the Commonwealth Club to tell his side of one of the most explosive stories of the decade. He was interviewed by Adam Moshinsky, executive editor of Fortune makes less than a week later, former national security Adviser H. R. McMaster spoke with author an anti terrorism expert, Brian Fishman. Mr. McMaster, who advised President Trump on national security issues for 13 months in 2017 and 2018 believes that American foreign policy has been misconceived, inconsistent and poorly implemented. Since the end of the Cold War, and he told us how he tried to change things during his time in the White House Thiss program is part of our Goodlett Siri's underwritten by the Bernard Ocean Foundation. We'll hear from the master later in the program First, Here's Peter Struck and Adam Lashinsky. Hello and welcome to today's virtual Commonwealth Club program. My name is Adam Lashinsky on the executive editor of Fortune magazine and your moderator for today, So as we get going, Pete, as you told me that most people other than your parents call you. It's a real pleasure to meet you. And let me say what has become a tradition for people who have not served their company, their country When they first meet someone who has thank you for your service, Not only that you serve the FBI, but you're also a veteran of the United States Army. Thank you Appreciate that. And thanks to the club for hosting this discussion, and Adam, it's great to be here with you. Great. I I was as I was reading your book, which I agree with something that Chuck Todd said on meet the press this weekend. It's very readable. Not exactly a happy Reed. It's a Saturday It is a matter of fact, but it but it goes down nicely. The writing is very clear. And as I was formulating my questions, I had already written a question that you answered at the very end of the book. And so I'll start right there. Which is why did you write this book? Because what we're facing right now is too important to stay silent. You know, I spent 20 more than 20 years, is a counterintelligence agent at the FBI watching and learning how foreign adversaries would go about targeting the United States and what I saw what we saw in 2016, both from the Russian attacks, as well as response. To those by the Trump campaign, and then the administration is still going on. That threat has only grown and I think, Well, you know, there's been all kinds of outrageous things around my way and thrown it all folks who have set up to tell the truth. Of what we're facing right now. Going up in November is too important not to speak out and say something. I take your your reasoning at face value, But if it were me, I would say I also wrote the book to set the record straight so that the record clearly shows my perspective. That must have been a motivation as well for you. Sure, of course it is. That's a great point. I mean, you know, I very much wanted to create something that was a historical record of what occurred. There was something that was based on precise dates and events. And particularly as we've gotten into an era of, you know, sort of a post truth environment where you know, partisans were slinging outrageous retellings of things that never happened. I wanted to have kind of a reference work piece for people could go to see exactly what we did precisely why we did it and what we're thinking and to have that out there for for all to see and, you know, understand again what we were doing, particularly in 2016 Ford. But you know what we're facing today as well. And I enjoyed that aspect of your book. I also read Andrew McCabe's book and then some of the some of the parts. I have both your books that I enjoyed the most were when you discuss your craft of being FBI agents, especially when you were younger. When the two of you were younger. You can see these sort of emotional energy as opposed to the weight. Of the topics later in your story. I want to start with the key word in your in your subtitle because I gathered from your book that it's an important Semantic point for you for people to understand what is meant by counter intelligence. So let me ask you to start at the highest level. Explain what that means. And maybe start to answer Why I'm ba laboring that point as you did in the book, Of course, so a lot of people when they think about the FBI, they think about crime fighters. You know, going back to the forties and fifties, all the movies that are made about chasing Gangsters and bank robbers, and it's very much centered around this idea of criminals who are violating the law that we go on investigating. We build the case evidence that we take in the court and we put him away. Intelligence work is very, very different from that. And when I say even just the word intelligence work, people have some idea of spies. But what I mean when I say that is foreign adversaries. The Russian intelligence service is certainly the Chinese. But any other nation on the surf are actively day in and day out, conducting operations in the United States to clandestinely get to our secrets and to influence our behavior. To counter intelligence is the government's response to that, and the FBI has the lead role in the United States. So I spent a career with a ton of people in the FBI trying to understand what foreign adversaries we're doing here with Soviet Union and then Russia is doing in the United States what China's doing. We both get into the workings of our government and influence the way we're behaving, and that has nothing to do with a criminal trial. It involves intelligence, which is classified. It involves a lot of uncertainty that you don't tend to see in the black and white of a prosecution. But it's a very different aspect of the FBI's worked in the traditional sort of criminal things that people think of when they think of the FBI. The title of your book is compromised. You believe that the current president of United States was compromised as a candidate for president and then continue to be compromised. By the Russians as president make make the case for that, if you would. Ah, I do believe that he is and look, I recruited people to work for the United States for more than 20 years, and I defended against those within the US who had been recruited themselves. How that works. What motivated motivates A person takes a variety of forms. I think when you look at President Trump what leaves to minus his primary vulnerability or his financial entanglements, things that and I'm not talking about legitimate business interaction. I'm talking about allegations going back decades of dealing with Potentially laundering money, you know, allegedly working with Russian organized crime, money, Russian money connected to oligarchs. And, indeed potentially money. Michael Cohen a search something you know financial transactions that he assumed millions of dollars. In a real estate sale. That was a payment for Putin. But it's important to remember that that's sort of how you leverage somebody how you impact their behaviour takes a variety of forms. So certainly we've talked about the monetary examples that but they're things that go into that like ideology. And when you look at President Trump's affinity in the recent Bob Woodward recordings where he's talking about how his affinity towards totalitarians like Putin And you know.

FBI President Trump United States president Peter Struck H. R. McMaster Commonwealth Club executive editor United States Army Adam Moshinsky Fortune Russia Adam Lashinsky Chuck Todd Fortune magazine Adam fraud Putin
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Listening to Bloomberg opinion on Bloomberg Radio. I'm Jim Grasso. This past May after George Fluid was killed by police in Minneapolis Protests followed in Portland, Oregon, as they did around the country. But unlike the rest of the nation, what began as a peaceful political expression devolved into something else entirely. What in the protests in Portland continue when the rest of the U. S had stopped. Hotels is David Shipley, senior executive editor of Bloomberg Opinion and former senior presidential speechwriter for President Bill Clinton. So if you write that the violence in Portland this summer overtook the reason for the protests, explain that You know, there was a really interesting and thoughtful movement. Then you would see, you know, people gather in peacefully by the waterfront along the banks of the lamb it to undertake the kind of process that were taking place across the country, which were by and large people, um, generally thoughtful. And Generally constructive eso. It started out in the right place. And then something happened. You have any idea what happened to turn the protests into mostly violence? You know, As with all these stories, there were so many different multiple points, you know, with policing. It was the right. It was the last and essentially what happened is that the thoughtful middle were quickly drowned out. You know, I've never been to Portland. But I have these images of Portland as this hip kind of city, the coffee shops, restaurants and But you write that it was a city in retreat even before this summer, so my idea is not right. Well, no. I mean all of that was there What was happening Important, You know, in the piece, I talk about Oregon government in the 19 seventies and eighties, where you had a really activist, city and state government. Working with the community to do all sorts of forward thinking things you know a bottle bill on urban growth boundary early, recycling, smart land use planning all of these things that turn Portland into the kind of magnet That it's become today. But you know what happened instead of continuing that tradition, it bread? Ah, certain. Listlessness. You know, Portland had a series of fairly unsuccessful one term Mayor Portland have, eh? Rare and serve complicated form of city government where the commissioner serve a dual role is both legislators and administrators of agency. Unlike New York, where, you know a city has a council and it have commissioners and all of this is bread, a certain level of sclerosis. Enabling problems to build up over time. Homelessness is probably the most evident if you were to go to Portland and you would be the number of people camping out on the street and people who are, you know, in need of of genuine help. And it's a situation that was allowed to get bigger and bigger overtime. And so all the while that there were beautiful neighborhood developing in Portland, and there were nice coffee shop. You know, it's cool music, and there was Portlandia. There were also these other problems that in some measure were obscured by the hitman. So has this violence sort of roused. The people who live in Portland rallied them to change things. Well, I think that that is the central question that that I was struggling and remember it if you were to visit Portland, you know you could be forgiven for not seeing or feeling any of this. You know the the violence downtown, the neighborhood's downtown that talked about you're talking about Several square blocks, or you are talking about the police union building or police precinct on on the other side of town, on the other hand, is like Saying that a section of mid town will just sort of go on police and, you know, ungoverned for a stretch of time. And if you do something like that, you sort of a ugh, not only seed part of the city that you care about that you're taking care of you run the risk of the problem spreading. Ah and of the city all of a sudden, not becoming the kind of place this city should be, which is a safe place for many different people as possible. So it would be. You know, it would be a mischaracterization to say that you know you have a wildfire violence sweeping all of port. That's not the case. But what you do have is this violence at night. These violent protests both helped along by aggressive policing and helped along by President Trump's decision Tio send in federal forces and then increasingly, you have a small, extreme sort of controlling the story. And the sensible center retreat, and the point that I was trying to make and puzzled by the summer is Why the centre didn't stand up and say enough. Um, the one other thing that a wrote about and that I think is Is a national issue. Ah, is the lack of a daily paper. A daily newspaper. Andi, I think you see this in, um You see this around the country as fewer and fewer local papers saying business Now The Oregonian is there. It publishes online. It tries to do a valiant job, but it doesn't show up at your doorstep every day, doesn't it? Print every day, and there is something you know It's not the hugest thing in the world but having a regular document. That everyone or a lot of people in town turned to get their news from offers a shared perspective that enables, I think a community to go into addressing an issue with a lot of the same information. You know you go to cities without local papers now or without regular local paper, and you ask civic minded people where they get their information. And they get it from a lot of different places, and that there is no sort of shared document that enables you to address the city's issues together, and I think that had a real effect important. David, Thanks so much. That's David Shipley, senior executive editor of Bloomberg Opinion and former senior presidential speechwriter for President Bill Clinton. Coming up on Bloomberg opinion how employers are finally helping parents. I'm Joon Gu also, and this is Bloomberg. The doors are opening. When is that moment out in the distant future? Some things will be as they were Others forever changed. The restaurant industry will never be the same. Follow every new development here on Bloomberg radio. What do we need in terms of may be the new School of economic thought, because the next best thing to magic is inside. It may take nearly a decade for the U. S. Economy to recover Bloomberg Radio. The Bloomberg business happened. Bloomberg radio dot com. Bloomberg, the world is listening..

Portland Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Bloomberg Opinion David Shipley Bill Clinton Oregon senior executive President Jim Grasso George Fluid Minneapolis editor U. S New York President Trump commissioner Portlandia School of economic
"executive editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Executive editor at cars dot com Joe what do you see well one of the big ones that I think people are less aware of the cars are becoming updatable similar to the way your smartphone hardware it will be around for two or three years but the way it works will always be changing and improving computer now cars will be the same I mean apple has had this for a while they were the first with wireless update that not only change how the dashboard you know the touch screen operate but really any aspect of the car that's controlled by computer code and and a lot and it really two important features you know one stop you know well with that games and Easter eggs were talking about how they get pictures operate like collision avoidance and you know a few years ago thanks to computers will have to learn the word algorithm algorithms run all the top and algorithms improve with time and if you bought a car five or six years ago that that had one of the teachers that's what you got a near kind of frozen in time with an updatable car that's not the case you can always improve and now other manufactures got involved including BMW with the ex five three zero eight and GM as well with the Cadillac five and the upcoming Chevy court that did on a platform that debatable along with the the the reason I pop owns the Bourbon Ford Mustang Mach Z. which is their electric car in a year that going to be available so this is spreading and it's really important feature that I think is certainly can be work what's sure to be added yeah I would just say is an updatable Kerr in this is certainly more expensive well it certainly more expensive I don't know how it's going to look to be the consumer this is one of the things we've been looking at for for many years now which is the increasing price of vehicles partly because of technology but also because of the move toward STV's which cost more and that actually let us to one of our other you know get out defining protection within the notations about the coming decade which is an affordability crisis were calling it work more boldly calling it affordability.

Executive editor apple BMW Kerr GM Chevy
"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"News from the executive editor for seeing that that's all on the way those in the coming attractions right now on WGN Jordan's got the news update fifty one degrees at five thirty and good afternoon I'm Jordan burned field the news is sponsored by antenna TV students attempt to process the death of one of their own over the weekend quick turn around for the bears there in Detroit on thanksgiving more in sports and a prosperous day for the markets but first WGN traffickers Lauren lapkus police are investigating a shooting in Crown Point which has shut down US two thirty one at lane street looking at in Bonn Eaton's at forty seven minutes from the cook to Montrose there's a roughly twenty minute delay southbound on the tri state upon Kennedy that's slow until Montrose it's forty six two o'hare fifty five heading in as an hour stop and go up on between ashen and twenty fifth it's an hour and ten minutes to three ninety an hour back in there is an accident on on the Stevenson blocking the center lane at the Dan Ryan it's an hour and a half to three fifty five in our intellectual drive traffic is heavy out on the Dan ran from pursing it's thirty five to ninety fifth thirty one inbound links to drive so north north bound between double in Chicago and southbound between north and Hayes and sing a twenty to twenty five minute delay on both sides of I. eighty for personalized traffic on demand get the traffic's Chicago app approved by the mortgage experts of team Oxburgh just search T. R. A. F. F. I. X. Chicago I'm more laughter from the I. dot traffic center reminding you to drive responsibly it really is a matter of life or death WGN forecast the high wind watch goes into effect on Wednesday morning to the evening for potentially damaging wind gusts that could reach.

Chicago T. R. A. F. F. Hayes Lauren lapkus WGN Oxburgh executive editor Dan Ryan Stevenson Kennedy Montrose Bonn Eaton Crown Point Detroit forty seven minutes twenty five minute fifty one degrees
"executive editor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:26 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"David day and executive editor of the American prospect, if you can respond to this, and also why libra will be based in Switzerland that have to do with that being a banking centre tax haven. Yeah. So I mean, the truth is, is that if you were able to create some sort of digital wallet that could be used in any country and purchase and make micro transfers and things like that. It would be convenient. I mean, that's really what Facebook is banking on, right? I mean it right now are the US payment system is pretty clunky. Particularly with international transfers that take several days to clear there would be a convenience angle here. And of course, Facebook believes that if they can get you on their website and using their digital wallet. Which they controlled directly. I mean, there's this Lieber association that's based in Switzerland, as you say, probably for tax purposes, that is controlling the governance of the currency, but cuddly bre, which is, what David Marcus, we heard from the top is, is running is a digital wallet. That's run by. Subsidiary that's wholly owned by Facebook. So if, if Kaliba becomes ubiquitous if it becomes this thing that you, you really need to make purchases, then you have something like we chat. And we chat is the app in China that has become so much part of people's lives that it's very hard use paper money in China. I mean, this is social media. It's a chat tool, and also it's a purchase app. I it's something that you can use in that fashion. And that's Facebook's. I think end goal I if you add payments onto this social media application, that is incredibly dominant, basically locked people into Facebook. And if you've done that, then, you know, whether you're taking a little bit out of every transaction that two billion people make on a daily basis or whether you are just locking people onto the site knowing what purchases they've made and then. Selling very data rich ads based on that, you, you have a prospect of real domination. And you know, I really think that either this thing is going to not get off the ground because too many regulators and politicians will have uneasiness about it, or we'll look back in twenty years. And this will be the week where this thing was announced that created this, this dominant global company that is, you know, an indispensable digital partner kind of walking you through life and David day, the whole issue of, of security Facebook is currently poster child for the violations of privacy data rights of individuals. They're insisting that they're going to build a set this ca- libra will be a separate subsidiary that it won't share the user information Facebook itself with the this payments system that they set up. You talk about this issue because it almost seems like or does say, but Facebook is basically transferring its monopoly position social media to then enter the financial transactions world. Yeah. I mean first of all, do you trust? Mark Zuckerberg with anything around privacy at this point after years and years of these revelations and second of all, it's a bit of a red herring. So it's entirely possible. Let's take Facebook at their word that the financial data and the social data will be separate well in order to access. Purchases on libra. You're still going to have to make a click within the Facebook app or within WhatsApp or, or wherever to, to find your purchase, or to search for a business that you want to solicit or things like that. And that information is certainly going to be available to Facebook. So the idea that there's no, you know, extra data that you'd be grabbing here. If you're Facebook is, is really not true. I mean you're, if you're spending more time on the app if you're clicking around to find things to buy on the app, which is not typically at this point, what people do on Facebook, then that's just much more data that Facebook is going to be able to use to target ads at you and do whatever else it wants. So, finally, again, the title of your piece, the final battle and big text war to dominate your world. Fill that out. Sure. So we've been seeing over the last several months. The big tech companies Google, apple Amazon, and Facebook, try to figure out how to become that sort of one partner. I mean you have apple that put out this thing that's a credit card called the apple card. You have Amazon, partnering with other global payment systems on what they call world pay or what they call Amazon pay, I should say Google has its own digital wallet. And now you have Facebook with this thing that is who knows what it is a Bank prepaid cards, digital wallet is a global currency. So you have all these companies that were kind of competing separately. Are now all moving into the payment space and also moving into other spaces that are overlapping, like entertainment to become that thing that is sort of the only kind of dish. Digital tool that you will need so you can make all your purchases, you can talk to all your friends, you can access all your entertainment. You can do everything that you wish inside this world, whether it's Facebook, Google, Amazon Apple, and that's really their intention, and that's why I call it sort of the war of all against all this is like the final battle for global domination here. And you know how that shakes out is sort of indeterminate at this point. But what we know is that if you're creating this, we already have these, these, these companies that are monopolies in their own sort of personal spaces if they if they combined sort of together, a lot of different options for for you, as an individual than you have just this absolute dominant behemoth. And there are serious concerns around giving that much power to one company. Well, of course, we'll continue to follow this David day and exert. Editor of Merican prospect will link to your piece in the new Republic, the final battle and big. Tex war to dominate your world coming up we go to Zona to speak with an African American family held at gunpoint by police because their four year old daughter allegedly took a dull from a Family Dollar store. They're now talking about suing for ten million dollars. But first, we look at a highly contested district attorney's race here in New York in queens, where one of the candidates is making headlines by going to radically reshape the criminal Justice system. Her name is Tiffany Coban. She's with us. Stay with us. Off..

Facebook David day Switzerland apple US Amazon Google partner David Marcus China executive editor Mark Zuckerberg Kaliba Tiffany Coban Zona New York queens
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:42 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"East last month is being blamed on a quote state accent. That comes from the investigation conducted by the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. The Trump administration has already pointed the finger as Iran is Theresa May's loss official day as leader of the conservative party shall remain on his play minister until. The new leader is elected next month eleven conservative MP's vying to replace their as party leader, and ultimately, prime minister, and there'll be no tall tales in the NBA, then he is looking into ways to ensure that all its plays are exactly as tool or shoot as they claim to be plays often Futch their own height numbers to get themselves in advantage in selection drafts. But the expansion of legalize sports betting is putting pressure on major sports leads to make sure all they play data is accurate. Global news twenty four hours a day on air, and it took on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm Leon gerrans. This is Bloomberg. Francine. We thank you so much snow today at the Saint Petersburg, international economic forum to Chinese president. She she and the Russian President Putin will speak at a plenary session now, jeeze, seemingly lost an attendance to the forum comes as tensions between the US and China around Bob whole. Russia has long been isolated by the west and cooperation between the two nations. And some. Interesting signals. Joining us now down the line from Saint Petersburg is Roseanne, Matheson. Bloomberg international government executive editor, and I think Roslyn you're also the only female executive editor in the small roundtable with President Putin yesterday. So really congratulations on that. And gives to a lot of weight to you the work on the team do what was the highlight from that. Well, yes, it was interesting, especially with him yesterday that the Russian president came across as pretty mellow quite relaxed enjoying the moments and obviously enjoying Chinese president as being in Russia for most of the way I in Moscow when he won't pandas. And now in Petersburg, where he and Putin took a stroll last night along the riverfront, an Akita state together a four and today. Yeah, you're pointing out that, that's a really interesting dynamic at the moment. Putin is calling see his friend trade is on the rise between the countries and the natural gas pipeline is to open later this year. The relationship is definitely on almost all that voting in taught. Because in a way the enemy enemy's my friend, China's embroiled in a very nasty trade. Well, with the US Russia size distinctions of continued economic. 'isolation a mutual imperative that mutual interest, and they have common interests and things like how to handle North Korea and a run and Syria and China's very much the big brother in that relationship. But we going to say that very much on display. Hey today when the two of them tight stage together. Yeah. Really a significantly larger than Russia in terms of its size. Visit Coney demographics knish impulsively really, really loss as you say my. The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Because there is a there is a history, of course, in their wariness in the relationship. Despite the fact you think that to large communist countries have had something in common late? They do, but I've always dude each other with some suspicion and China has long seen itself as the big brother in that scenario and certainly that Russia needs each more than it needs Russia, especially strategically. We saw some years ago, quite floor discussion over potential gas deal with China was increasingly demanding favorable turns out of Russia's so you see those tensions come up, and it's obviously to the relationships that a high point at the moment, because of external issues. But certainly there is an underlying tension about who really is the biggest party in this relationship, and how much they need each other in the longer term rose how how much what do you think the two leaders will focus on today? What was interesting yesterday when he spoke to this media grapes, really laid out his concerns about the current global ODA. He talked about trade tensions the US withdrew from the INS missile trae, in particular, he went on about that, quite a lot of warning that he really feels that the wells dangerous period in time he may speak Fedor about that today before we would expect that for a country that's often, the case of middling and other countries phase. It'd be like, if mischievous child is interesting to he can talk that way about the global ODA and teaching paying very much echoing that we've seen him speak about the nature defend that older, particularly when it comes to trade and institutions like the WTO, for example, and warning about west some of the things are being taken under the administration of Donald Trump in the US. So we'll probably see them to let late Memphis strong trace at the forum today coaltion about the global order. Defending the roads by system is underpinned gross today cades since the end of World War Two, they'll probably very much mirror each other on that, that will probably be the main thing they compensation today. Great. Thank you so much. Joining us civilization Matheson. Bloomberg international government executive editor on this growing relationship with peasants. She and Putin now straight ahead on Bloomberg daybreak Europe. But John Wraith he's head of UK rates strategy, UBS joins us. And if you're sitting in the office, be sure to check out more great.

President Putin Russia China Bloomberg US president Saint Petersburg executive editor United Arab Emirates Theresa May Iran prime minister Matheson NBA Twitter Saudi Arabia ODA Leon gerrans
"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

08:53 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Six. We're talking with Kelly lejos, the executive editor of the American conservative their website, the American conservative dot com, and does she executive editor of their magazine. In terms of assessing Trumpy in the foreign policy. We have of course, the efforts aimed at some kind of a quote deal with the Taliban. I view that rather sceptically to say the least, but nonetheless, there's a move in that direction of pulling out troops from Syria. And then sometimes moves in countering director of it, a little hard, I suppose to do exactly pin down a a direction a philosophy at an ideological. If you will focus just exactly where this administration is coming from a does seem at times that as I have caustically said of our president. He shows a great versatility of conviction. Do you see a common thread through his actions? I do and I forgive me. I I meant to say peace through strength. When I was quoting Ronald Reagan earlier that might have been a Freudian slip because I'll be honest with you Trump doesn't really talk about peace too often. So those words don't really come to that word doesn't really come to my wife, think Trump. But that's what I was trying to say that he was he was taking measures. In an effort to show strength, but not aggressively use military force like his predecessors. Do I see that as a common thread, many of us in the more realist, you know, foreign policy world who came at his word when he was running for president in two thousand sixteen and he he went to the National Center for the national interest. And he talked about wanting to bring troops home not wanting to get involved in foreign wars of choice that he felt that the wars and the war in Iraq was a mistake that you know, he did not want to repeat those mistakes of his predecessors. So I see some of his foreign policy moves whether it is announcing a withdrawal from Syria. I draw down troops. Maybe a full withdrawal from Afghanistan as part of those measures those those promises he made. On the campaign trail, I think he feels. That you know, that, you know, pushing back against Putin is is part of that. I don't I he does not seem to be interested in going to war in Iran. Even though personally, I think getting out of the Iran deal was a mistake. So I do I do I do. I don't see him getting us into wars putting troops on the ground in foreign countries. Like, I think Hillary Clinton would have. So I do see a common thread. It just does seem a little schizophrenic sometimes because he does he does speak aggressively. And he does make these categorical statements and ultimate homes which sound like, wow, he's right on the threshold of of some sort of forceful development. But I I do feel personally that so far. He hasn't gotten us in any wars. So he's not gotten this entity. That's that's true. I I certainly have serious doubts about just what will be accomplished by his summitry with Kim of North Korea. Certainly, of course, a note as as laughable his statement that his first summit led to the removal of the North Korean nuclear threat, which was against the kind of overreach that the fortunately this man is famous for he has begun a process, which might possibly maybe someday lead to possible lessening of that threat. But that'd be done as it may regarding Iran for a second here. I I had on George Mitchell. One evening about that deal. And I asked him to read the part of the deal, which prevents Iran from doing anything. And he couldn't of course, because there's nothing in there the does. And I said if it really is your view and the view of the administration that we. Can't prevent Iran from doing anything. But we can if we bribed them enough delay their nuclear program. Intellectually honest thing be to say, so I don't have the by that point of view, by the way, I genuinely subscribe to the view that a nuclear armed this Iranian regime, not a nuclear armed Iran is much, but this regime big nuclear armed as intolerable that this is not to be tolerated at all by any means necessary. Yes to add, including preemptive strikes. I review the possession of nuclear weapons by this regime. Simply not even remotely acceptable. But if it's your view the best we can do is bribed them into the process become the world's biggest funder of terrorist activities by giving them that much money Than Shwe's. Don't you just say so well, he didn't really have an answer for that either. And I I again, I. This prevented Iran from doing anything that might be one thing. It doesn't prevent a thing. Well it delayed. Okay. So you're talking about two things nuclear program and their activities their aggressive activities in the region and the aggressive activities in the region had nothing to do with the deal. You're right. It didn't stop them from doing their behavior in Yemen, and in Syria, Lebanon, what it did it was it was it was preventing them from increasing their nuclear capabilities. They still contend that. They don't have a nuclear weapons program. So this was basically restricting the center futures it was re restricting they're enhancement of uranium. And so I it's. You know, how many years it took the? But but but only for a fixed number of years if they lied perfectly with that. There would be a time in the very near future. When okay now, we're free to make all the nukes. We want to. Think it delayed delayed only. And that was my problem was the intellectual dishonesty of saying, it prevents anything it delays. And that assumes around the ins don't cheat that I think one of my main problems with that deal that it was sold as something that it wasn't. Yeah. It was definitely an imperfect deal. But I mean as as you remember has been in the works. I mean, it, you know, I remember when the Bush administration had started talks with the Iranians, which of course, we're we're we're we're stalled and did not return nobody returned back to the negotiating table until the Obama administration with this years in the making and you're right. It's an imperfect deal, and if it was sold as ending any of their capabilities forever that that was wrong, and that was a lie. Well, that's exactly how it was sold by the Obama. Ministration? I mean. I think I think they felt that they had finally reached a place where they could say, hey, we have got we've got around to like, you said delay their abilities until you know, twenty twenty four twenty twenty six I can't remember exactly which time I'm in terms of their enrichment that was that was the best that anybody has ever done that point honest, if they never sold it that way, what you just said was obviously assessment of what it would do if Iran complied they pushed it as preventing that I got to be more than anything else. If it's such a great deal was necessary to lie to sell it and the Obama administration lie anyway, not to spend all night. That that that that bothered me from day one. But, but we just heard a statement of exactly what it would have done from somebody who is at electorally, honest. We'll come back and talk some more in just a moment. Selling your home is one of the biggest.

Iran Syria president Obama Taliban executive editor Kelly lejos Trump Ronald Reagan Trumpy Hillary Clinton director Iraq North Korea George Mitchell Putin
"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Zero five four six two six US pulling out of the intermediate forces nuclear treaty with Russia after what? Appears to be years of violations by the Russians that would hardly be any big surprise the Russians have not exactly taken the spirit or would possible. Even the the precise wording most of their international agreements that seriously. Putin's efforts to resurrect the evil empire, which he has had undisguised nostalgia. Over the years. We're talking with Kelly hosts the executive editor of the American conservative magazine, their website, the American conservative dot com and something else that appeared in the report that we heard earlier, which was that. European officials have been urging the Russians to take the next six months to return to full and verifiable compliance to preserve the treaty, which makes it sound. As though until the next six months are out. This is not a done deal as such that. There's a there's a window here. Now, I doubt seriously that this will persuade Vladimir Putin. Do suddenly see the righteousness of that action and go the straight narrow, but nonetheless, I gather that this is not cast in concrete quite yet. Is that right, right? They have according to the tree. Eighty they have a hundred eighty days to rectify this. So either what what Trump is saying is that he, you know, he wants them to destroy violating missiles in this regard. I don't know. And the Russian say there is that there missiles are within the range of compliance. So were there's an impasse there. I don't know what's going to happen. I mean, some folks believe that the Trump administration is is basically pushing this I would hope that within one hundred and eighty days the Russians will comply like you said. Or you've suggested that the Russians probably are dead. That's not really in a car then. But there is that six month window where where something could happen some negotiation could happen. What's interesting is? This. This whole matter began way back in two thousand seven so the American intelligence have had wind of these missiles for a long time. The Obama administration did not push it. Although the intelligence community had pretty much connected all the dots that these missiles were not in compliance. If the Trump administration has decided and announced a year ago that it was going in this direction to really push push. The matter the Russians way up until recently had denied that these missiles had even existed now they say the exists, but they're within compliance as you know, this this kind of back and forth has been going on for more than a generation at this point would various. Treaties. And it is it is a dance that's been carrying on since the Cold War on this is just the latest chapter, but it could really escalate things either way. Like, you said earlier in terms of our security European security in the region. So it is an age of of satellites I mean to to question the existence of such missiles or or their capabilities. I mean, if the Russians of ever tested, these things, you know, that a US satellite is watched it and watched how far it went. I mean, we're really passed the euro, I think when you could can can make this stuff up. I mean, if you've got a missile, and it it is fired and tested within the the the boundaries of that treaty. Well, then the Russians have that. If those very same missiles are are seen deployed in such and such a location again there's little in the way of deny that at least with a straight face. Well, and I'll be fair because I'm not an expert. You know, I did talk to Scott Ritter. Be you know earlier today. Getting his take on it. You know, as we know what happened in the lead up to Iraq. Intelligence is not, you know, necessarily a smoking gun. So, you know, the what he believes, and you know, you might disagree intelligence community often has a sort of a pre narrative, you know, they they is in like would Iran they believe that something's going on. And they find the dots to connect it. You know, but scientists and sound and so there's a lot, you know, satellite. Images might come up. They might be testing wooden weapon. And it turns out it's another weapon. So I this has been going on since two thousand seven, you know, what he told me is that the Russians had often they had had repeatedly asked, you know, the Americans due to provide their evidence, and which they didn't. And so that little game is going back and forth for years on end. So. I'm not in any position. 'cause it's not really my, you know, my my field, you know, to tell you what the evidence they have. But I could probably say considering what we know about the intelligence community. And how it sort of builds narratives, you know, connected. I for what whatever agenda they have that this might not be a smoking gun. But on the other hand, we know the Russians and their history. And so it's not necessarily going to believe everything they say either. But do we get out of the treaty? Does that escalate things or does it puts the Russians to comply or come back to a negotiating table? I think that's the question. A lot of people in Washington will probably tell you that getting out of the treaty is probably is is a dangerous move. But we've seen this president kind of push people's hands before and get people to the table. So I think. It'll be interesting to see over the next six months. What happens it will that? We'll talk some more one eight six six five O, JIMBO one eight six six five zero five four six two six Kelley hosts executive editor of the American conservative magazine, their website, the American conservative dot com. We are not the US decision to pull out of the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty, a key pact with Russia, which have been a centerpiece of the European security since the Cold War back in just a moment. Mill why do so many Wisconsin businesses turned a Creston electric supply company. They've been around as long as Green Bay football starting out in nineteen nineteen. It's a small company in a.

US American conservative magazine Vladimir Putin executive editor Russia Trump Obama administration Green Bay Kelly Scott Ritter Wisconsin Iran JIMBO president Iraq Creston Kelley Washington