18 Burst results for "Executive Creative Director"

"executive creative director" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"It takes a certain kind of weird person to want to do that. And so sometimes credit people don't really want that and i can honestly say that a lot of people i work with are absolutely more talented than i was and trying to find ways to support them and make them feel seen. It's i mean it was a constant always on your radar. Every needing i walked into it was constantly. Like how do i in this particular situation give feedback but make this person feel seen and understand that i think during credible in doing great work. It's constant it's like having a child so you ended up becoming president at j. crew and also executive creative director which a creative role by it's also a business role and you're known for actually helping turnaround j. crew of the past and turning it into a multi billion dollar business..

multi billion dollar j. crew
"executive creative director" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Lie worldwide. Sports byline usa. And here's host ron bucks and good to have you with us for this edition of sports byline. Usa we're gonna be talking a little hockey and also we're gonna talk about the marketing of athletes. I find that a fascinating subject. And i think you will do this hour. I'll tell you more about our guests that'll be joining us in just a moment but as you know you've heard me say many times on this program about being on the american forces network the some five hundred stations in one hundred and seventy seven countries around the world and if you've listened to us for any period of time you've probably heard our broadcasts when forces were in iraq that we broadcast there with the troops and of course in afghanistan as well and from a hospital in germany landstuhl and also even downing one tomoe and it's just been a privilege and an honor to be with them. They've been with me for more than twenty five years the afl network. And i when i think about them i do that all the time but particularly during the holidays because i about people being away from their families and i've said this before but i think it bears repeating that. Some people take things for granted. But i've never seen that to be the case. On any of our deployments to broadcast our shows in iraq afghanistan on amo- or in lan stool. And i've never heard a soldier complain and i think that that's amazing. And i asked a general one morning at breakfast. Why that is. He says because they know what they signed up for. So i just want to send my very best out to our servicemen and servicewomen and thank them for what they do for our country and I have really the best thing. I've got my broadcasting career. I said this. The other day in an interview was take those trips to iraq afghanistan and elsewhere and i'll continue to do it as long as they need me and then i also love letting the soldiers co host each hour and be able to talk the big name athletes. That are either with us or join us by phone. We're going to be talking with bret hedican in just a second. He played seventeen years in the national hockey league with saint louis. Vancouver florida carolina in anaheim. He won a stanley cup championship with the hurricane and he was a two time. Us olympia and and he was a product of saint cloud state university and he played on the nineteen ninety two us olympic team. And also. bob dorf is going to be here. A sports marketing expert and executive creative director of baker street advertising in san francisco. He analyzes athletes marketing potential. You're really gonna find this insightful. Because it's going to help you understand. Why some athletes are more popular and others. We're ready to crank it up good to have you with us here on sports byline this holiday season. The home depot invites you to cozy up by the fire and do some grilling with top rated grills from traeger next row and master lined up shined up ready for holiday cooking lots of weekends to come and don't forget bags of kingsford charcoal. And if you're not big enough order online and get free delivery. Top-rated grills kingsford charcoal and free delivery online orders. Holiday shopping improved only at the home depot. How doers get more done us. Only hey. i'm andy. If you don't know me it's probably because i'm not famous but i did start a men's grooming company called harry's the idea for harry's came out of a frustrating experience. I had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over. Designed out of touch. At harry's our approach is simple. here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars. 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You visit bright side tax relief dot com or call eight hundred seven three zero forty three thirteen. That's eight hundred. Seven three zero forty three. The consultation is free. Go to bright side of dot com. Now as shell we know from the time you get up to the time you wrap up. There's a lot of meet. Ups eat ups and hurry up st- so come to shell and get three things don at once. Fill up with shell v power nitro plus to help. Keep your engine running like new. Save up with the fuel rewards program and never pay full price for gas again and snack up with instant rewards to save. Even more at the pulp make the most of the stop. You need to make shell engines that continuously you shall be natural plus premium gasoline full terms and conditions if the spread of covid nineteen is still unchecked across the nation. And you need to keep your family safe. Make a new habit and check your temperature twice a day once before dinner and before leaving home in the morning. You can't afford to take chances so use the extra ten temporal scanner. Its accuracy is backed by more than eighty clinical studies at. It takes an accurate reading in seconds. It's the only home thermometer used and recommended by hospitals doctors and nurses quick and easy to use. You can count on exigent to keep your family safe twenty four hours a day. This is america's sports talk. Show sports byline. Usa here's rondo bret. Hedican joins us on sports byline. He played seventeen years of the national hockey league with saint louis vancouver florida carolina and also anaheim and he want stanley cup championship with the hurricane and he was a two time u s olympian brett. Are you surprised you play as long as you did in the national hockey league. I think anybody that plays Beyond the three to five years. I think is is a long time. I mean I think when you get by that moment then you can kinda stretch it out into the ten twelve but then even after that you know to get another few years i think it's just You know i. I just always took the game seriously. I always trained seriously. And i knew i had an opportunity and and i wanted to make the most of it and i wasn't going to let it go so to play as long as i did a. Yeah it's a surprise but you know obviously very fortunate as well. You know one of the things. I've always found with athletes that are able to play double digit years. In professional. Sports is one word that applies and tell me if it applies to you and your ability to play seventeen years adaptability. Am i correct observation. I think adaptability. I think always continually trying to learn. I think when as soon as you think you know it all the time he should get out of the game. Try do something else because I think that was always trying to get better every year. I knew my game always needed to have things i could work on. And if you always are thinking that way every summer you're trying to accomplish something to get better and then every season with every game and every stretch of games you're focusing focusing on those little things that are working towards getting better on the skills you need to work on and i think adaptability is definitely something but also you know continually trying to learn also read. I would think that that's probably a necessity for somebody who is not an alex. Ovechkin the likes of those type of people that you really do have to invent yourself and get yourself.

iraq harry afghanistan national hockey league bret hedican anaheim florida carolina ron bucks hockey afl irs Sports Us saint cloud state university Vancouver tomoe
"executive creative director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Will be chosen from a group of women. But Trump double checked with supporters at a Pittsburgh campaign rally. What anybody prefer that I pick a man? After months of blasting Mitt Romney for voting in favor of impeachment. Trump praised the Utah senator. Now I'm happy. Thank you men for announcing that he's among those who support confirming a new justice to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the November election. Jackie Quinn Washington Since the start of the pandemic, Nevada has relied heavily on molecular tests to gauge the spread of the Corona virus. Now is the federal government employs 150 million of what are called Auntie Gin tests. The state is weighing how the best report data from different kinds of testing. That is one of more than 20 states that don't report complete data on anti jen test to the public decisions over how to interpret the faster but less reliable tests could affect decisions about the future of the state's pandemic directives. Looting, business closures, capacity limits on public places and the face covering mandate. He'll be cva and are now our partners have rolled out a new series of ads targeting people living within driving distance of Las Vegas really right now going after our fans and markets. There's any place that you could get here in about four hours, five hours. That's Arnie George, the executive creative director at R and R. One ad. Keep your mask up. Let your hair down reminds visitors Las Vegas is following safety guidelines to prevent the spread of Kobe 19 all reminding him it is still the place to come to have fun. Another spot when you're up for it, you know where to find us. Reminds visitors Las Vegas is ready and waiting for them.

Mitt Romney Las Vegas Trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg Jackie Quinn Washington Kobe Pittsburgh Arnie George senator executive creative director Utah Nevada
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"You know a bit that I like to like to really teach. The young traders is. Don't be afraid to raise your hand and ask your friends your peers like it's fine. If your stock and you're honest, duck on an idea, raise your hand. Say I got this man I. Don't know what's going on. Can you help me can? You can give me some thinking around it if you're a writer and and you're not, you know you you. You can't get past a certain scene, or or if you're a comedian, your jokes aren't landing whatever the case may be. Don't be afraid to rely on your community around you. You're not alone in this. This isn't a senior thing creativity. Creativity thrives on multiple people. Having creative conversations I'm telling you the biggest fears. A creative has always been when you walk into a boardroom, and there's forty five people there and you it and they go. Oh, my God. Thank God the Creator guys here and I look around these forty five people say eight hundred. You've got a good idea. Wow, that's scary, right That's not true because they all have good ideas in it takes a village. Creativity takes those. Don't get stuck and don't look so hard and and feel like you're failing at something. Be Open to ask him for advice and help. I've never met a creative person that that isn't willing to offer help. Or willing to tell you some of their story, their trials and tribulations that they've gone through. You never know what you're GONNA get. Your answers coming in the most unexpected places for sure. Awesome I love it. Okay. Let us shift gears to talk about La. Now, I. I talked to a lot of ad agencies and marketing people in my life, and this is you guys have the best tenants on your website or best core values any that that like resonated with me, personally as like a human so. I'm going to go through them real quickly, and then we can talk about what makes La Awesome. Awesome all right so I one besides I one at the top of the site was discovered hiding in the chaos than nobody's going invites you to be great but Then you have one called new mines, which new mind which is we shakeup things in perpetuity rest. When we rest on Sumptious, we skip over opportunity to discover something new. New Than Humble Disruption nobody wants to listen to somebody flipping the bird question everything with quiet force like the eye of a hurricane and then bottomless optimism, which got us some optimism. Now everybody can be better. We just have to try without hesitation the spirit of one when we act like we're connected, we become more connected. We are in this. This with each other, and with our clients, we are bigger together and then we are part madness, part method, and I would like you to talk about what makes Ayla awesome and you can add though you can you can. You can remix or talk about those brand values, but It's one of the best ones that I've seen. So. I wanted to highlight it yourself wonderful. Thank you for giving me the opportunity and I'm it. Yes, this is about UCLA. it is, it is about the agency for sure, but I'M GONNA rise above that and say what you just witnessed, and all your listeners need to understand is it's not about the agency. Forget Yele exist for a minute. And this goes back to when I said we're stopped trying to create an ad agency and started create a brand that stood for something in the world. So what you're seeing, there is the the the the sort of culmination of Andrei, Philip, and and Carlos, coming together and our ideals, and you know how we come about projects, and how our process works, and how he thinks, and I think it's you know people look at us, and you guys are crazy. It's like your processes insane. It's not normal and you know going back to the last question. Sometimes I'd heard sometimes you go am I really that different is. My doing something wrong, and then rather than trying to counter that Liam braced it and we sit, but how can we articulate? What is really going on in our heads, so it's not disruption for disruption. Sake right? Nobody wants that you have to. You have to have great purpose behind everything you do, and so with that stemmed from. Was this notion that What drives type of people that work here. What drives the clients that we WANNA work with what drives our work? in what drives us to get up every single day and coming at his office, so when you think about new minds, and what that means and humble disruption is you know those two things kind of culminate in in a way of we always want to look at things in new, light, we are never going to set in. Just justify why we're right. That's that's an easy thing to do. Everybody can stand in front of me and tell me why they're. Thing is right that the harder thing. Thing to do is to really take a step back and look at it objectively, and I try to not fire the same type of trade of thinker I want diversity in all aspects. I want people from very diverse backgrounds, very diverse creative backgrounds, so we have key artists that come from the entertainment world. We have writers that come from you know writing books and editorial I think we have you know traditional art directors and package designers. We bring all these different perspectives because we're looking for a new way of thinking of things, my way isn't the way our way will be will will will really start to Use, that conglomerate of trade of brain power to bring new ways of thinking and humble disruption is very simple. You know nobody wants to be tackled when they're jogging in the park. That's disruption. Disruption for its own sake is is is is not good. Nobody on the face of the planet wants to disrupt their Their thing right and I am reminded of one of my mentors Luke Sullivan. A writer. That grew up in advertising he teaches at. Savannah College of the Arts and all that and he wrote a book called whipple squeeze this in the beginning of the Ford of the book starts to talk about how as a child? He hated commercials because they disrupted his his cartoons right and nobody wants that everybody wants to have a purpose to that disruption so getting some hesitation with what disruption means, we have to be humble as creatives and creators and as brands. What gives us the right to disrupt whatever you're doing at that moment I like to say back in. In the day the discretionary dollar was the most valuable things that we got. You know we had to think about how we got you to part with your your dollar bill. Was it buying a lottery ticket, a candy bar or a magazine? Well, those days are gone. Maybe they're gonNA. Come back after everything we went through now, but what became more and more valuable, was time and attention. Our time and attention is a very very valuable, and we have to respect that. Be Humble about how we're disrupting your day. the question everything really comes from you know the entertainment world, and really looking at range and working with Andrea Relief taught me to look at something and go, but we do that, but why did we do that? And sometimes it gets? It can great on you as a creative person to have to do that on because you typically don't do that, but we like to say to people we question everything. Don't take it personally. That's the second part to that right. You can't take it personally. If I'm asking a question, we want into every one of our clients and I would consider. Everybody in that room to be extremely smart got MBA's. You got us that have been doing this for. You know twenty plus years that we've all been around the block and Andrea and I and everybody in the agency love to throw up our go. I'll be the first one to ask the dumb question. I'm not afraid of that I want to ask the dumb question, so can get to the meek of thing, and that's that kind of comes from his. Don't be afraid to ask that. And then bottlenose optimism surely put is is exactly that you know it is very very easy to look at something pessimistically I hate the term. Let me play devil's advocate. All that really means is let me tell you why you're wrong or let me tell you why this is going to fail. That's not the way to look at something. We need to look at it and go no matter what unconditionally we have to be optimistic about. That we do and how we approach it, and then you mentioned one right off the bat. Is going to ask you to be great I think that is so important everyday as creatives week it up and if you're waiting for permission to do something great, it's never going to happen. Nobody is going to give you permission. However timeout I'm giving everybody permission right now. Go out and degrade I crown you kings of trade city, and and you know, and the purveyors of greatness..

writer Andrea Relief La Awesome La UCLA. Luke Sullivan Sumptious Ayla Liam Savannah College Andrei whipple Philip Carlos
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Trade people out there and a lot of people that have been doing this for a very long time. That have that approach, but I don't I. Never ever feel that way I still feel like a young creative a startup. If you will every day's Day one for me every day, I walk into a room every day I go, what can I learn from the person next to me across from me? Whatever good battering different I'm. Being observed always a student of my surroundings and listening. Because whom I you know kind of a pompous jerk to walk into a room and say it's this guy's or or nothing I never want to be that I always wanted to listen and understand and help the room. Really come up with creative solutions and uncover those things that they might not be looking at. That's what drives me and I think as creatives. Or as entrepreneurs we need to be thinking about in the world were always out there, trying to improve upon the thing that's always there. You wouldn't start a business or make a product. You didn't think that you can do it better than the last guy period. That's all there is to, but don't close yourself off to the world to it and use that that's fodder for your greatness. Absolutely I want to I want to talk about La but one sort of sort of wrapping wrapping this all up in a nice bow. Question are freehill because. I talked to a lot of creative. I think that because they're stuck isn't resonating with people, or they're not making a lot of money or people aren't really responding to their work. like that makes them a failure that makes means that they're not a good artist and I am constantly telling them that. Like they just need to iterating more and find, try twenty different things, unlike maybe this project isn't a project, but maybe it's not a you at some point, it's not you problem. It's not like a your skill problem at say your marketing and audience problem so I'm wondering if you could sort of just wrap this all up in sort of talk about what you would tell that person who's like. Well, you know who is a good artists, 'cause there are people that are not good creatives yet, and not that they're not good. They just need more time 'cause they're young and they need to fail than like and like break things, and like learn kind of their voice, but for someone that doesn't have already sort of has their voice has their style. Is Making some money, but not a lot of money and is sort of bummed out, because like the things been trying have not been working What would you tell that person to sort of get them excited about going back and doing all the stuff we've talked about. Oh my gosh. I have so much to say to this 'cause. I encounter this every day I have Miteir career and from myself to to the the creatives that I. I brought up in this world that you know gone to to amazing banks, and some of them have dropped out of the business for sure it's. It's a very i. said before. The creativity is very emotional, so I have several things to say so. Let me start off with saying one of my professors I was going to school. told me he said If you WANNA, be a fine artist. Don't go into Advertising Gobi of plumber. And I laughed at that and I said why, because the purity of the thing that you have will be destroyed because it's all you. You're hundred percent vested into that fine art as your expression into the world. When you think about commercialism, you think about marketing. You think about what we do. a big portion of it is not us. A big portion of it is the market. Market the client that the the you know what people think about it. You have to deal with a lot of opinions and I think that was really sound advice. Right off the bat is you have to be able to look at it and and and take your ego out of it a little bit, and really think about you know, but what can I learn from? People are saying. So! That's number one I think we're just as creative people. We got it. We just have to do that. Another thing that's really helped me in Kinda shifting my thinking around when I have to do something and that it's Kinda like you. You brought this up earlier. About how do you get invested into something? Really not into it's a shift in one word right and the ideas you you. You have to go. Do something right gotta go do this right versus I get to so if you change I have to get to, and you really look at the responsibility. You have as creative to the world. There's a lot of shit out there a lot of crappy things. Things that we see in the world and a lot of people view marketing and advertising and creativity as crap. Because there's a lot of it out there, it's our responsibility to listen and look to the world and go, but let me put something that's valuable. That's beautiful. That's emotional whatever the case may be. We have a responsibility to that, so I think that the self awareness understanding where you fit kind of getting out of your own way. That's number one. You really have to come to grasp with that and then. secondarily to that point I think what is the point I made earlier about listening and understanding. We all just need a understand that nobody nails around one. It is very very rare to nil unwound one. We strive for that. We round one best around obviously all the time. We want to hit that that that's something that we try to do. But we. We kind of coined a phrase which we like to call perfection paralysis, and I think that's a little bit about what you're talking about is. Everybody wants to be perfect. Everybody wants to have that perfect result from whatever it is, and when they don't get it. They get dejected and they start to go. Wow, you know. What's wrong with me? You know it's an inward sort of sort of thing and I go. That's okay feel that don't ignore it. Everybody needs to have that feeling, but don't let that bogging down. Don't let that be the thing that you go. Wow, I'm broken in some way, or I'm not good enough in some way I mean you know you gotta understand Tiger Woods didn't become tiger woods because he was great. Right off the bat he practiced. He did stop. He constantly is out there. Anybody in of that caliber is going to tell you gotta put the time in. You gotta be able to fail. You gotta be able to look at your. Thanks and building go, but how can I? How can I how can I and have that drive? And obviously there's two things as successful create as. Met My life and work as thinks that they have that I can't teach nobody teach it, and that is passionate care, either have it or you don't and the two go hand in hand so when you're passionate about something. He put Great Karen. Who Me have great something you find the passion for it and I think that's what we have to do with ourselves. As creatives is stand that the world is going to point proverbial gun at your idea, constantly everybody out there is it critics and everybody out? There will shoot your idea down. You never stop fighting. You never start stop looking at how you can improve. Improve it and I think creativity is all about that. Don't give fraction paralysis and don't try always you know rob there and go. Oh, this is it. This is the perfect thing. Look at it objectively and try to go. How can I improve on it? Every time you touch a project? It should get better if it gets worse. You learn any. Make it better, but you're always trying to improve the thing so I think those are some core values, just as a you know a creative human being so start to look at yourself that way, and then you know I think the last part of that which.

Tiger Woods Advertising Gobi La
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Getting irritated that we weren't making any money in December I would just turn into it and spend really a lot of time analyzing what was working and the minute that I stopped. That first year. I within days, maybe even within hours. I knew exactly like. Oh well, that's the problem like that's the thing there. It is like I've now identified it, and I identified all of these things that we can do to make the brand stronger going into the next year, and while that and that that's happened every year and pretty much while that that is a dead month where we don't make. Make any any money or very much money. It literally has is the thing that has had uphold that us into being able to light to to sustain this company, and keep it going and keep it growing, because we do stop and we do try and figure out how to make the brand resonate with the people who it's already resonating with, but on a deeper and more impactful level. Yeah that's great. I think you know on A. Large, scale, business model, or even just you know putting pen to paper creativity when he think about that, we, the Argos getting away sometimes in in when you're making anything and I would consider every entrepreneur out there and all of your listeners to be of a creative mindset, and it's hard because you pour your heart and soul into a thing right and. And you get really close to it, and for sure you should trust your gut, and you should trust instincts, and you should be true to yourself all of those things, but every once in a while, even during the ideation process to stop kit perspective. We've put everything up on a wall. It's old school, but it works in the reason we do that. Is To get perspective when you're looking at something on a computer strain, and you're kind of judging it it. It's sort of limited perspective and what I love about creativity something. I've taken with mine tire. Life is the notion of childlike wonder, right? You give a child a block and you ask them with block is and and they're gonNA go. In and running around on the ground, then they're gonna put it on its. You know access a little bit in and say it's a rocket ship and they're gonNA. Hold it in the air and say that it's an airplane. Then they're gonNA put it in some water and say it's a boat. Creative people need to remember that. You need to look at things from all angles Sanchez won and that's part of the Pasi if you will get perspective. put it up lookout an objectively. Look at it from a different angle. What am I not thinking about what am I not seeing so your example is is key 'cause sometimes, thank could be going and running and you can kind of take it for granted. But. It's maybe not performing at the. The metrics want or you're not getting the results you want when that happens. Something's wrong and I always say the same thing when I'm going into client relationship I'm presenting to them on on around three four five six suddenly I. GO timeout. If you more than three rounds of the thing, there's something wrong. You need to get a perspective on that and go. Okay. Let me look objectively and say what am I. Not Seeing Right now, because clearly were all smart. Smart people in the room, but we're not getting it right, so we're not seeing something and I think that's really is is don't be afraid to take a step pause and look at something objectively, but then there's another half to that, which is you have to be able to tasked with a lot of iterating quickly right? You can't just be doing so the biggest apple is like a people that do a couple of Kanzi here or only bring one. One product to market like once you have your your your your theory of the case and your product you have to actually out there doing it at enough speed and added at enough volume at enough pace, so that you can actually know if your ideas working quickly otherwise you might take a year or ten years to now because you just don't have enough inputs, so the other thing that I find is creative, or any entrepreneur is now like working. Working at such a slow pace once they actually put their idea, and and and if it's not working, it's hard to know that it's not working because they're just not enough inputs and not enough data. Tell you. Oh my Gosh, you know you've probably heard the term. Fail vast right on wits out there that that phrase means so much to me creatively in growing up in the creative space over the course of the last. You know Tony a years. You. Know I've drawn. I've grown to really hate traditional of focus groups in the reason. I hate traditional focus. Groups is because it's so skewed. The questions you how you ask the audience you're talking to. It's really difficult to get real world sort of responses and I've gotten very very very fond of of social testing, iterating and programmatic advertising, and and being able to. Put something out there in multiple iterations and learn very very quickly from what works and what doesn't work because we learn so much from what doesn't work probably more than what does work right once we start to look at what's not working that feeds stated feeds information. A good thing to bring up now that I want to talk about is the notion between theory and practice when we say the solid time data is nothing of theory, is nothing interior able to harness that and put it into practice so going on top what you just said. It's not just about having the data. It's about how you analyze that data and then spit it back out. Out quickly into the world to see is my hypothesis correct, and that iterating is is the second part as you said to this. Make sure you're doing it and don't be afraid to fail fast. You get so much from your quote. Unquote failures and I think everybody listening hopefully believes this. There's no such thing as failure in the way that we all have been brought up in the. The world think that failure means bad. No failure absolutely means good. It means that you're learning something and you're improving on the thing that you're making absolutely I remember every time we brought up to market until arc through his heart spout like the big one. We learned something new. We're like Oh, we got like a little bit higher and a little bit higher and a little bit higher. Higher. We had a book call Mazdas. Another scary shit that that did great on Kickstarter, but when we brought it to our table, it just didn't sell and we're like. Oh, how interesting we started iterating on that process until kind of kind of all came together in the same way that coban came together, but in a different way where we the Kebob the interior was the. But we just changed sort of the marketing behind it, but with the with the Anthology series we really brought it out and we were like. Oh, it got to eighty percent this time. Oh, now it's one hundred percent. Oh, now! It's like God's own sort of life of its own. Yeah. It's great, you know. The market doesn't lie right I mean it has no feelings. It's just out there, and it's going to tell you the truth every single time, and and being able to be opened that as great and you know as I mentioned before throughout my career. You know it's easy for me. you know as an executive trade walking room and say this is preached the Gospel. This is what it is guys. This is how we're going to do it and there's a lot of senior level trade..

Sanchez A. Large executive Kanzi Tony apple
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Yeah I love that because that happens even when you put out a product, so my I always talk about how like some of my books have had ten covers on them or like town. Yeah or we had a book called Jones Monster Hunter, which is like our most beloved book, but it wasn't until it's seven printing where it had. Maybe it's fifth or sixth cover that it really started to take off. This was five years four five years into my company that likable, maybe three years into my company two thousand seventeen, I, really started to take off, and it was doing middling numbers, and suddenly it was it was it was keeping pace with the bestselling books in our entire company This a this is a book that had been on our table for years and suddenly. Suddenly, it was just like shooting up and like becoming this like Juggernaut, and it's because I was able to like. Bring market test it test the messaging. See what people liked and didn't like about it and be able to really define what the brand was by like the fifth or sixth cover, so that the right people came by were like. Oh, now I, now they know exactly who now the right person is looking at the book, and being like I think I like that as opposed to the wrong person looking at that book, or the person will ripeness looking at that book and being like. Not completely turned on by it or not having to stop from it and so I do think it's part of iteration is really important where you can take something and keep working at it and working out in working at it, for years until it really starts to resonate, and then you see that it resonates and like. I mean this is where the gut feeling came in for me. It's like suddenly I just saw that people's reaction was the right reaction like I can't tell you what that right reaction was like what I was seeing suddenly that I wasn't seeing before, but I was seeing like their eyes light up, or I was seeing something about how the book responded to them how Wannabe press responded to them, and how all of this stuff was starting to finally work and then I then I was off to the races, but that took. The tilt. I started doing comedy doesn't intend that took until about two thousand seventeen before we could really scale. Yeah, that's. Completely right. I get it I get that journey and let me let me take way up in the air and bring up way back down and for your audience here like guys look listen. Don't be afraid of that it happens to all of us credit as part of the creative process. Let me bring. The notion of Netflix into the equation or streaming service for that matter, but Netflix's in general when they come to us, and we do some work for them. you think about their platform and it's it's really interesting, and you think Netflix's house of all kind of figured out and they do. They have an algorithm all those things, but they'll bring us a show on the documentary. Let's say Said's documentary and they'll give us. Maybe a title treatment, and they might give us some some key photographs or frames from you know the the first edit, but this is rarely ever completely. One hundred percent figured out. What they say to us every agency that they were for that matter they say all right now. Come back with thirty different ways to articulate that and the reason they do. That may pick a lot of that. Is They? Start to feed and I want everybody to start to notice this. When you're listening to you know not just listen podcast, but looking at Netflix Hulu or any of those what gets feds you on their system? So a comedy special you might get one piece of art one day. Pass right by and then the next day you get that sent comedy special. You get another piece of art, so they use their own platform their own media channel. If you will to test and see what they're of yours are responding to and what Russell you responsive might be very different than what I response you on. On the same exact show, so what you just said about your book, and the cover is pretty interesting, so even a net netflix's. That level goes through integration in iteration in originate doesn't have a crystal ball. They put stuff out there and they they let the market tell them of what they want. And you have to listen to it, and there's an old adage coming out of advertising. That, says something effect of you know the the consumers, not idiots. She's your wife and I love that statement. Because you know, it's one of those things of life. We're all consumers. We all watch things. We all buy stuff at the grocery store. We all go to restaurants and and take an entertainment right so. But what's different about us is our uniqueness. What makes us whole makes us human. It makes us who we are, and respond differently and I think that's what is a very difficult sometimes when you get so passionate about a product or project that it has to be a certain way, you have to be able to give that up a little bit. Give up a little yourself to that and say I'm okay. I WANNA listen. That's probably the biggest lesson I've ever learned in my twenty eight year. Career is sometimes just stopping and listening helps you create the next best thing. I think that's that's amazing advice. I take every December off. Maybe not this year since I pretty much full year off, but I started the first year of my company, we were going and going and going like on a treadmill and never getting never never getting anywhere that we wanted to go, but because I was running the whole time. It didn't have a chance to stop and. And think about what we were doing and so in December pretty much, all of our shows kickstarter and my own of rising dealership, and all of our businesses pretty much stopped buying so I figured instead of instead of getting irritated that we weren't making any money in December I would just turn into it and spend really a lot of time analyzing what was working and the minute that I stopped..

Netflix Jones Wannabe press Russell Hulu
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"That that is Do that's equally valid strategy till I. Maybe maybe it's not the most the thing that's going to the absolute most in the CA- through. World but I found a way and and a lot of successful craters, not just me, but find a way to be like. Hey, here's a world that like has my ideal person in it, and like here's what I can add to the conversation and might not make ten million dollars, but it's a way for me to definitely make like like making impact on my business it for the positive more so than I've ever had before and find new audiences and be able to like. Make it to the next level. Yeah, I completely agree with you and it Kinda that is. Exactly what I'm trying to articulate is trying to find the thing that you can love within it, and it's you said some really important things that when it comes to the creative process and one thing that can I pull out of that at wizard, totally inherent with being most creatives is creativity isn't necessarily a science. Right it's it's there's a lot of problem solving that comes along with it, and we always talk about this. We believe that creativity can solve any problem for sure clients come to us because they can't solve those crater problems. So as a traitor, you look at things from a different point of view you start to to to look at the problem. That's in front of you in in quite frankly I love the puzzle. I think Andrea the puzzle. Adhere to La. We'd love the puzzle pieces right. We love to look at it and go. That's a challenge I. Think Creative Challenges Pretty Challenging, stare at a blank piece of paper before you type the first word, or or draw the first line with your sharpie year staring at a problem you're. You're staring at a challenge in the and overcoming that challenge is. How can I find myself in it? How can I find something that I'm solving four and I? Think that's what you're just saying like I I'm solving for a problem that I've created to fall in love with the project I think that's that's absolutely marketing one. When you go out, you have to go. What am I solving four? What's the? What's the challenge in Kinda Fall in love with the challenge? I think that's another way to look at it. Absolutely, okay, so next step, so we've got a project now that we've really love that. We've found our audience. We know that it's a viable product and now the next step I hear from creators often is like well. That's great for big agencies, but like I don't have any money so like I. Don't know how to go out and build my brand or do this stopped. Stopped so. Let's not assume you have no money. Because like you need some money to do something right like you can't say zero duck. We're not gonNA. Say Zero dollars, but we'll say somebody who is bootstrapping themselves and and hasn't had their big hit yet, so they're not flush with cash, and they're not flushed with the money to be able to reinvest from a successful product. What are the things that you think that someone could do at the beginning, assuming they have very little, but not no. Money to invest and they are serious so. 'cause that now cuts away a lot of people. Right cuts whip. Let's say they have no money and people that like sharing staring plane. Someone is serious. They have a little bit of scratch and they're ready to like. Really make an impact. How do you take that? Didn't take someone who's got a a product that is viable and bring that out and keep getting their brand out there. Yeah, that's this is a great question. It's It's it's loaded with. You know a lot of response or so let me try to be as soon as I can and I want to back up a little bit on this question until a little bit of a story about your way quickly about brand, so it is my personal belief that a brand is the judge of brand sort of. Is this notion of not what you'd project out there, but it's what people think of you when you're not in the room. And? That's really important for everybody to understand. So you project all you want. You can be out there, but if you're if you're Nike a travelocity like our clients, Western digital or thermidor or coca. Cola or anything like that. We all know those brands because they spent hundreds of millions, billions of dollars on their brand to give that message out there and tell you how you should feel about around, but if you're just starting out, and you're trying to build your brand, and on June I went through this when started La and we didn't talk about UCLA, the notion that yellow stands for everything. L. A. and we did that because everything in La. When I say that to you. There's a little bit conjures up some emotion. Right we. There's the art of music scene in the entertainment. All of this stuff, Hollywood everything that kind of comes brown L. A. With the culture of La. We wanted to represent that so what I will say to everybody's when you're looking at your brand. Think about what you want people to think about you or your product or your brand in this case when you're not there to tell them about it. What do you want them to feel act and all that so? So, that's number one that takes zero dollars ride there. So that's that's that's step number one. You absolutely have to do that now. We've worked on campaigns. I'M NOT GONNA lie. You know two hundred thousand dollars commercial, two million dollars, commercial, versus a you know you know a five thousand dollar spot as you have to do is very different, but the creative process in which you approach, it is the same. So when you're thinking about your brand in you get out their money isn't the the the object here we're not talking. Money should never hold you back in getting your brand out there. You should be really thinking about how. You, want your brand perceived and thinking about your audience talked about and going through the process of creating something that feels very honest to you. So when Andre Knight created La when I met him. We started to create what we like to say. We're creating an AD agency. And I'm going to tell every one of your listeners. We weren't super successful at it. Right out of the gate win through our trials and tribulations. Just like you. You know we're an independent shot. When I joined L. La, it wasn't like we had the backing of a big conglomerate and millions and millions of dollars we had to. You know bootstrap this thing ourselves for sure and I like to. To say blood, sweat and Beers. You know we were really thinking about what it was. We were creating. When we're trading the notion of of an AD agency. We couldn't figure out why wasn't quite working widened just didn't feel right. There was something a little bit off. So I tell everybody that's listening. Be Aware. Listen to your gut. Listen to your brain and see what's happening. Something feels off. There's something off and we switched our thinking and I want to talk a little bit about the way that we think maybe later, but right now and you think about. The way that we switched our thinking was. Let's not trade an AD agency. Let's create a brand that stands for something that has a unique point of view on life, so that helps us narrow in on why we exist as a company so so when you're building your brand, and your your property kind of have to think about why you exist what you want people to feel and all those things, and then when you're out there, you don't have to be a marketing genius. Genius I think what you really have to do is go what you know in a single sentence. Right down. Try to articulate the the reasons, the whys behind something in a single sentence. If you can't do that, then you're not clear and I think clarity is everything and when you have that clear definitive, this is why exists the Mrs what I want. People feel about my brand or perceive. My ran as it becomes much easier because you're just putting out messages and start with. As I said social channels things like that. You know getting the word out there and then try to understand your audience when you understand your audience, and you understand what you really all about. That's for the iterative testing and.

La CA Andrea Nike Andre Knight L. A. L. La Western digital UCLA Hollywood
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"That start it. How do you? So you've got like five products, and like one of them is like the one that your heart wants in one of the other four may be the best product for you to make to like rent, and actually make an impact and and scale your company. How do you? Sort of become dispassionate about that I know a lot of for movies. Andrew is talking about movies, and I know a lot of directors for instance. They're really angry at the marketing people when the marketing people come in and tell them like they have to change a bunch of stuff around I'm not saying the marketing people are always wrong or are always right, but they're certainly not always wrong either. So how'd you kind of get that mindset when you're before you even test stuff to like in vibe yourself because you don't WanNa, make something that's hollow, right? It's got like have a piece of you in it, but maybe it's not the thing that you love the most. How do you sort of have that dispassionate look and sort of build the marketing an into your product as you're building it so that you can so that you don't come up with a dud? Spend a year making a dud. Dud and then bring it out into snark very successful. Well, that's that's an awesome question. By had the amazing crystal answer. We would all be rich right now right so but I'll tell you how we can kind of come about it. You know first and foremost a creative proposition. You know it's really really difficult. Because at the end of the day we fall in love. We always like you know. We have a when we presented clients the of course. Course. You're going to present three or four ideas right and they always ask you. What's your favorite? And that's hard and we joke around. We go. Gosh, we live all our children, but we can only send one to Harvard right. That's a joke that we have for years and years and years that we had our fights, but that's sort of what it's like. It's like the idea of the passion projects of what you're talking about something. That's meaningful to me. But may not fit very well. The marketplace thrive in extremely limited audience, right. And you're saying. How do I monetize that? Or How do I? Make sure that it's a success. And then second earlier that you have maybe something that you're not asked passionate about, but it's out there. Need you definitely absolutely one hundred Percent Nov? There's a market for it. We've talked about this with with products, services movies, all of the things so from creative proposition, this is really difficult and goes against everything you just said, but I say you have to try to fall in love with all of your projects. I know that sounds. Easier said than done because you might be passionate about something over here in this one might not be as passionate about and when you're having client, hire you to create something like marketing. If you will. You don't always love everything that's there. But you have to dig at it and I think when you dig at it. You try to find aspect of it that you do love and one. She of find that aspect that you do love I go all in on that, and that gives you a little bit of that drive to create something around it. The other thing is true of challenges right understanding that maybe it isn't the greatest best thing in the face of the planet. Right and we need to think about ways that we can turn it into. Something that exists in the world that people really care about, or that can have success around it so. It starts with honesty with yourself being honest about the projects in front of you, the things you have knowing what's a passion project, and what's not a passion project, and I advise everybody that's listening. Don't fall in love so much your passion project that it becomes a distraction and would mean by that is it can get in the way of everything else. You really do have to disconnect yourself once in a while like Andre Sane and looked at it and go but I know I love it. Wise the rest of the World GonNa. Love it. secondarily to that is the Anti. Anti Passion Project. If you're the one over here, that could sell really well. You need to know the world's GonNa love it, but I don't. How can I love it so i? Think there's there's an emotional connect timothy to those two things that start to and I know it's not easy to do and I. Don't have the answer to tell you. This is the process you have to go through to do that, but I definitely think that when you're starting to think it rate understand. What is that project out? What is that thing that I'm standing up to make or two? Or if a client has given it to you, and how has asked you to? For instance your writer I'm sure you've been hired in the past to to pick up a project and do a rewrite. You may not be totally into it, but you need to Kinda yourself into and fall in love with it a little bit. Zad sorta make sense to you. Absolutely I think there's another piece of it to where so you know where your customer is a of lovecraft anthology. Go through Lewis hard to spell. Yeah, all right here. Thanks, and part of it is Part of that was finding what my audience wanted and finding away from me to construct something in that world. That I could love so it's not just about making a saying. Thank blatantly be like well. This is what the market wants from going to put it out there. It's also about being like look. Is this the thing that I love one hundred percent? No, but the elements are so deep into things that I love in the fact. Fact, that my audience will love, it will make me love it as well and so I'm not saying I don't love the Castillo Anthology, but it certainly not liked the nearest and dearest project to my heart that like I've been working on for ten years right but there are elements in there that resonate with the target market that I'm going for and that make me love it like genuinely love it and I think that..

Passion Project Andrew Andre Sane Harvard Zad writer timothy Lewis
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"What is your audience say? What is the person that you're making this? For say and ninety nine times out of one hundred us, not nine hundred ninety nine times out of one thousand they have. No idea who that audience is or who they're even making the product for they may be. SA- may be selling products, maybe selling a lot of products, but they still have absolutely no idea the person who they're making this product for, and I would love for you tub before we actually talk about breaking the campaign and talking about that with Carlos love for both of you to sort of talked about how we can go out I and actually know who the audience is, who was going to buy this product and buy it for the lowest customer acquisition cost and the highest lifetime value. Yeah, that's a very good question. Yeah, so so all starts Andre. I think that you know without doing you know obviously on a potential limited budget. It's hard to do customer segmentation and do all that, but let me start with this What I find is on a smaller business or independence that they that they think that and I think part of the reason that the ninety nine percent answered. This way is because they want to appease everybody because it's very hard to say, who is my audience right and and so they're trying to be everything to everybody so a good example. Is You know those diner's that have anywhere from Meatloaf to? tacos to salads to everything right and it's like a twenty page menu because they want something for everybody, but I think that you know what I see that a lot in small business by bank because it's very scared to say no, this is my business my core. And I'm going to make that core audience really care and a an attack them, and then there's a halo of Acton and there's a secondary and tertiary audience outside of that, but I think you have to look at There's a lot of factors from pricing like I. Think you mentioned but I think we need to look at who is that person and create that persona? What other things are they buying right? So what? What? What do you think? Their annual household income says build a story? Your audience is created. What does this person do on the weekends? What other what when they exercise if they do what kind of? Did they go to the gym or the Yoga? Are they? Are they runners? What kind of movies do they watch? What are they like to eat? Tell me what they look like right, so it's not the old school like. If this was a celebrity, who would it be? It's really digging deep and creating the character. And Finding out who that person is or that group of people are and what their interests are, and how you fit into their life, which because with that does it gives you some sort of insight into? Strategy so for example. If we know that you know this person, is you know a workaholic? They're always on the move. They're always on the go. They're working. They're doing calls in their car. They're doing whatever they're doing. Then you know how to position your product S, but potential alignment to that world, which is a productivity play. It could be a recluse from what they're doing. It could be a surprise and delight to take their mind off of something, so it actually informs how you message your product. Product and I think that without understanding who that person is. Then what you're going to do is have messaging. That is very bland, which is I? Have this quote product and you're hoping that people will come to your site to your brand to your product and connect the dots on how it fits into their world. We can't do that. We need to show them exactly how we fit into their world, but you can't do that if you don't know the world. They're living in so my recommendation. Recommendation is to create that person or that group of people and really build them in a very deep way. I would rather take more time understanding that person because once we know that we know why they're going to choose this bottle of water, versus that followed water or this brand of copy versus that brand of coffee there are unique selling propositions to your product or service that we will then plus plug in there on the reasons to believe, but you gotTa. Know who you're talking to without. Without a you're just. You're just going to be very bland Bonilla brand. That doesn't have a point of view. That doesn't have a tone in. That isn't saying anything. You're just talking about yourself, but what we need to do is shut them in Saudi and speak and have a one to one dialogue with that individual, and they understand exactly why we exist in how we fit into their world. Awesome before you are, you have follow up for you. Carlos but I know you have to go Andrea. Parting, thoughts. You'd like to deliver before we let you go. Yeah, I would say overall on the entrepreneurial spirit of everything You know I have a saying, which is you? You! Jump off the cliff and you grow wings on the way down I. think that P-. Raniall spirit is always alive in your listeners, and they wanted to build something. They WanNa grow something. I think that they just need to be You know Kinda slow slow down the speed up. Take your time what we do here at the La. Is You know there's a lot of research? A lot of conversation, a lot of digging a lot of trying to find out where you fit in the marketplace does. Does anybody even need what you have or is there? Are there a lot of other people saying what you're saying so I? Think that my biggest recommendation is to take that time because a solid strategy collapse fell for years. If not decades you know having a knee jerk reaction, which is part of being a little bit of an entrepreneur, which is running fast is is a great trait to have, but when it comes to your marketing and Your Business and actually generating revenue I think you. You gotta be very slow very methodical and look at the entire landscape, and really understand where your products that sin and I think that once you do that. The actual expression of that is what we call creativity, but without that it's creative for creative sake, so always make sure that there's a bigger strategy that all of your tactics. All your messaging and everything that you do always points back to that North Star without that Northstar. I think that you know. People are GonNa Evan flow on other people's..

Carlos Andre SA Northstar Bonilla La Andrea
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Yeah, and you know it's interesting and I think a boat lives be above. That is the notion that we live here at UCLA. which is everything matters everything we do. There's no word there's no pixel. There's no design element. There's no There's nothing that we put towards a campaign That is just there to be there. Everything has to move the ball forward, and I think that's as much of a design story as your your sneaker example as it is an an and how you build a business, or how you develop your own brand as an entrepreneur as an independent right everything has everything matters and I think that it's. Over thinking that is still also part of that chaos, and at one point you do have to trust your gut, but then you spend next two weeks doubting it, and because you have to, you have to break it and I think that what we find most in marketing and advertising in this world is creative world as that it's easy to justify your idea and why it's a, but it's more difficult because all of our egos are attached to it to tell said to look at yourself in. In the mirror and say, but why is it wrong and I think that that is a that is a a spiritual journey is much of it as a business strategy, and and we have to go there in order to get to something like I said. That's greater than where we there were. We found it. How do we do that so Do you have any strategies for actually how you can start looking at yourself and objectively thinking about about what's wrong, noxious? What's right without? A going without going without spiraling and thinking that like will now I'm horrible because I just. I just unlock all of these big. These things that like a wrong with the thing that I'm planning. Yeah well first of all I think we actually it's you mentioned this because we actually bring this up to our clients right sometimes also close to what we're doing that die. The reality whether it's the business were trying to build the product. We're trying to sell whatever it is and sometimes I asked a simple question. If you were a consumer and you had no idea you're just walking to the world and you saw this. Would you care, would you? Would you buy that? Would you interact with that? How would you like to be You know marketed, sue or approached by brand right and I think that just looking at it a little bit objectively and saying how would I reacted by had no idea what this was, and you'd be surprised at. At the answer is a lot of times people go. Oh, well I guess I wouldn't watch a two minute long video about this thing. I would probably want this okay well. Why don't we go do that and trust our instincts as consumers, and not just as creators, so you have to play both worlds create something that you're passionate about, but then look at it as though you're an objective human. Being that and I always liked the look at the worst case scenario I'm in the middle of my day I. I'm having a bad day, and then I see this content. How do I react? Not In the best case scenario, which is your friends, family people who love you. Those people are going to buy or read or subscribe. It's the people that don't know you, and that May, and we have to say that. Don't even care about you. How do you create an event that desire and I think just looking at it? In that simple way, it could be could be a big shift for it for the people listening. Absolutely of anything to add arlos yeah, no I think I, just echo that that's something I've learned to do. creatives inherently loved to justify their word, right? That's what we do on. Remember speaking to a an old for of mine. That you know asking when you stop. And he said never you never stop fighting, so is inherently you know part of the creative being to say I want to stand up in front of my work and defend it right. But it's very vulnerable. Things Build. Stand up in front of your working up. No, let me tear down on a for good reason for with purpose, right and look at it and you know and and you know we've coined the phrase year. give a shit ability, which is the idea of why do people care? Why are we going to care about the thing that you are putting in front of them? And sometimes you have to look at it subjectively where you just go. Wow, you know I. Don't think somebody's going to care about it, and this is why I think they're not going to care about. About a slow change it and what unders really talking about is getting to that notion of training, functional benefit, emotional benefit to the end user, right or the consumer. Whoever your audiences your movie, Guy You get it your book I. You get it stories all about that, right? How's that connecting to somebody? How that you know tugging at some kind of an emotion for them to draw them in for them to care about it on a level and everybody's different, so you don't have to have a consumer care about it the same, but there has to be rationed on reason behind why they would care about it. Absolutely I. You said something you said that. They know they're awed to find the audience for the end. Consumer and I think This I know Andre has to go in a couple of minutes, but I think this is probably the most important question that I can ask because the thing that I find with craters, or any business owner is like I is, is they wonder why they are or what they're supposed to make or healthy is going to resonate and every time they do that. I ask them while WHO's your audience?.

UCLA. business owner Andre
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Andre said about six years ago I decided that I was seeing something in the marketplace. That wasn't quite working for me. The wind as stories are being told the way that we were trapped in the work the way that it was kind of. A bit of a lumbering process, and seemed a little bit outdated and antiquated. I decided that I was gonNA. Go do something else so after a good eighteen plus years and big advertising. I met Andre and a mutual friend introduced us, and we met at a starbucks like typical. You know typical stories are and he told me his dreams about how he wanted to bridge the gap between traditional advertising and entertainment, and I was fascinated with his entertainment background because I didn't have that didn't see the finish polishing speed of execution in the credit ranch, so we came together, and that's what we've been doing. We've been trying to create something. That's a little unique in the in the space. And take our unique expertise and compile them together to look at things from a different perspective and try to bring a new point of view to the industry. Awesome I can't believe that in the five minutes ago. Talk, neither if you mentioned the name of your agency, the. Yeah, the obviously, we're not for good promoters of our brand Yeah, so e La La. is name of the global creative. Addy's the were based in West Hollywood, and we also have a location in Irvine California's law. Awesome and now I did some digging a on your website. Before this interview, Kasama good interviewer and I the thing I love is I went to your about page, and the first thing that pops up is sort of This thing that I've lived on my whole life kind of which is that discovery is hiding in the chaos and is that your? Your overall sort of idea. Can you talk about why discovery hiding in the chaos or how you bring that discovery out of chaos? Oh! Yeah, absolutely so as part of our brand, and and how we kind of live and how we create work right, so it is, it is very chaotic. what we do and what I mean by that is. Is there? There's a lot of digging. There's a lot of exploration and the most people are too afraid to go deep, and they just stay on the surface level we we dig really deep, and it's a messy process at times because we look at what the world is doing. Look at trends. We look at what's happening. We look at we look at. At, the work and not just say wow, this is great, but we actually break in say how is this wrong? How is not gonNA make a consumer want to purchase this or engage with us right, so it is a very again it's it's kind of like that chaos theory where they're still organization within the chaos. Right so it's not just like we're. Crazy creatives, there's process, but we really believe that you know in order to Make something bigger than the way you found it. You really have to crumble it down in all its pieces and build something bigger than the way you found it. Absolutely anything to add. Yeah I think from my point of view and getting back to the origin story. This comes directly from Andre Philip. This is the way banks, and in easy is the best darned strategist I've ever worked with my life, so he's taught me a lot about the notion of chaos and fear right, and I've heard some of your. Ask US talk about creativity, and how we live in a place of fear, constantly creatives artery emotions. I mentioned before. We're always sort of fearful for for where the next thing is coming from the next idea what people are going to perceive about? All of those things but I think you know down to at a writer freelance artists that you know a producer anybody that's in a business you kind of need to live in that fear and a good way, and that's what Andres talking about so from my point of view what I love about this notion of you know the beauty tiny in the chaos is is dating an anthropologist and archaeologist, looking at the puzzle pieces, not being afraid of it. But understanding it and once you have comprehension of thing that's what allows you to find the really cool creative nugget that little saying that you normally wouldn't see and I think that notion mixed with multiple opinions and points of view on it is what allows us to get to a really great creative idea when you're not afraid to look at it that way in open up your your creative bean to it. Really great things happen. Yet Russell I'm love to add you know. There's that butterfly effect right, which is that theory is you know butterfly flaps, its wings at Florida whatever creates a hurricane, all the way to Texas right and let me tell you how that affects business and business strategy, and also on her website is is the spirit of what we do in here has lasting effects out there, so let's take a simple example like hitting a golf ball. one millimeter off is not a big big difference, right, but as As it projects entra checks out into the world that could be a mile apart that little millimeter, so what we do as creative as business strategist as people who position brands or as your listeners position themselves a small little change that you do today will have lasting effects in the world, and so we take that very serious, and so you know it's. It's something that we we we think about, and we don't. We realized the responsibility that we have to each other and the brand that we were with. I love that because I think that most people that I talked to and of trying to start their marketing too late, or while the ball's already in flight I was listening to that Jeff Goldblum show on National Geographic last night. I don't know if you've seen. And he was about sneakers and he was talking about He went to go. Find someone who is working really high end like a high-performance Ashley Athletes Sneakers. And they were talking about how literally everything they do in the sneaker changes every other part of how someone runs or moves or or or or or or or or how they protect themselves, and all comes from these live, this little basically soul, and like five inches above the bottom of their feet. That can change. About the rest of how they succeed or fail in their careers. Yeah, and you know it's interesting and I think a boat lives be above. That is the notion that we live here at UCLA. which is.

Andre Philip starbucks US UCLA. Jeff Goldblum La La. West Hollywood Kasama Ashley Athletes Addy golf Irvine California Russell Texas writer Florida producer
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"Dot com forward slash audience and Haywire clicking buttons. Maybe you would like to subscribe to this podcast. Leave a review. It's a real cool thing to do, and it helps us get found by. By more and more people all right that being said, let's get on with the show. Take it away, guys. Tell us what you're passionate about these days. Well I saw Russell having on resume. Excited I. Know Your listeners are creative and hearts and the answer this. Probably your listeners probably want me to talk. About would be the work of passionate about the work and I'm always special project that. That kind of goes without saying, but there's two things that I want to talk about that. I'm most passionate about today wants functional ones emotional, and they sort of go hand in hand. The first one is from functional proposition when it comes to advertising and marketing and what I do every day with the team on I love this idea of really closing the loop on on what an idea really is right. Sometimes you can start at the. Tactical phase you know so. It's something like a bill or on TV, spot or anything like that, but. What I'm starting to see. Today is the lack of understanding on how to create a holistic idea and latter that backup, so a key example to that would be something like I'll use an example that's not ours, but it's brilliant I love. It is like snickers and whole ideas sneaker satisfies right, but the new spots and stuff that they ran. Was this idea that leans into the notion? That people aren't themselves when they're hungry. And so you're not you and you're hungry is a really big idea and a really cool idea that you can hang your hat on trade of we saw a really passionate about that and always searching for those kind of connective tissues when it comes from a functional benefits and emotional benefit. And that gets into the second thing that is probably most you know driving passion today, and that is sort of this idea that around self awareness and and Energy Right Andrea and I talked about this a lot, and you know I think those two things go hand in hand, especially when it comes to being a creative personal motion creatures at this is deeply embedded ns right, so we can't take our emotions out of things even though we we try to. But really when you think about the notion of what emotion place to us, having a positive and really finding the great and the good and coming out at like unconditionally happy really just coming at every project, it really shapes the project shapes. You're working on yourself. Your team everything even a client all I. It's Kinda radiates around the project. We really noticed that when we mind our energy that way. breaking stop in and I think that anybody at any level Jen can take to both of those things away, say. How can I be mindful of my energy in one putting into a project? I love that how `bout you Andrea anything in to add to that? Yeah you know in my end. Would I think I'm most passionate about is really of an entrepreneurial answer, which is creating something from nothing which I think is the What entrepreneurship is all about so for me? It's it's taking You know first of all business which could be my own business and building it like I did from scratch and building it where there was no business in creating something, but also looking at a brand of products. Products and really getting into the strategy and discovering where there's a product that nobody knows about in creating that in creating that awareness, and that dry that makes people crave that thing and actually one purchase that day, so I think I'm most passionate about creating something, and really in that discovery in that strategy of how do you take something that was never there and create huge demand for it. I think that's that's a really drives me every day. I love it and I love that you talked about creativity in the brand and marketing part a part of it, and creating something from nothing, because I know most of the audience of the people that we talked to a struggle with the marketing struggling with thinking that you know there is creativity in the marketing, but when I go back to them all I, all I say is what I don't understand how you think this is create if it's finding your people and figuring out ways the talk. Talk to them. That's like the most creative thing that you could possibly be doing right so before we get started talking about that I definitely to break this whole concept down I, think for the purposes of this I think it's I. Don't always do this, but I think it's important for us to talk about you and the company and who you guys are and and sort of tell us a little bit about the back story of of of where you guys come from. Yeah, so this is Andrea I started off in entertainment, really doing movie, posters and movie trailers at Seiger Advertising, and that's right. That's right. I got my vipers exposure to to advertising marketing, branding and. You know I was in that space for a while and I. I realized that the Finnish and Polish speed that people work at in entertainment is like no other a segment of advertising and a time You know all my friends in general market advertising. Had you know weeks and months to to do a campaign, whereas we had you know days in entertainment to create a strategy, a visual vocabulary and And concepts for movies, and so my my my thought was you know if I can combine the speed and efficiency that we work at in entertainment, and then the strategy and holistic approach of of general market and kind of combine those things together, and that was how I created the the agency where you can be very strategic, also be fast and so I think that's really our clients look at. At us for that. We kind of sit in the middle between strategy and being able to execute a holistic campaign and and then I met Carlos about six a little over six years ago, and then he can tell you that story and his background. Yeah, so I come from a traditional advertising background kind of grew up in that on Nikon big conglomerates space working out here in southern California. California on every time at Brandon, they got from automotive to consumer packaged goods to beverage to adult beverage You name it I've I've done it and I love advertising. I fell in love with advertising at a very young age, and I love the idea of persuasive communication, and that we could create something that that created impact in the world and that was great. You know I went through. A big portion of how advertising changed throughout my career so. When I got into it. It was still kind of a lot of stuff was hand done, so I grew up in that world went through the computer vase went through the fracturing of agencies from being an aor what we like to call an agency of record where one agency handles a lot of the bulk of the work for a client to the fracturing of You know spinning off if you will of specialty agency, so you had a digital agency Social Agency, an advertising agency and Promotions Agency. And that worked for a while, but what happened was the world started to change, and as technology caught up or what I should say. As as humanity caught up technology and started become more ubiquitous the way they'll be consumed constant change, and that agency model started to to become very lumbering and and select. Andre said about six years ago I decided that I was seeing something in the marketplace. That wasn't quite working for me. The wind as stories are being told the way that we were trapped in the work.

Andrea I California Social Agency Seiger Advertising Dot Promotions Agency Russell Nikon Jen Andre Carlos Brandon
"executive creative director" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on KCRW

"Star Wars the rise of sky Walker is in theaters that is confirmed I went on my way to work last night to see it still jealous though my colleague monthly delbarco who earlier this week got to cover the film's premiere on Hollywood Boulevard at the premiere of the franchise's original droid C. three PO and R. two D. two arrived in style then the roly poly droid BB eight small new sites DO rolled by the droids in the Star Wars universe come in many shapes and sizes some are diplomats scout buys or nannies others are mechanics surgeon's assistant pilots or even a south Amir actor John boy a guy who plays the storm trooper turned resistance fighters in and double check overseas designs for all of Star Wars talked about their favorite droids BB eight because the VA can move you anyway I'm sure that some of the capabilities sort of a USB dock in there RGD yes charm and the other so much that saying is vice president and executive creative director at Lucasfilm I love joy because I mean you can really imbue them with a lot of character traits in terms of how they look they performed on the speed J. J. Abrams directed and co wrote this final film he says he admires George Lucas's template of the hero's journey accompanied by many allies including droids each has their own personality at times offering comic relief.

vice president Lucasfilm J. J. Abrams George Lucas sky Walker John boy executive creative director
"executive creative director" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Can you gotta tell us a little bit about your story now out weren't aborted Fleishman. Hillard Habitat record that is amazing in the advertising and marketing space. So tell me talk about what brought you. Yeah I'm so. I'm actually a classically trained director. When I went to college John I thought I wanted to design print ads? TV spots. Which I did I started my career at Olivia may there and worked at a number of Bigger brand agencies for a large part of my career and kind of worked my way up the the chain executive creative director and then Dan. Gosh it's going on six years. Now that I came over to Fleishman Hillard and had I originally in my career if you'd asked me if I would end up at a you know a communications firm a public relations kind of distorted big Firm like H I would have said well that just seems like that would not be my path but you know much like culture permanent for meeting all things that we do the minds have truly begun to blur in what I saw as enticing With moving into the you know more of a PR and communication space was that ownership of conversation Michelle so I came from a world whereas advertisers we own the conversation and we totally an way and so you know there's there's a preciousness about in the PR team was kind of at the end of the gate right before it went to the market. Yes exactly exactly and I used to roll my eyes at the Pierre. All pecking order. You're done draper for goodness sake so you know but I aw. The tables begin to turn. Because I'm a social media. became such a big part of everything that we did. We lost control as the planned and so we would have. I'm our customers really controlling the narrative and that made me uneasy and I just actually wanted to be part of that in so I saw. Aw that The PR partners were really owning that frontline conversation. And you know. I spend a huge huge believer that brandon reputation are inextricably land and so if I unable to control the reputational part of the conversation really need that puts everything else that I'm doing at risk. I feel like it's it's unwieldy I have no control over it and so To me having the benefit of being able to Kinda play both sides of that coin and really understand how brand reputation work together and Tanta was really attractive to me and so fortunately I followed that. Hanson landed ended here and work with people that are far smarter than me and I of every day so impressed by the work that the the team yoga you know. That was the topic that I wanted to get into how things have changed there are people say oh. Pr Is Dying. And I'm like wow you know that's interesting because PR practitioners in truest form if they are moving with the times have been become have become more of integrated marketers. I than they have right pass if they're really good at the game and that's the language that the brand people speak right right so right you could speak that language you're at the table and you are impacting both brand and reputation right and redsfest where we are. Yeah absolutely absolutely. I mean I think you have to be well-versed on both the brand reputation inside integration as the desert and I don't think that's going away right anytime soon. You have to think about things through the line so as not just a single moment and time again as we talked about it especially as we're talking about this societal issues brand depths into this space. It's going to create a conversation again. You cannot back away from it and so Being able to understand the I think. Pr Practitioners do this way. Better than General marketers is they actually can think through you this scenario. Planning what could we have. We're like mine reputation. We're the Guardian is exactly the cartons emotionally emotionally. It might feel really good at that moment in time and be like. Oh we bought this creative idea. And we're GONNA you know executed today but you have to think through. What is that GonNa do for for the longer term reputation of the brand? And so that's what I love about working here is that you know it's tempered heard by. I call it a calculated rebellion. That's is since we know we need to be both. We know we need to be creative. But we're never going to do anything that's going to put our our brand.

Fleishman draper Fleishman Hillard Dan Hillard Habitat Hanson Pierre Michelle Olivia John I
"executive creative director" Discussed on podnews

podnews

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on podnews

"It's the Ron burgundy podcast. Guess what? I got up gas. And you don't Poltrak have published the stats for February two thousand nineteen February included that the much height- Ron burgundy podcast which released its trail on February the first and launched on February eighth yet. I heart radio is figures will actually flat at five point two million downloads a day. Iheart remains the global leader for downloads. Well, NPR remains the US number one based on unique audience and has ever we need to remind you that Padre only measures some US based publishes and their methodology is both proprietary and OPEC. What's the secret to successful podcast advertising, US radio network? Westwood One says that communication is best quote when it's transparent, real direct and tells a story apply that to a podcast, add the company says and the audience will appreciate it. Listen calls itself. The only podcast app built. With multitasking and beauty in minds. The first version features unique gesture based navigation for on the go listening, including a queuing system, and it's available for IOS. Meanwhile, the Iowa's app for Stitcher has also had an update the guardians podcasts are the subject of coverage in digital including an estimate of the total size of the UK podcasting Avmark it from veteran at by a Howard Baram, the figure twenty five million pounds. That's thirty three million US dollars. Guardians daily podcast has eight people working on it. According to the article, meanwhile in the guardian itself, they cover have podcast sold out a critical look at the launch of luminary and similar services. The excellent article interviews, many excellent people who all say excellent things, especially the second person to get a quote. That's me. Edison research is Tom Webster writes about these significant new podcasting stat hiding in plain sight, it's a figure that's flat and you'll find a link to that in our show notes and in our newsletter bay. Based on recent conversations says Nick choir in this week's hot pod luminary has attracted a level of bile. I've never encountered before meanwhile, Pandora's executive creative director Lauren Nagel says that every brand needs to consider sound in a speech at south by south west. The I have published a list of direct brands to watch mcgettigan have examined the list and concluded that four out of ten of them. Have tried podcasting. The podcast at research company says that personal care products are most likely to have added podcasting to their marketing mix companies like our new favorite electric toothbrush company. Quip who joined us today as our newest supporter. They offer perfect oral care delivered available internationally as well. And there are get quip dot com podcast communities are all over the place. And they choose a bunch of different tools speaker looks at eleven of them and how they make their communities a success. We should have covered this story last week. But for the record Maryland's highest court has denied a new trial for Adnan Siad, the subject of cereal in a full three opinion and his job for you podcast audience producer for the economist newspaper in London in the UK. There's plenty more including Twitter's first podcast series. Two of a podcast about religion. A new true crime podcast with a retired cold case investigator, and you thirty part podcast from the BBC thirty animals that made us smarter you'll

US Ron burgundy UK NPR Iheart OPEC Twitter Poltrak Pandora mcgettigan Maryland Howard Baram London BBC Edison research Adnan Siad investigator Lauren Nagel
Ron Burgundy podcast fails to hit the mark for iHeartRadio

podnews

03:30 min | 2 years ago

Ron Burgundy podcast fails to hit the mark for iHeartRadio

"It's the Ron burgundy podcast. Guess what? I got up gas. And you don't Poltrak have published the stats for February two thousand nineteen February included that the much height- Ron burgundy podcast which released its trail on February the first and launched on February eighth yet. I heart radio is figures will actually flat at five point two million downloads a day. Iheart remains the global leader for downloads. Well, NPR remains the US number one based on unique audience and has ever we need to remind you that Padre only measures some US based publishes and their methodology is both proprietary and OPEC. What's the secret to successful podcast advertising, US radio network? Westwood One says that communication is best quote when it's transparent, real direct and tells a story apply that to a podcast, add the company says and the audience will appreciate it. Listen calls itself. The only podcast app built. With multitasking and beauty in minds. The first version features unique gesture based navigation for on the go listening, including a queuing system, and it's available for IOS. Meanwhile, the Iowa's app for Stitcher has also had an update the guardians podcasts are the subject of coverage in digital including an estimate of the total size of the UK podcasting Avmark it from veteran at by a Howard Baram, the figure twenty five million pounds. That's thirty three million US dollars. Guardians daily podcast has eight people working on it. According to the article, meanwhile in the guardian itself, they cover have podcast sold out a critical look at the launch of luminary and similar services. The excellent article interviews, many excellent people who all say excellent things, especially the second person to get a quote. That's me. Edison research is Tom Webster writes about these significant new podcasting stat hiding in plain sight, it's a figure that's flat and you'll find a link to that in our show notes and in our newsletter bay. Based on recent conversations says Nick choir in this week's hot pod luminary has attracted a level of bile. I've never encountered before meanwhile, Pandora's executive creative director Lauren Nagel says that every brand needs to consider sound in a speech at south by south west. The I have published a list of direct brands to watch mcgettigan have examined the list and concluded that four out of ten of them. Have tried podcasting. The podcast at research company says that personal care products are most likely to have added podcasting to their marketing mix companies like our new favorite electric toothbrush company. Quip who joined us today as our newest supporter. They offer perfect oral care delivered available internationally as well. And there are get quip dot com podcast communities are all over the place. And they choose a bunch of different tools speaker looks at eleven of them and how they make their communities a success. We should have covered this story last week. But for the record Maryland's highest court has denied a new trial for Adnan Siad, the subject of cereal in a full three opinion and his job for you podcast audience producer for the economist newspaper in London in the UK. There's plenty more including Twitter's first podcast series. Two of a podcast about religion. A new true crime podcast with a retired cold case investigator, and you thirty part podcast from the BBC thirty animals that made us smarter you'll

United States Ron Burgundy UK NPR Iheart Poltrak Opec Twitter Pandora Mcgettigan Howard Baram Maryland Edison Research London BBC Adnan Siad Investigator Lauren Nagel
"executive creative director" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"executive creative director" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Here's the background to the ad Bateman was posing as an elevator attendant kept taking passengers down two different scenarios. And each one was like worse than the last one. And one of the bad floors was a vegan dinner party, and they were making beats loaf instead of Meatloaf. It looked horrible vegan fans on Twitter or unhappy with the ad. They voice their opinions and Peter got involved too. Of course, it got so bad. This is heavy outrage. Mob works on social media. It got so bad that Hundai started responding to customers on its Twitter account, stating they don't necessarily hate vegan food. The executive creative director at the agency behind the ad said in an earlier interview that he thought people would react, positively to it. Well, he he must not know any vegans because they don't act positively to very much a little joke like that. Then you don't eat cheese. You get really angry. Right. Is it is it just what what what what is the vegans have any like meat animal products byproducts again have dairy. What about eggs can they do? And they can't do anything vegetarians, eat eggs. What's the difference between vegan and vegetarian? Don't eat meat. You can have sees. You can have. Okay. So vegans worst than vegetarian vegan. You can't eat. I need to. I I don't even know what they can't eat plants. I'm sorry. If you're if you're a vegan you have to understand if you're throwing let's say, you're throwing a Super Bowl party, and beat loaf is the dinner your serving people aren't generally going to be thrilled with that. That's just the rea- you may like it. And that's great for you. But most other people aren't going to like, and there's no changing that and how angry and upset you get all the time. Just makes it funnier rights. It's true better. To makes us want to troll. You even more waiting for the vegan. Hey, tweets, begin Email to come pouring in to this show. I'm sure I'm sure what I wanna know if I were covering the twenty twenty presidential race. I would like to know Cory booker's feeling on the commercial because Cory Booker apparently is like the first vegan presidential candidate. That is true. That's part of his he's not trying to make people vegan but him being vegan is part of his opening message that we learned about last week. Honestly that whole commercial confused me the first time I saw and I didn't even catch the vegan thing. I thought it was I thought it was pretty funny because every different scenario. I'm like. Yeah. And then I thought I thought all of it was I thought that was one of the better commercials the, bud. Let me just address the but night game of thrones commercial. I certainly did not have bud night getting his skull crushed and the dilly dilly people getting lit up by a fire breathing dragon in my pool of potential Super Bowl commercials. That was that was an odd one. I'm excited for game of thrones coming back, but I didn't really kind of get that whole time. It was a very odd commercial. Although I will say bud night getting taken out he still had a better week than Ralph Northam last week. If we're being honest here so bad commercials last seventy two hours actually ole with Sarah, Michelle Gellar to see the LA commercial. It's right up. Your alley. It's you know, Marshall, okay. Now, I must have missed it continuing. My brother-in-law brought this up, and I thought it was a fantastic point. They couldn't get Freddie prince junior to do the commercial with her and play her husband trail. What the hell is pretty prince junior doing these days like you don't see him. Anyway, he doesn't act anymore. That's a good point. Right. So you've got Sarah Machel Geller who really doesn't do much anymore either. She does this commercial. She's got a husband in the commercial. And you couldn't get a real husband of play in the Super Bowl commercial actor with a lot of free time. I didn't get that bad. The other thing that I didn't get is the Google translate commercial. And it was one specific translation I didn't understand I'll play it for. If you missed it. I I don't know Google is they were trying to promote how they help people understand that key touchy feely commercial, very, touchy feely. All right. Here's the here's a clip.

Sarah Machel Geller Cory booker Twitter Hundai Google Bateman Peter Freddie prince Ralph Northam executive creative director LA Marshall Michelle Gellar seventy two hours