17 Burst results for "Every"

"every" Discussed on So Every Kid Can Podcast

So Every Kid Can Podcast

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"every" Discussed on So Every Kid Can Podcast

"Some of the behaviors you like to tell parents and teachers to be on the lookout? If you were going to say like, you know, just don't police your child, but keep an open mind. Take a look release. Yeah. I would say that generally, any kind of changes that you see in a child's behavior. You know, when we look at school performance, perhaps their grades are dropping. Maybe they're withdrawing from things that they would otherwise have enjoyed. Maybe they're isolating a lot. You notice that they're in their bedroom more than they are usually. Again, we have to balance this with what is a typical when it comes to a 13 year old that just likes to be alone. And when is someone really isolating in a way that's withdrawing and could be some depression? Maybe they have excess worry or anxiety and it's persistent and so disproportionate to the situation. They might not want to go to school in the morning or not want to attend an activity. They may show hyperactive behavior. Anything that's a difference in their behavior change, a spike in disobedience can be an indicator, or being aggressive, and even poor hygiene. You know, that child who was always pretty good about taking their shower and brushing their teeth, all of a sudden, they're not doing that anymore, not taking care of themselves because they're not caring. That can be an indicator as well. We've been talking about overall approaches and issues with kids mental health. But I want to pivot a bit to talk about some of the more common mental health diagnoses that we see in kids like anxiety and depression. I know the rates of these have been steadily increasing for the past decade. And now, with the impact of the pandemic, the negative impact on our kids mental health, things are even worse. But before we talk about the pandemic, can you talk to us a little bit about anxiety and depression? Sure, sure, absolutely. You know, both anxiety and depression are very common. They're probably the most common mental illnesses that we see in kids. And when I talk anxiety, it's not just nervousness. It is absolutely typical and healthy that a child get nervous before giving a book report, for example, or doing anything. Actually, healthy that I became nervous before coming in for this podcast. That's healthy. I may have called it anxiety, but it's not anxiety in the mental illness field is when it's long term. There's a duration. It disproportionate to the situation, and it's very intense, the distress is extremely intense. Just last week, I had an elementary schoolboy who he was all of a sudden. Just having great anxiety about writing the school bus. It seemed to come out of nowhere. When I said, what's it all about? He wasn't able to articulate exactly what was going on. There really wasn't an obvious cause. He had said that he talked to his parents and they were like, oh, it's fine. You can sit with your sister or I can pick you up and the problem with that, they were doing the best that they could. It was wonderful what they were saying to him and trying to calm him down. But the problem is he wasn't being taught how to manage that anxiety. So what I did with him, as I said, where are you feeling this anxiety? And he pointed to his belly and said, oh, I feel it right here in my stomach..

depression
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Seems here's your specialty, right? Well look you know it's GonNa take a village as they normally stay right maybe a military I like to charge the highest steepest hills. So I'm taking on this large child, just because I've been and I've seen the data set again, ninety five percent of trials or European white males That's been over the last forty, fifty years. So I mean gay, you could think about any bigger drug that's come out on the market over the last forty fifty years has been predominantly that so population and I think it's time for a change and so what I liked Freddie mentioned the covid situation kind of brought up those health disparities right exposed. It was sitting at home watching a wise that not the case while you mean we're all the black people were all the Brown people I mean they're all at home, right? So. Pretty spoiled. That's why we focused on all those different track areas because it all ties in who's going to be involved in this you mentioned mentors, influencers who can take part in this thought is it a national thing or is it a mit thing talk to me? How does somebody is can somebody from Milwaukee get involved in some seemingly probably do more of these right? So it's really hoping to engage. Anyone in everyone's anyone who's had experience with the space who or who wants to make a difference in space since. So really I think that's the diversity that we always seek for. talked about diversity of expertise. But then there's also diversity in personal experiences that also will will be helpful as part of this process in so. We are focused mostly on individuals from the United States isn't going to be as Global Agathon. The way most of our others have been the most recent months with Koga and again, really targeting the population it's been you know. Had direct experience with these issues is really who were trying to identify and target US car the participant pulling them mentor Interpol. And the judges in partners are at fault as loud 'cause we realized that it's you know it's one thing to wanted make a difference but the other is a don't have that firsthand knowledge of what that issue. Is. It's a lot harder and we really need to get the people who experienced the problem first hand to be there as part of this. After the hacker thon top teens, we'll get connected to the resources they need to make their solutions a reality they will have access to mentorship tailored to the solution day develop plus prototype facilities and eventually capital. According. to Dr Win, it's kind of a little bit of. Playing matchmaking between both sides of the people who have the resources to provide those who need them. So here are some of the solutions we discussed and this episode of by every measure. One developing anti-racism programs in healthcare that tackles bias. More representation in healthcare that means increase in a number of black doctors, which helps build trust investing in programs like bomb Dula to reduce the infant and maternal mortality rates. and. Finally, most importantly, we need collaboration between the health care industry, government education, and community bring them all together to tackle these issues. Well Reggie I have to say, thank you. This is the final episode of. The Great Journey I. Knew I thought I knew a lot. I knew now in a whole lot more than. I have to thank you for the opportunity I. It's been a pleasure for me to have this form to share these things that I talk to people about quite a bit. It's been an emotional journey. There's days where I just get angry. And upset and just just get depressed here in these stories right I. Think it had to be done because I think a lot of people believe a lot of people really understand systemic racism and I think a lot of people when we talk about race I, feel like a lot of white people feel like it's a personal attack right and then it gets very self-defensive and say you're racist Reggie you're a racist Tariq and we're way what. I think. To win this podcast doing these kind of conversation like truly trying to understand the history. And have a conversation and then talk to people about possible solutions of what people working on. As a good foundation to start and hope people will see that and maybe as you say, I'm not worried about the people who just you know wearing a confederate flags who already you know. I'm worried about the people on the fence. And this is for the people on the fence. One of the hard things about this as I say this to people all the time man listen. The truth hurts. What ends up happening for why people in this country in in you know. They think that we're blaming them. As an individual, no, we're not blaming you as an individual. It's not about you know that's part of the arrogance of of people that think that you know a about them and I'm not talking about shoo I'm talking about this system that exists there was a here before you came and we'll be here after you've gone is not about you don't take it personal. Just understand that what we're trying to do is we're trying to just use American history as a tool. To show you what America has done and you can't deny I mean you can deny it but Kamal. Listen denying is not going to make you feel better. Santa. Know. America's always been land of freedom and Justice and liberty and everybody's that same opportunity. Notice a lot. They noticed systemic racism happened because they see it way more than we do. They are the ones that are an office when when Tariq goes for the interview and doesn't get the job and doesn't know why and then went to relieves the boss goes over them and says man I'm glad we didn't have to hire that black dude they hear these things they know they can't hide from it. They know they hear the the the the remarks that their peers and their family members and neighbors and stuff make they know more about stemming races and than we'll ever know but they don't WanNa admit it. Because guess, what if flies in the face of everything they've been led to believe about their country everything they still believe about their country because they want America to be this mythological place in this utopia is never been a utopia for him for people. Color never has been never will be and the only way I can even approach being something close to that is a people start to actually put their foot down and do some real work in this area, and it's not easy work and you know I I I wrote a piece where. I said you know I'm glad a lot more white people woke Lebron woke is one thing are you can get your behind debate now that you woke because Zach when the rubber history roll that's when the real work needs to be done and I think providing people with the information that we provided. You know in this podcast I think is a really good first step for a lot of people. Now, they can have different conversations, but ultimately I think the white people have to understand this clearly by systemic racism, it hurts everybody people. Of color more but it hurts everybody because ultimately think about all of the human potential deaths wasted us. Now taking advantage of people of Color think about all the black doctors and all the black engineers and astronauts and scientists that we could have if we were to cultivate young black children in the way that we cultivate young white children think about all the people from the lad next community who are super talented, super bright, super-motivated, entrepreneurial spirit that could be doing so much better in helping all of us if we would cultivate that in. Their community same thing native American media. We wouldn't have treated native Americans way we did and put them on these crappy reservations where someone known have running water we could cultivate it their culture, their community May, and we would be a healthier places more than enough wealth to go around for everybody Yep. Why people hoarded resources for? So long that they think is normal for them have all the resources and we try to balance that try to balance the scales a little bit with stuff like affirmative action. Then why people say well, let's reverse discrimination. No? The plainfield spent unlevel forever. What's wrong with leveling the playing field and give people in our wrote a piece and.

America United States Reggie Tariq Milwaukee Freddie Brown Koga Global Agathon Santa Lebron Zach
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"You know and I'm making decent come right. Regardless of that. Because of racism and you know and I'm not a doctor but I have some thoughts as to why that might be the. We still are saying the same income, our outcomes, health outcomes as if someone who maybe living a below the poverty level. So it is really significant, and that's why we have to address things like unconscious bias to address the type of care that. Everyone is receiving. And on top of that, it's like we're tracking everything great. We're looking at all of our outcomes by various demographics so we can get a better understanding of what is the outcome you know because data is what's going to help us change things right we need to have the data to show us tell us the story so we can put infant interventions in place to overcome some of those disparities right. So when it comes to really having hard data like what is the outcome verb after American women who are giving birth in our organization and at our hospitals and how can we track in identify what are some of those causes what what can we? Do to support organizations in the community that are dressing those things 'cause as tiny mentioned social determinants of health happened beyond the walls of a healthcare organization, right like only twenty percent of what a healthcare organization can do impacts the health of an individual a lot of the rest of it is environmental social, all those economic, all of those things. So how can we help support those other areas that that that also impact a person's health outcomes without being directly involved but supporting those organizations that do so that's part of what a lot of what Heidi does is creating those partnerships in those relationships with organizations that help us achieve our mission for. The other issue would you brought up? Kind of leads into the mistrust is that there's data saying that if a patient has a black doctor? The outcomes of their health would be much better talk to me about that. Absolutely. Yeah. That's called concordance rate like patient. Physician concordance when there's that similarity garrity from a point of diversity, an definitely increases the trust that helps you know with a patient identifies with their physician. They're more likely to share formation that's relevant to their health. They'll. They'll be more honest about what's happening in their lifestyle, what they're doing on to uphold their house at it creates a better relationship that creates better. Communication is all about that communication I'm so for us, you've course, education and recruitment of our staff is a key priority for us as well. We have a program right now that's going to pay people and pay for the education of staff members who want to become. Search texts in organization, right? So not only do they get a free education HEC they get paid for it at the same time. So it's helping create that pathway for folks to get into direct care positions in advance in the organization and more programs like that are in development and organization right now, also partnerships with a with ABC News and medical institutions that help us to recruit physicians as well after American physicians made physicians, lgbt physicians, Lgbtq population on because we have a growing population of patients as well that we want to make sure that we are meeting their needs, addressing their concerns and creating that relationship and that trust as well. You can read more about freighters plan to end racism both inside and outside of its walls on a dedicated page on its website, you can find it at freighter dot com slash in Dash Racism. It outlines a four point approach including reducing, Bias Employment Career Development Health Equity and supplier diversity. We'll put a link to it and our discussion guide. That brings us to the third system that's attacking systemic racism and health higher education. I read about this effort at mit link Dan and it really piqued my interest. MIT host, an event call hacking racism and health care in collaboration with black tech matters. Mit Kovic one, thousand, nine challenge and MIT. Hacking medicine. And on a long shot, I decided to reach out to a couple of the organizers doctor Freddy Win I'm a post, doctoral fellow and MIT. Resin physician mount. Sinai. Hospital. Cord last years, I've been part of a group calling MIT, which has done a lot of healthcare hydrophones over the years Rayson launch. The cooking chimes about six months ago and Yousaf Enriquez, Co founder, and CEO of Code. Clear. Ventures, which is A. Biotech. Company developing a rapid detection test for covert. Previously I started another company that focuses on mental health genomics, which is called added I started three years ago. Prior background as military. Force, Medi and worked in the government for quite some years. Where did this idea of hacking realism come from? You know I used to run hack a thon for my program and I love the people like, why would you? Why would you hacking steal from me? So soon, talk to me was a hack and talk to me before we get into the hacking racism. Explain hacking and then talk about. Your hacking healthcare like that program you know Hack Ifan. Seven hacking for us. Really as you said, it's not about breaking into. Some high-tech system are still in code or anything like that. It's really about an creative use of ingenuity and trying to bring a lot of craziest ideas and people together as part of. Our Hike Athans and really what's remarkable is that a hacker thon model has been able to transcend. All of the. Barriers that you normally think of. It's social cultural or language or whatnot and Salah things. We don't allow preformed teams. We don't want preform ideas that began the hack on everybody. In the same level it doesn't matter what Your Day job was or your title was or how old you are or high on you are. Wearing a bag rains, it's really about the richness of the ideas and leading the best ideas rise to top. So what kind of problems a structural systemic problems in.

MIT Bias Employment Career Develop ABC News garrity Heidi Salah Yousaf Enriquez Dan A. Biotech Freddy doctoral fellow Co founder CEO
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Back on episode six of by every measure. This is our final episode of the series at least for now, and since we're talking about health care during a global pandemic. It makes sense to go a little deeper in the solution section of this episode. We've got five experts joining US representing three different institutions that intersect with healthcare equity. To men of color working with MIT on upcoming hacker thon and throwing down an open call to the world to help come up with solutions for racism and health care. And, we'll talk to one of the state's largest healthcare providers freighter and the Medical College in Wisconsin to learn about its own anti-racism efforts, cross it system. That's institution to the healthcare system itself or we're GONNA start here in the public sector institution number one what the city of Milwaukee Health Department. The. Department appear to transition right now is director. Dr. Jeanette. Kollek recently announced her resignation citing racism within city government. We asked her for interview she declined but point doesn't instead to the department's Chief of Staff Lillian pain who joins us now we start on the topic of bias. When things we talked about is biased medicine and how black and Brown people are treated differently systematically by medical professions bias. Theories about you know still in some medical books you know has of like maybe ten years ago that black people skin thicker. Than we talked about you know. That outcomes of diseases and When they when a black person has a doctor that looks like them improves. Does the city having role in addressing those biases and dealing with hopefully enlisting finding more medical fashions, mental health doctors, cardiologists that reflect the community. So when you think of public health, think of population health and you think of healthcare and medical systems. Think of Just, what you're talking about like who are the front line Dad who's welcoming people into the hospital? WHO's welcoming people into a health clinic? WHO's rocked me people into urging hair on the health department partners with health systems. and. Can't speak to the experience that Patients may have within the healthcare system because they incubate with some of the direct services we provide. I believe the. Commissioner has that on many boards and as part of networks for local health officers that have that positional power to influence and inform health systems to reconsider their hiring practices, and I'm culturing climate wing serving our resident. City resident. Speak of the Health Commissioner at. Can public she resigned due to some of the issues we're talking about right now the racism. How do you see the health department harness this moment to move toward solutions? Yeah. having the ability to implement anti-racism plan having the ability to Work with our another thing that came out of the reorganized another credit to the. Commissioners. the. Board of Health. So. A solution is. Working, with our board of Health to promote an advocate, the need for the health department. as well as again are a residents of the city. they are appointed by the mayor and they have two year terms. And they just Elected their new president and vice president after being around for a year. So that's a space and those are powerbrokers I would say that can help Co create solutions and advocate on behalf of the health department. The nine member Board of Health was reestablished by Dr Koala in two thousand nineteen and its mission is to advise the department on priorities taken stances on public health policy issues and being champions for public health in Milwaukee. And addition to the Board of Health Lily and also mentioned other interesting effort. The city's Dula Program we have birth outcomes made better the Bomb Dula program targeting specifically black infant mortality and mortality. Maternal mortality with everything going virtual this summer. our program managing a coal miles has done a great job. Every meaning engaged She created a bomb Dula book club for the breastfeeding feeding month. She has done a great job with on boarding are Dulas and participating with national initiatives like the here her campaign will official watch will happen in a couple of weeks. Bomb Dulas one solution being developed in Milwaukee. A solution to a heartbreaking crisis infant and maternal mortality? Wisconsin cheese to rank is the worst state in the country in terms of birth outcomes for black women according to the CDC black babies in Wisconsin nearly three times more likely to die than white babies. and. That makes constant infant mortality rate the highest in the country. And then look at the maternal mortality rate for black women. It is five times higher than white women according to a story in the journal Sentinel, and clearly the city can't fight our states dismal infant and maternal mortality rates alone. Next we're looking at the provider side, the healthcare system itself. Join us now our reps from freighted hospital and Medical College in Wisconsin to talk about those mortality rates. This is Sherry Tron. Diversity inclusion. Freighter and Michael Kosh Wisconsin there for eight years and Heidi more director of emerging markets in inclusion and I focused primarily on the external stuff. Milwaukee has been you know as far as rankings indicators when it comes to specific, the black community is not very good matter. Of fact, it's been like last place in a lot of indicators and one of those is like maternal mortality rate and infant mortality rate. How freighter. Tackling that in Milwaukee. So when you you have something like you know the to health condition that you mentioned when it comes to maternal health when it comes to the birth of our children, what was interesting for me because I've been doing Equity Diversity Inclusion worked for over twenty years across different industry vectors. So coming into healthcare, it's years ago. One of the things that really stood out for me with this concept called social determinants of health, and also the concept that health disparities regardless of income for certain. Ethnic and racial groups. You see a thing kind of outcome that absolutely is true for black African. American mother. So. Regardless of how much money you know and and you know I went to school has got some degree and.

Milwaukee Board of Health Wisconsin Milwaukee Health Department Health Commissioner Board of Health Lily hospital and Medical College director US MIT Medical College Dulas Sentinel Chief of Staff
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Dude, the data is pointing in a different direction now was shifted and after the first three weeks the first three weeks each of those weeks majority of people, Milwaukee. County. Who died from covert or black, right? But after that every week since then a majority of people died and covert Milwaukee County have been white. And so there's been this big shift I. Mean a lot less people are dying from covert but shifted to being a much bigger issue for whites. Over last however, many months than it has been for blacks. In fact, I pull up the numbers because I posted this to facebook last week I wanna I wanna give you the raw numbers. So. This is what happened in March. Seventeen blacks who died. To Hispanics and one white in. MILWAUKEE. County. In April, you had to agents seventy seven blocks. Nine Hispanics one multi-race person and seventy two whites. So you already see the white people already starting to catch up by by the second month right Reggie kept track into Cova data in our county month after month, and he kept finding the same thing. The last month I track August There were four blacks. One East Indian five Hispanics, one multi-race person and sixteen whites. So this is what I've been trying to tell people since very early on I was tracking I saw the shift to more white people die I solicit the narrative has to change if the data has changed the narrative needs to change here locally. Now this is Milwaukee County whites a fifty two percent of populations Milwaukee County but still when I talk to people about it, I think the impact of hearing the narrative is by blacks and Hispanics. It makes why people relax like nobody's dying but a bunch of black people and a bunch of Hispanic people we don't have to worry about it. Why should I have to wear a mask? Why do I have to social distance? Why can't I go into the bar all these because they're not hearing about any why people die and when I talked to why people I hear this do you know anybody to start from? Yeah, no five people that are Kobe personal people. I know personally have died from it. I've had over a dozen family members that have gotten a virus, right? So I know people have died but on why people are men I don't know anybody to die personally. Well, you know what? That's problematic because just because you don't know somebody die doesn't mean people aren't. The only people I've heard say cove is a hoax. A bunch of white. People. This is I say to to re that until the people in our community here Metro Milwaukee area start to share people the numbers of asked. About the shift from May through August at the majority of people who died from corona virus and Milwaukee County White White people knew that. It would be like me. Better Star wearing a mask, a better stop yelling at people at the restaurant who tell me I need to put my mascot because it's just straight up ignorance in ignorance isn't isn't being dumb or stupid and ignorance is the lack of information. And the fact that they're not getting the type of information when I watch the local news, I read the newspaper nobody is sharing this narrative that has been a shift in where the covid deaths are here locally going back to my observations which basically you're justifying that. Once. Mainstream America White America found, out? Hey. Based off the data I'm good. Basic. White banker says to me they don't really value us at all in the first place so. This whole pockets we've been talking about health and semi raises them. is about valuing. And we have never really as a people been truly valued in the in the aspect of this country, and that's what I saw. What happened like people did start taking it seriously right in the beginning right when. You didn't have the numbers were like, yeah. I'm down I'm sticking out but also the numbers come out people like. I don't need to wear masks. Because they like that's black people, I don't need to care about that. You're not valued in this country. And that's a very strong thing to say, but that's what I felt. that. Cova realized maybe realize which caused me more anxiety that we're really not. Knowing really cares about our people. Yeah. You know I. It's been clear in the way that people reacted to Calvin that you know the numbers that that show that blacks and Latinos and native Americans much more likely to die from it and you know it goes to what you said about how we value people if we don't value people and then we can scapegoat them. Corona viruses black and Brown problem look at them. They're the ones with the highest rates instead of having empathy for people insane man what is wrong with our country that these people are getting exposed and and dying at a higher rate what can we do about that? There's no empathy and you know part of that goes to the fact that there's never really been a whole lot of. For black people in this country from whites I mean if people can sit around and and and in burn person alive at a spectacle lynching with fifteen thousand people there. What makes you think they're going to be empathetic when you have the corona virus, you know decades later when they can can, can you know have the police department come out and spray you water hoses that will cut the bark off a tree and do this too little teenage kids. What makes you think they're going to be empathetic now so you know America's never had any empathy or real care or value for black people above and beyond the fact that they need in our. Labor. So they're not really concerned. So I find it. Funny. People like us, America for their own purpose like the black and Brown people. American. So shouldn't this be an American problem? Yeah. But as only the American problem when it facts them listen. Koogle. All American, boy. And looked for images. and. To See what you see. You're not gonNA see Black and Brown faces all American boy American only maize white folks in the minds of a lot of people. Captain America Superman couldn't be a brother come on man we know how this works. So. You know systemic racism in full effect man and it's unfortunate that is is causing all of these issues of people life and death issues. Do. So that's the problem and coming up in the next part of this episode, we're looking at the answers to these healthcare disparities. Since we have been talking about institutions were actually looking at three of them government, the health care system itself and education. We will talk to a panel of experts from the Milwaukee, health department freighter and the Medical College of Wisconsin, a post doctoral fellow from MIT. Any fellow, our university alum who are working on solutions next on by every measure. Radio Milwaukee is on a mission, and if you hit a discover new perspectives on music in Milwaukee than you're on a mission to. Join today to support the programming you love. Visit Radio Milwaukee, Dot Org, and click the orange hearten. We're.

Milwaukee County Milwaukee America facebook White America corona Kobe Reggie Cova Captain America Superman Medical College of Wisconsin doctoral fellow MIT Brown Dot Org Calvin
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"This is my heavy measure. We are nearing the end of this podcast series and we're talking about one of the most important things we have as people are health, and this episode is coming out during the global pandemic. So, it's so relevant to be talking about health and healthcare. Publishing Time Wisconsin seeing a huge spike in corona virus cases. Me National Headlines at number two, state for new cases in the country. And across the nation black people more than three and a half times more likely to die of covert nineteen in white people and that's according to a report from the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy. But the fact that these racial disparities popped up right away pandemic as early as march should be no surprise. In fact, at a press conference in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six, Dr Martin Luther King, junior stated of all the forms of inequality. Injustice in health is the most shocking. The most inhumane because it often results in physical death. On this episode we're going. These disparities in depth. That's where we start with our co host Reggie. Jackson. This is our final episode health, which is kind of a issue ended because if you think about it. Policing housing. Education the wealth gap. All plays a role. In health. Bad Housing Education. The lack of resources in schools racial wealth gap can cause stress and can't afford healthcare policing dealing with like the stress of being pulled over and mental health issues. All that leads down to this and I, like you shared a quote from Him Okay That I thought was cool on your article. The impact of racism is the other of Corona virus crisis for people of Color in this article was very personal in terms of my rationale for writing. In it, it goes back to a store with my aunt mom, my mother's younger sister years ago. You know she still live back in the hometown of Mississippi and. She got really really sick. and. You know she went to see the same doctor as she sang for years in my hometown Mississippi and he just kept telling her you know it's not too serious. It's not that bad blah blah blah blah this right and of course, people trust their doctors. So she just kind of continued to deal with it and you know she would tell my mother what was going on my mother you know is a retired registered nurse. So my mother knows you know medical stuff like the bag she's like, no, this is something very serious. You need to tell the doctor that you think it's this right and so she did in a doctor's I know. Your sister doesn't know what she's talking about. So find them. My mother got so frustrated she. She literally caught a plane and she went down in Mississippi and she forced her sister to go with her to a hospital in Memphis, which is about seventy miles from my hometown. And she was able to see a doctor there. In immediately based on the symptoms she had the doctor is light you have cancer. And you need to go see a specialist. So you know he he referred to a specialist initially started getting treatment. This is like two years in she'd been dealing with these symptoms two years and her doctors kept telling her now is that the series Blah Blah Blah, and so had it not been for my mother going down there and forcing her to go see another doctor in Memphis And Ban getting, special. Specialized treatment to to deal with the cancer, she probably would have died from it. So you know I know from from research done over long period of time that black people you know we just know we don't get treated the same. We go to the doctor pain tolerance thick skin. It's funny how Comedians can really tell the truth through comedy. I think this really drives it home. Sykes was racist that was a study and a shoulder doctors. They actually prescribe opioids frequently to white people and then they do the but they don't give us opioids because they're sympathetic all just wipe personality they're in such pain here. Let me give you this. Let me give you these opioids. That pain away. A double mastectomy. You they sit my. Home with. Booth. Sad that a comedian. Has the point this out. And there's proof to all of this. All you have to do is look at the numbers to see unconscious bias all through our health care system. You know black people are. I think three and a half times more likely to lose a limb and they have diabetes and white person who's black women who go in have babies are almost four times more likely to die having a baby than a white woman is in this country, we have been used as guinea pigs in medical experiments going back hundreds of years in this country. So there's all of these factors that layer on top of each other in lied to us having conditions that people claim, which is just nonsensical to me they that we're predisposed to have high blood pressure nonsense listen. Let me tell you why we're predisposed to have high high blood pressure. It's because of racism because if you go to other countries where a majority of people are black, you go to places in the Caribbean you go to West Africa, you don't find the same levels of hypertension that you mom blacks that you do here in many of these places, they eat the same types of stuff eat the differences the level of stress from racism is completely different. I remember Richard Pryor talking about you know his first trip to Africa He. He he landed in Zimbabwe in an airplane right and he got off and he no he spent a couple of days there and he was like Nah he says now I know what it feels like to be a white person there's no stress a lot of the disparities for black and Brown people simply come down to access before the affordable care act lot of black people didn't have a primary care doctor or even health insurance which means they would go. To the Emergency Room and dad, and that's only when they're really really sick and guess what happened loaded -mergency room they're gonNA look at you like crazy. You wait forever they're gonNA look at you like crazy and Gigi to bill let you can't believe how big the building is. Right so guess what you're going to be much less likely to go to an emergency room the next time you're sick or your child is sick or your husband or your wife. Is Sick whoever so you're going to develop the sense that like man I have to be like deathly ill before I go because I don't have a regular doctor I gotta go to Mercer Roam. The bill is going to be crazy on just not gonNA do it unless I'm like critically ill. So over the course of time, what is happening that connects kind of intersects with this idea of the distrust us there in another factor here in Milwaukee that people forget. Is that we had to hospitals closed in Milwaukee Saint Michael's hospital close shortly after I moved back from from California the early nineties Saint Michael's hospital close. When do you ever hear of a hospital closing in white neighborhood never write another hospital that close northwest or hospital right up on like fifty third fifty, four in capital. Close, that's in a black neighborhood, and so what you end up having is you have people talk food deserts we have healthcare desert's you'd have to go far and wide to find healthcare, and if it wasn't for programs that had been set up to provide. A level of care for poor people Then a lot of black people for a long time didn't really have access to healthcare and what ends up happening is you don't go and you get you don't get preventive. Medicine Down Right. So you don't go in, you see a doctor and get a fiscal every year. So your doctor doesn't recognize you have some ailment. prediabetes. Okay..

Mississippi Memphis Dr Martin Luther King Wisconsin Milwaukee Saint Michael's hosp Center for Infectious Disease Milwaukee Bad Housing Education Reggie Jackson Richard Pryor Zimbabwe Mercer Roam Sykes California Caribbean
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Did <Speech_Music_Male> a hundred years <Speech_Male> ago. How'd you <Speech_Music_Male> fifty years <SpeakerChange> ago <Music> <Advertisement> model hasn't <Music> <Advertisement> changed? <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Coming up <Speech_Male> on the next episode by <Speech_Male> every measure, we're <Speech_Male> talking about the most <Speech_Male> precious resource <Speech_Music_Male> anyone has. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Their health. <Speech_Music_Male> It's no surprise <Speech_Male> that black people <Speech_Male> face a much worse <Speech_Male> outlook when it comes <Speech_Music_Male> to their health <Speech_Music_Male> by lots of different <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> metrics, <Speech_Male> preventable death, <Speech_Male> infant mortality, <Speech_Male> and higher <Speech_Male> rates of certain <Speech_Male> illnesses. <Speech_Male> But we <Speech_Male> also face bias <Speech_Male> in the healthcare system <Speech_Male> itself. <Speech_Male> These disparities <Speech_Music_Male> are literally <Speech_Music_Male> life <Speech_Music_Male> and death <Speech_Music_Male> will break it down <Speech_Music_Male> next time <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> on by every measure. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By every measure <Speech_Male> is hosted by Tariq <Speech_Male> Moody and <Speech_Male> Reggie Jackson <Speech_Male> executive produced <Speech_Male> and edited by <Speech_Male> Nate Immig <Speech_Male> with additional <Speech_Male> production support from <Speech_Male> eight hundred nine <Speech_Male> program director <Speech_Male> Jordan Lee. <Speech_Male> Marketing Director <Speech_Male> Sarah mcclanahan <Speech_Male> Marketing <Speech_Male> Coordinator Aaron Begajah <Speech_Male> Web <Speech_Music_Male> Editor Evan <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Rent leschi <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> audio producer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Salaam <Speech_Music_Male> tire executive. <Speech_Music_Male> Director. <Speech_Male> Kevin. Suker <Speech_Music_Male> content <Speech_Music_Male> marketing manager <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Linda Garage <Speech_Music_Male> community <Speech_Male> engagement manager <Speech_Music_Male> Mattie Reardon, <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> imaging manager <Speech_Music_Male> Kenny Perez. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> handcrafted sonic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> inspiration <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from the licensed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lab in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our. Sincerest. Thanks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to our members <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for making all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"We have discussed on this podcast And these solutions aren't just limited to Milwaukee. Some of them could be scaled to other cities across the country that face similar issues as Milwaukee. We hope that by talking about them in this podcast, we can get the word out. Across the country. Now, I would like to introduce you to Davis WHO RUNS A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION CALL MILWAUKEE SUCCEEDS It's focused on equity in K. twelve education specifically convenient other entities to work better together to improve educational outcomes for students throughout their lives. It's part of the Greater Milwaukee. Foundation and it is one of seventy communities who are part of a national network called strive together our space universities early childhood through young adults. and. Because of the huge disparities that are based on race ethnicity and income, our primary center centered focused around racial equity would donate talks about students in Milwaukee she often calls them her babies. Such a human way to say it. To show that these kids in our city right now they're our future all of them. So I WANNA. Talk about let's start with discipline because I seem like it's ingrained from teachers and principals to policies to. To treat especially youth of color differently when it comes to discipline issues I think that affects down the line graduation college careers. Everything affects long-term of their whole life. So terrific, you are bringing up something that's really near and dear to me insofar as honestly the examples go all the way back to kindergarten I think the solution is. Two things. One is we don't need police practices to be a part of the solution in our schools whether they are childcare centers or K. Twelve, elementary middle or high school That is not what we need. We need our social workers and psychologists, nurses, and better programs that engage parents in a partnership with how do we. Teach better development practices with our children and our babies But the bottom line is we have to understand that they are babies and children and young people. We gotTA start there and not act as though they are adults because they're not so. That one solution is we don't need to institute police practices as a means of addressing. Issues around that typically are represented in disciplinary and explosion. Go into. Let's go inside the school. Let's another thing I've read in articles about. Diverse teachers, representation matters, and teachers that. A black student has a black teacher. They're likely to perform better go to college all things like be more successful. Yes. And let me just say yes and I'm GonNa tell you a little bit of a story. So as I mentioned, the role of Milwaukee succeeds one of the programs that we have a that we brought to Milwaukee very proud to something called ladyman bellows and the leading rebels program basically was you know a cohort of ten young men who are fresh Outta High School? So between the ages of eighteen and twenty one let's say predominantly African American some lab necks and they're trained in the summer and then they're placed Peres in early. Childcare centers basically supporting the reading capability in literacy of three, four, five year olds these young men. They they didn't have teaching as on their radar in terms of what they wanna do they got you know they didn't have good impressions about teachers. They had way too many teachers who verbalize their displeasure with their jobs. In other words they didn't really want to teach these kids and they had seen anybody who look like them in the classroom there they saw. In their engagement with these babies. Such progress based on the responsiveness of a these young men looking like them. And be because these men came from a place of love. And nurturing. And Caring and these kids would be able to write their names. They'd be able dispelled they'd be. Like sponges in their ability to read because of those two factors, I, know that's anecdotal experience but I'll tell you it is absolutely truly reflective of why we need to to support the teacher pipeline. And growing Black Brown. The name inches another local organization that is laser focused on that city Ford collective. is working to create a pipeline to increase the number of black and Brown teachers in. MILWAUKEE. Something that's clearly needed here and across the country. But even if we have better representation in classroom, there are still many other problems that need to be solved with access. That takes us to our next topic cove nineteen and how that ties back to education with learning and a digital divide. I've seen like, for example, to Oakland Oakland Public School decided to go big ride like let's let's do thirteen may not give every kid every kid computer Wifi and corporate corporations got involved in a big way. Twitter Co gave twelve million dollars of their thirteen million dollars goal. Is this what would we need? Corporations to step up this area because at the end of the day, this benefits stem parents digital literate you get people will wi fi. Hotspot you give people, real computers and all that. Helps the kids learn but that also helps the workforce exactly right. I love your analogy in and I think that it can't be small. So Milwaukee's tendency is too small itself in also whatever the solution is will just give you like a chance of what's needed and then wonder why it doesn't work. You know what I mean. So in this case. And I applaud them walking public schools foundation I know city for collective is doing a similar fundraising effort for for charter in in and choice schools But WHO's not running into being part of solution are the Internet providers themselves so whether it's Oakland or Chicago is another model where you know Dane County for that matter where the providers are at the table and figuring out how reduce the costs associated to a families you know access to Wifi high, speed. Internet. Without penalizing you because you didn't pay a bill. You know what I mean, which is we to my knowledge is in discussions but the sense of urgency I'm not feeling on the part of spectrum and a t and t for example or charter. So I think that leadership in Milwaukee. needs to insist that these providers be a part of the solution..

Milwaukee MILWAUKEE Oakland Oakland Public School Peres Oakland city Ford collective. Outta High School Dane County Milwaukee. wi Chicago
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Before. We begin this episode by every measure talking about systemic racism in education. I want to share a personal story with you. When I was in second grade living in Charleston south. Carolina. I I. Guess You call it my first incident with races that I remember. I was hanging my paper end to the teachers older White Lady. and. Right when I handed the paper and to her. Right, under breath I hear say the N. Word to me. I stick with me I'd even tell my parents to later in life. Probably my college days. that. I told them that. But it was kind of traumatic for me and doing this podcast brought up that memory again. But thinking about that I'm thinking about all the instance that students and kids that look like me had to deal with. An schools going beyond just been called the inward. Being handcuffed by police. Being expelled for. Minor. Incidents. That is also traumatic that occurs across the country. And in this episode we're talking about systemic racism in education. Not, just outcomes or test scores were talking about bias among teachers, the school to prison pipeline. How black students are treated differently than white students when it comes to discipline. And we also look at how schools are funded. All of this was studied more than fifty years ago in the Kerner Commission which we have talked about in other episodes in this podcast. Say Segregation now. gave. Erosion. Forever. In the current commission, they recognize the disparity between black and white students America over fifty years ago and they made several recommendations. which alas were never followed. A little more than a decade before the Kerner Commission. There was brown versus board of Education. You probably learn about this in school, the nineteen, fifty, four US, Supreme Court decision that ruled segregation unconstitutional and in violation of the fourteenth amendment. It's easy to think that was years ago. I was even born right but it wasn't that long ago. Remember Ruby Bridges. She was a young black girl who became the face of school integration had to be walked to school by Federal Marshals. Now, she's only sixty six years old younger than my parents but back, then she was in the national spotlight as a child dealing with hatred. This is what White Americans were saying about school integrations aggregating bill. Is. Had and European in. WHICH CONTAIN There were protests all of the country bussing programs meant to integrate schools into the nineteen seventies places like Boston. Here archive audio from WBZ, TV to give you a sense. Of How intense These protests. Here. Don't exit one and try to hit people would doesn't. Don't where I. Was Glass and black people. audio you just heard from the nineteen seventies, but the issue of bias and prejudice in schools. Persist today, black children are five times as likely as white children ten schools that are highly segregated by race, and that is to the Economic Policy Institute and a twenty seventeen report while segregation is technically illegal. The truth is is still happening all over the country including right here in Milwaukee and cities like it. That's where we'll start with Reggie Jackson Why is it? If someone says well, your separate but equal with the problem right? What does segregation really do to black community and black? Students I was a teacher for eight years and you separate, but you're certainly not going to be equal in any respects they were building brand new schools on the south side for. White families. Didn't build many at all on the north side, it took a great deal of pressure took. Boycotts by students to put pressure on walking public schools to build those. But the most important impact segregation policies have is that the way we fund schools is based on property taxes. So as we created these segregated all white spaces. In, certain parts of Milwaukee than suburban communities talking. Is that the property taxes? Because of the value of the homes increased the wider, the neighborhood got. Hired a property values got the less white neighborhood got the lord of property values went, and so what you in having is a very unbalanced system where our suburban school districts funding is significantly higher than within the city. That's why when you go to the suburbs, you'll see much nicer and newer school facilities compared to schools. And Black neighborhoods which in Milwaukee the central city. More tax base. More funding and man I'll tell you when I go out to the suburbs, you don't go to school you go to campuses right? You go to the campus of the schools in and they're so different. So different than the schools in the city of Milwaukee you know we have a lot of really old school buildings and Milwaukee and and and you you know this as well as I do to wreak that if you go to a school. That looks like really good in modern and has wonderful facilities. It makes you feel good about yourself like man I'm going to get really good education here but then you go to one of the schools. MILWAUKEE. That's maybe an old raggedy building where the air conditioner doesn't really work. That will when it's hot, the heat doesn't work that. Well, when his Kohl's you know the windows don't close properly. So there's a lot of cold air blowing into the building. To school I worked at those are major issues that they couldn't figure out how to fix the window. So we wouldn't be called in the classroom. So we have to sit in classrooms jacket. So it makes a big difference for the students as well as the staff and the parents recognized to. That's why so many black parents Hispanic parents are always trying to get their kids out to the suburban school districts. Let's talk about discipline like A lot of studies abou how black students especially black girls. Young women are disciplined unequally and base this also kind of leads into the school to prison pipeline talk to me. About how disciplined in schools treat it between the races? Yeah. Yeah. They're. They're huge disparities across the country in disciplinary outcomes for. particularly between black and white students black here's a much more likely to be suspended. And expelled from school than their white peers for you know participating in the same type of. Age Appropriate behavior but the other side is because of unconscious bias and even some conscious by white teachers because the majority of teachers in the country. White. The white females when you have a black students, particularly black boys, they're much more likely to be sent to the principal's office ridden up suspend it eventually expelled. There was an actual study about this twenty sixteen done by the US Department of Education Office for civil rights that show black boys were more than three times more likely to be suspended one or more times compared to white boys basically eighteen percent versus five percent black girls on the other hand. The difference between how they're treated is that they are treated in less nurturing way is a big study done are called black. Girls interrupted of several years ago. What it show was that there's this general assumption that black girls are older than what their ages that they assume that they know more about sex than they do that they're less in need of nurturing than their white peers in. So if people have so you're less in need of nurturing in emotional support. Then.

Milwaukee Kerner Commission Carolina Charleston south US Federal Marshals US Department of Education Off board of Education Economic Policy Institute Boston Ruby Bridges Supreme Court America principal Reggie Jackson Kohl
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Not the black communities. Yeah. They look good on paper, you know to read what you just shared about what happened to Atlanta when people ask me well, what can we do to help Milwaukee? I say do the same thing you did. Listen what Atlanta did what Maynard Jackson did was he said listen, the things that we have done as a government organization, but white people We can do for black people and see what happens em do in Milwaukee what you've done for why people decades do the same thing for black people and you won't have any more problems in Milwaukee. That is the key off. I get tired of people asking me for the solution and I tell them that that's it and they're like, well, you know, that's sounds discriminatory. I'm like, it wasn't discriminatory when you were doing it for white people. Probably New Deal the VA loan housing all that they call it handouts their Homestead Act Right all of those things, but now all you reluctant to do that for black folks because now white people who have been so accustomed to getting a hookup off now am at the black people make it a small piece of the same hook up. They got you know, that's so unfair. And you know, that's Reverse Racism or something nonsense know when you get black people the opportunity we are able to take advantage of Milwaukee hasn't done that. The brain drain that we have is tremendous man. So how do you convince young black professionals who graduate from Howard University like yourself off? Or from you know, Grambling a wherever and you grew up in Maryland who grew up in North Carolina, I grew up in Montgomery. I grew up in Austin Texas or grew up in La how do you convince them to Milwaukee? I tried what is attractive about Milwaukee? I haven't told people this but I've tried a couple of people and like hey, you can buy they gotta they win a you know, two hundred square foot apartment for $5,000. So ridiculous Thursday, and I show them Zillow looking at a house can walk we hang out with you build something together and they look at me like, you know, all right, let my little closet up in New York before coming here and I'm just like I showed my house and I'm just like wow, you know that it's like I think that needs to be hurt. I don't think that people running the city wants to hear that personally. They don't want to hear ye know. It's the truth though. Listen, they you cannot be an intelligent person and not know that those are things that are factored know. Nobody wants to leave a place where they see birth. Themselves having success and moved to a place like Milwaukee that has so many issues. I mean, it doesn't make sense. It makes national news for life for the wrong reason and people see that right with the post office so much stuff that's wrong that you're not going to convince particularly young people to move here and think about all of the people to read that you know, cuz I can think of many that I know over the years that have have, you know, tried Milwaukee like man, I'm going to try really hard to you know to get my act together and have success in Milwaukee and then it's like you're bumping your head against a brick wall. I'm not trying to bash Milwaukee. I'm just being real Milwaukee is a difficult place for a lot of folks and you know, you have this crab in a barrel syndrome where people are fighting for the same crimes and they can pull you down so they can get pulled up right then you have that constant battle people working in silos competing against each other and then some of the people just like, you know what I'm tired of this. Let me let move to Charlotte. Let me move to Austin. Let me log Dallas let me move to Houston. Let move to Phoenix. Let me move, you know, when when black folks are leaving Milwaukee. It isn't just because it bad weather. You can't convince black folks to come in Milwaukee just cause chest. I mean some of us is beautiful things. The Fiserv forum is a beautiful Arena but ain't going to convince nobody to come Milwaukee. They're like man, I can see the Fiserv Forum on the internet. I don't need the moon walk. You said not to say there are any organizations working to retain and attract black professionals to Milwaukee one organization. Reggie mentions is called fuel Milwaukee which aims to do just that but it takes more than just one organization to bring black professionals and retain black Professionals in the city and more importantly to start closing down the racial wealth Gap. It's going to take more than construction of condos, which has exploded across the city, especially in downtown. You know, once you come here move into the condo you're like really dead. Be like man. This is a beautiful condo as cheap blah blah, but then it's like so what are y'all do on the weekends, you know where to clubs at clubs and Girls Clubs, you know, you're not going to have the the atmosphere you having so many other places and that that's something that to me and I remember this to read when when I moved back to Milwaukee and early nineties after leaving in early eighties and I came back and as I was driving back to Milwaukee driving over there that bridge downtown coming into downtown Milwaukee and I looked over to my right. I'm like, oh man, where are the tall buildings built know tall buildings in the last ten years of walking still look old and Raggedy like it did when I left ten years ago and you know, they built some new building and try to fix downtown up better now, but Milwaukee is still very old fashioned place cuz it's still run by a bunch of old fashion minded folks. You know, we were very conservative City for a job. Long period of time and we're still very conservative we not Progressive Milwaukee is not a progressive place and.

Milwaukee Atlanta Maynard Jackson Fiserv Zillow Austin Texas Grambling Charlotte Phoenix New York Howard University Dallas Montgomery North Carolina Maryland Girls Clubs Austin La Reggie Houston
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Top priority issue. Neither party is even Champion right now. Also, keep going out and looking for discrimination actively bringing lawsuits against offenders support organizations that are doing the work like the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council and a solution is not necessarily that black people need to move to the suburbs. But we also need to invest in black neighborhoods crave more opportunities to buy homes rehab existing housing stock there a great organization in Milwaukee doing just that like Milwaukee's acts housing. We have more information about them at Radio Milwaukee. Org / measure. We're also have a great reading list. We want to learn more about systemic racism including know your price value in Black lives and property in America black cities by Andre Perry of the Brookings Institute and The Color of Money black Banks and the racial wealth Gap by Marissa bharara. She also put together as amazing proposal. Idea for solution called the 21st century Homestead that proposal would create public trust to purchase abandoned property in Target cities and Grant them to qualified residence by pairing this plan off with a suite of programs to redevelop these cities really interesting read. You can find Links at our website at Radio, Milwaukee. Org. On our next episode of by every measure we're going to go even deeper on the conversation of wealth and the racial wealth Gap. How big is that cap? Well, in terms of housing a report from The Institute of policy studies showed that the average black own home is valued $48,000 less than white own homes, and that adds up to a hundred and fifty six billion dollars of lost wealth and you can measure that Gap in dollars and in time that same study showed it will take two hundred twenty eight years. 228 years you understand what I just said the closed the wealth Gap meaning black families when that reached a wealth parody with white households until the year 22041 will break it down next time on by every measure..

Milwaukee Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Ho Radio Milwaukee Marissa bharara Brookings Institute Andre Perry America The Institute of policy
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Settle with federal government for 275 million in 2012, Countrywide Financial set up three hundred thirty-five million largest lawsuit settlement effort for housing discrimination, and then Associated Bank set up a hundred million dollars. So what is the real impact of systemic racism and housing? What does it mean? Well, basically it means that black people ended up decades now centuries behind why people in terms of or building they didn't have access to one thing Equity Equity builds, but you can use that Equity to make repairs to your home in your kids to college without debt to buy a boat to go out on the lake fishing to buy a cabin up north to go on vacations to Paris and France other places. It's the it leads you into the American dream and when you deny home segments of society the right to build that generational wealth you have what we have today. These are the things you need to know have productive conversations about race. I believe that the biggest challenge we have faith in terms of having these conversations is that we don't know enough to start the conversations the right way. Thank you all so much. Appreciate your time. So that is the problem and that is just scratching the surface coming up in the second half of by every measure. We're talking about an organization and it's tackling one facet of systemic racism and housing..

Equity Equity Countrywide Financial Associated Bank Paris France
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Eerie area to black people lived in or red line right didn't matter if you had money or not. You were going to be red line if you lived in that area blocked so that's another economic advantage and you have to remember at this time. This was the era of the new deal but that new deal and acted by President Roosevelt used coded language to exclude black people from various programs that were meant to help all Americans off. One of my favorite books on this topic is called when affirmative action was white and it talks about how we had a system in place that when we create a social security and unemployment in nineteen thirty-five. Both programs are written with very colorblind language, but then all of a sudden we decided that we were put in clause in at the end they said oh if you were a domestic wage or a farm worker, you're not eligible for you to program. So who you are most black people in the South which is where a majority black people lived in the 1930s. You are a domestic worker son. You can't you log Put any money away in a Cell security so that you have some money your old age. Oh man, you're a domestic worker. You work for Mister Johnson, you know cleaning his house and and nursing his children. You're not eligible for Social Security ma'am. Sorry and that was the case of 1935 until 1952. So between the lack of social security know unemployment insurance and the widespread practice a red lining. It's no wonder that. We're still dealing with these disparities in housing today and you think it would stop here but no it even affected black veterans home to me. One of the greatest disservice has ever done to any American in history is the GI bill that promised all those jobs who fought in World War Two and came back after fighting, you know fascism were told that you'd be able to get access to a V8 guaranteed home loan and you be able to get free access to college or tech school whatever, you know post-birth Your education you want and in his face. It is colorblind, you know, it doesn't discriminate. The law says all these gyasi eligible to guess what your black GI you come back like two of them is uncle's from fighting in World War Two. Do you think the people in Mississippi are going to let you buy that house that you're trying to buy and give you that loan heck? No, they are not going to do it towards a story about my dad who you know, I'm a veteran. My dad was a veteran came back GI Bill and he was telling me he couldn't get the loan but luckily found a house where the owner was white, but he was just the developer. Whatever was just desperate to sell to whoever so we they worked a deal together. So my dad got his first home and built his wealth again. He's the first and family to do that. Right? So the generation wealth is brand brand new, you know, and of course he's had issues of Corporation life is home and being pushed out and all this stuff and but I just just got me thinking about what my dad is and the wealth Generation Well, the black middle class is in rivers Atlanta wherever it's usually a first generation of middle-class right now, you know one one element related to what what you just heard about your dad, you know, trying to buy a house right now. They've been multiple black people here in metro Milwaukee in the North Shore region, right? They literally one of my best friend's hurt her mom and Dad tried to buy a house, right? And these were both Highly Educated people had great jobs and they could buy a house. So, you know how they bought the house they had a white Friend by the house. Right and and and that's how they were able to acquire the house. They have this white person, you know by the house from this white family and then when when when the movie truck pulled up and they saw a black post things like wait, wait. Wait, hold on. Wait a minute. Why are y'all here? I'll say like no. No, this is my name Oh, I thought it was this white guy know he was off the South. This is not Mississippi. This is not Montgomery, Alabama. This is right here in the suburbs in Milwaukee the majority of the top segregated cities in the country today are all located in the mid west and North including right here in Milwaukee, which takes the number one spot for racial segregation and when we mean segregation in Milwaukee, we mean suburbs versus the city. We're going back to Reggie's Off the Radio Milwaukee stage or Reggie shows evidence of the restrictive practices in place in Milwaukee suburbs. This is a sign in every lower doses City wage homes restrictive zoning. This is a sign that used to be all over Wauwatosa four years four years. This signed told you that Wauwatosa had what they call restrictive zoning wage what restrictive zoning simply meant was that only white people could live in Wauwatosa in these communities that had restrictive covenants in place. These were legally binding documents that said only white people could occupation this particular space. And so that particular sign was assigned. I went it took a picture of the Wauwatosa Historical Society last year. I used that photograph in a presentation and I did for the n-double-acp on Milwaukee took it from Milwaukee Journal Sentinel John Schmidt was there he came up and you asked me about the the the sign I told him about it he inquired about it. He did a really good article I consulted with him on the article. He wrote about kind of the history. Racism and segregation in Wauwatosa after that photojournalism Journal Sentinel took picture that signed the next day. They took it down. They literally took it down and that photograph when I use it one other time Wauwatosa alderperson for my other person said Reggie, you know, they had one of those in City Hall too long and like really he's like not only that they have it in City Hall, but they just took it out last year. I was like really and he said that's not even the worst part. This is the worst part back in the eighties. Somebody came along with some green duck tape and they taped over the part that said restrictive zoning with green duck tape as if nobody knew what was under their tape, right? I said you guys should have left the sign up I said it's a teachable moment for tose. Don't try to hide from your history. You can't cover it up. Listen. The photograph was on the front page of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Reggie Jackson as Jews that photograph like a hundred times and protections people know don't hide from it use it as a teachable moment. And that's exactly what they're doing and working with them now to kind of get the sign put back up there. So that's a good sign. But why mitosis sir? Really wasn't the only Community with these restrictions in place. In fact racial covenants, like the one in tosa took place in multiple cities surrounding Milwaukee Bayside Fox Point Hales Corner Glendale Greenfield, Cudahy Saint Francis Sherwood. Whitefish Bay, they all had their own types of covenants. This is an example of one for South Milwaukee. So it's written 937 set expiring 2024 and let's read it together. Can we read it as a course and no time. She'll any such lot or building may be purchased on least occupied or used by any person other than citizens of the United States of America of the white race this provision shall not apply to domestic servants, which may be employed by their owner or occupant of any such lot or building their own. However, the government wasn't only institution that played a role in systemic racism in housing the banking sector played a devastating role in early 2000s with a subprime crisis, which led to the Great Recession during this period black people lost over half half of their wealth One bank Wells Fargo targeted black communities with these packages within the last fifteen years. They were giving Latino and black borrowers completely different mortgages than whites who had the same exact credit worthiness Wells Fargo Bank.

Milwaukee Wauwatosa Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Reggie Jackson Wells Fargo Bank Mississippi Wauwatosa Historical Society Dad President Roosevelt United States Whitefish Bay Mister Johnson City Hall photojournalism Journal Sentin
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Back before covid-19 Radio Milwaukee hosted free event in our community space called how to have better conversations about race. Thank you all for coming out. I'm going to do we got a packed house and a snowy February evening and Reggie Jackson started the evening off with a short presentation on the history of segregation and how we got to this point and he showed how the federal government can help create the disparities in housing. We see today traditionally and I have to be honest with you. I tell people all the time to have these conversations. You can't pussyfoot around about it and be honest the reason and it looks like that is because white people wanted it to look like that that's the bottom line. So I'm going to tell you some of the mechanisms that they had available to them to create we're going to spend a few minutes going through different name is a black people were left out. Of the American dream of home ownership. And if I'm going to be completely totally honest with you the housing situation now for black people isn't all that much better compared to the time when Vel Phillips wage was all the woman fighting for fair housing for Milwaukee according to recent data from the real estate company Redfin Milwaukee has the third-worst black homeownership rate down entire country Salt Lake City and Minneapolis takes the number one and number two spot just to give an example how little progress we've made 1968 Federal Fair Housing. Act was supposed to end discrimination in housing on the federal level outlawed all those different things the black homeownership rate at that time was forty 1.3% and it's 42.9% today. It peaked at 50% in 2005 and it's gone down every single year since then we're moving in the wrong direction, but nobody knows. A couple of months after his talk and Radio Milwaukee. We follow up with Reggie on another conversation going more detailed and all these systems will go back to the stage just a bit. But first month, we gotta go back way back to the Civil War during the Civil War. The Homestead Act was created in 1862 by Abraham Lincoln in the last until nineteen Thursday formed basically in a speech by linking. The purpose of this Act was to elevate the condition of men to live artificial burdens from all shoulders and to give everyone an awful fettered start and fair chance in the race of life, except this act benefited mostly white families and left out. A lot of black people learned about the Homestead Act in school. All you had Homestead Act allowed, you know, people to immigrate and become, you know homeowners and blah blah know you stole the land from the Native Americans dead. I normally just gave it to white people. And guess what when you have land in America, you have the beginnings of wealth building here. Only land is the major way American families Built Well, and so you have this built-in advantage over people of color and then when the federal government starts to help people become Role Models by creating new types of mortgage that allows you to pay only 20% down white people off Main beneficiaries of that because when the federal government issued Federal housing administration loans to people from nineteen-thirty to nineteen sixty 98% of those jobs went to white people own this discriminatory lending led to a practice called redlining a term you might have heard there is a fantastic book called color of law that describes redlining as a practice used to deepen segregation by refusing to insure mortgages and and around black neighborhoods. Meanwhile, the FHA was subsidized to developers were building these amazing suburbs for whites. But with one khong Wax they couldn't sell.

federal government Radio Milwaukee Reggie Jackson Milwaukee Vel Phillips Abraham Lincoln FHA khong Wax America Redfin Minneapolis Salt Lake City
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"The truth <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> on our next episode. <Speech_Music_Male> We look at another <Speech_Music_Male> Legacy Milwaukee <Speech_Music_Male> issue <Speech_Male> an issue that <Speech_Male> was protested <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> violently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and peacefully <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the 1960s <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and still Rife <Speech_Music_Male> with any quality <Speech_Male> today <Speech_Music_Male> housing. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> What makes Milwaukee <Speech_Male> standout Chicago <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Detroit <Speech_Music_Male> Cleveland Buffalo, <Speech_Music_Male> they're segregated, <Speech_Music_Male> but what's different <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are suburbs don't look <Speech_Music_Male> anything like their suburbs <Speech_Music_Male> and if you look at <Speech_Music_Male> Buffalo Detroit <Speech_Music_Male> Chicago and <Speech_Music_Male> Cleveland a significantly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> large <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> number of black people living <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in their suburbs. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Reggie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will take us through the history <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of redlining <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Milwaukee and how black <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> people were kept from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> building generational <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wealth. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Plus we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> talked to an array of Milwaukee <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or actively <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> working to fix <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the problem <Speech_Music_Male> that's coming <Speech_Music_Male> up next time <Speech_Music_Male> on by every measure. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> By every measure <Speech_Male> is hosted by Tariq <Speech_Male> Moody and <Speech_Male> Reggie Jackson <Speech_Male> executive produced <Speech_Male> and edited by <Speech_Male> Nate emmick <Speech_Male> with additional production <Speech_Male> support from <Speech_Male> 888 9 <Speech_Male> program director <Speech_Male> Jordan Lee <Speech_Male> marketing director <Speech_Male> Sara mclanahan <Speech_Male> marketing coordinator, <Speech_Male> Aaron Bogata <Speech_Male> web <Speech_Male> editor Evan <Speech_Music_Male> rytlewski <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> audio producer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> selamat pagi <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> executive <Speech_Music_Male> director, <Speech_Music_Male> Kevin sucher <Speech_Male> content <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> marketing manager, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> amilinda Bridge <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Community <Speech_Music_Male> engagement manager <Speech_Music_Male> Mandy Reardon <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> imaging manager <Speech_Music_Male> Kenny. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Handcrafted Sonic <Speech_Music_Male> inspiration <Speech_Music_Male> from the license <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lab in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our sincerest. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to our members <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for making all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Radio Milwaukee content <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> possible <Music> <Advertisement> <Music>

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"As you've probably seen on the news not just here not just around the nation, but across the world cover this story about Jacob Lake worth a shot in the back multiple times by a police officer and before that a few hours before that. I was actually working on this episode which you about the here as a black man when you see that box. I don't think you can really understand or even a black woman a black man black person if you see this as a black person, I don't think you truly understand the trauma of seeing. Someone that looks like you being killed in a video the same experience happened with me George Floyd imag Barbary this traumatic. We're about to discuss policing immigration police and Reggie Jackson and it makes me wonder what this conversation really make a difference. Would it make an impact what people listen long as you know, there's a lot of people in this country that don't really believe systemic racism exists. If you can't get people to acknowledge that Dismantling that makes it even harder. So it got me thinking and part of me is like can systemic racism be dismantled and policing and to be honest with you what I just saw this past weekend, but I'm not.

Reggie Jackson Jacob Lake George Floyd officer
"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

By Every Measure

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"every" Discussed on By Every Measure

"Hey, this is Tariq Moody host of a new podcast from Radio Milwaukee called by every measure and over six episodes. We're going to examine systemic racism right here in Milwaukee. The six-part podcast will look at a different system in each episode from policing to the racial wealth Gap to education and we'll focus on the data behind each of these systems place will share solutions that are being developed right here in Milwaukee. Joining me on this podcast is Reggie Jackson a milwaukee-based research journalist who specializes in racial disparities and education around racism. He has appeared on CNN NPR off and the BBC plus he has an extensive collection of work published on the publication Milwaukee independent. Here's a little preview of the kind of conversation will be having throughout by every measure. How do you go about trying to convince people especially white people and institutions and like non-profit Corporation to show that this is a thing. This is a real thing off. How do you how do you explain it to them? But you know, I have a policy where I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything. I simply provide them with the information and let them choose to take it. However, they want to take it. You know as I've travel around the United States doing this work particular here in a state of Wisconsin and 35 different communities people. Sometimes take it well and other people don't believe it. I don't waste time on those people who are denyer's of racism because if you can live in this country and deny racism then I see you are your person who will never be convinced. So what I do is I've concentrated on the people in the middle. I know that there are some people who are who are white and particularly firmly believe that correct. Just exist. They understand systemic racism and they're all on board. They get it and then there are some who will never get it because they choose not to they just want to live with their heads buried in the sand off but there's a whole bunch of people in the middle to re those are the people that I'm generally reaching. So, who are you are you open to learning more about systemic racism and the work needed to do to eliminate it. We.

Milwaukee Tariq Moody Reggie Jackson United States CNN non-profit Corporation Wisconsin BBC denyer NPR