35 Burst results for "Executive Editor"

Monitor Show 12:00 08-15-2023 12:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:55 min | Last month

Monitor Show 12:00 08-15-2023 12:00

"From potential bidders seeking the union's approval, a necessary legal step for anyone seeking to buy U .S. Steel. And his quote is, I was adamant that the Cliffs bid is the only one the union will consider due to its synergies and the fact that it best reserves blast furnace and steel making capacity and its jobs. It's about the synergies. I see. Now I understand. Exactly. Synergies. And it, you know, going to preserve the United States workers and members of the U .S .W. We're going to have more coming up. This is Bloomberg. Broadcasting 24 hours a day at Bloomberg .com and the Bloomberg Business Act. This is Bloomberg Radio. This is Bloomberg Markets with Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller. We got a lot of green on the screen here, but the volume is light. We constantly underestimate the strength of the U .S. consumer. This is a market that's much more optimistic or bullish than maybe its central bankers are. Breaking market news and insight from Bloomberg experts. There's still some concern out there in the market that there is room for things to deteriorate a little bit more than what they're indicating. As small and medium sized businesses struggle, they don't present as much competition. The supply chain has still got dislocations globally and here in the U .S. This is Bloomberg Markets with Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller on Bloomberg Radio. All right. Coming up in this hour, we're going to get some analysis of the latest Trump indictment. This time we're going to roundtable with a couple of heavyweights. Tim O 'Brien, senior executive editor with Bloomberg Opinion and June Grasso, legal analyst with Bloomberg News. I mean, these folks know what they're talking about. Tim O 'Brien actually sued Donald Trump before he was president. I take that back, Donald Trump sued Tim O 'Brien and Tim O 'Brien won. So he has that kind of perspective. So very interesting there. So again, Tim O 'Brien and June Grasso will be joining us. Andy Bischoff, utility strategist at Morningstar Research Services discusses a few...

Andy Bischoff Tim O 'Brien Matt Miller Morningstar Research Services Donald Trump Paul Sweeney June Grasso Bloomberg Business Act U .S. Steel United States Bloomberg Bloomberg Opinion 24 Hours A Day Bloomberg News U .S. Bloomberg Radio Bloomberg Markets ONE U .S .W.
A highlight from Featured Story | RIP DAOs?

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

07:20 min | Last month

A highlight from Featured Story | RIP DAOs?

"This episode of Market Staley is sponsored by Kraken. Good morning. This is Market Staley from Coindesk. George Gellu is here again with your featured story. On today's show, we're bringing the Wondercraft AI voice back yet again to read a piece by Project Glitch. And just a reminder, Coindesk is a news source and does not provide financial advice. Project Glitch is a team of journalists exploring the future of the internet. The article was sent to me by Mark Hochstein, the executive editor of ConsenSys here at Coindesk. And it's a pretty lengthy one, so I'll let it stand on its own for today's featured story. The piece is titled, R .I .P. Dows? One theory of innovation, albeit a cynical one, is that most of what technologists call innovation is really just an attempt to exploit regulatory gaps before they close, to capture value in areas where legal precedent is shaky and the technology in question is misunderstood, and then leverage this confusion as much as possible for growth and power and money before these opportunities go away. If you find this theory compelling, you'll probably look at companies like Uber and Lyft and see something that looks a lot like a cab company. Rather than seeing the transition from dispatch to smartphone -based ride hailing as novel and fundamental, you'll see a trivial tweak that allowed these companies to circumvent important rules, rules that forced cab companies to provide things like employment contracts and job security, say, and allowed ridesharing companies to ignore the assertion of transit authorities that they were, in fact, cab companies. Innovation. You'll probably also agree with a legal stance recently taken by the U .S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission, or CFTC, the government agency in charge of regulating the derivatives market in a lawsuit against Uki Dow, a decentralized autonomous organization that describes itself as a protocol for tokenized margin trading, borrowing, and lending. The agency argued that Uki Dow wasn't innovative at all. It was, regulators said, little more than an unincorporated association, something like a nonviolent version of a mafia crime syndicate. In a bizarre episode of American Jurisprudence, which involved the CFTC serving Uki Dow via the chatbot on its website only to find that nobody bothered to show up in court, a federal judge agreed, ruling in June that while Uki Dow may think of itself as a neutral software protocol operating as a digital cooperative, it's really just a trading platform that's been acting unlawfully since 2021. In light of the decision, a group of crypto lawyers operating on another, more charitable theory of innovation now say it's time to rethink the entire concept of a Dow. Uki Dow may have been a grift, they admit, operating under the false assumption that by adopting a Dow structure, they could evade the law. But the idea of the Dow in general is worth defending, as it can allow for things that traditional organizational structures cannot, things like coordinating finances democratically and transparently while sharing resources between strangers without the need for an intermediary, actual innovation. The case of Uki Dow figures to be a body blow for Dow's, and it's not a huge stretch to imagine that they may be dead, at least in their current form. But as the concept begins to fall within the auspices of the law, we may be entering a new era of online coordination. Long live the Dow. The court's ruling in June came after a period of legal uncertainty, which began in September 2022 when the CFTC issued an order, meaning it filed and settled charges simultaneously against a company called B0X and its founders, Tom Bean and Kyle Kisner. The agency charged the group with illegally facilitating the sale of assets the CFTC regulates, while also failing to adopt a customer identification, KYC program. At the same time, it charged Uki Dow with the same crimes. Uki Dow is the operating name of BZX Dow, which in August 2021 took over control of the BZX protocol from B0X. In its complaint, the CFTC argued that for all intents and purposes, Uki Dow was the same type of organization as B0X. It ran the same software in the exact same manner. The CFTC claimed that by transferring control of B0X's software to a Dow structure, its founders believed that its operations would be enforcement -proof and that its founders touted as much to the B0X community. The enforcement action in September ordered Bean and Kisner to pay a $250 ,000 civil monetary penalty and warned that if Uki Dow didn't respond to the charges within three weeks, it would receive a default judgment. That's what happens when the defendant doesn't show up in court, so the claimant, in this case the CFTC, receives everything they want. The CFTC argued that Uki Dow ran afoul of the Commodity Exchange Act, a law from 1936 that regulates commodity trading in the U .S. According to the agency, since Uki Dow was operating as an unincorporated association, in legal terms it also qualified as a person and was thus liable for violations of the law. That's based on a legal concept called corporate personhood, in which corporations and other similar entities have the same rights as natural persons, aka humans. By pursuing a default judgment, the CFTC angled to enshrine its arguments as law, with no opposition. And it worked. In June, the CFTC got its default judgment. Uki Dow owes the CFTC about $650 ,000 and needs to end registration in the Dow immediately, and if reporting from the crypto media is correct, it will also shut down. Dow enthusiasts argue that the CFTC has been running roughshod over due process and unilaterally setting all sorts of legal precedents. For example, when the CFTC served Uki Dow legal notice via its chatbot, nobody had ever done that before. No court had ever established that a Dow token holder is a member. For that matter, none had ever established what a Dow really is, in the eyes of the law. But what's really at stake here isn't just the fate of some minor software project. What's at stake is the future of Dow's as a concept, and by extension, the way people organize online. A note from the Markets Daily team. Project Glitch then includes a section titled, A Brief Primer on Dow's, in which they explain the concept's origins and highlight some of the most crucial examples of Dow's, including the Dow and Constitution Dow. Check out the link in the show notes if you'd like to read more about this section. But for today's show, we'll skip it and stay focused on Uki Dow. Stay tuned for after the break, when Project Glitch takes a look at what the Uki Dow case means for Dow's in general. Meet the all -new Kraken Pro, the powerful, customizable, beautiful way to trade crypto. It's Kraken's most powerful trading platform ever, packed with trading features like advanced order management and analytics tools, all in a redesigned, modular trading interface. So head to pro .kraken .com and trade like a pro.

Mark Hochstein George Gellu September 2022 June August 2021 September Tom Bean Uber Commodity Exchange Act Cftc U .S. Commodities Futures Trad Kyle Kisner Lyft $250 ,000 B0X Coindesk Market Staley 2021 U .S. Consensys
A highlight from MARKETS DAILY: Featured Story | RIP DAOs?

CoinDesk Podcast Network

06:11 min | Last month

A highlight from MARKETS DAILY: Featured Story | RIP DAOs?

"This episode of Market Staley is sponsored by Kraken. Good morning. This is Market Staley from Coindesk. George Gellu is here again with your featured story. On today's show, we're bringing the Wondercraft AI voice back yet again to read a piece by Project Glitch. And just a reminder, Coindesk is a news source and does not provide financial advice. Project Glitch is a team of journalists exploring the future of the internet. The article was sent to me by Mark Hochstein, the executive editor of ConsenSys here at Coindesk. And it's a pretty lengthy one, so I'll let it stand on its own for today's featured story. The piece is titled, R .I .P. Dows? One theory of innovation, albeit a cynical one, is that most of what technologists call innovation is really just an attempt to exploit regulatory gaps before they close, to capture value in areas where legal precedent is shaky and the technology in question is misunderstood, and then leverage this confusion as much as possible for growth and power and money before these opportunities go away. If you find this theory compelling, you'll probably look at companies like Uber and Lyft and see something that looks a lot like a cab company. Rather than seeing the transition from dispatch to smartphone -based ride hailing as novel and fundamental, you'll see a trivial tweak that allowed these companies to circumvent important rules, rules that forced cab companies to provide things like employment contracts and job security, say, and allowed ridesharing companies to ignore the assertion of transit authorities that they were, in fact, cab companies. Innovation. You'll probably also agree with a legal stance recently taken by the U .S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission, or CFTC, the government agency in charge of regulating the derivatives market in a lawsuit against Uki Dow, a decentralized autonomous organization that describes itself as a protocol for tokenized margin trading, borrowing, and lending. The agency argued that Uki Dow wasn't innovative at all. It was, regulators said, little more than an unincorporated association, something like a nonviolent version of a mafia crime syndicate. In a bizarre episode of American Jurisprudence, which involved the CFTC serving Uki Dow via the chatbot on its website only to find that nobody bothered to show up in court, a federal judge agreed, ruling in June that while Uki Dow may think of itself as a neutral software protocol operating as a digital cooperative, it's really just a trading platform that's been acting unlawfully since 2021. In light of the decision, a group of crypto lawyers operating on another, more charitable theory of innovation now say it's time to rethink the entire concept of a Dow. Uki Dow may have been a grift, they admit, operating under the false assumption that by adopting a Dow structure, they could evade the law. But the idea of the Dow in general is worth defending, as it can allow for things that traditional organizational structures cannot, things like coordinating finances democratically and transparently while sharing resources between strangers without the need for an intermediary, actual innovation. The case of Uki Dow figures to be a body blow for Dow's, and it's not a huge stretch to imagine that they may be dead, at least in their current form. But as the concept begins to fall within the auspices of the law, we may be entering a new era of online coordination. Long live the Dow. The court's ruling in June came after a period of legal uncertainty, which began in September 2022 when the CFTC issued an order, meaning it filed and settled charges simultaneously against a company called B0X and its founders, Tom Bean and Kyle Kisner. The agency charged the group with illegally facilitating the sale of assets the CFTC regulates, while also failing to adopt a customer identification, KYC program. At the same time, it charged Uki Dow with the same crimes. Uki Dow is the operating name of BZX Dow, which in August 2021 took over control of the BZX protocol from B0X. In its complaint, the CFTC argued that for all intents and purposes, Uki Dow was the same type of organization as B0X. It ran the same software in the exact same manner. The CFTC claimed that by transferring control of B0X's software to a Dow structure, its founders believed that its operations would be enforcement -proof and that its founders touted as much to the B0X community. The enforcement action in September ordered Bean and Kisner to pay a $250 ,000 civil monetary penalty and warned that if Uki Dow didn't respond to the charges within three weeks, it would receive a default judgment. That's what happens when the defendant doesn't show up in court, so the claimant, in this case the CFTC, receives everything they want. The CFTC argued that Uki Dow ran afoul of the Commodity Exchange Act, a law from 1936 that regulates commodity trading in the U .S. According to the agency, since Uki Dow was operating as an unincorporated association, in legal terms it also qualified as a person and was thus liable for violations of the law. That's based on a legal concept called corporate personhood, in which corporations and other similar entities have the same rights as natural persons, aka humans. By pursuing a default judgment, the CFTC angled to enshrine its arguments as law, with no opposition. And it worked. In June, the CFTC got its default judgment. Uki Dow owes the CFTC about $650 ,000 and needs to end registration in the Dow immediately, and if reporting from the crypto media is correct, it will also shut down. Dow enthusiasts argue that the CFTC has been running roughshod over due process and unilaterally setting all sorts of legal precedents. For example, when the CFTC served Uki Dow legal notice via its chatbot, nobody had ever done that before. No court had ever established that a Dow token holder is a member. For that matter, none had ever established what a Dow really is, in the eyes of the law.

Mark Hochstein George Gellu September 2022 June August 2021 September Tom Bean Uber Commodity Exchange Act Cftc U .S. Commodities Futures Trad Kyle Kisner Lyft $250 ,000 B0X Coindesk Market Staley 2021 U .S. Consensys
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Ineligible. Auto trader and Kelly blue book executive editor Brian moody says requirements like final assembly taking place in North America aren't necessarily bad. In Savannah, Georgia, the Hyundai motor group has already building a gigantic facility to build both batteries and vehicles to serve the U.S. and I assume Canada and all of North America. That will employ thousands of people. The good news for EV buyers, the previous $200,000 vehicle cap on tax credits is history. I guess the thinking would be their popular enough, you sold 200,000. We don't need to keep incentivizing this. That goes away. Incentives are not a moody says some consumers are still determined to buy an EV. They're probably not going to let tax credits stand in the way I've done getting the car they want. I met Corey Bloomberg radio. And I've Denise Pellegrini in the Bloomberg newsroom. Berkshire Hathaway, posting a jump in quarterly operating earnings, but billionaire Warren Buffett is warning about declines across his businesses going forward. It says Buffett is still bringing it though in terms of bringing people together at the annual shareholder gathering in Omaha that's really more, he says like a county fair. A lot of variation actually not people address, right? Like some people are wearing suits and ties and love first and then some folks are wearing like jeans and a T-shirt. So what's really interesting about the event is how folks kind of rubbing elbows now you had folks from all kinds of walks of life who view themselves as fellow travelers because they're all part of the cult of Buffett or whatever you want to call it. They're all disciples. And Rhea's also says the stadium there are no Mahal is packed. Buffett saying Berkshire won't bid for the remaining portion of Occidental Petroleum, it doesn't already own, and Buffett also says some execs have failed banks should be punished. New York City employees, including teachers, cops, and firefighters. Well, they lost nearly $30 million in pension funds tied to the collapse of Silicon Valley bank. That's according to the New York Post. Sources tell Bloomberg, the SEC is investigating the conduct of first republic bank executives before the government's seizure and sale of that lender to JPMorgan Chase. We get more on that problem as Charlie pellet. One of the sources says the SEC is looking into whether any members of the then executive team at first republic improperly traded on inside information. It could not immediately be determined which former executives are the focus of the inquiry first republic was seized by regulators and sold to JPMorgan in a government led deal after a drama filled weekend. Charlie pellet, Bloomberg radio. Thank you, Charlie. More inflation data ahead in the coming week. Consumer and producer price index reports coming out, and St. Louis fed president Jim bullard says the fed still can achieve a soft landing. Yes, the economy could go into recession, but that's not the base case. I think the base case is slow growth, probably somewhat softer labor market. And declining inflation. So that would be the soft landing scenario. And I think all of you should put most of your weight on that scenario. And then, yes, there are risks out there. Other things can happen. We understand that. But I wouldn't make those, you know, the base case. You don't want to make, you know, the meteor coming from outer space and hitting us. You understand that risk, but you don't want that to be your base case. And bullard speaking at the economic club of Minnesota. And as we've been reporting, the latest on the debt ceiling stand up a group of 43 Senate Republicans, including minority leader Mitch McConnell now, say they depose allowing a vote on legislation increasing the debt limit with no strings attached. The group saying, in a letter, substantive spending and budget reforms must be part of this package. Global news 24 hours a day, powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in over a 120 countries. I'm Denise Pellegrini. This is Bloomberg. Hi

Fiery Activist Jose Vega Disrupts Columbia Journalism School Panel

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Fiery Activist Jose Vega Disrupts Columbia Journalism School Panel

"Do me a favor It's on my rumble podcast today rumble dot com slash bongino Please do me a favor Go there spread the clip around It's on the clips channel too And just let everybody see this This is great stuff Check this out I'm looking for the one with Seymour hersh because it's a policy and press Paul event So shouldn't we be talking about the Nord streams and sets the biggest story of the century and you guys you know I mean you have the executive editor of The New York Times there who came out with a phony story to try and block see more hers It just it's just kind of funny how that happened you know I mean did you even acknowledge Seymour hersh All of you are executive editors of papers that broke Pentagon me line Watergate Is this the same papers or not I mean is there anything you've gotten right in the last 20 years or am I mistaken about that I mean it's just kind of funny because Iraq wrong Syria wrong russiagate really wrong okay I mean the list goes on and on So the last thing you could do to try and actually fix your reputation is acknowledge that through leagues We had to find out that zelensky was going to bomb Moscow on the anniversary I mean if you're so impartial shouldn't you at least say right Does zelensky was going to bring us on the verge of World War three That seems pretty fair While Julian Assange ronson prison all of you got fat checks Because he's in jail for doing your job And you know what Tucker Carlson ain't no Seymour hersh but he did something you guys are scared to do Speak the truth and actually be critical of the war which is why he was actually acquired from Fox because you are all cowards Every single one of you Folks that goes on for about another minute along the same vein in the interest of time I had to cut it off a little early but let me tell you something I don't know Jose Vega never met the guy in my life Don't know his politics Frankly I don't care Round the applause for Jose good for you for asking questions and questioning authority and questioning power And the media has power make them say yes

Jose Vega Jose World War Three FOX Zelensky Today Tucker Carlson Seymour Hersh Pentagon Julian Assange Ronson Paul Watergate Last 20 Years Moscow Rumble ONE New York Times Russiagate Iraq Every
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"News senior executive editor Stephanie Flanders on why the global economy of 2023 is going to be a wild ride. So what's useful about doing this exercise for business week and I have done it a few years now is you sort of obviously you're quite caught up in, especially these days on exactly what's going to happen to the economy this year and are we going to get up, get a heads around inflation is the fed going to stop tightening. But you also want to step back and think, okay, how is the world fundamentally changed? And I think this was one of those years where I thought, wow, we really have had these fundamental assumptions underpinning maybe 30, 40 years of global economic history, certainly my lifetime of thinking about economics and thinking about the world. All having been kicked away over the last couple of years. It's not just cheap energy prices. It's not just cheap labor costs and transportation costs, and as you said, the sort of friction free period for geopolitics, at least when it came to am I going to find it fairly easy to set up a complicated supply chain in Asia or China. And all of that has gone away. On top of all that, you kind of, every time that any one of those pillars was sort of shaky, you always had the fed put, you always had the fed there, super easy money, kind of free money to make everything still make the numbers still add up. And when you start looking ahead and thinking, okay, if those have gone in quite a lasting way, decoupling whatever you want to call it, as well as potentially kind of higher interest rates sticking around for

Stephanie Flanders fed Asia China
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 9 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A conversation with Bloomberg news senior executive editor Stephanie Flanders on why the global economy of 2023 is going to be a wild ride. So what's useful about doing this exercise for the business week? And I've done it a few years now as you sort of obviously you're quite caught up in, especially these days on exactly what's going to happen to the economy this year and are we going to get up, get a heads around inflation is the fed going to stop tightening. But you also want to step back and think, okay, how is the world fundamentally changed? And I think this was one of those years where I thought, wow, we really have had these fundamental assumptions underpinning maybe 30, 40 years of global economic history, certainly my lifetime of thinking about economics and thinking about the world. All having been kicked away over the last couple of years. It's not just cheap energy prices. It's not just cheap labor costs and transportation costs and as you said, the sort of friction free period for geopolitics, at least when it came to am I going to find it fairly easy to set up a complicated supply chain in Asia or China. And all of that has gone away. On top of all that, you kind of, every time that any one of those pillars was sort of shaky, you always had the fed put, right? You always had the fed there, super easy money, kind of free money to make everything still make the numbers still add up. And when you start looking ahead and thinking, okay, if those have gone in quite a lasting way, decoupling whatever you want to call it, as well as potentially kind of higher interest rates sticking around for a while

Stephanie Flanders Bloomberg news fed Asia China
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"News senior executive editor Stephanie Flanders on why the global economy of 2023 is going to be a wild ride. This exercise for the business week and I have done it a few years now is you sort of obviously you're quite caught up in especially these days on exactly what's going to happen to the economy this year and are we going to get a heads around inflation is the fed going to stop tightening. But you also want to step back and think, okay, how is the world fundamentally changed? And I think this was one of those years where I thought, wow, we really have had these fundamental assumptions underpinning maybe 30, 40 years of global economic history, certainly my lifetime of thinking about economics and thinking about the world. All having been kicked away over the last couple of years. It's not just cheap energy prices. It's not just cheap labor costs and transportation costs, and as you said, the sort of friction free period for geopolitics, at least when it came to am I going to find it fairly easy to set up a complicated supply chain in Asia or China. And all of that has gone away. On top of all that, you kind of, every time any one of those pillars was sort of shaky, you always had the fed put, right? You always had the fed there, super easy money, kind of free money to make everything still make the numbers still add up. And when you start looking ahead and thinking, okay, if those have gone in quite a lasting way, decoupling whatever you want to call it, as well as potentially kind of higher interest rates sticking around for a

Stephanie Flanders fed Asia China
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 9 months ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A conversation with Bloomberg news senior executive editor Stephanie Flanders on why the global economy of 2023 is going to be a wild ride. So what's useful about doing this exercise for business week and I have done it a few years now is you sort of obviously you're quite caught up in especially these days on exactly what's going to happen to the economy this year and are we going to get a heads around inflation is the fed going to stop tightening. But you also want to step back and think, okay, how is the world fundamentally changed? And I think this was one of those years where I thought, wow, we really have had these fundamental assumptions underpinning maybe 30, 40 years of global economic history, certainly my lifetime of thinking about economics and thinking about the world. All having been kicked away over the last couple of years. It's not just cheap energy prices, it's not just cheap labor costs and transportation costs, and as you said, the sort of friction free period for geopolitics, at least when it came to am I going to find it fairly easy to set up a complicated supply chain in Asia or China. And all of that has gone away. On top of all that, you kind of, every time any one of those pillars was sort of shaky, you always had the fed put, right? You always had the fed there, super easy money, kind of free money to make everything still make the numbers still add up. And when you start looking ahead and thinking, okay, if those have gone in quite a lasting way, decoupling whatever you want to call it, as well as potentially higher interest rates sticking around for a while

Stephanie Flanders Bloomberg news fed Asia China
'The Great Reset' With Marc Morano

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | 9 months ago

'The Great Reset' With Marc Morano

"Now and again, a book comes over the transom that appeals to me. This book, we're going to be talking to the author Mark morano is titled the great reset, global elites, and the permanent lockdown, a serious subject, the forward is written by my friend Sebastian gorka just to introduce the author Mark morano. He's the executive editor in chief correspondent for climate depot dot com, a news and information service he founded way back in 2009. He's the author of the 2021 book green fraud why the Green New Deal is even worse than you think. And he is now the author of the much more recent the great reset. Mark morano, welcome to this program. Thank you, Eric. Happy to be here today. I appreciate it. Well, this is a really important subject. So obviously, I want to jump right into it. It's called the great reset global elites and the permanent lockdown. What do you say in this book that we wouldn't know just from generally watching the news? Well, the biggest thing, I think the simplest way of explaining what the great reset is and what the thrust of this is is our entire world changed in March of 2020. And what happened then with these COVID lockdowns, it was in eye opener to not only to the rest of the world, but to the progressives and to the global leaders in charge because to them it was like, wow, this was easy. They basically scared the public enough to issue emergency decrees globally, almost every country. And then by issuing these decrees they bypass democracy and they imposed everything from school closures to church closers to business closures to mask mandates to stay at home orders to curfews, to vaccine, all without democracy without a vote.

Mark Morano Sebastian Gorka Climate Depot Eric
A highlight from Episode 54 life as a neurodivergent parent with Autumn OConnor and Tammy McGown

Dear Dyslexic Podcast

29:47 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from Episode 54 life as a neurodivergent parent with Autumn OConnor and Tammy McGown

"Hello everyone, and welcome to the Dear Dyslexic podcast series. I'm your host, Shaye Wiesel. Before we get started, I'd like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the lands on which I live and work, the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation, and to pay my respects to disability clearinghouse on education and training. ADCET is a national resource that aims to promote discussion, dissemination of information and advice that informs educators, disability practitioners and students with disabilities on inclusive education, teaching and support within the Australian higher education and vocational education training sector. Thanks ADCET for your ongoing support. I'm super excited to be bringing to you this special edition that podcast was live from our 2021 living successfully with dyslexia conference. At the conference, I had the privilege of speaking to three wonderful women who are all very neuro diverse about how they manage day to day in the workplace. My guests included Autumn O 'Connor, who's the executive editor of teaching and education at Be Your Best Academy. Tammy McGower, who is a disability consultant in her own business square hole training and consulting. Ari Becka Flower, a lecturer in the department of psychology and counseling at La Trobe University. I really hope you enjoy this conversation about neuro diversity in the workplace and the ups and downs that we manage with day to day. Well, hello everybody and welcome to another episode of the Dear Dyslexic podcast series. Today I was thinking I was hoping to have a really interesting discussion around parenting and neuro diversity and not just because I've become a parent or maybe because I've become a parent that I wanted to talk about this topic and to hear other people's perspectives about how they manage day to day when they're a neuro diverse parent. So welcome Autumn and Tammy to the show this afternoon. Hello, thank you for having us. As I mentioned, I was super excited to talk to you both because we've had some really great conversations around neuro diversity in the workplace. And it got me thinking about how we manage as parents and Autumn and I are both new parents to the scene. Autumn's baby is only a few months older than my daughter. And Tammy, you've now got adult children. So we've got both ends of the spectrum here today. That's right. I think I'm representing the crying side of fertility in this conversation. And I was, I myself have had challenges day to day managing around being dyslexic and having a baby, which I didn't really think I would, but I really wanted to get other people's perspectives on how they manage. And what are some of the things that help you day to day. But before we get started, Autumn, would you like to introduce yourself to those who haven't heard from you before? Because you've been on my show a couple of times now. Okay. Well, I always get a bit stuck in these sorts of introductions. I'm not sure exactly how much to share. But I am currently working at Be Your Best Academy as the executive editor. And what we do is we develop professional and personal development courses for neurodivergent adults. And I'm also the founder of Aspie Rebels, which is a psychosocial group for autistics in Melbourne. As Shay said, I am a new mum. My son has just turned one, which was an unexpected event in itself. We weren't expecting or wanting children. And there he appeared. But I love him all the same. So that's my sort of introduction to, well, being me and this. Thank you, Autumn. That's a great introduction. It is. And it's very true and authentic. So thank you. And Tammy, welcome. We haven't had an opportunity to do a podcast before. So I'm really pleased that you could join Autumn and I for this conversation today. Thank you so much for inviting me. I've been looking forward to catching up with you both. Okay. I just spoke right over you. Sorry, Shay. I guess that's probably a fair introduction into who I am. So I'm Tammy. I am a late diagnosed autistic ADHD and dyslexic. And I also have dyscalculia auditory processing disorder and chronic pain conditions. And I interrupt people because I have trouble guessing when they're going to speak or not. I have four adult children, three birth children and one stepchild. And so I've been doing the parenting thing now. My oldest is 28 and I got married this year, which was whoa and wonderful. Very, very excited to be increasing the members of our family. That's one of the cool things about having children is that you get to increase your family every time someone starts dating somebody. So that's pretty cool. No, no, I haven't talked about work. Okay. So I have a 15 year history in the care of foster care and a long time now in disability. And I am a disability advocate and an independent contractor. And I have to say that you look way too young to have a child that's 28. Thank you so much. It's because I've had my hair dyed and I don't mind your listeners knowing that because I was taken into surgery four weeks ago and the nurse asked my husband if he'd be waiting for his mother in the waiting room. So I decided that aging gracefully was not going to be a thing. So I started going great at 21 and I'm now 48 and going backwards in trying to pretend it's not. Well, I just got my head last weekend and the week before Ava and I were both sick in bed and I just had a meltdown. I was under the covers crying because I'd been waiting for so long after lockdown to get my hair dyed and cut. And I was just like, this is the tipping point. Well, you've got a haircut too by the looks of it. So you're looking lovely. Thank you. So hopefully the audience will forgive me today because I'm really tired, even though Ava is sleeping through the night at the moment. I don't know if my body's trying to catch up on eight months of no sleep. So if I'm a little bit jumbled, please forgive me because I feel like I'm on the top of my game today. And I think that's maybe one of the on top of that, having a neuro diversity or divergence or whatever word people would like to use. So Autumn, what have you found as a new mum, juggling work and motherhood and everything else? Well, I actually find like, yes, it's difficult, but for me, I cope because of my partner. And I'm really thankful to my partner. He has the role of stay at home dad while I work. And he also has a tendency to be really nurturing and caring towards me generally, even before I we had children. So when I get overwhelmed, he helps me through that. And I think that's one year old and having even prior to that, a baby that goes through sleep regressions, it's really intense. And he manages my overwhelm and my intensity and also our kids. And I think part of it as well that makes it actually also really cool is that I work from home. So while I have a home office and my son is not really allowed to see me while I'm working, because we close the door, I do take my lunches with the family. And whenever I pop out to make a cup of tea, I sort of sneak a little baby cuddle or I get a little chat when I sort of want to talk a bit about, I guess, how I feel my neurodiversity makes me a better mother. And maybe Tammy has similar thoughts and maybe you as well, Shay. But I feel like because I had a difficult childhood with my neurodiversities, I want to put forth the best possible experience for my son. And I've noticed already that he has some autistic traits. And while I don't really believe in early childhood diagnoses, I have noticed some things that really are quite significant that really couldn't be anything other than autism. But instead of making him feel wrong for having these reactions and interests, I try to remain sort of curious and supportive of him. So, for example, one of the things that does is when he gets really emotional, he bangs his head against the wall. And he does it to self -soothe and he does it quite aggressively. So instead of telling him off or trying to physically stop him, I help put words to the experience. So, for example, I might say things like, honey, I know you want to hit your head. Does that help to get the frustration out? And then I wait for him to respond. So, from a very young age, we've taught my son baby sign language, which to a large degree really is just Australian sign language, and he uses it. And he also has his own little babbly words that he uses. And for those listening who are parents, you get to know the babbles your child makes and what they mean. And so he has a certain intonation, inflection of certain words when he's trying to say them, which, of course, he doesn't say them like English, but he says a baby version. And so then he will respond. And I listen to him. And then I might say something like, you know, it's okay to calm yourself using head banging, but maybe we should try the couch cushion because then it won't hurt you. And I find that every time we do things like that, where he has a sort of reaction, and I listen to him and we talk, we get closer. And one of the things I've noticed with that is that he now only rarely bangs his head on the wall. He comes to me. So, if he's very twice against the wall, and then he'll crawl or walk over to me and he does the sign language for pain and sad, and then he asks for a hug. And then I hug him. And it seems to just shift that reaction or sensory experience that he's been having. And similarly, when he's really overwhelmed with sensory stuff, I can hold him really tightly and that will help calm him down. And I sort of think that even though it's really difficult to, in many ways, to be with him while I have my own neurodiverse issues, I try to find a way to work with what I'm experiencing and with what he's experiencing by putting words to it and making it a learning experience and making it something that can build self -awareness. Thank you for listening to this podcast. The DHUB is our digital learning space where you can access our first Australian e -learning courses for those working and supporting dyslexic employees, as well as webisodes, online courses, communities of practice, and much, much more. So head to the DHUB today and start your learning journey. dhub .dyslexic .com. Because you've been diagnosed with autism, it enables you to mother in a different way compared to dyslexia is generally genetic. So my dad, if he'd known he was dyslexic when I was growing up, I might've been supported in different ways. And because you know that you have autism and dyslexia, that you're already in tune to how you can be helping your son if he does develop either those neurodiversities, which I think is really special. And I think it might help as generations go on that if parents already know that they're neurodiverse, that their way of approaching parenting might be really different to how we were raised because we didn't, our parents didn't know. And so the strategies you're putting in place already that you probably missed out on as a young child growing up, we're extremely beneficial and the impact of the neurodiversity might be a lot different. Does that make sense? It does to me. What do you think Tammy? I absolutely agree. One of the regrets that I have in life is that I wasn't diagnosed until my children were late teenagers or young adults. And so I didn't have that full understanding of myself and my abilities and my growing up. And you know, my father's dyslexic, my brother's dyslexic. They were both athletic and struggled with spelling and reading. Whereas I loved to sit in the corner with a good book and I was the opposite of athletic. So it's one of the many reasons why I got missed out on as a young girl growing up with our diagnostic systems in Australia. I always knew that I had a big issue with numbers. I couldn't learn my timetables. I couldn't remember things other people remembered. But because I could write and I seem to speak well, and I seem to listen well, I think I learned some skills as a young child about passing way before I ever understood what that was. I found out really, we started our journey in my family with my middle child being diagnosed as autistic first. And then as often happens with neurodivergence, everything after that got put back to him being autistic. And so I was fighting the system really from day one, the battle to have the diagnostic process for autism and ADHD, and then going privately to explore vision impairment, hearing impairment, and dyslexia, because I didn't believe that just being autistic was the whole sum of everything that was happening. And I was right. And so he had weekly tutoring that I paid for. I was a single mum. So again, in a different situation, my ex -husband left when my oldest was five and my youngest was still a baby. And he moved six hours away. So I was very much on my own and again, not understanding my own neurodivergence. And so I really relate to what Autumn has been talking about around the connecting and communicating and that unique bonding that we do to try and meet our children where they are. That was certainly how I stumbled through parenting. One of my children is still not formally with diagnosed dyslexia, and I'm confident that they are dyslexic. But now we have to go through the NDIS system because they're already a young adult. I'm not sure if that answers the question. I think it was more a comment. But Autumn did ask you if it was a question. I'm lucky I've already pre -apologized for my brain functioning 100 % today. How do you think that being diagnosed later in life, did that then change the way you parented? Or did that influence how you parented? How you parent? Look, I think it did change in the sense of we're all on the same playing field now. I tried hard to find that balance between being helicopter mum, knowing that my kids and myself were different from other people and allowing them to have freedom. I tried not to push too hard on academic side. I mean, parenting is super hard, isn't it? And I know that while I tried to be supportive and while I tried to make sure that we had all of the supports that we could have in place with the diagnoses that we had with my children at the time, that if we'd had more information and more resources, definitely there might have been better outcomes for the kids as far as their immediate after school opportunities, as far as employment, etc. We really just muddled our way through as a very confused household, I think. They'd asked me for help with homework. I'd have no idea because of my own spiky skill set. Some of the kids were way better at maths than I was. I was better at research than they were. A couple of them love reading. A couple of them found it so hard. I think that they would feel that they missed out on a lot of opportunities. I'm just hoping that when your kids are primary school age, that we will have been able to create enough of a social movement for dyslexia and learning disorders to be properly recognized and actually funded and resourced so that families can get early diagnosis and can have access to services. I was in a position of case managing my own family when I was near a between the kindies and the schools and the high schools and the different support agencies and the tutors and the kids. I'd love for it to be a lot easier for you both as your children grow into young people and then adults. It would be nice. I don't know how much of a change we'll make. The movement is happening, I think, particularly in primary schools at the moment. I do worry that when Ava gets into primary school, I know that probably by grade four, I won't be able to help her with any maths anymore. My partner said, oh, we have to just start learning maths. I was like, oh, God, learning maths. Oh, please. Just one plus two oranges, three oranges. But as soon as there's an orange and an apple and a banana and there's a train going at 500 kilometres an hour and what is X? It's like, I don't know. I'm so glad my partner can do that. You've lost me after you had the apple. That's probably an experience that all three of us have had, even though we don't all have the same neurodivergent diagnoses, is that we have been aware that we're struggling for as long as we can remember. We know that we're really good at some things and really, really not coping with other things. We know that pressure of everybody around us to just try harder. You could do this if you just applied yourself. You're so good at these other things. Why can't you be better at those things? I think that that's something that we don't want to put on our children. I tried not to. I guess we have that understanding that it's not as simple as just we can learn it. I can look at something every single day and I can try the singing it, writing it, et cetera. I'm still only remember two phone numbers and only because they haven't changed for 13 years. I have no idea what my kids' phone numbers are. I forget my ATM code most of the time. I was never going to be able to learn maths to help the kids. But what I could do was pay someone who knew what they were doing and beg people to help. I guess that was my way of managing not being able to support them with those types of things through schooling. Something that I've noticed when you were talking, Tammy, is from the question of getting diagnosed late. I was diagnosed late with my autism. You said you kind of remember the word you used. I'm going to use squished because I can't remember the word you used. But kind of squished through things. Just trying to get things done while not knowing who you really were. Then when you knew who you were, you were able to interconnect situations more and become, I guess, a more organized, more connected parent. I kind of reflect on that. I think, although I don't know if I'm a good enough mother, but I do think that because I'm more confident in myself and my diagnosis, so it's not so fresh that I'm not sure who I am, and it's not to the point that I don't know who I am at all because I know there's something wrong but I don't know what it is, but I'm actually quite confident with my diagnosis that I find it easier to relate to my son. I can see when I do see things that I'm a bit autistic. I can see the amusing side of it and I can see how I might be able to make it a better experience for him because I feel confident in myself from that space. I think that that's sort of an important distinction. Of course, everybody who's becoming a parent isn't necessarily in that perfect sense of being confidently in their diagnosis. Some of them might be undiagnosed. Some of them might get it later. Some of them might still be in that kind of frantic finding out that you are a certain diagnosis and what does that mean and a bit all upheaval. But I do think that I am a better parent now than I would ever have been three years ago or even 10 years ago just because I have a better understanding of who I am with my autistic dyslexic identity. Do you kind of feel like that might be the case for you too? Do you have less expectations? Sorry Tammy. No, no you're good you go Shay. This one says you have less expectations on yourself because I know now like I know I'm really disorganized and I'm probably going to forget something. So part of me now like I have a bag specifically packed for Ava so that I know that I won't forget things. So I'm putting strategies in place like that but I also know that that means that I'm really flexible. So it's okay if Ava doesn't go down at a certain time or if something happens or you know I have to go see my mum because she's had a bad day or something. So I think that being dyslexic has always made me really flexible and adaptable and so I think that's really helped in having a calm home environment where we're not too too stressed or anxious about things which I think like 10 years ago I would have been really different and even though I worry about you know what happens if Ava is dyslexic how do we manage it or she's wriggled so much is she ADHD or you know I'm already trying to label her and I shouldn't be doing that but I think in that sense it has helped to know where I need help and where I know I can manage really well. Yeah I was just reflecting back on what you're both saying and I think that even though I wasn't diagnosed I was of course still neurodivergent and so I did squish my way through things including parenting and I developed my own coping strategies my own way of doing things so that I could manage the household and the children on my own and then I had to adapt again when I fell in love and partnered up with a single dad and he had the opposite way of doing everything that I did and that was a challenge trying to do joint parenting and all of that after I'd been so independent but I think one of the reasons why it was so difficult for one of my children to be diagnosed was because I had unconsciously created a very autistic friendly environment because I was creating a home that was comfortable for me and communication that was comfortable for me and so it was really only the non -autistic and non -neurodivergent family members that were impacted by our family life and our lifestyle not the autistic ones. I kept everything very simple I read every parenting book that I could find for every single stage of development because I had no idea what I was doing and I didn't have any friends with children because I was such a young parent and I was fairly isolated so you know I did things that horrify my friends who are much younger than me with young children now like color coding the children's socks and underwear so and limiting to only having one week's worth of clothes for all the children so that I knew exactly whose clothes were in the wash and whose clothes weren't and whose socks belonged to who.

Shaye Wiesel Tammy Mcgower Ari Becka Flower Australia Melbourne Aspie Rebels AVA Shay Tammy Five Autumn 100 % 13 Years 15 Year Six Hours Eight Months Today One Week 28 Dhub .Dyslexic .Com.
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Local outbreak with John Lou Bloomberg's executive editor for Greater China really just talking about the challenges that these COVID zero policies are continuing to rake on the likes of Hong Kong and China This is Bloomberg Streaming on peacock it's the girls trip of a lifetime Look at this water We're gonna give them something to talk about 7 iconic housewives four different cities Oh my God this thing right vacation a Turks and Caicos The party now And there's no party like a housewives party I don't give a fuck You're not a girl's girl Why would you say that Find out what happens when the forecast brings sunshine and a whole lot of shade You are so self absorbed It's crazy The Real Housewives ultimate girl trip All episodes streaming now Only on feedback Wake up and text text and eat Text didn't catch the bus Text didn't miss your stop Text and be late to work Sorry Text didn't work Text and pretend to work Text and X surprised when someone calls you out for not working Who me Text and meet up with a friend you haven't seen and forever Hi Okay Text and complain that they're on their phone the whole time Text and listen to them complain that you're on your phone the whole time Text in whatever But when you get behind the wheel give your phone to a passenger put it in the glove box Just don't text and drive Visit stop texts stop Rex dot org.

John Lou Bloomberg China Bloomberg Hong Kong
James Poulos, Executive Editor of the American Mind, Describes 'Transhumanism'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:48 min | 2 years ago

James Poulos, Executive Editor of the American Mind, Describes 'Transhumanism'

"I listened to the American mind podcast, which is phenomenal from the Claremont institute. And I was listening a couple weeks ago. And I was texting Conor in the midst of the episode and I said, we have to have this guy. It was just so interesting to me. It's doctor James pulos. I hope I did okay with that, pronunciation. He's the cofounder and executive editor of the American mind at the Claremont institute and author of the new book human forever, and the digital politics of the spiritual war. And so let me just first kind of start with James. If you could introduce yourself to the audience then also introduce to our audience, what is transhumanism? So it's great to be with you. Thanks for having me on. The best way to think about transhumanism, I would say is in the following way, once upon a time, technology was firmly on America's side, the electric age was very good to us, the telegraph, the spread of the incandescent bulb, radio television, really the time when America became the world's leading power, superpower that was so, so powerful, not just in terms of military might, but also in culture, you know, in mass communications and every all the ways that that shapes people's inner and outer lives. Europe did pretty poorly during that time. Everyone's empires fell apart, massive world wars, genocide, disillusionment, loss of religious faith, really just kind of a wipeout of that of that civilization. It's just still barely trying to hang on in some ways. And so there was this big sense of optimism and triumphalism around the Internet when it came into being in the United States. You know, of course, we thought we created these technologies. They're super powerful. We have a huge head start on everyone else. And so they're really just going to fulfill our consummate. America's role as the most important country in the world, the country that can sort of turn the world into something that's American and its essence and its civilization. And that's not what these machines did. You know, the elites, the folks in charge, were really shocked by the way people use these technologies to put opinions on the Internet that they didn't like. And ultimately to elect a president that they didn't like very much. And so once that happened, there was this real kind of head check. Suddenly everyone had a smartphone and this technology wasn't just a cumulative. It wasn't just a progressive addition to the technological advancement of the past. But it was really something fundamentally different. A new medium, a new form of technology. And the way that it's reshaped our inner and outer lives, their senses, their sensibilities, maybe even our souls. Has already been super profound. People are now sort of realizing that every day is they look at the news that's coming out on a regular basis around the clock. And so what effect are these technologies having on who we are as human beings? And I think the effects very

Claremont Institute James Pulos America Conor James Europe
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of the news around the oil space Bloomberg executive editor will talking Shell and total next This is women With the Bloomberg bit Care has the power to bring kindness where it's needed It brings out the best in every one of us It doesn't just see people It takes time to understand them It puts the needs of others ahead of its own And when you start with care you end up with a very different kind of bank Truest Truest bank member FDIC The composer Joseph Haydn famously said I listened more than I studied It sounds like a law school hypothetical Here at Bloomberg it's the same thing Do you maintain that low rate regime Can you see how two years How do you build a strategy with that eventuality in mind Experts information news The push sets up a potential fight What do we know about how it will go public Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com Bloomberg the world is listening The world's financial decision makers connect on the Bloomberg terminal sharing ideas negotiating trades and forming an influential network that helps power global markets isn't a time you join them Bloomberg dot com slash professional This is a sports report I'm Charlie pallette brought you by ex surgeon The Cleveland Indians baseball team is being sued by a local roller Derby team over their planned name change Earlier this year the baseball team said it would change its name to the Cleveland guardians in response to complaints from Native American groups Now the Cleveland guardians roller Derby team is asking a federal judge to prevent the baseball team from taking the name Cryptocurrency exchange FTX which recently topped a $25 billion market valuation has bought an ad in this year's Super Bowl It is The Crown jewel of sorts for the company's push to corner the sports sponsorship arena The NBA's Miami Heat play an FTX arena while FTX is the official crypto exchange of Major League Baseball and that's the Bloomberg business of sports report I'm Charlie pellet.

Bloomberg com Bloomberg Joseph Haydn Charlie pallette FDIC Baseball Cleveland guardians Cleveland guardians roller Der Cleveland Indians Super Bowl NBA Miami Major League Charlie pellet
Europes Travel Restrictions and the Fate of Aviations Recovery

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

Europes Travel Restrictions and the Fate of Aviations Recovery

"This summer began on a high note for the aviation industry in the us. Kobe nineteen infections were declining. Dramatically and air travel was rebounding sharply europe even reopened to us tourists. Some analysts saw it as the beginning of a fee shape rebound in air travel but as we head into september. The clouds are back cove is surging again in the us because of the highly. Contagious delta variant. The european union has proposed new restrictions on american travelers and the biden administration stubbornly refuses to let europeans in even though europe now has higher vaccination rates and fewer cove infections than north america as the moody blues would sing has the sunshine. We've been waiting for turn to rain here to discuss this all aviation weeks. Executive editor for commercial aviation jens float. He joins us from frankfurt germany. Also joining us as kevin michael's managing director of aerodynamic advisory and irregular. Aviation we calmness jens. Let's start with you. Tell us what's going on in europe with all these new restrictions it's complicated. That's the kind of the bad news part of it. So the european commission has proposed new restrictions for transatlantic travel given the high infection rate that we see in the us basically. It's saying that all nonessential essential traveled from the us should be stopped. Except if you're vaccinated and that the caveat is important because that obviously means that a lot of people will not be affected by this new mechanism. The other uncertainty in this is of course. European member states have to are in charge of zero and rules so the just proposal and it's not always that they all fall. Follow these proposals.

Biden Administration Europe Jens Float Kevin Michael United States European Union North America Frankfurt Jens Germany European Commission
Behind the Headlines at Boeing and Airbus

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Behind the Headlines at Boeing and Airbus

"Boeing last week wild wall street with its first profitable quarter in a long time but ceo dave. Calhoun seem less excited about when the company might launch. Its next clean sheet airplane in fact some believe he was signaling. It could be a long ways off for its part. Airbus's looking to aggressively ramp up production to cement. Its formidable lead over. Boeing in the narrow body market while embarking on a long and expensive are effort to develop a hydrogen-powered aircraft but twenty thirty five aviation week editors listened in on earnings calls and tried to make sense of where the two companies are heading. It was truly an exercise in reading. The tea leaves joining me to discuss. That are two of them. Senior editor guy. Norse an executive editor. Yen's floto guide. Let's start with you. Dave calhoun had been saying for a long time. If boeing launched a new clean sheet aircraft. They couldn't wait for the propulsion makers the propulsion wouldn't be ready would have to be other advances to to make the business case now. He's talking about the importance of propulsion advances. Is that a signal that this next airplane which originally was called anna may is not coming for a long time. is that what. He's gently telling us. Well so really good question i mean the point is is that we simply are in the dark so we just we should admit that up front to to start with so we are as you say. Having to look at the tea leaves along with everybody else so so what do we know. We do know that as of june as you mentioned calhoun told us you know he said. Look you know. We're sticking to his message. whatever comes next. We're not talking about big leaps in propulsion. You know we're just going to. All the savings are going to be made to the airframe technologies like that which was was fine near that made sense but something has changed and of course the big news from the propulsion side is the emergence of the cfm rise program. The open fan open rotor technology demonstrator.

Boeing Ceo Dave Dave Calhoun Calhoun Airbus Anna
The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

Morning Edition

02:05 min | 2 years ago

The Executive Editor at the Miami Herald Responds Publicly to Racist Email

"Are no strangers to receiving negative feedback on their stories. Recently, the Miami Herald's executive editor, Monica Richardson, who is the first black journalists to hold that position in the papers, 117 year history. Says she received a racist email. It was really brutal because of the language and the tone and and really the hatred that it portrayed and how this resonates with Different communities at different moments In that email, the sender expressed anger over the Miami Herald's coverage of recent Cuban American demonstrations, which shut down in Miami Highway. It noted that no one had been arrested despite a new anti riot law. In a message permeated with racist commentary, the sender referred to Richardson with a misogynistic slur. And use the phrase your people, Richardson wrote an open letter. In response in it, she writes, Like other moments of coming face to face with racism, it will sit with me for life. Martinez spoke with Richardson about why she felt compelled to respond. Now, these protests are there about something that we all care about their about fairness. And so that was not the question that I was trying to raise. It was really about people how they handle Being under pressure and that tension on issues of race and so this one was particularly as I said, the word I used. I like to think of was brutal. And so I decided to respond. Monica and you know, there's been a discussion last few years about how much of someone's humanity can go into their job when they are journalists. And it sounds like in this case your humanity came out when you read that email. It did. In fact, I wrote two versions of the column in the first version was very polite, and I came back to it and just wrote it strictly from the heart. Overwhelmingly the response that I got the positive response that I got was from the human community. So the it resonated not just with me as an African American woman, but it resonated with the Cuban community as

Miami Herald Monica Richardson Richardson Miami Martinez Monica
36 States, DC Sue Google, Alleging Antitrust Violations in App Store

Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

01:12 min | 2 years ago

36 States, DC Sue Google, Alleging Antitrust Violations in App Store

"Of states are set to sue Google and an antitrust case joining us now, as Tom Giles, Bloomberg's global tech executive editor. Tom Tell us about this lawsuit. What's the basis of it? Well, this is yet another action by U. S. U. S regulators against Google And these this is yet another sign of concern. That Google has grown too powerful and that it's and that is wielding that power in a way that sports competition in particular. This focuses on the Google play store. So this is the store that you have to go to in order to download apps on your android device on And so the concern is the fees that they charge APP developers for distribution of your apps. And these developers have they've they've said Enough is enough. They've complained to to regulators. And so what you've got is three dozen states Attorneys general from 36 States and Washington D. C coming together. And leveling a lawsuit against Google alleging alleging anti competitive

Tom Giles Tom Tell Google U. S. U. Bloomberg Washington
Interview With ULA's Tory Bruno

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Interview With ULA's Tory Bruno

"Hello and welcome to the czech six. Podcast i'm jen. Damasio executive editor for defense and space. I'm here with space editor. Irene clots a very special guest tori bruno the president and ceo of the united launch alliance. That means he's the principal strategic leader of the organization overseeing all the business management and operations but the real reason why. We're very excited to have him with us. Today is that you a. Is on the verge of launching. Its new vulcan centaur rocket and that might be a good place to start the discussion the upcoming launch. So maybe you can open with that and tell us a little bit about the vulcan in this particular mission sure so woken is is in fabrication right. Now we've actually built the first booster already. It's not the first one that will fly. It's the first one we built a can fly in its down at cape canaveral annette's brand new mobile launch on the recall. The vlt vulcan mobile launch platform in its path. Finding for us in tanking tests. It's making sure all of the software and launch hardware and support equipment. That is involved as working properly. One of the things people probably would never guess maybe they would if they thought about it but the launch pad is actually win more complicated than the rocket. there's all kinds of pneumatic hydraulic systems and electrtonics and whatnot. So that i booster has down there doing that. It's been doing that for several months. The actual booster that we will fly first gazette. One will go back into line when it's done in flight later the one that will fly. I is in the factory right now being built. We've just put the tanks together so it looks like a booster in getting the other things that will go on it. The the pacing item. I think i've shared with irene before is still the beef or blue origin rocket engines and to sort of. Put it in context. You know whenever you develop a new rocket. You're pacing item is always software unless you have a new engine and it's always engine

Damasio Tori Bruno United Launch Alliance Irene JEN Cape Canaveral
Giving Autonomous Aircraft a Moral Compass

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Giving Autonomous Aircraft a Moral Compass

"Hello and welcome to this week's check six podcast. I'm greg mark aviation executive editor for technology. Today we're going to ask. Will we ever be able to trust an autonomous aircraft. Nasa is working to ensure that we can and joining us to find out. How a my colleague. Guy norris aviation weeks western. Us bureau chief and our special guest. Marc scoop the principal investigator for at nasa strong flight research center in california a lot about tony and artificial intelligence in aviation particularly in the context of urban taxes an unmanned cargo aircraft. Tony and i are not same thing but they are potentially very complimentary using machine learning to train algorithms to automate takeoff and landing autonomously plan optimum flightpaths recognized obstacles and avoid collisions and identify safe. Landing sites along a route has tremendous potential to make aviation safer. But there is a problem. And here i will grossly oversimplify impart to avoid showing my own lack of real knowledge. The software used in today's avionics such as those pilots and digital flight controls is deterministic. That means the same in input always produces the same output and three rigorous analysis on testing. We can prove to the regulators like the faa that our system will always be safe machine. Learning algorithms non deterministic. Same input doesn't always produce the same output because of some change in the environment inner around an aircraft. It might decide to turn left. not right. And because we fully understand what goes on inside a machine learning algorithm. No amount of testing can guarantee to the regulated. The system will always behave safely. So how do we safely unlock all those great capabilities. That me and i promise.

Greg Mark Guy Norris Marc Scoop Nasa Strong Flight Research Ce Nasa Tony California United States FAA
Interview With Smithsonian's Ellen Stofan

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Smithsonian's Ellen Stofan

"Hi and welcome to the aviation week. Check six podcast. I'm jen damasio the executive editor for defense and space. And i'm here with aviation weeks. Space editor irene. Clots and a very special guest ellen. Sto fan the under secretary for science and research at the smithsonian institution. Ellen comes here after leading the air and space museum and previously from nasa where. She helped plan to get humans to mars. But we're here today. Because of a really thrilling development. This morning nasa flew ingenuity. An aircraft for the first time on another planet in mars is very thin atmosphere. So i'm going to turn this over to irene. Who ensure has a lot of questions for ellen about this historic achievement. Thanks jen and welcome allan. This was all a very long time coming and I know that it's a significant step. For future. exploration of mars been likened to the ninety seven landing of the pathfinder mission with the prototype rover sojourner and we see what that led to colluding ingenuity is ride to mars ellen. Can you talk a little bit about as planetary scientists. what aerial abilities bring to the exploration table. Yeah well i. I will say on this day where. I'm still frankly just overcome by the immense this morning. It's i put this in an even broader context as having had responsibility for a while of caring for the nineteen. Three right flyer is. This is the first powered flight on another planet. Just let that blow your mind for a minute because this is huge historically and so it's really exciting so if we go to that fundamental level. Oh my gosh what we did on mars. It's incredibly exciting. But this idea of having multiple modes of mobility rovers or great especially when you want to go from rock to rock and analyze the composition. And we're looking for past life on mars. We really need that rover capability but you also want the ability to go longer distances more rapidly and you can only do that by air but mars is such a challenge because of that thin atmosphere but you know the ingenuity team. They show perseverance and ingenuity and they did it.

Jen Damasio Ellen Nasa Smithsonian Institution Allan JEN
Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

BBC World Service

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Journalist arrested while covering protests acquitted

"And I have a reporter arrested while covering a racial justice protest last summer has been acquitted of violating police orders. From Iowa Public Radio Grant Gerlach has the story. Andrews Story of the Des Moines Register was covering a protest at a shopping mall that turned violent, She testified. She was pepper sprayed and arrested while moving away from police. Defense attorneys told the jury she was there to do her job. Just his officers were there to protect property. So hurry says she's glad the jury recognized that. You know, I'm really, really grateful for them that they Upheld freedom of the press. And, of course, you know, Adjust democracy. The registers executive editor thank the during a statement saying Arresting reporters at protests denies people the right to know what's happening in their

Grant Gerlach Des Moines Register Andrews Iowa
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 2 years ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

"Denis muhlenberg has kept a low public profile since he left his job. Ceo of boeing at the end of twenty nineteen. But that's about to change me. Lemberg has teamed up with air finance founder. kirsten bartok tau and other aviation luminaries to fund a special purpose. Acquisition company called new vista acquisition corp. They're aiming to raise two hundred and forty million dollars through public offerings to acquire businesses focused on transformational technologies in areas. Such a space defense and communications advanced their mobility and logistics. What does that mean well. We'll let you hear directly from denison. Kirsten who have joined today also with us on my side of the table so to speak is aviation weeks. Technology specialists and urban air mobility guru executive editor graham warwick. Just one no we will. Not be talking about boeing past or future. If you're interested in that i'd like to refer you back to our january twenty nine podcast so let's get started a dentist. Tell us what you're up to. And why joe the good morning and thanks for the chance to talk about new vista. We're very excited about this. New endeavor and that excitement starts with a tremendous opportunity that we see right now as you know i had the privilege of being the ceo of boeing back in. We celebrated our centennial in two thousand sixteen and we. We did some work together on the age of aerospace and when we look back on the history of aerospace the opportunity in front of his right. Now i think it's the greatest one in that one hundred plus year history harris face. We're seeing this convergence of technologies in a way that we've never seen before technologies that span artificial intelligence autonomy new manufacturing techniques satellite technologies new types of vehicles and propulsion systems that set of emerging technologies. All at once has never happened before. Combine that with mega-scale changes in the market. You mentioned air mobility new waste. People are moving Logistics e commerce capabilities the revolution in space in the build out of the lower orbit ecosystem and next generation defense systems that combination of technologies and mega skill. Market ships creates an unprecedented opportunity. And that's what we're focused on at new vista kirsten. Let's hear from you. What brought you into team. Up with dennis and How are you approaching this. Thanks joe and as you know. I've been pretty focused on advanced ever ability for the last four or five years Having been based in silicon valley and kind of live through the internet growth and doing venture capital back then realized early that this transition was going to happen and just from the basic technologies with your talk about them. Electrification greeted propulsion which then goes to autonomy and an ad in hydrogen which has come on the radar lately These technologies are going to completely change Aerospace so that the next twenty years is going to look completely different in the last twenty years and even the is you know. The aircraft designs will look entirely different. Lucky enough i been working on this trying to figure out the right vehicle to investment doing a lot of my own personal investing some through our finance and then was Got on the idea of a spec realized that could be the optimal solution to help. These emerging companies crossed the chasm of death valley of death that we call where you got early stage venture capital money but they needed at large amount of growth capital. These are deep company's hardware and software at their capital intensive and then added that they've got the regulatory component of the faa and. they needed some good opportunities. For large amounts of crossover capital groups. Like softbank could have been that or sovereigns but the spac product has really come in to help. These company cost the valley of death and make it to the next level where they're commercialization occurs and their operational so i couldn't be more lucky to partner with such an incredible operators dennis someone who really pushed billing to be more. Entrepreneurial created horizon ex and necks and We put together a great team here. And we're excited to make a positive difference in the landscape. So so what are you thinking. I mean how do you take these technologies that we write about all time. I guess our listeners want to know and apply them to be like a real product. What what is really exciting. Talk about this this change in the next twenty years. What can we see in practical terms. What are we going to see. joe. I think you're gonna see transformation in these four market segments that we're talking about that's way beyond what we've ever seen before i take what's happening in the in. The lower orbits space ecosystem and extraordinary the number of technologies. That we're seeing that are coming into places real applications now. The build out a satellite infrastructure nanno sats micro sats we see a market for fifty thousand plus additional small sets on orbit or the next decade. We see a number of companies who are working on breaking the cost curve for access to space new launch capabilities that are coming to bear and then new applications in terms of how to use those satellite networks to create information at useful data earth observation New kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities connectivity. In communications i think the low earth orbit ecosystem. Build out that we're seeing now is just one example of the kind of massive transfer transformation that we're gonna see that's going to create economic value. It's gonna create new companies new jobs. it's going to create a new technologies that are on the innovation edge that are now ripple out into other business sectors. So it's an exciting time to be working on this leading edge

Boeing Denis Muhlenberg Lemberg Kirsten Bartok Tau New Vista Acquisition Corp Graham Warwick JOE Denison Kirsten Dennis Harris Silicon Valley Softbank FAA
Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

Airplane Mode

05:14 min | 2 years ago

Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

"Hi my name is era. I am twenty four years old and am from texas a small town in texas. So i hadn't really talked about therapy danny body or heard about their p for the most part because it's not something that was discussed in my family or at my school with my peers. There's such a stigma around in the black community is not something that i thought i'd ever need until i got to college. And so once. I went to college and i started struggling a little bit especially since i went to. Ap w i primarily why institution. I felt pretty isolated. And eventually i decided i e. I need to do something about this. Some of the things that i wanted to talk about specifically dealt with me being a black woman. And that's something that's hard to talk about with people. Who don that experience directly. Czar barnes executive editor. Here itself has written a lot about mental health in general and mental health black people specifically so when care wrote to us i was like i have talked is are we work together but we've never actually interviewed each other before so this is a new milestone zarin. I talk basically all day every day. Not in this context though pretty much constantly slacking constantly getting on zooms. But i'm excited to do this. Which is a little different for us back in june. Sarah wrote this incredible article. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive. In this country there are list of people and organizations to follow directories and her own words of encouragement and support. Let's tell the story from the beginning like what was happening that week. That made you decide. I have to write this. I mean it was just the constant flood of honestly traumatizing news about violence against black people. In this country this was right around the time. When the protests about george floyd stuff were really kicking off in earnest and in my role as the journalist over multiple years. I've had to cover news while also having a lot of feelings about the news but it has never been this intense for me as it was that week zara knew that if she was having a hard time finding mental health resources for herself and her friends after all her years of reporting on this. She probably wasn't alone. She wanted to do something to help. Change that. And to normalize the conversation. There still so much stigma when it comes to talking about health in our society in general. But there's also a very specific stigma that can come with talking about having a hard time with mental health black person we've talked about the strong black woman trope a lot at self. That was a big part of our cover story with trudgy p. Henson the idea that black women are kind of supernatural strong and we can handle anything and we don't suffer and we never have a hard time there is a corresponding trope for black men. And even though i feel like people have done a lot to break down those barriers culturally. There still is just this pervasive idea. That having a mental health issue as a black person is first of all not something that happens. And second of all if you're dealing with it it means you're abnormal or your weak or something's wrong with you and you need to hide what you're going through and i feel really proud when i even look at the headline of the story. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive in this country. Because i feel like it sends a couple of messages it first of all says if you are just simply trying to survive day to day as a black person that's completely valid and that's a worthwhile goal and then it also says there are all these mental health resources so you cannot be the only person going through this. There are not forty four mental health resources just for you. it's for everyone. it's because there are so many of us also dealing with us in her reporting zara focuses a lot on barriers to accessing mental health. Care the things that get in the way of people getting the help that they need and one of those barriers is the stigma as she says but there are other major stomach barriers to being able to access. mental health. services is such a tremendous privilege. I mean first of all you have the cost even if you have insurance absolutely adds up. I've seen a lot of people talk about having to see their therapist once a month instead of once a week because even their co pay is simply not affordable for them and dot is a travesty. At the cost of it is especially the fact that so many therapists don't accept insurance so that adds an additional barrier.

Danny Body Czar Barnes Zarin George Floyd Texas Zara Sarah Henson
"executive editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm getting it from a reliable and ethical sores on and it just means a lot that there is an organization like this, so I wanted to step it up a little. And we appreciate you so much. Thank you. Thank you, Allison so much, And it's individuals like you who do step in and leave a very nice comment Like that. And up their membership to KQED that keeps things running here. Good afternoon. I'm clear Green. I'm here with Beth Beth highs ago. We need to raise $1.2 million By Monday afternoon, likely since we're going to stop once the impeachment trial begins, and we need to hear from you in right now, Beth we have a triple challenge. A dollar for dollar for dollar challenge That's right. It is a triple challenge. Dollar for dollar for dollar So that's make sure donation worth three times the amount from Stephen and Mary Swig and another generous donor, so they're each giving $500 towards Lister donations during This hour. That's right. Then if we don't get the challenge before the hour's over, we have to offer to return the money and sense that would be something that we don't want to do, because we're trying to move forward as quickly and efficiently as we can to get to our goal of $1.5 million before the impeachment trial begins early next week. So if you listened, I have a little something that you might be interested in. If you listen to that here and now and you heard the interview with the Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron, right, so he's retiring. And he's a man who has spent a five decades in the news business and done a lot of work on a lot of great stories over at the Globe and the Herald and at the end at the Post is well and won numerous Pulitzer Prizes for his work. If you appreciate what's happening in the world of journalism outside of KQED, I mean, you love KQED, too. But you'd like to pair your affection for KQED with another news source would be happy if you're able to give us $15 a month. Uh, toward membership here to KQED. We would extend to you a one year subscription to the Washington Post. So that's something that you would like if you were, um if you hadn't haven't been a reader of that paper and became curious about it through the interview with Marty Baron on Here and now and would be interested in taking advantage of a way of not only thanking.

KQED Marty Baron Beth Beth Washington Post Allison Stephen Mary Swig executive editor Herald
"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I think most people when you say you want to save energy home, they think of really expensive projects like solar panels and geothermal. And while those things will save Extraordinary amounts of energy. There's lots a little things you could do that Don't they don't cost anything like it doesn't cost much at all by a smart power strip and plug your stuff into it, and what these things do is They sense when, when the whatever's plugged into it a TV or computer. Whatever isn't actually using it, and they shut off because a lot of different electronic things in our homes that we're not using. While they're not turned on. They're still pulling. Electricity from the grid in so these these smart strips you can program them to turn off at certain times. You can program them to sense when they should turn off themselves. It's a really cheap way to cut down on the costs of your electricity. But if if I have that hooked up to my TV, and then it touched down to have to reset the time on my my TV It just It depends on what you've bought. And even what your power settings on your TV are. Our overall advice really is toe go around your house and unplug stuff that you're just not using. Like if you have a printer that's plugged in. But you rarely use it like ours. The one behind me in this room. Right. Well, I can see it. It's a nice printer s. So you need it right, then plug it in. The same goes for a lot of other things like they they've done a good job Manufacturers have of of not made of making things that are called kind of. They were like wall wards where they vampires where they were soon energy off. Even when you aren't charging any more, But there's still I bet If you go around your home, you'll find a lot of things that are plugged in there. They're pulling juice out that don't need to be plugged in. So one option is just unplug. And another is the by a smart power strip. My kids still roll their eyes. When I say turn off the lights, and they're in their mid twenties. Yeah, right. Well, even wrote in the article. You know, Chandler Channel your your father and the house screaming, You know who love this light on right? It is amazing how much energy though. Eyes consume these days from Elektronik. Send lights. I mean, it's a big percent of our electricity. Bill Heating is the number one consumer of energy and the vast majority of homes. But you know, close third after large appliances eyes is Tak alright? Yeah. 100 dealers or more per year for most homes. Kevin Bracelet is the executive editor. It consumers checkbook. I'm glad we talked. I look forward to doing again. It's a It's a great side. It's a great resource. Thanks so much. Thanks. Very me on you. Bet you're listening to Chicago's afternoon news here on 7 20..

Kevin Bracelet Bill Heating Chandler Channel Elektronik Chicago executive editor
"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mean Tune in for that story tomorrow on Morning Edition. You continue no 93.9 FM or a and a 20 Or ask your smart speaker to play double U. N. Y C. Tonight. Rain and sleet. Likely It's gonna be more rain than sleep throughout the night. Cloudy skies this evening Love about 35 degrees. It's w when my C at 4 20 Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Procter and Gamble, maker of Zeke Will Night Pain, a nighttime pain reliever designed to help people fall asleep fast. It contains diphenhydramine and acetaminophen. More zzz quill dot com and see three c three dot ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot ai It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang, a giant of American journalism, has announced that he is retiring. Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron says he is stepping down after more than eight years, leading the newspaper. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us now to talk about his career. Hey, David Hale, Sir. Hey. So you have called Marty Baron, the best newspaper editor of the past 20 years. What did you mean by that? Look Baron 66 years old. He's had a tremendous career. He's not the life of every party like one of his predecessors, Ben Bradlee, right, but he exudes a quiet and intense integrity and charisma of his own. I want to play a clip for listeners. This is from him talking 2014 to our former friend and colleague or former.

Marty Baron NPR Ben Bradlee Ari Shapiro Morning Edition David Hale David Folkenflik diphenhydramine Washington Post executive editor Elsa Chang Procter editor Gamble
"executive editor" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WTOP

"News on w T o P CBS News Special Report. President Biden is right now signing a serious of executive actions aimed at dealing with racial inequalities. Now's the time to act. Time, Jack because that's what the faith and morality calls to do. Mr. Biden's actions focus on such issues as nondiscrimination policy, prison reform and public housing across nearly every faith, the same principles hole. We're all God's Children. We should treat each other as we would like to be treated ourselves. This is time to act to this. Timeto acted because it's what the core values of this nation calls to do. The president says. Criminal justice reform is not enough, he says. Every Frederick every federal agency will be involved in advancing racial equality. One of his actions which he is signing right now, or is just completed signing will ultimately and the use of private prisons for federal inmates again. President Biden focusing today on dealing with racial inequalities, CBS News Special Report. I'm Steve Futterman, and we'll have more reaction and Analysis all through the afternoon here on Double D t o P. 2 22. Some big news and local journalism. Marty Baron is leaving his post as executive editor of The Washington Post. Baron has been at the helm of the post for eight years and arguably transformed the paper into an even greater power house when he came aboard as executive editor. Staff was about 580 strong. Now it's more than 1000 under his leadership, the post 1 10 Pulitzer Prizes and now has some three million digital subscribers. A million of them signed up just this past year. Baron is sharing the news about US retirement in a morning email to staff he plans to leave at the end of next month. In other news a bill to end the death penalty moves forward in Virginia and lawmakers didn't focus on ethical reasons They focused on money to eliminate the death penalty in Virginia would cost the state $77,000 to feed and house to death row inmates for the rest of their lives, says state Senator Scott Serval, who introduced the bill. But it would save a lot more money that's being spent for the capital defender Service, which represents defendants and possible death penalty case. State currently spends $3.9 million a year for I think 29 employees. The bill passed the committee on its fiscal merits, but debate still to come on the idea of eliminating the ultimate sentence in Virginia's court system. The log in stained Wtl Pinos, Arlington County is getting more than $2 million from FEMA.

President Biden Marty Baron Timeto CBS president Virginia The Washington Post executive editor executive Wtl Pinos Steve Futterman capital defender Service Senator Scott Serval Jack Pulitzer Arlington County US FEMA
"executive editor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Bark ish executive Editor proper. Paul Weekly will hop aboard top of next hour And then Sigmund Bloom from football guys dot com will also kill. I meet a little later. But right now I need you to give me your insights to the game Hit me up but a 55 to 1 to 4 to 27 You know, you can always tweet the show at Jodie Mack Man J O D Y M A C m A. N. Erin in Vegas Up on CBS portrayed Yo Yo, Aaron. What a mag man! How you behave, man. I mean, I love it, man. I'm right here. Man is licking my chest waiting for this action, man. It's match up, man. And when I look at my breakdown, I got this thing I called the all sense of smoothness tests. You know, I look at all for these teams who operates the smoothness because I love offense. When I look at a rate these teams, that's a case he was cheated coming out of it with that little a little bill coming out the back field Next. I got Green Bay with that. Adam's combination very smooth. Only got a running back coming out The bills get in a little trouble. I love digs, and they come in nation, but no running back, Will you That's really jumps out at me. But you got Brady with Evans. They got the running back game, but this think about it when the guy get open. Who doesn't miss. Who is the one is likely that the over Thorne you know who's the guys who don't drop the ball? She is a little bit bigger than this to QB. And one thing about staff. But out in the Lions, please come to my cowboys. I could use him down there, but I believe the break. I think the boys down that new England gonna find a way to get him What you think about all of that. So I'm going with Green Bay and I'm going with Kansas City and that I'm looking at that got this. In the whole thing. I'll get back to me in two weeks when those two teams match up and tell me that you still like the Packers because they're smoother on Yes, I would agree. You picked the two smoother of the four offenses. In this game. If that's what you're deciding on, you've got the right side. Matthew Stafford. Here. Here's what I wanted to say about Matthew Stafford on it might take me a couple minutes. I got get to an update, so I'll try and go quick here. The fact that he's officially on the market right now should surprise No. One. Um Detroit, swapping out head coaches. You look at their roster. It's been years since they were in the playoffs. They've gotten down to Matthew Stafford Road Despite him putting up Cordy numbers on a year in year out basis. It just has an elevated the franchise. It's about time they part ways so it makes a ton of sense. Again. Why does it need to be decided right now? There's only one party that gets hurt when this happens when a team and a player both agree it's time for them to move in separate directions, but one of the two sides decide Let it leak out to the press. The team is trading. The player gets hurt because all other teams are now going to say, Well, they opened up the door. I can't go back there, so they have to give up. They have to take the best offer that we put on table. Now you can build up some leverage pitting one team against the other. But even when you do that, you're only going to be able to raise the bar so high and it will not be as high as it could have been if you had been able to keep it under wraps. So the Lions had any hand on letting this leak out. Shame on them. You've got to be able to keep it under wraps. Now That's me whistling in the wind because these guys have covered the NFL these days. Are just so good at getting information. The information, guys, the Glazers the chapters of the world, They're just phenomenal at being able to work contacts and get info. No, like Maybe gotten a little too old school with this and I'm being unrealistic that teams could actually have conversations and it wouldn't leak out. But it doesn't surprise me that Matthew Stafford is now officially on the market, and it's been acknowledged by both Matthew Stafford and the Lions. Shame on both their houses. I hope that he land somewhere and he's happy where he goes. I hope Detroit does Okay in the trade and gets reputable. Compensation for him, But it's not. It's a good thing for NFL fans because you'd rather be well well warned and forewarned and not warrant. But if you want your team to do the best deal that you can your Lions fan tonight, breaking of the news that Matthew Stafford will be somewhere else other than Detroit Doesn't help you going forward Mark my work 855 to 1 to 4 to 27 Jodie Mack. I'm going to run the phones rested. It's ours soon as I get back into the latest CBS Sports Update Well, Mike, we can See.

Matthew Stafford Lions Jodie Mack Man J O Detroit CBS Green Bay Sigmund Bloom executive Editor Evans NFL Paul Weekly Adam football Packers A. N. Erin Jodie Mack Aaron Thorne Vegas England
"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Whether you know they will be tackled by You know, big policy makers like Emmanuel Macron, like Angela Merkel and well, obviously remains to be seen. I'm Simon. What about the whole idea of building back? Better building back greener, which alone we have been talking about this surely will be the forum to talk about that. The idea that the world the other side of the pandemic can be very different, not only inequality terms but also in terms of sustainability and directing in in that way. Come through the other thing. This is something that pandemics is also said the lights on perhaps more brightly than the feeling that the pandemic told that story of The need to focus on things like climate and environmental change again. The form would argue that lesson in the forefront of this stuff in there, but it's certainly last year was Fought well the pandemic George folks, National China, but there have been quite long globally. Last year, they painted the West meeting. Dallas is very much green. The first attempt makes green issues kind of slug through the agenda and sterile against right through that this year. Thank you so much for being with us as we look ahead to the world Economic forums Doubles event not at travels this year, but virtually online are thanks to Bloomberg's reporter in Switzerland. Catherine Bosley and our executive editor for economics, Simon Kennedy. For joining us, Thanks so much. I'm counting help get here in London and I'm Roger hearing and you can catch is every weekday morning for Bloomberg. Daybreak Europe beginning at 6 A.m. in London. One. I am almost re jump. Thanks, Caroline and Roger and just a hint of Bloomberg. Daybreak weekend, South Korea on the way up or on the way down..

Bloomberg Simon Kennedy Emmanuel Macron Angela Merkel Catherine Bosley Roger London South Korea National China Europe Dallas Switzerland Caroline executive editor reporter
"executive editor" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Might think. Here's how from Katy Hill, executive editor at Milly. Did he tell us about this study, So they looked at $100.250 dollars, And they found that people who were not able to keep savings balance above $100 were 95% more likely to have their utility shut off an 83% more likely to have to use high club cost borrowing like payday loans upon stop and in both of those cases, right those expenses and spiral So your utilities get shut off, and sometimes you have to pay to get them back on. He used high cost borrowing and it just send you into this huge spiral. Of a cost that you never really get out of. And that's just $100.0 100. A little over $100 really could change. People you know lives basically so it saying, basically if it comes down to it And you need the 100 bucks to keep you know the power on in your house with the electricity or the heat, like during the winter that can do it. Right, because even if your utility bills 250 if you pay something like you might be able to release keep the lights on a little bit longer, right? Like it's these little amounts that can read you but not have to take a payday loan to pay some, like $25 expensive. It's getting at you, right? I So and again, I mean more and better, but even $100 to make a difference. All right. How about getting upwards to that 250 bucks that opens new doors, I presume. Sure, guys, so people who were not able to keep their balance about $250 in their savings account. They were 71% more likely to have had to move in the past five years for financial reasons, but moved out of their apartment. 250 bucks, right? That doesn't That's not that much. But again if they weren't able to do that, they were way more likely to have had to move on. But again that you is expensive, right like when you're moving. You got to get all your stuff and and you might find a new beef with the new deposit like again. These these cost when you don't have this little amount of money kind of spiral, speaking with Katy Hill, executive editor at Millie, they've got a story writing entitled Here's Exactly I was saving just over $100 can transform your life as you point out in the story, like it doesn't have to be that difficult to get there. Yeah. I mean, start with a goal of 20 bucks, right? That's something that most of us can do. And maybe you don't even have a job right now. You're just living on unemployment. See if you could do something on task, Rabbit or whatever, you know, drive the uber of whatever you gotta do. But even just starting with I'm gonna save $20 this week, Right?.

executive editor Katy Hill Milly Millie
"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is fresh air, and if you're just joining us my guest is Maria Ressa, The executive editor and CEO of Rap Lor and online Media organization in the Philippines investigating the authoritarian President Rodrigo deter today and his government. Publication is trying to fight against the massive spread of disinformation by publishing the fax. She and the publication have been under attack by the government, a documentary about her and her work will be shown Friday night on PBS stations as part of the front line, Syriza's Part of your arrest is filmed for the documentary That's about to be shown Friday on on front line. And You speak to the press? After you're arrested and you are so cool and so calm. And you thought it was so kind of organized when you make those comments, and I was watching it thinking, how does she do that? How does she remain calm at a time like this and just, you know. Say what she needs to say. I was so angry. You know, and I watched that when I watched the film, it was like getting punched in the gut. Because when you live through it, it's like it happens in slow motion and you take it and you move on. You know, I live my life step by step. I know which direction I need to go in. Um, that particular one I was detained overnight. They're several of these now. I don't know which one that which one It was, but in each one I know that I need to tamp down the anger. It's kind of like doing a live shot, right? This is a good thing that I guess I took from the From 20 years with CNN and doing live shots, all hell could be breaking loose around you and you have to take What you know, Push your emotion down and have clarity of thought. And like a live shot. I pegged. What are the three main things that I want to say? And that's that's how I speak. Um, the worse it is the calmer I get. That is so interesting that your CNN experience doing live reporting helped you that make it makes a lot of sense. Um Unrelated note. Do you think that the cameras the cameras from the documentary about you the other cameras from the press? Do you think that they protect you in any way or do they make things worse? Because the cause more attention? Yeah. No, they protect You know what the beginning If you come under attack, you think that you know, just be quiet. At least that's the impact in the Philippines of president to tear down. That's what I saw happen with a BSC bien. You try to just do your jobs, But that's not the way it works. And to me. It all came to a head in December 2018 1 time. Made me one of the covers. For the person of the year. And, you know, I didn't know that that was gonna happen. So the first time I saw it was a tweet. And when it came out, I was like, Oh, my gosh. The first thing I did was, I thought it was It was false, So I sent it our social media team to verify But when I got the call I thought, my gosh, now I'm really gonna be targeted. I already was targeted and what I didn't realize And what I embraced later on is that that was a shield. And that's the same thing with the documentary film with Yeah, There's Shouldn't post I think they're new Banner says it right Democracy dies in darkness. Staying quiet. And Constitution is being violated when your rights are being violated. That doesn't help anyone. And I guess that's that's the lesson. I've learned that whatever it is, call it. Shine the light because if you don't, it's gonna happen over and over again. So There's a scene in which you're preparing for the award ceremony for the Time magazine. 100. What is it most important people time? 100? Yeah. Time. 100. Yeah. So you're gonna be honored at that? Because you want to you? One of the 100, you're visiting family. While you're there in the U. S. And your sister is holding up this like slinky black gown and says, This is what you need to wear. And you look at it kind of in horror say I don't dress like that. And she said, And you say it's the gown is too long, and your sister says no, you lift it up. It's supposed to be that way You lifted up when you walk. Then she holds up a pair of silver high heels. And you just kind of recoil. Yes, I don't wear heels. I can't walk in heels and you say I never dress like this, And I can't dress like this. Usually you're wearing either a hoody or a blazer and pants s O. I just found it very entertaining. I guess for me. It's like it's comfort, right? I want to be comfortable and I think you can look and you're so comfortable Literacy. Exactly. Yeah. So, yeah, but my sister and I am. Yeah, it's funny. It's funny that that's in the film cod, but it says something about you as a person. You know, you're gonna You're going to be comfortable and stand up for your right toe. Where what you wanna wear, in addition to stand into standing up against new territory, do you know because it's hard award ceremony is a really hard when you don't conform. And you're close to what a woman is supposed to wear it an awards ceremony. You could buy a man's tuxedo or it's just the choices are limited. And you have tol, I think, make peace with the fact that you'll be considered the most under dressed woman in the room. I think I have that down now, like, I guess, um No, I am who I am. And I I'm old. I know who I am. And I Don't really change that. I know my values. I know my comfort zones actually say these things so The way I am. That's the way I dress and I Don't apologize for it at all. In fact, I'm very proud of it. Yeah. Like standing up for a woman's right not to wear heels. Oh, my God. Never have. I've done so many of those things right and imagine, I think the very first time I had to do a promo photo for CNN. They wanted things that just When you're on air..

CNN Philippines Time magazine Maria Ressa Syriza President Rodrigo Rap Lor executive editor Banner president CEO
"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. My guest is Maria Ressa, the executive editor and CEO of Rap Lor, an online media organization based in Manila. The president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, has threatened to shut it down and his Warren journalists they're not safe from assassination. The frontline. Syria's will show a documentary about wrestle called 1000 cuts this Friday night on PBS stations. One of the things that you and your publication have been investigating is where is all the disinformation? Where are all the false narratives coming from? How did you first realize? That there was an organized online campaign to attack rappel er, and that much of the social media was being sent by fake accounts. My gosh. So we live on social media, you know, before the website of rapper was created and 2012, we actually started the this On Facebook. We started as a Facebook page. And if Facebook search had been better, maybe we wouldn't have created the website, so we're very aware and attuned to the changes in Social media on Facebook, Facebook 100% of Filipinos on the Internet are on Facebook. So Facebook is our Internet. In 2016. Soon after detector was elected, we began to sense that the there were active campaigns T shut down to criticize anyone questioning the drug war. And that happened on our pages. And so we We were starting to think about it. And I was like, how do we do this? How do we tell this story and we started gathering data. So we wait did a three part series. It's called weaponization of the Internet and two of the three part series I had written the second part of that series. The title was how Facebook algorithms impact democracy. As soon as we ran that story, I got clobbered. 99 0 hate messages per hour. That was when I knew something was wrong. Look, I knew that when we exposed this, we started calling it the propaganda machine. When we exposed it, I expected we would get attacked. But I didn't know that this weapon existed. You don't know until you become the target 90 hate messages per hour. How do you respond to that? You can't even I'm at the beginning. I was trying to answer everyone, Then you realize they don't want an answer for me. They just want a pound you to silence and that's what it's done to many Filipinos. That's how you silence a narrative, but the second part of that is That's also how you create a new narrative. So you silence the narrative you don't like and then you seen the narrative that you want. So what were some of the narrative seated and this is something I've lived through. I've seen this In 2016 they seeded journalist equals criminal. So 2016 that comes up exponentially. You say it a million times it becomes a fact. You lie a million times it becomes real. So you can't respond to 90 hate postings on dour But really a lot of those postings were from fake accounts. They weren't even really people, right? We didn't know it then, and that's something that we discovered, right. But you found out you found out that this was artificially generated. Yes, And you know if you go and the first, the first hint I had was actually by looking over Facebook's disclosures. So in in the U. S disclosure, they actually said The Philippines in a footnote that the Philippines had the higher than average number of fake accounts, false accounts. So that's that was one and then I realized as we began to do network analysis of the data base that we were building We were able to then find the networks that were spreading the lies and not just spreading one lie right? These air ris it ofhis network. So I began thinking about them like terrorist networks, and you can chart And you'd cover terrorism. So you know what you're talking about? Exactly right. So, so it was really like we use natural language processing toe. Look at the clusters of What messages these networks were spreading and then looked at the networks and how they evolved. And in the time period in the last four years, we've seen at least six different waves. And most recently, the take down a Facebook on September 22 were to influence operations one out of China, the other out of the Philippines that they're linked to the police and military here. Both of these networks attacked me and rapper But, you know, we're minor were small fish. The Chinese network that that was taken down had created fake accounts using Artificial intelligence photos for the U. S elections. Small number of accounts that had done that, so when that was taken down, we discovered everything that those that influenced network was doing. It wasn't just attacking the Philippines. It was also seeding a campaign for president to tear this daughter. For president in our 2022 elections. This is how far ahead they plan and then that second net influence operation I was taken down by Facebook. We expose that network. We mapped it. We showed how that network was attacking civil rights activist human rights activists and journalists. And the film You say people often ask you people who are not Filipino. Ask you. Why should I care about theater today? And what happens in the Philippines? What's your answer to that? I've been saying this for four years and I now know what Cassandra and And CeCe office feel like combined we were. You could say we were the canary in the coal mine or you, you could go with what Cambridge Analytica whistle blower Chris Wiley said. Philippines was the Petri dish for Cambridge Analytica. And this is where they tested tactics of mass manipulation. If it worked. They then and the word he used. This supported it over to the rest of the world. But for me it's interesting because we are a former colony of the United States Protectorate. We also speak English. This is a country where a lot of the tactics digital tactics are tested. You know Yahoo, For example, in the early days, if you were rolling something out in the West, you tested it in English speaking countries like the Philippines, So it's not a surprise. You mentioned Cambridge Analytica. This is voting profile company that harvested social media profiles and use them to target people susceptible to disinformation. And then sent them false narratives. Steve Bannon was involved with the company and Chris Wiley, who you refer to us was the whistle blower. So, yeah, he says the Philippines was one of the testing grounds before trying it out in the U. S. Um Let me take a short break here and then we can talk tomorrow. If you're just joining us. My guest is Maria Ressa, The executive editor and CEO of Rap Lor, an online media organization in the Philippines investigating the authoritarian President Rodrigo deter today and his government. Publication is trying to fight against the massive spread of disinformation by publishing the fax she and the publication have been under attack by the government. A documentary about her will be shown Friday night on PBS stations as part of the front lines serious We'll be right back after a short break..

Facebook The Philippines Maria Ressa president Rap Lor Rodrigo Duterte Cambridge Analytica Chris Wiley executive editor CEO Syria Manila Yahoo President Rodrigo Steve Bannon United States Protectorate
"executive editor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"executive editor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"They want to roll right over America, and that's it. That's the revolution, and it seems to me we can have one kind of revolution Another and we don't know what he's gonna be yet. What's your perspective on this sort of the precedent setting arguments going in opposite directions? Tom Cotton, arguing that it's a dangerous precedent to lodge these objections, as has been proposed telegraphed by Cruz and others. And Cruz and a zoo. You heard Ron Johnson saying that well, but we're basing our precedent. What was done in 18 76 and oh, by the way, it is worth noting that in both 2004 with respect to the outcome in Ohio in 2016, there were Members, Democrat members of Congress who lodged objections to the results as well, So there's there's no constitutional crisis or precedent that we're creating here. No, there certainly is not, and I think it's important to do it. So the idea that it is disruptive yesterday that extent certainly confidence correct, but When you have an election like this disruptive election, I guess I should be investigated. I think he's wrong. I think that this needs to be at and it needs to be edge. So that so that those Americans who can be satisfied by what happens in Congress by what will happen in Congress can be satisfied. I don't like anybody. I don't think everybody is ever gonna be satisfied, but it might be that Lodging the objections and discussing him openly and looking at them and intelligently by both parties. A lot of those people who don't take the election to stand now can come to believe it is a sweeping out the rug. I did. My guess is that you'll have more people who think the elections unfair. Daniel Oliver, former general counsel that part of education, chairman of the FTC, executive editor for National Review, and now chairman of the Education and Research Institute, Daniel.

Congress Ron Johnson Cruz Daniel Oliver chairman Tom Cotton America Ohio Education and Research Institu National Review executive editor FTC general counsel