35 Burst results for "Ewing"

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 3 d ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
Lightning reach East finals for 4th time in 6 years

The Dan Patrick Show

00:14 sec | 3 weeks ago

Lightning reach East finals for 4th time in 6 years

"Advance to the eastern conference finals double overtime win against the bruins Tampa has been in the conference finals five times. In the last ten years, they play the winner of the islanders in the flyers. That's courtesy of lightning

Tampa
Legendary Basketball Coach John Thompson Dies At 78 in Washington, DC

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:48 sec | Last month

Legendary Basketball Coach John Thompson Dies At 78 in Washington, DC

"Legendary college basketball coach John Thompson has died known as Big John Thompson took Georgetown to three final fours in the eighties and 17 Big East titles, becoming the first black coach to guide a team to a national title. More from CBS Sports College Basketball Insider Jon Rothstein. Your town is synonymous with great big man. You know, for a long time, and that was really started by John Townsend Abilities to recruit Patrick Ewing recruited Alonso. I'm warning You recruited the camping the jumbo with lead Do Georgetown. Obviously getting Roy Hibbert so That kind of lineage of big man was created by John Thompson, who was a big man himself when he played his problem for the Balkan. Thompson also led the 1988 U. S national team to a bronze medal in the Olympics. John Thompson was 78

John Thompson Georgetown John Townsend Jon Rothstein Roy Hibbert Basketball Patrick Ewing Olympics Alonso U. S
Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:50 sec | Last month

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

"Legendary college basketball coach John Thompson has died known as Big John Thompson took Georgetown tow three final fours in the eighties and 17 Big East titles, becoming the first black coach to guide a team to a national title. More now from CBS Sports College Basketball Insider Jon Rothstein door has been synonymous with great big man, You know, for a long time, and that was really started by John Thompson's abilities to recruit Patrick Ewing recruited Alonzo Mourning recruited to Camden. The jumbo was let do Georgetown, obviously getting Roy Hibbert. So that kind of lineage of big men was created by John Thompson, who was a big man himself when he played problems for the Boston Celtics. It was 6 10. Thompson also led the 1988 U. S national team to a bronze medal in the Olympics. He was 78 years old

John Thompson Georgetown Jon Rothstein Roy Hibbert Alonzo Mourning Basketball Patrick Ewing Boston Celtics Camden Olympics U. S
Basketball Hall Of Famer John Thompson Dies At 78

The Free Agents

00:24 sec | Last month

Basketball Hall Of Famer John Thompson Dies At 78

"It's with a heavy heart that I report. We've lost another basketball icon, legendary Georgetown coach, John Thompson junior known simply as big John Throughout. College. HOOPS has died at age seventy eight. He led Georgetown to the one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, national championship. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of fame and ninety nine and famously coached future hall of famers Patrick Ewing and Alonzo Mourning and Matombo and Alan

John Throughout Basketball Hall Of Fame John Thompson Georgetown Alonzo Mourning Basketball Patrick Ewing Hoops Alan Matombo
Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:28 sec | Last month

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

"The nation's capital, The John Thompson, Georgetown, the great coach there. Georgetown led the Hoyas to the National championship Back in 1980 for Patrick Ewing. John Thompson died today. You might remember him. And if you don't let's just put us this way. If you ever see an old college basketball game, and there's a coach on the sidelines with a white towel slung over his shoulder, That's John Thompson. He was 70 years old

John Thompson Georgetown Hoyas Patrick Ewing Basketball
Mike Pence vows to 'make America great again, again

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:52 min | Last month

Mike Pence vows to 'make America great again, again

"The Republican see their presidential nominee for twenty twenty four give his first campaign speech last night. The Vice President Mike Prints told his party's national convention that they will make America. Great again again in this election, it's. Not so much whether America will be more conservative or more liberal. More Republican or more Democrat. The choice in this election. is whether America remains America some already looking at him not as a dutiful deputy but as a man maneuvering into position for the next presidential election or watching his speech was Angela, Wilson is professor of politics at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom and the US policy political commentator joins me now a very good morning to you Angela. Good morning so making. America. Great again again, your verdict on that slogan please. Not. Particularly Catchy. Is it. but you know Mike Pence's not not typically known for being done amock or An inspirational speaker so It's not surprising that is His final comment. There was not typically inspiration. What he did say was those it the this election will decide what America becomes A. Thus is something that you could argue happens it absolutely every single election but in particular, he had to try to strike a really really neat balance between. Saying that America can become. Great. Again again. Having obviously gone through the coronavirus pandemic. Yes well for small America is. Completely divided in a way that certain ought never seen in in my observation. American politics over the last fifty years. and this both the Democratic National Convention last week. Republican, one, this week speaks to that division. They are both speaking to very, very different audiences in different voters. and. Mike Pence job. Followed that the that he did last night followed what was seen as a traditional job of the vice presidential candidate in that was first of all to be the attack dog. So at. The convention. The vice president is there to be an attack dog on the other party and he certainly did that in attacking Biden in all sorts of ways we can talk about. And secondly to speak to particular demographics and Mike Pence was chosen originally because he spoke to the Christian right demographic, which makes up about sixty to seventy percent of the Republican Party voters and again, he did that last night pointing out how trump has been a friend in his stood with them. So. So in that sense that he do his job yes he absolutely did his job it. Are we going to see a Mike Pence candidacy in twenty twenty, four, I suspect he will try but I don't really think he'll get that far. Let's have a look then at the attack dog approach that Joe Biden took He's he said, president trump set our nation on a path to freedom and opportunity from the very first day of this administration. He said Joe Biden we'll set America on a path of socialism and decline Frankly I didn't find that as shocking as it could have been because the whole point of the Republican convention has been quite a dark one to sort of warned the United States electorate against forces which could destroy this pasta freedom. Not, least it's also quite easy to say that durbar really isn't that much of a socialist at all. What we all thoughts on on his sort of attack. Biden. His attack on. Biden of interesting lady US Sanders words to attack by saying that. Abidin was going to implement some of the policies that Sanders thought was appropriate and so he used. Sanders words to attack by himself, but the the other areas in which he was able to attack Biden quite effectively keep in mind. He was at a military base when he was given when he was. Giving this this talk was to attack by non law and order and on military defense and those traditional conservative areas but also given the audience that he had that went over very well, and of course, given the context of what's going on. Across American cities that went over very well. So it's attack on Biden. CAPIT- in a way that was. About the military and about law and order, but it was certainly in the theme that had been set out Republican Party. Sorry. The Republican convention already that this was a clear contrast between well. Frankly Gordon Evil and evil being socialism or evil being a lack of law and order in our cities. As. Vice President he has. Trodden, very delicate path. There's a great article in The New York Times which describes his modus operandi and says the cumulative effect of Mr Pence's conduct is to create around him a kind of bubble of relative normalcy in which vice. President. Avoids Mr Trump's most explosive in defensive behaviour mostly by pretending it does not exist and he is getting a reputation as being the man who's accustomed to dialing back in private. What Donald Trump bellows in public is true. Well he certainly set himself office not condemning trump last night but as taking his leadership in in the kind of amusing, insane. Yes. What is different but nevertheless, he is a leader and what what pence is. Is as vice president is to to not a on one hand to not question drunk and trump's leadership and on the other hand to be a bridge between trump's Shall we say missteps? And a community that they absolutely have to have behind in, which is the Christian right voters, and that's a really delicate bridge. To to keep. Those voters on board with trump who's not known for his son shall we say moral? Well. If you have him acting as a bridge, the creator of a bubble keeping the electorate safe I mean, are we looking perhaps at the the the first speech of someone making a bid for the presidency in four years? While, he may have those dreams don't actually think that the Republican Party will be looking to him and twenty twenty four. Mike. Pence is not known for his dynamism is not known for his public speaking I thought it was interesting that they gave him an audience last night and the audience was obviously primed to to jump in. and. Be Shouting four years in that sort of thing. So he's kind of public speaking that definitely needs an audience not doesn't go over very well with the voting public. And secondly, I. Think you know. I if by wins and that still is a big if if Biden wins pence will be marred with the the trump presidency in the legacy of that, and I really think the Republican Party may be looking to someone. In the future that that is that is either completely away from the trump presidency, some light, a Ted, Cruz. Or you know I fully expect one of the leading. Candidates in twenty, four, Maith from trump's family. Tell us a little bit more about the the the parallel narrative what's going on in Wisconsin how much was that brought into day three of the convention. Well what was then what is unfortunate for both conventions that many of these speeches habit to have been taped and what we saw in day three of the convention was not all of the speeches were taped. So therefore, did not mention what was going on in terms of Wisconsin, but also in terms of the hurricane that's dot hit Texas Louisiana. And so Mike Pence's speech did stand out and that was able to address both of those those crisis One of the things you mentioned about what is what is His job here, delicate position that he calls trump various students put pinson charge of the corona virus response, and so he will be able at trump will be able to kind of label if it doesn't go well put that onto pence in his lack of leadership or his. Mistakes made but pence was very clear. Last night in this is one thing that I thought was rather shocking that America will have a vaccine by the end of this year. And that's a promise that certainly scientists star saying that we won't that. He won't be able to keep but he does this under the language of the that this will be a miracle that will happen. Tennis Elizabeth about the general polling figures. Now we've got Joe, Biden, Aheadon, what five or six is a key swing states. This is following the Democratic National Convention, but his numbers didn't rise perhaps as many thought they would and Donald Trump's approval rating has now bumped up particularly among white voters. Yes, I, mean I think previously elections there was a larger contending contented independent voters and so what you would see after the conventions was swaying. For each of the Party of those independent voters. But at the moment America is so divided along party lines that that. That that. Percentage of independent voters is is much smaller. And it's not surprising that at trump's upswing is going to be amongst white voters particularly when does riots happening and the black lives matter movement has put some not a lot. But some white voters concerned about what the future may fly finally Andrew you mentioned a moment ago that you think that the next presidential candidate from the Republicans could another trump who might that be? There's quite a. Rogues Gallery to choose from. Well, you know I grew up watching dynasty and the ewings in in Dallas and I will tell you there's nothing more intriguing than good family fight for leadership and so I think we'll all be interested to watch what happens they`re Both which ones end up running the leadership of the Republican Party and which ones may or may not end up. Serving time. We look forward to enter the Wilson from the University of Manchester thank you for joining us on monocle twenty. Four.

Mike Pence Donald Trump Republican Party Joe Biden America Vice President President Trump University Of Manchester United States Wilson Mike Prints Sanders Angela Abidin United Kingdom Wisconsin Mike
Identifying AI Opportunities, a Key to AI Readiness - with Mark Ewing of Eastman Chemicals

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:02 min | Last month

Identifying AI Opportunities, a Key to AI Readiness - with Mark Ewing of Eastman Chemicals

"So. Mark will kick off with just getting your perspective on what the aspects of Ai Readiness are a lot of enterprise leaders. Sort of wondering you know how do we get a already but there's components to that there's different aspects to that. How do you like to break those down Yeah Hey dan first off thanks for having me on today real pleasure to be here. So when I. When I think about readiness I think there's the technical front end side of things that. Have to be addressed, you have to have some some means methods of actually building the solution, but I think more important than that. From an Air Readiness Perspective is a defined need for where is GonNa make an impact in your business. It's easy. Relatively speaking to hire talent who can come in and talk about a I. It's relatively easy to buy software that will do I think where the rubber really needs. The road from Readiness Perspective is leadership who can look at the processes that they deal with on a regular basis and identify where there's value in having intelligent automation through ai or identifying places where there are opportunities to realize a lot of additional value from mining their data and in using the insights there to then build out a solution to help them make faster or better or decisions. I? Think if you don't have that part right there, everything else you're doing is building up a framework that's not gonNA deliver value and so long turn that around likely isn't going to be successful. So, completely understand the the. Just, where you're headed here mark. When you think about I, guess what people can do to arrive at that point where were they can have a clear enough idea to to get things to be successful what folks need to do I guess to get there to that place you're talking about? Sure I think a lot of what we do is try to guide people through a journey of trying to look through the eyes of their line of business operations, right? So If, we look at, for example, a logistics department in a supply chain, where are the places where they're making decisions that are based on data, but those decisions are taking a long time to make or maybe the decisions are made inconsistently. For example, if we want to identify orders that are at risk of shipping late. What can we do to identify and prioritize the rights shipments to get extra attention to ensure that we are delivering s for Lonzo? Right. So looking at that look at our processes and saying, we have an issue of late orders, we want to address that issue today. What we're relying on is watching analysts who manually are digging through the data trying to figure out where an opportunity to make an impact, right. So being look through identify those key elements that are you have data, you have a process today that is utilizing that data to make decisions, but the process is being done by people. It's not necessarily being done consistently or quickly, and so that's where the opportunity comes in for a to make a difference. Yes. It sounds like for you. Part of Ai Readiness what I'm here you articulate is having I guess functional leaders who can have their antenna up for opportunities like that. Right because I think if you don't understand a at a conceptual level, you're not gonNA be able to ask yourself what are the data based decisions whereby there are errors where we could leverage I. IT sounds like there's probably some. Background knowledge folks would need to have that the readiness of those antenna for lack of a better I. Don't know if I'm not shelling this well for you. Yeah. No, I think Dan. That makes sense. Obviously a functional leader would need to understand. where I can make impact worry, i. can't make an impact and I think that's essential at some level because a highly technical individual. If you bring in a data scientist who has a lot of ideas about where things could make a difference, they're gonNA have to try to be pushing that vision up the chain to get buy in from sufficiently senior leadership to invest in that sort of an initiative. And honestly that's a lot of work especially for people who have just hired into a company where they may not know the politics and the INS and outs in all people who are involved as soon as you have leadership who begins to have an idea and a vision of where and how you can make an impact that conversation shifts to a whole from the top up saying, how do we elevate the organization with what we're doing here? At. So if you have the social leaders who are primed and ready with their value cases and then you bring in your talent, now you've got a match made in heaven of we can take action. You can do that quickly. We've got the by, we've got the investment and we also have the framework for the change management is going to be required for in a implementation successful in the long run.

Mark Lonzo DAN Scientist
Oskar Lindblom signs 3-year extension with Flyers worth $9M

Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Oskar Lindblom signs 3-year extension with Flyers worth $9M

"Oscar Lindblom, who 77 months ago was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer. Has signed a three year contract extension with the Flyers, and they are hopeful that he's going to be one of the 31 players on the roster. Tomorrow. They head to Toronto to resume their season in another week, and Boy, this kid he's 23 years old. We learned early in the season, he had Ewing sarcoma. It just seemed like such a rough break and it was, but he's fought it. He's finished the treatment and he's Ah, he's gonna

Oscar Lindblom Flyers Ewing Sarcoma Toronto
Color-coded Runways

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

04:54 min | 3 months ago

Color-coded Runways

"Let me tell you that this is borderline genius. If you ask me, this is just borderline genius all right? Let's color code the runways. I like that it's it's. KINDA UNIQUE DEER VALLEY Because they have a lot of rocks it wouldn't work a lot of other locales OKO although. Fake being what it is, we would probably discover that. Harrison Ford is colorblind but. That was Hodgson agent. Now is just an easy Joko. It's too easy. Sorry about that Harrison. I know he's a listener and It's kind of a clever idea. So this is we found this from a listener I think he's a listener, but a tweet twitter guy Ryan Ewing Nine high-ranking guy. What did I say? You Twitter Guy Twitter? Guy Yeah I. Don't know what the on twitter at twitter guy. We're all twitter guys in this day and age. He tweeted he tweeted. The Phoenix area is one of the most popular regions for flight training as such mistakes do happen. Runway landings have occurred Deer Valley airport. He writes owned by the city of Phoenix Arizona has a unique solution to prevent this different colored rocks surrounding each runway. So basically the what what I would think of as being the grass around the runway apparently is gravel. Zona 'cause grasping grow real quickly. You said wrong way. That's not correct. Wrong runway wrong runway landings. Oh! If I said runway. That was a mistake. You're absolutely right. That was Corrigan Corcoran. Different meaning different meaning. ANYWAYS so they've done apparently have done it with colored gravel. The terrain surrounding the runway and taxiways has a distinct color to it and but I want to know whether ATC, do they say you know land on Purple? Runway, purple instead of instead of landing on on the green dot at Oshkosh. Read read one roster. I can't say one way. Runway Yeah Right. Valley. QUIT GLENN! Wait. Never. Only one drawback or Weakness in it. Being told to land on the color runway doesn't tell you which way on the colored runway will now. That's true. True, but you they could say. Let's see what are. Let's just assume that these are two seven and nine there probably not exactly that. Zuma would picture. It should cut down on the confusion on. is at this piece. Is Strip payment or that? Oh! This is the one surrounded by green now which way on that runway? It's seventy five. Seventy five, so they'll say land on runway to five purple or I don't. Know they'll say land on runway to five left the purple one, which happens to be perfect. Yeah, that'd be an interesting question, Ryan, if you're a listener Give us anything in the in the in the follow up in the responses here, let's see. Someone else made my hair. Practice four joke, but there's a lot of colorblind jokes. CH-. Help for blind pilots. That's that's. This is also true. Well. That's yeah I know. Are Up sorry. From flight DECK IS HE THERE'S A. Problem, with death pilots, because they just don't listen. Higgin hi. Let's just discard this recording is. Really really know all right so. colorizing runways. I I hadn't thought of that I hadn't thought about the. Air! Venture colored dots, thing which apparently is wildly effective. I've haven't landed on those runways during those type. Jeb. You have obviously. Is it I. Don't know what's your reaction to that system as a pilot who's used operated on and off it? It works I mean. A IT works well I'll be seems to work well. I haven't landed on the dots that often. Over the years generally I will get in before the show opens, and although the dots are there, I'm I'm. ABC is not asking me to land on them. generally there's been a few years at that's been. Landed on the DOTS, but they're easy to spot and and. My only concern. In the past has been when landing on the first dot of the runway the one I come to. Its. Knowing, that there's a bunch of traffic and knowing that the runway is constantly in use. My only concern is getting run over from behind

Twitter Harrison Ford Ryan Ewing Deer Valley ABC Hodgson Oshkosh Phoenix Arizona Corrigan Corcoran Zona Zuma JEB Harrison
Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

"The body of George Floyd has arrived in Texas for a third and final memorial service of Ewing is planned for later today in Houston followed by a service imperial tomorrow in suburban Caroline's Texas also later today direct shop and the officer film pressing is the on Floyd snack is scheduled to make his first court appearance in Minneapolis where Floyd died a majority of the city council has vowed to dismantle the city's eight hundred member police department but when Mary Jacob fry showed up among protesters and said he opposed that idea the protesters responded accordingly what do you see of WCCO TV the state of Minnesota has launched a civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis police department I'm I. Kampen

George Floyd Texas Ewing Houston Minneapolis Mary Jacob Fry Wcco Tv Minnesota Officer
Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

"The body of George Floyd has arrived in Texas for a third and final memorial service of Ewing is planned for later today in Houston followed by a service imperial tomorrow in suburban Caroline's Texas also later today direct shop and the officer film pressing is the on Floyd snack is scheduled to make his first court appearance in Minneapolis where Floyd died a majority of the city council has vowed to dismantle the city's eight hundred member police department but when Mary Jacob fry showed up among protesters and said he opposed that idea the protesters responded accordingly what do you see of WCCO TV the state of Minnesota has launched a civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis police department I'm I. Kampen

George Floyd Texas Ewing Houston Minneapolis Mary Jacob Fry Wcco Tv Minnesota Officer
Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Police back off as peaceful protests push deep reforms

"The body of George Floyd has arrived in Texas for a third and final memorial service of Ewing is planned for later today in Houston followed by a service imperial tomorrow in suburban Caroline's Texas also later today direct shop and the officer film pressing is the on Floyd snack is scheduled to make his first court appearance in Minneapolis where Floyd died a majority of the city council has vowed to dismantle the city's eight hundred member police department but when Mary Jacob fry showed up among protesters and said he opposed that idea the protesters responded accordingly what do you see of WCCO TV the state of Minnesota has launched a civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis police department I'm I. Kampen

George Floyd Texas Ewing Houston Minneapolis Mary Jacob Fry Wcco Tv Minnesota Officer
Ewing out of hospital after being treated for COVID-19

Steve Cochran

00:06 sec | 4 months ago

Ewing out of hospital after being treated for COVID-19

"Month basketball hall of Famer Patrick Ewing out of the hospital after being treated for culvert

Patrick Ewing Basketball
NWSL moves to allow training in small groups

WCCO Morning News

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

NWSL moves to allow training in small groups

"Patrick Ewing son says the Georgetown basketball coach and former NBA great has been released from the hospital recovering from covert nineteen at home the national women's soccer league says players may start training in small groups provided it's done under league protocols meets the requirements of local authorities teams will be able to progress to full team training on may thirtieth once a complete five days of small group training Spanish league clubs are not allowed to train with groups of up to fourteen players such a little larger than we've heard

NBA Patrick Ewing Georgetown Basketball
Ewing 'getting better' in battle with coronavirus

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Ewing 'getting better' in battle with coronavirus

"NBA hall of Famer Patrick Ewing is out of the hospital he was being treated for corona virus his son Patrick Ewing junior tweeted by father is now home and getting better we'll continue to watch his symptoms and follow the CDC guidelines I hope everyone continues to stay safe and protect yourselves and your loved ones on quote he also thanked the medical staff who took care of his father in the

NBA Patrick Ewing CDC
Knicks legend Patrick Ewing out of the hospital after testing positive for coronavirus

Dave Ramsey

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Knicks legend Patrick Ewing out of the hospital after testing positive for coronavirus

"Sports Knicks legend Patrick Ewing returning home after a weekend at the hospital with coronavirus met mensen files this report it was announced on Friday that Ewing had tested positive for the virus and was being treated for symptoms Patrick Ewing junior tweeted a thanks to the hospital staff for caring for his father and that he is now home and getting better the former NBA superstar is fifty seven years old and is currently the head coach at

Knicks Patrick Ewing NBA
Knicks legend Patrick Ewing out of the hospital after testing positive for coronavirus

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:20 sec | 4 months ago

Knicks legend Patrick Ewing out of the hospital after testing positive for coronavirus

"And and be a great is out of the hospital as he battles coronavirus come was bill Neal has more from the Harley exterior sports desk Patrick Ewing son says the Georgetown basketball coach in NBA great has been released from the hospital and is recovering from covert nineteen at home the fifty seven year old hall of Famer who played for the whole is in college and the New York Knicks for fifteen seasons announced Friday it has been positive for

NBA New York Knicks Bill Neal Patrick Ewing Georgetown Basketball
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Do you think there's something to the idea that audiences would react more favorably to a story about an Asian family written by a white writer is it just bad luck that that happened in DC any contemporary parallels to that today? Oh, golly. Here like dislike do some landmine hopscotch. Hallway? For the record. I love that book. And I know it's a controversial thing to say. I know Asian American writers who hate that book. I don't care. It's a really beautiful book. And I think Pearl buck was actually a very good person. And she cared a lot about biracial Asian orphans who weren't fed and she spent a lot of her life taking care of very poor people that Asian people had discarded. So for me, I see her as an ally. That said I think for young hill Kong to say that it's unfortunate for to have two books come out about Asians. And therefore the reader only had space for one. I can see why he would say that. But I actually think that Moore's more if people like pachinko, they're going to beat another create a book about Koreans. It's a really dangerous thing to walk around feeling like there's only space for one person of. One group. Well, nobody ever says all we can't read the great Gatsby and Ernest Hemingway novel because we only have room for one idiot syncretic weird white guy on the syllabus. Right, right. Nobody ever says that you know, it reminds me of the first line of pachinko, which is you know, there's like collections of great. I lines in novel history. And I think this has to be one. The first line is history has failed us, but no matter and there's an interview with the guardian where you explain what you meant by that, especially as someone who you know, you yourself. You have an undergraduate degree in history. You said I believe history has failed almost everybody who is ordinary in the world. Do you think the same is true of our literary canon is literature failing ordinary people or is literature the remedy for that failure? I think it's both. I think that it has failed us in many ways. But I think that it can remedy us. And maybe that's romantic for people like us to believe, especially if it has failed. It's like to keep taking the same cough medicine. I'm not sure. But I guess I have to believe that literature can repair us because maybe what we need is multiple books. Like when Arbi Jane Eyre, I think about how much it healed me as a girl who believed that she was very plain and on loved, and that's not to like feel sorry for me. I think most people feel plain unloved, it's not a big deal. I walked around with that sense of consciousness, and when I read that book, it was really important to me. But would it have been more lovely in some ways to have had other create Americans and their stories. Sure. So when I was in college, and I read Kim run young, and that's a pen name for somebody who wrote a book called clay walls to historical novel, and she got no attention at all. And now, it's sort of included in the canons. But I think the thing that you, and I are trying to grapple with is how much space. Do we give for the other in the syllabus? Right. Right. Right. Is it one and knowing that there's an infinite multi. Implicity of otherness right and everybody wants to be able to see themselves in a book. Everybody wants to be able to see themselves in the world. And and feel like they're not alone. But that requires a multiplicity of. Well, that is all my questions for you. Is there anything that you wanted to make sure we talked about? Well, I wanted to tell you from the very beginning that I was really so pleased that you wanted to talk about young hill Kong because he is the OG of Korean literature in America. And it just made me really happy. So thank you. Oh, thank you. It makes me really happy. And we're so glad that you're able to come on. And I hope that a lot of people are going to go out and read his weird books after this. They're actually they're really fun. There's a piker usque aspect to. It's it's really fun. And you just learn so much about what it must have been like at that time..

Arbi Jane Eyre writer cough young hill Kong Kong Ernest Hemingway Moore Gatsby Kim America
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Because we know that's not the way it should be. And I think even going to law school, it really taught me that even though there's a lot of inequities in this country from historically it's well as in present day, we know that we can try to be dressed some of these things and the wheels of Justice churn incredibly slowly, but we have to keep pushing the wheel, and I think that level of belief that the wheel can progress is really very American. I'm not surprised at an American took on the Korean Japanese history. As opposed to people who are much more resigned to the fact that you know, life is shaky and it's gonna station. So you did live in Tokyo for four or five years. Did you experience racism during your time in Japan, and that also influence the lens that you brought to the book? I did experience a lot of racism against me because I'm created always took me by surprise. Because I think there's a kind of naive belief that when you're educated, and you have some means that you're sheltered from discrimination. But very often people would refer to the fact that I had Korean blood, and because I had Korean blood that made me a suspicious person. And this happened so often that it really took me by surprise because sometimes people would save these things without thinking of me, let's say like they would be talking about other Koreans or Chinese people. And I was thinking while you're my friend. How can you say these things and you realize like, that's what you have to take on when you're in a world in which the norms are that there are good, Asians and their bodies, and in Japan, the wrong, Asians, are people from outside of Japan. So as you know. During this episode. We've been lucky enough to listen to the archival interview between studs terkel and young he'll Kong, and he wrote the first Korean American novel. That's right and your novel as I've read, and you can correct me if I'm wrong is the first written in English that discusses the experiences in the history of Korean people living in Japan. Now, I know that questions of being the first and being the only as a really complicated thing. And in some ways it can be special. But it can also be burdensome it can also be kind of depressing. I always think it's sort of depressing to be the first person to do anything in the twenty first century. But what are your thoughts on that? You know, the idea of firsts and first nece to do those things matter to you or not so much. I think even talking to my therapist. So I. I think the processing is the right adjective. I found it really discouraging because the whole time. I kinda thought the reason why no one has done, and it's because nobody wants it. So what makes you think that you're so special like I had these voices in my head like why are you bothering doing this? And I did watch other people become more successful doing other things. And I thought, wow, they have security they have health insurance. They have money in the Bank. They have an office. And there were definitely parts of my career that I felt this kind of longing to be normal..

Japan Kong Tokyo Bank five years
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"The Guggenheim fellowship an honorary doctorate from Monmouth college and a Radcliffe fellowship at Harvard University and recently, she was the runner up for the Dayton literary peace prize, and I have to admit this might be my favorite biographical detail. You were jeopardy clue. I was the question was Korean-born min Jin Lee wrote a twenty seventeen book with this Japanese pinball game as its title. Of course, the answer is pachinko, but you have to say what is pachinko right answering the form of a question. And I believe the person got it. Right, right. She did Burkey got it. Right. How bad mouth bad? Well. Welcome to bughouse. Wear. It is great to have you here. Thank you for having me. It's really an honor to be here. So one thing many of our listeners might not be familiar with is the experience of Korean people in Japan people like the characters in your book and the layers of social constraint and straight up racism that they experience, obviously, this is a huge issue. But could you talk briefly about that social context and the experiences of Zion Ichi in Japan today? Oh, sure. Well, essentially, what's really important to know is Japan colonized Korea between nineteen ten to nineteen Forty-five at ended with the end of the World War Two because Japan was an ally of the axis powers and then during this era, a lot of Koreans ended up going to Japan for economic reasons as well as some of them were forced to come. So you have this incredibly humongous population at the height. I believe it's about two million people and that eventually many of them repatriated going back to Korea which was by the time eighteen forty five divided into two. There's an increase. Really humongous of people who ended up staying in Japan. Because if you wanted to go back to Korea, either south or north you are limited in what you could take back and also usually all their homes were gone, their families were gone, and there's a lot of cholera and illness, so many than decided to stay, but in deciding to stay it was a very difficult law, and even today the Koreans Japan suffer a lot of social discrimination as well as legal discrimination. Now, you did not grow up in Japan. You're born in Seoul, and you grew up in queens, but you did live in Japan for a period as an adult. So the story in the novel is in some ways quite different from your story. But you said in one interview that the topic became like, a compulsion for you. Why is this something you wanted to write about I think that the reason why felt like a compulsion to me is because when I heard about the plight of cranes in Japan when I was eighteen years old, and I was in college. I didn't realize that people could be so hated based upon their immutable care. Actress deke's and that sounds really naive. But it's not that naive. Think about the fact that queens is a place even today, which has the highest number and variety of immigrants Nin tire nation. So it's really normal to be different when you're in queens. So I had a really good life in queens. And when I heard about the cranes in Japan, I kind of freaked out because I couldn't believe how mean people were. So I felt like I had to figure it out. And I think if you really want to understand Koreans in the world, you can't not understand the intersection of Japan and Korean history. So I spent some time thinking about writing a book, and I had no idea that it would take almost three decades of my life. So in a way, it sounds like even though this book is situated both between Japan and Korea. It sounds like being from queens, really shaped the point of view that you brought as a writer. Oh, absolutely. And also brought the kind of rage. It brought a kind of anger and a sense of indignity. Nation about the fact that people should not be treated this way in the same way. Like, if you think about how angry we are about the way women are treated or people of color in this country that comes from us a space of entitlement..

Japan queens Koreans Korea Burkey Jin Lee Guggenheim fellowship Monmouth college Harvard University bughouse Dayton cholera Seoul deke writer eighteen years three decades
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"This is a remarkable trip this trip. This is the great track of young hill Kong ten and eleven three hundred miles where you're scared to. No, no, I wasn't now. I. Wasn't scared that then you saw the first western train. Yes. What was your impression of saying? Well, it was. Well, something you know, you heard of you never saw just like dragon. You never saw dragon. You know, but you're very much impressed. Like a dragon. And then you came to the city. Hey, it's me again eve I feel like those two could go on all day. And I love listening to them. So it pains me to interrupt except. It's for a really good reason. Which is tell you that it's almost time to bring on Mingeon Lee. So recently, I read a phenomenal novel that I hope many of you may also have read, and if you haven't you really should it's called pachinko, and it was written by Mingeon Lee. Our guests for today. It was one of the New York Times book reviews. Ten best books of two thousand seventeen and it was a finalist for the national book award in my opinion. It is deserving of those accolades and more. The book follows the experience of a Korean family over multiple generations. It begins in Korea. But the majority of the novel takes place in Japan in a few minutes. We're going to have a conversation with Mingeon Lii, which I'm very much looking forward to. But I I want to share but of history that I'm definitely still learning about after reading pachinko history, that's very much illustrated in the novel just a heads up the discuss. Of sexual assault that I mentioned at the beginning of this episode is coming up shortly from nineteen ten and nineteen Forty-five Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This had intense political, social and cultural consequences. For the first ten years of that occupation Japan ruled via strict military intervention in nineteen thirty nine the Japanese government. Pushed many Koreans to change their surnames to Japanese names, if they chose not to they weren't able to participate in anything that required, government documentation. If you didn't have a Japanese name, you couldn't go to school get a job or get a ration card to receive food schools and universities didn't allow people to speak Korean and over two hundred thousand Korean historical documents were burned these kinds of tactics were an intentional effort to straight up a race Korean culture during the World War. Two years Koreans living under Japanese imperialism were forced to fight on the front lines forced to work in factories and many women and girls referred to by the euphemism term comfort women were forced into sexual slavery at the hands of Japanese soldiers. Here's one of them. I'm Johnson talking to NPR about her experience of being kidnapped and enslaved at age thirteen. Cunanan go yet. You'll be what I remember that. I was forcibly taken out of Korea and taken to China. More than you could tap Munia. Go. What can I say, they did all the things they wanted to do according to their desires it was during these colonial years that young hill Kong actually, left Korea because he was a vocal anti imperialist activist. He went to Canada, and then the United States, but many other Koreans went to Japan it self during the wartime years, the Japanese government forced round three quarters of a million Koreans to work in Japan, and my nineteen forty five when the war ended there were about two million Korean people living in Japan altogether. They became known as I in Ichi, which means residing in Japan, a term that implies they'd be there temporarily, but many Koreans have stayed in Japan for generations in today. There about seven hundred thousand Koreans living in Japan. Let's jump to our interview with Mingeon Lee. And we'll learn more about their experiences and her novel. Men gin Lee is the celebrated author of two novels her first novel free food for millionaires was a bestseller in her more recent novel pachinko, which came out in two thousand seventeen was a bestseller as well and a finalist for the national book award and was also named by the New York Times is one of the top ten books of two thousand seventeen she's received many prestigious awards, including.

Japan Korea Japanese government national book award Mingeon Lee New York Times young hill Kong Mingeon Lii gin Lee Kong NPR assault Cunanan United States Canada Johnson China
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And then Komu sharply told me says our guest young he'll come that. I was impolite this younger generation, the becoming rotten vulgar, obscene. And I can see the world is going to be held and he was much upset and trembles with rage shortly afterward, he gave some conservative. I'm more safe student that is an A. And when the wine came Komu drank too much after that began to weep decencies of thing of the past the world has no more respect for ancestors. An old man. Oh, why am I two sons worthless? Why do not take care of their old father? So he doesn't have to work among young scoundrels in ingrates doesn't the sound so familiar today. This was year when you were small, and you hear it again, don't there there are some differences. Of course, you know, the, otherwise the younger generation is. Move part of the differences, you that you see for instance, at the time. I was cutting my hair and eight goes something very radical and not good, you know, consider because hey was part of my patents Confucius said the body of the son. He's flesh. He's limbs. And he's hey belong to the parents. Therefore, he must not hold these injure them in any way. Now today, these young fellows of teenage generation, they don't cut they don't wanna cut their hair the other way, you what's going the opposite. He touts Beatles. So that this is the reverse a reversal of custom of a country. Yeah. You are the little rebel. You are becoming westernize than that. So you you were then the good Korean young, man. A man what have the top not what? Yes. Yes. And you cut this. This cut this off and your father who is a very good man, though, beat you. He was yes. Yes. That's what I saw. It's. But here we have the reverse now to place at both represent a certain kind of seeking don't they? Yes. That's right. So we come to now throughout there is the shadow in your book, as you are growing up, and seeking and you know, you must leave this village to find a better education. There's always the shadow of Japan that sense represents the west. Yes, I to just the way the sensitive poet in nineteen eighteen or nineteen fifteen and twenty s in the west of fair test Elliott put in this is dead land. This is cactus land. I felt that there was no more a hope there. That's why I had leave then. And so you leave you had to go. You wanted to go to Seoul. That's a big city because they have the western contact. And so and so did you have on your way? This is a remark you took a walk free hundred miles. How'd you do the yet no food you had a little liquor? Stick. Plenty of those two dark. I would go into a village at that time there were schools, they all fashioned contrition schools still going on so. I had to write conventional Chinese poin to impress the teacher to get my room and food everywhere. I went I looked at the landscape mountains and streams and off the conventional points. How old were you? Then I was between ten and eleven and then the teacher was impressed. Of course, he provided, you know, food than than slow you where this little ten year old vagabond, the traffic poet that get crazy poet uncle and away had imbued you with us love, and you would make up poetry to fit the village slayer. Yes. And they would take you in. Yes. They knew when you told you are too proud to say who your uncle was. No, no. But finally, they would investigate that, you know, and they were bandits following you. And because you had some little money stock. You couldn't find and little old woman who was afraid to shut the door on you. Then let you sleep on the floor. Yes. Yes. Because you haven't been Jap on ice. Was that a word that was used then? Japanese the meant westernize. Yes. And going into Denver. The idea..

Komu Beatles Japan Seoul Elliott Denver ten year
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"It's a good bite with certain beauty at us. The growth of an artist who is going on yet Rothe of an artist. The end of one society would seem one time. And of course, in the more, dramatic and broader scope is your grass roof, which is another world at eastern world and the westernization of and you beginning if Pepsi could pick up this particular conversation, we're having yesterday you were talking about cycles. How important was the sixtieth birthday for a man was the end of one the beginning of another. And here's a case where you were. Now, growing you a questioning this was co Moore was a teacher the schoolmaster was. Yes, he was the school my, but you you were always questioning weren't you? Always. Yes. Okay. Now, we're gonna get something really special a little bit of light theater. Play acting. If you will fun fact that not everybody knows studs was actually an actor. In fact, he got the nickname studs from a director and a play where they were to actor's name Louis, so Lewis Turco became studs. Terkel? Let's hear a little bit of studs terkel, the actor in the next part of his conversation with Kong, suppose, you read that that sequence I will be cool MU schoolmaster and you'll be you young you'll con as you about nine or ten at the time. Then how old were you then about oh about seven Monterey around? I very soon began to argue with the call more the schoolmaster all the time. I insisted that the western mathematics taught in the marketplace was much better than that taught in this school, and I prefer to use it. He says no the counting roads of short chopsticks used by our excellent forefathers were far superior to any myth known by foreigners. He made a very serious didactic speech on how our Korean missile had lasted thousands of years. This was he's one great argument. Always. But our way has lasted hasn't. It is much much older than the new. One time I say to him Confucius was wrong when he said that earth was flat earthers around. Where did you get the nonsense stuff earth is flat and heaven is round? No because I saw glob in the western school on the other side from us upside down is continent called America on which missionaries live. Why have we never fallen off? We have existed here ever since remotest times and co looked at me you over pipe as if to say deny at your peril that is because we are too small a little on going around the branch or not know if you were upside down or right side up Korean scholar with the learning of Confucius, would no we are not so small as all that that Japanese. Have been talking to you. And then another time I asked him that as you young con asked to do, you know, why the peaches fall to the ground? He looked at me blinking, and then taking his long pipe from his mouth. He spit on the carpet, which is an unsanitary way. He had white peaches fall on the ground because it is natural at his natural road of peaches that become ripe. But Don Juno by nature, and he became red. It is because of the law of craft station..

Confucius studs terkel Pepsi Don Juno Monterey Lewis Turco Moore director America Kong Louis
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Melting music steers upon the sky and softens sounds along the water's die smooth flow, the waves, the self gently play Belinda smile and all the world was gay. It made me happy bye products. I got the words curse how to pronounce them. But you got of the impulse impulse through. The word dutiful words, you got the impulse and got the sense of beauty smooth flow the waves disasters gently play young Il Kong was someone who had a deep admiration and knowledge of English literature. Maybe he was Bill. Building on a love of art that was encouraged by his parents in Korea who instilled an appreciation of painting and poetry. And here's what he has to say about his uncle who was a poet. Craze put on ker was a teacher. He never got paid for that. But the people patterns of the children see if you needed the noble coke, and they provide one shoes or anything like that you call him your create several because he's crazy poet. I'll tell you why that's not maybe. You seem to have you have the coins and feeling and sympathetic thinking with me therefore, you understand that would crazy poi- because he was a tower. The thousand teach that the greatest thing you can do is do nothing therefore the greatest appoint never rights appointments correctives composer, never makes any music the greatest painter never makes any picture once he came to the states Kong was also contemporaries with some major heavyweights in the literary world of his own era in this part of the interview, he'll talk about a few of those Thomas Wolf was a hugely influential novelist and Maxwell Perkins and editor who is famous for making names out of people like Thomas Wolf, and f Scott FitzGerald and Ernest Hemingway who also get mentioned here. Let's take a listen, I think of what Thomas Wolf of San Thomas Wolf of Lakota angel. He said Kong is a born writer everywhere, he is free and vigorous he has an original and poetic mind loves life again and again in his book. A person a scene action is described in a few words of rich and vivid brevity? We come again to the matter s Simpson, I suppose it was wolf you say Thomas wolf's over at the first four chapters in the to them to Maxwell Perkins. And the, you know, he brought me an advance a check five hundred dollars at that time. I was only an instructor my monthly salary. You know, first of the month getting the monthly pay. You know, this whole year seller was divided in twelve months wasn't as much as five hundred dollars. And that was the biggest check made in my name. You know at that time. This was a nineteen thirty round thirteen. Yes. Thirty and I had a very strange feeling. You know, I was playing with words words as the Kelly, of course, that could bring the money like that. And do you remember because you you were part of the circle of friends then? Yes. Yes. Where where Thomas Scotland, Gerald? Yes, Hemingway only I ran into Skopje German hemming on Wednesdays and Maxwell Perkins dining modem called trae. Oh, you know. But Tom, and I talk. Taught the same courses in the same department English department at New York University. So we used to see each other every teaching it's interesting because see isn't that strange? Even now as I think a same kind of poignant feeling when I first read lacomb angel of Thomas Wolf, the feeling I have in reading your book here too. It's a good bye to a certain innocence..

San Thomas Wolf Maxwell Perkins Il Kong Bill Belinda smile Ernest Hemingway Thomas Scotland Korea ker New York University Tom instructor Simpson Kelly Scott FitzGerald editor writer Gerald five hundred dollars
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"But we couldn't actually make a collective decision to move forward because we were afraid that this is a book that only we would find funny, and it was proof that we were bad parents. And one of the stumbling blocks for us funnily enough was this inability to get our minds around wearing a bookstore. This book would go because we knew it didn't belong in the children's section and one of the turning points actually was when Johnny walked the book into green light books in Brooklyn around the corner from his house was like where would you put this? And they. Or like, the parenting section and Johnny called me. And he was like your. There's a parenting section, and we were like, oh, I guess we are bad parents. You know, certain things I don't wanna children's section. I don't want. My ten year old stumbling on when she's browsing and our local bookstore. They're probably not for her. So I think that to some degree those demarcations make sense at least on on an age appropriateness level. I always think about Percival Everett's satire erasure which begins with the main character who's an author who's who's a black author. But he writes like reinterpretations of Greek myths and stuff, and he walks into the bookstore, and he can't find his books, and it's explained to him that there in the African American section, and he's like, I'm rewriting like Sophocles like why would you put that shit there? You know, I think it's that point that the utility of it breaks down or the kind of ways that John refraction gets marginalized that you know, Seifi isn't treated. Seriously as literature or fantasy isn't treated seriously literature, and one of the things I really like about the moment that we're in right now is that these boundaries are getting broken down and dissolved not by the industry, but by writers who refuse to care where they're categorized or how they're categorized. You know, the kind of thing that plagued somebody like Kurt Vonnegut where he was like a scifi writer who had to claw his way out of that barrel. Does not really bother or fact Jonathan Letham or Marlin James who's like, yo I'm writing a fine. You know, I'm writing the African game of thrones right now. Like put it wherever the fuck you want like, I'm good. You know, I think that's a cool thing about the moment. We're in is that a generation of authors who were like raised in an environment where highbrow lowbrow distinctions were insignificant or we kind of obliterated them, you know, like Victor, the Vall right or Matt Johnson or Paul Beatty, or you know, some of what I do as well. Like, we don't we don't really care. We don't make those decisions like comic books. Aren't less important to us than you know, Moby, Dick. So we just kind of do what we do and let the chips fall where they fall, and, you know, render some of these distinctions less and less meaningful. I hope it's not a cliche to say this. But I feel like there's something sort of hip hop about that, you know, like I feel like it's not a coincidence. That writers coming of age in the hip, hop generation would also have this capability for kind of remixing alighting these different John right total and thinking about like, sampling culture. And but it's funny because I think that like when you are a writer, and you're setting out to make a piece of art. These are not considerations. We think of as writers like where you know. Is it going to be on the front table as it going to be on the side table? What's the categorization gonna be on Amazon? And then there's a whole industry built around these categories and divisions. I agree with what you said about hip hop, though. I mean, if you hadn't brought it up, I would said the same like it, sampling culture. But it's also this this fundamental idea of kind of intellectual democracy. Through sampling through collage where you know, there's no quarter given to anything wack, even if it comes from somewhere. Cool like a wack James Brown record is still wack, right? And we won't use it. But like a fresh monkeys drum brake or a fresh drum break from the Mickey Mouse club is still fresh, and we will use it. And I think when you approach the world that way ideas, that way, aren't that way politics that way you end up with something that is built to kind of bulldoze these boundaries..

writer Johnny John refraction Brooklyn Percival Everett Sophocles James Brown Kurt Vonnegut Moby Jonathan Letham Amazon Seifi Paul Beatty Marlin James Victor Matt Johnson ten year
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"To ask oneself one really believes most of the was, I know really got ask themselves what they really feel about miscegenation on a personal level and not as not as a kind of abstract favor to me. I don't care what you know. I'm not important here right now. What is important is what you really think, what you really feel it has to be personal than conflict has personally avoid this. But everything begins that someone speaks says, I said, of course, miscegenation is right as you say to track sociological way, but then has to be thought of personal immediate term. That's right. Otherwise really doesn't mean anything and what is worse. If you take an attitude, we've never examined it. When a crisis comes, you'll be surprised at what you can do, what base things you can do and what good things you can do, what good things you can do. You know what you're doing, cannot be an attitude as what base things you can do if you're not as fully matures, you think you are right. The attitude, the attitude is called when when when you call to take a risk to defend what you say, you believed. And then comes the period of rationalization of excuses. I wo- I wouldn't mind, you know, but I don't care if she marries him. However. So it's the Butson Lee, however, is that somehow must be. Pinpointed that Dr. Whenever we hear the butt of the however no matter how well meaning that speaker might be with apparently got the stay with that bunch. I ever since the keys key is what is really demand in this country. I think it's very important and probably won't be done. Is that'd be surrender the notion, surrender the notion of being like nation. It's an to use this idea anyway, you know, and was waiting to me negroes here occupying peculiar dangerous vision that they do. We're going to be called by nation anymore. Maybe could make this revision in our optic. This then is Ron the acceptance of the phrase or the idea of the image. A word I hate him. Vision of white nation is just as wrong as a. Like, let's say, a black nation, both equally raw. They're both equally wrong this and I would. I would hate to see the old nightmare repeated the next two thousand years. As we say she on the other foot. On the other foot of the fire fire more people have cut on the world and Asians. And this is to something I suppose that we as white people not in the Sanford of just protection standpoint of moralities. We should think of of reality, yes, form what Vimal people have cut on the world and then Caucasians this is the way it is. This is the way it is. And you know, we all we don't all know, but we are not the self. I don't. We are not the anointed where the cellphone exactly not. The chosen of God is why people always thing because it creates acuity situation which. Why people think that. Coaster negro gets, it'd be like them. The better is well, I don't. I don't accept the proposition at all. You know. And I don't mean to suggest that you become like me, the better off you are either, but. I don't see any reason why we can't live. No. In peace as it were, you know, and enjoy the things which which different without nickname. That's right. That's right. I'm thinking of view and a panel shows couple of years ago and it was a good man. And he said to you, somewhere in the discussion was rather heated. You very well. But he said to you, I accept you and you said to him, I don't mean to be rude so, but who are you to accept me? Well, yeah, this is this is what I mean. Most people make something quite innocently. Who am I to accept you. I'm trying to find where the holy oil came from. Yeah. So there's nothing I can say here that's going to top that as a closer. So I'm thinking we should probably just end episode, but, hey, you can hear studs, terkel, 's entire unedited interview with James Baldwin and over a thousand other interviews at studs, terkel dot org. And here's a little teaser for our next episode. Let's see..

Ron terkel Butson Lee James Baldwin two thousand years
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And as the home true and the inability, you know, the refusal to think the same people suppose I guess I gathered, I suppose there's some debate between Mississippi and United States. No, I don't see their two sides that question. You know, it's a question should have been resolved under years ago. Never had to sides rather interesting, two sides to crazy kind of coin here, and the client is not legitimate metal. Apparently that's the seeing only one side of Cuba but seeing two sides vis-a-vis Mississippi's. Yes, yes. And by the way, this has great repercussions in Africa too. I'm very glad west Africa this morning to try to explain to anyone in Africa what the government is doing. Why those mobs in New Orleans, why this fantastic hassle about letting somebody have a Cup of coffee is a very unenviable task because it can't be defended. And on the other hand, you know, right. I think one has no right to to allow the Africans to to to cling to to be submerged by all them as apprehensions about the United States. No one is always when you're out of the United States and having to say it's not that bad. You know, even though something in the. Of your mind was maybe it is do no, but still when's got one of whatever calls to try to achieve some kind of clarity. Therefore, you try to explain to the rating ship all the states to each other and the whole history which resulted in this terrible impasse do no, but it reduce ably. It would do with the African ask you of, I will in your country and if I were an American, but what happened to me there. This handicaps, this handicaps. All the American have, it's in Africa, much more than Americans are willing to realize. And when you have a situation in which government is willing to invade Cuba nor the free, the Cubans as its ads and cannot get one negro boy university of Mississippi. Who do you think your fool ING? And I don't blame him. All right. Let's pause it there for a second Baldwin's reflections here are really interesting because they allow us a glimpse of how people were actually thinking and talking about these hot button issues in the early nineteen sixties today. If you look at a history textbook in the twenty first century, you usually will not see the desegregation of ole miss depicted as a case where they were to reasonable size to consider. They don't say some people were integrationists and some were segregationists and we have to consider both sides. Instead, you'll see the integration of ole miss depicted as a moral triumph. The textbook say that were bad people trying to stop the school from being integrated in their good people who wanted it to happen and implicitly we all see ourselves as good people, but Baldwin is illustrating here that lots of people who considered themselves good, reasonable liberal people used this sort of gotta hear both. Side's argument to enable segregation. In other words, segregation wasn't just maintained by big, famous, powerful people like bull. Connor the man behind the fire hoses and police dogs used as weapons against civil rights, protesters, or people like governor. George Wallace who famously said. Segregation and..

Africa Cuba United States Mississippi government Baldwin university of Mississippi west Africa New Orleans George Wallace Connor
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Which is a kind of kind of joy among the people which is very, that always sounds corny where joy is always terribly suspect. We're told me more about that about this joy among the people and some of the countries that visited began for. I went there with my one of my sisters. And the way began as to net to be typical of the way it was going to continue. Standing in line at that at that car customs shed. Waiting to be allowed in. Glad arrived to be the ride in a car without any reasons cannot fault. Well, when we while it was ending online and a little girl about three, maybe four. But during that more than that, it was standing some distance from holding mother's hand. Moved over my sister and smiled. And then a little girl left. Her mother came running over to Gloria and made make pick her up. And all the children we met in west Africa will like that. And I never saw why Soviet ready crying child, and also anybody beat a child. And now the sounds no, I suppose it's very. Dangerous to the conclusion of any kind such a. From this. And yet it seems to me it was very, very important. Someone's had to me, it's impossible to often in Africa, all the children belong to all the all the grownups. And as far as I could see and everywhere I was entirely true and you could tell by the way children treated you by the way children treated you? Well, the way they came to you with a certain kind of. Openness, no, no, no, self consciousness. No. They you were, and then they were obviously, you know you since you were grown up since you talking about some of the west African countries and the sense of Gye, which perhaps could be acquainted with sense of freedom to kind of freedom is perhaps some of the countries is going on the fields of say, theater, writing. Creativity. Yeah, you find a great deal of harder to Todd into assessed for me because. I put it in a way. Great Barrier of language. Now, I don't mean that quite the way it might sound. For example, some poets working in French African African poets working French-Language will very, you know, who have very important. And of course, when things Sangob you think of 'em is out. I, but when I say the barrier of language, I'm fairing to the fact there's so many languages in Africa, you know, and that. Time. I think about this time, you know, poetry about to be produced out of these various dialects. No fool then have to work in French or English. Do you know how this becomes then that is unique is not to say an idea that have such a variety of dialects and languages that it's hard to pinpoint who the creative centrally. That's right because it may be very great poet living in this village running a language which is which has no currency, except in the village all you know what I imagine they're not what will come out of this eventually. I think something very rich, not very, very gated to try it and we'll change French and English while it will change. You mean did you feel a census of in language or. Well, the problem I have an education, for example, is how to that save your schoolteacher in west African and you're teaching English on friendships. Yes, he matters. The problem is how to..

west Africa Gloria Todd
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"That thing like black women where we're also black, right? Black queer. People are also black actress. People are also black and who's to say, who's issues get to be at the center who's have to be at the margins, right? Write your book and makes me think, of course of of the fire next time. And I think some of the style of your pros also made me think about that book. And I wonder if you see yourself as writing in the legacy of Baldwin, not only in your political orientation or your identity, but in your actual kind of craft as a writer, one could only wish you know. I would love to be like sure. But what I, what I gain from Baldwin is bought wins, insistence on writing into being. Black life and interior already of black life, a black, radical politic that is intersectional. But when style was so bold is so just unapologetically black. But when the thing that I picked up from Bart his, he's awesome artist. It isn't just like polemics. He crafted sentences, right? That had rhythm and cadence, a particular sort of style that was remarkably beautiful. I can only please, I I'm nowhere close to to try to to mimic that. But I certainly thought when writing a book, how how might I write a book? That is honest and unflinching bear, but also are full. You know that that has a music -ality that if you read the words at loud that you might, you know you can sense the rhythm. The Bob, the sort of the distance sometimes between our two spaces that exist create moments of like meditation, like I really did think about, but when sort of words and works and influences. And that's what I tried. I know how successful. I think it's important to name that lineage and I understand the self deprecating urge. But you know, the beauty of legacy is that it's not like we're like, you're the net, you know what I mean? But it's like, who? Who are your people? You know what I mean? Like in whose lineage who speaks for you, and who are you trying to come from who you know where you're trying to go? I think it's really beautiful to to own that, and it certainly is a beautiful book. So I'm not. I'm not gonna let you get away with to myself, never occasion, but I get it. I get it. So in the interview with studs terkel that we include in this episode between studs and James Baldwin. They talk about the fact that many people perceive the book another country which had just come out right before the time of this interview. They perceive the book is like a negative book, Baldwin response that by saying, why was trying to serve some bitter medicine. And it really reminds me of the critique that black writers get a lot like, oh, your book doesn't offer any hope..

James Baldwin writer Bob terkel
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I am so excited to talk to our guest today. Who is someone I think is so sharp so insightful such a truth teller, and also a very kind person Darnell more is at journalists and activists. Currently, he's editor at large caches, and previously he was a senior editor and correspondent at Mike, and he's also the co managing editor at the feminist wire his activism and advocacy. Take many, many forms, including organizing the black lives matter rides to Ferguson Missouri after Mike Brown was murdered and working to develop infrastructure chapter system of the black lives matter network across the country and lucky us Darnell has a new book. It's a memoir called no ashes in the fire coming of age, black and free in America. It's about growing up in Camden and beyond in it he writes, I am a black man who has loved and been intimate with men and women, a black man who defies societal norms, a black man who grew up in age of hip hop and aids. And a black man from the hood. I couldn't write a memoir full of life stories without animating all the invisible and not so hidden forces that rendered my blackness criminal. My black, manhood, vile, my black quickness, sinful and my black city hood. This book is testimony. It is a cultural political history, bringing to light the life of a black boy maneuvering through a city whose past he never knew Darnall more. Welcome to the show. So one thing I feel like I've noticed in many other people have commented on as well as that. A lot of the conversation around Baldwin still tends to omit the fact that he was a gay man. And in your book, you write that latte, queer writers and thinkers are the names. Some still refuse to remember and celebrate. What are your thoughts on that admission as regards Baldwin and even beyond him, black, radical politics, black movement, and organizing ten already to imagine as the domain of black, heterosexual sister under men. We imagined folk who speak articulately on behalf of like the race, quote, unquote to be the Martin Luther King's of the world to be black suspender men in suits to to be of a certain type of sort of ilk. And that's what we listen to, and that's who we sort of tend to to lift up as as our leaders as people that we respect. So in so many ways, that make sense to me that, but when has been marginalized within not only literature, but also within a sort of genealogy, a black, radical politics period because of his quickness. But here's the thing even today I was thinking about when we organizing and from Ferguson organizers to folk who was part of the movement for black lives and this current milieu, you know, the resistance was still there folk with say things like, why are you bringing up transgender stuff? Why are you talking about this quite like, you're, you're distracting us from the real issues issue. We'll get to that later. We'll get to that later. The real issue was black. Men may read black straight men are being gunned down. That's what we should be focusing on. We get the stuff later. Right. Why else often about the sexism and feminism stuff without thinking that so many of the folk who have made this movement possible are the very folk you're attempting to leave out of the conversation, you know, and it's been a long standing problem and also that we're black to write to me, that's always kind of the obvious logical fallacy..

Darnell Baldwin senior editor managing editor Martin Luther King Camden Darnall Mike Brown America Missouri Ferguson
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I've all guests we've had in the past several years of of the wax museum. Perhaps the one who's caused the most conversation, not controversy really never controversy amongst people of enlightment get questions, probing questions asked and being made to think of all the guests we've had Jimmy Baldwin is certainly the one that was caused much of that conversation. And incidentally, the issue perspective with the jank interview is now I imagine something of a collector's item and James Baldwin guest. Once again, you've written a book since then the book you spoke with a book another country time, what you were writing in Switzerland, and the book has come out since and has received reviews that are pro and con very pro and very calm. But you know, very building reception. I don't know what I expected. I like the book myself, of course, when I say that, but I mean, I do. It seems to have frightened. Some people. Why is very hard to say since in some way after all that tried me first and now I can't remember precisely where my areas of distress were. You know when I was working it out because it's something you blind memory, I think. The people seem to think of it as a very harsh and bitter book, and in some ways is but. In my own mind. Anyway, it's very affirmative book. And if I may be called me about it, you know, it's meant to be bitter when it bitter. The way medicine has been. And trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in America. According to me, from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed, and it's really a book about the nature of the American moments and the dangerous. That is a hard it is for people to establish any real communion with each other and the chances they had to take him to do it. Hey, this is eve again. Sorry to interrupt you. I just want to pause there for a second. So Baldwin just said something really interesting that I want to talk about a little more because it really resonates with me his point about people calling his book bidder and his point that it's really something like bitter medicine. I love that metaphor, and it makes me think about the fact that black writers sometimes get criticized or questioned about the idea of optimism or hopefulness. We heard it a lot wind tunnel hoc- coats is booked between the world and me came out, oh, this book is so great, but where's the hopefulness in my own experience I've been asked so many times in interviews, if I'm quote optimistic unquote about Chicago or about the country. And to me that question kind of misses the point. I have a lot of other close friends who've had their work characterizes being sad when they themselves don't think of it as sad. And I feel like all of these comments kind of misunderstand what the work is trying to do when a doctor publishes a steady about a disease, they don't face the same critique. Why are you being so negative about cigarettes and lung cancer? And in many ways, that's how Baldwin saw himself as a social critic of America. Someone whose job it was two point out the ugly truths about the reality in which we live, even if they're a little negative. It's meant to be bitter when it's the way medicine has been. I'm trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in the marathon coding. To me from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed. It reminds me of one of my favorite essays written by Langston Hughes. It's called the negro artists and the racial mountain. In it Hughes contends with the challenges of identity politics and representation that black artists face the essays from nineteen twenty six. And it's kind of amazing how much of it resonates today. Hughes says the negro artists works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. Oh, be respectable, right? About nice people show how good we are. Say, the negroes be stereotyped. Don't go too far. Don't shatter our luge about you don't amuse us too seriously. We will pay you say the whites later on. In the same essay, Hugh says, we younger negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark skinned selves without fear or shame if white people are pleased. We are glad. If they are not, it doesn't matter..

Jimmy Baldwin Langston Hughes James Baldwin Edward America Switzerland wax museum lung cancer Chicago Hugh
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"We think that these voices from our shared past can teach us a few things about history and maybe make us learn some things about our own time. So we'll hear these voices from the archive and from time to time we'll talk to some folks from today who have something to add to the conversation. Now, what about me, the person that's just been talking at you for several minutes? Well, I am your host viewing. I'm a writer sociologist question asker reader, Jay Walker over enthused internet user and like studs. I am a loud and proud Chicagoan. You'll hear lots of me chiming into the conversations from the past with some thoughts on the present. Okay. So let's look at this checklist. You know who says. His, you know who I am before we go any further last order of business is I should take a second, explain the slightly weird name at this podcast. Bughouse square was the nickname for a park here in Chicago, where during the first half of the twentieth century, soapbox orders and St. debaters would gather to hold court and debate and speech a fi about the world. And that's the place where studs came of age. And since our show is also a place where brilliant people share ideas, we decided to steal the name. So I gotta be honest with you. I'm going to be real real. I am so excited to do this show. I am a lifelong fan of studs terkel as the Chicago and interested in the art of storytelling. I always heard about studs for my mom and my Granddad. In fact, my mom actually had a studs terkel mug. It was a, it was a coffee mug with a drawing of his face on it. And whenever I saw it, I was always really curious about this funny looking guy with a really weird name. And when I started diving into the archive for this project more than anything, I felt. Like kinda greedy. I wanted to live vicariously through studs and have the conversations with people. I wish I could have met and spoken to when they were living. So naturally, for our first episode, I am fully indulging my greed, we decided to go all the way big to kick things off. And when it comes to intellectuals thinkers, people who inspire us with their ability to understand American society. You don't get much bigger than James Baldwin. You heard me. We got Baldwin baby in this episode will hear nineteen sixty two conversation between studs and Baldwin, who of course was one of our nation's greatest writers and thinkers public intellectuals and civil rights activists of fierce fierce critic of American society and the author of many incredible books perhaps most famously the fire next time. So let's talk a little bit about what we're going to here in this first clip. Just to give you a bit of context. Baldwin is talking to studs about his book. Another country which had just been released. The novel tells the story of a series of relationships between a jazz drummer and his network of friends and lovers, and includes quite a bit of content that was really taboo at the time. It came out, especially in a novel written by a black man interracial relationships by sexual relationships and suicide all play a role. The book was a bestseller and the title. Another country is a bit of a double entendre in the sense that Baldwin finished it in Istanbul, Baldwin who was known to be a world, traveler and global thinker had just returned from visiting several African countries at the time and this interview, and he's going to talk about that with studs as well. But I took so long explaining that their already busy talking without us. Let's get a move on and head to nineteen sixty two. So we can listen in..

James Baldwin Chicago American society Jay Walker Bughouse square writer terkel Istanbul
"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"He's. What makes a human tick? What is that? Ask oneself? One really believed. It's meant to be bitter when it's bitter the way medicine business. So it's conversation rather than interviewing turns out to be that really. Hello? Hello, and welcome to bughouse square with eve Ewing bughouse square with eve Ewing is made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the humanities, exploring the human endeavor. This is the show where we hear from studs terkel the legendary interviewer writer, listener and wonder right now I guarantee there are two camps of you listening. Half of you are super excited. You're like, oh my gosh, that's terkel a legend and icon and half of you are like, who, or what is studs terkel. So to the people in the second group. First of all, thanks for listening to this podcast. Even though you had no idea what it was about. Shout out to you. I appreciate you. Second of all, here's your quick and dirty rundown on studs. Terkel Lewis terkel better known by his nickname studs was a broadcast radio host most well known for his interview. Use in his work. As an oral historian. He worked primarily in my hometown, the great city of Chicago, Illinois, and he talked to everyone. You would interview a person sitting at the bar. He would interview an elevator operator and hear how they felt about being an elevator operator, and he would interview famous people from Martin Luther King junior to Luchino Pavarotti. But you know, maybe I should let him introduce himself. Something quite revelatory might happen something revelatory phrase. It might be a pause even that Pau see, I might say, now, wait a minute. You just paused. Now you said something. No. What did you pause and says, oh, I didn't want to. What was it made you pause all of a sudden this silence is revelatory too. Even the hem, the Hoai and the hemming. That's also part of that person fumbling and some of thinking out loud in contrast to being on a a network TV show you told you got three minutes studs. Terkel was born in one thousand nine hundred twelve, and he passed away in two thousand eight. That's a really long life to put it in perspective. He was born the year, the Titanic sank, and he died the year Barack Obama was elected president. That's a lot of American history to live through and forty five years of that life. We're spent doing interviews for his radio show on WFAN tea and listening to studs. Interview people is like a masterclass in how to be a good listener. He had a curiosity and a compassion that shine through in his conversations with people, the archives of his show, our treasure trove of stories, insights and conversation from our past recent and not so recent. Now, since studs is radio show ended in nineteen Ninety-seven all of that material. Has basically been behind closed doors until now the studs terkel radio archive is making these interviews available to the public on our website studs, terkel, dot org, and right here on this very podcast, we're going to share with you some of our favorite discoveries from the stockpile of hidden archival treasure..

Lewis terkel Ewing Luchino Pavarotti Martin Luther King WFAN National Endowment writer Pau Chicago Illinois Barack Obama president forty five years three minutes
"ewing" Discussed on Championship Drive

Championship Drive

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ewing" Discussed on Championship Drive

"Ewing his backstory suggests he might just find a way to return the hoyas to national prominence though it is in a story he told in his fifteen years in new york where he guarded his inner thoughts as fiercely as he guarded the pain the jamaicanborn ewing defines himself as an immigrant who made good against the longest of odds when he moved to the us at age twelve the idea that ewing with some someday become the face of one of the nation's leading academic institutions wasn't within ten country miles of possibility he made it happen anyway so ewing believes he will weather his new career challenges the way he weathered his stormy transition to a new world shaped by the cancer of racism to become what he became i'm what america is all about ewing says he means the good and bad patrick ewing is a problem solver to understand where he might go with this attempt to georgetown reconstruction you have to understand where he's been what he's seen and what he's conquered ewing had dreams of becoming the next ted lay when he moved to america in the mid 1970s just as palay started turning the new york cosmo's into an iconic disco era brand ewing had been a soccer and cricket player in jamaica but when he arrived in the cambridge office of steve jenkins junior high basketball coach the dreamer was little more than a lost soul in a strange land classmates mocked his size and jamaican putts wa a friend named richard burton had introduced patrick to basketball and the older playground players laughed at his awkward attempts to execute even the most fundamental moves burton mention ewing to jenkins a bearded white man raised in the predominantly black boston neighborhood of roxbury the coach figured patrick could learn the game while playing for his team at the achievements school and alternative programme that help young immigrants with their english the kid asked jenkins nearly every day if he could stay after practice and work on passing boxing out turnaround jumpers unique.

hoyas new york us america patrick ewing cosmo jamaica steve jenkins richard burton basketball roxbury georgetown ted cambridge boston fifteen years