3 Burst results for "Everglades River"

"everglades river" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:01 min | 4 months ago

"everglades river" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In 1917, she took a brief break from the Herald to join the U.S. naval reserve during World War I. The following year, she signed up for the American Red Cross in Europe. She returned to Florida in 1920 and became the assistant editor of the Miami Herald. In her new role, she started a column called the galley, where she covered everything from geography to the plight of women. A few years later, she left the newspaper to become a freelance writer and author. Over the next two decades, she published essays and short stories, frequently appearing in the Saturday evening post. She received numerous awards, including second place in the prestigious O Henry award, and first place for a play she wrote at Florida's little theater competition. She also joined the faculty at the university of Miami as an associate Professor of English. In the 1940s, Marjorie turned her focus to the Everglades. Over the course of 5 years, she dove into research and writing about a vast patch of wilderness that had wrongfully been characterized as a useless swamp. Unbeknownst to Marjorie, her work would have a profound impact on Florida's environmental landscape. In 1947, she published the Everglades, river of grass. The book was an instant success, selling out its first printing in just a month. People were captivated by the way she blended science, history, and rich imagery, to tell the story of a precious ecosystem. Up until this point, the Everglades were considered worthless. Marjorie redefined these wetlands as a place of flowing, fresh water, intimately connected to and necessary for the wildlife of the Everglades. She emphasized how draining the swamp could destroy this ecosystem of prospering wildlife. Marjorie's work to protect the Everglades, didn't stop after she published river of grass. In the 1950s, she criticized a development project led by the U.S. Army Corps of engineers that threatened the natural cycles of precipitation and evaporation upon which the Everglades depended. Then, in 1969, when she was 79 years old, she formed Friends of the Everglades, a grassroots organization. Their first goal was to stop the construction of a jet port that could decimate part of the wetlands. She traveled across Florida and recruited 3000 members to join her organization. They were able to generate enough noise that the project was halted after just one runway was built. Marjorie spent the rest of her life and career devoted to conservation and preservation efforts. She campaigned with environmentalists to pass legislation and served on committees to protect national parks and wildlife. She became a fixture in the Florida environmental movement and received numerous awards. In 1993, she was awarded the Medal of Freedom by president Clinton. On May 14th, 1998 at the age of 108, marjory Stoneman Douglas died quietly at her home in coconut grove, Florida. Her ashes were scattered across the Everglades. For more information and pictures of the work we're talking about, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. Check out the second season of as she rises wherever you're listening right now. And special thanks to Jenny and Liz Kaplan for inviting me to guest host this episode. Talk to you tomorrow..

Marjorie U.S. naval reserve Miami Herald Florida Henry award the Herald American Red Cross U.S. Army Corps of engineers university of Miami Europe Everglades marjory Stoneman Douglas president Clinton coconut grove Instagram Liz Kaplan Facebook Jenny
"everglades river" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

14:05 min | 2 years ago

"everglades river" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Michaels and he's a six point Bonnie WBO is here with Leslie pool answer of environmental studies at Rollins college we'll be talking about the impact that Florida's women have had in protecting and advocating for the state's wildlife and environment thank you for joining me today I'm curious first just how you became interested in studying with these women have done in the environment well I'm a fourth generation Floridian and so it doesn't take very long to start to be concerned about what's happening to our environment and I as I was working in my first career as a newspaper reporter I wrote a bit about the environment and I noticed that women were constantly you know the movers and do or an environmental organizations they're getting things done so when I decided to go back and get my PhD on a looked started looking at that as a possible topic and I found it was incredibly rich and and tapped area and so your your studies are in environmental science and this just seemed a nice fit well my degree is actually in American history but my specialty is Florida environmental history and I've been doing this are research looking at conservation in the last century and how we went about trying to save and protect our natural resources really interesting and what we're gonna do in the next few minutes to share some of what you found out and I'd love to hear from you as well about what kinds of trends you've seen from that historical perspective why don't we begin with Marjory Stoneman Douglas this is a name that's familiar to all of us Floridians but tell us a little bit about what you learned what she did well she's amazing I call her the patron Saint of the Everglades and most people know her because of her book Everglades river of grass and like she first describes this ecosystem away people understood a moving sheet of water a river of grass issues and mazing communicator but when the most interesting things I discovered about her is that while we all associate her with being an activist trying to save the Everglades she didn't start doing that work until she was seventy nine years old and when you live to be a hundred and eight you can get a lot of things done but it was just a late that was a late live on the Upper heard that be made her so important to our state actually as she became that activists will how does she really go about doing it and was that a model for the later activist so she absolutely sets the model she created a group called the friends of the Everglades that required a one dollar donation to be a member and as a result she built up a huge grassroots community of people in Florida who were concerned about the Everglades and then with that grass roots para behind her she would go to planning meetings or city commission meetings and if there was a development deal or project that she thought would threaten the Everglades she she would stand up at the meeting and re engineer she was not a very tall person should maybe five feet tall but she'd studied elocution in college and had a very strong speaking voice and she would let her feeling Hibino across the room and one of the things she used to say was well they can't be mean to me because I'm a little old lady but I can certainly be rude to them and she was incredibly effective in absolutely she teaches us about how women created environmental changes and protection even before they could vote and it was through grassroots by joining together no one other person you talk about is Marjorie Harris car tell us about her story so Marjorie hairs cartels much of the same model she would have been a scientist with a master's degree in zoology but wasn't really recognizes the scientist we think of her more as the activists who led a group called the Florida defenders of the environment that fought to stock the cross Florida barge canal in the late nineteen sixties and again Marjorie put together a grassroots group of citizens across the state she also put together experts that could contend that this project was going to have a huge environmental impact as well as questionable economic numbers and then she was a wonderful communicator who could work with the news media you can get the story out and individually the group stopped the cross Florida barge canal and it was the national news and it was the first time in a grassroots movement in Florida had stopped a federal project that was so far along they had already stuck over seventy million dollars and constant to building the canal when they were able to get president Nixon stopped the canal and that was really the end of the project construction it is still there pieces of it were built there's a thing out near Palak can that is still there that's created this kind of barren reservoir so she spent the rest of her life trying to repair that damage only made that dam and that remains on our agenda today so these battles are on going you know I'm curious about what you were saying about you know how to use the media to get the word out and everything this is certainly being attentive also to who you're appealing to so have you seen changes is there a trend in the change of how you appealed to Floridians in making the case for something well some of it is the same as somebody has changed a lot so for example when I'm in that one was proposed several years ago that would force the state to create the funding mechanism to help buy in protective mantle land that begin with the petition drive to get the whole topic on the ballot women's groups garden clubs environmental groups all around and got his chin signatures to then you know the powers that be to put it on the ballot they also have in their tool box now a lot of other methods of working within the media they have to be a social media now based in Instagram and yeah online petition to there's a lot more opportunities to contact people in the in the public but I think at the very base it's people who are mourning change who were demanding it at the right then trying to gather together maybe a new techniques but to achieve the same goal which is to protect the environment and appreciate the beauty of Florida this also difference though in the listeners in those years you mentioned that Marjory Stoneman Douglas was really grated elocution and you know she could give these fabulous speeches but help people listen to these issues has changed over time and you know what we pay attention to what we question has that come into play in the the latest efforts well you know it's it's I think we're still finding some of the same battle we did maybe in a and just different personalities yeah we open at one got past with any Norman better approval I believe it is seventy five percent and yet the legislature has been reluctant and even refusing to spend that money because they're spending it on other things so now it again it requires the voices of the people to the man that the legislature start spending that money and we're seeing some of that start to happen now I think if you live in Florida and I give you maybe five years you'll start to see the actual places that you loved start to disappear so I think people in Florida first of all move here because of the natural beauty and then it doesn't take very long before you see how in battle so my experience has been and that it doesn't take much to get people engaged it's just sometimes they don't know how to go about doing it but now we have the internet and email and there are lots of opportunities to do that speaking of that one of the results is the Canaveral national seashore which which I so love and tell me a little bit about Doris stock leaper because it was her effort to create the Canaveral national seashore all right love doc leaper it's such a great story she moved to the hi this bill area in the nineteen fifties she was artists and message she became known for they call her doc because she initially want to be a medical doctor but was told in that era that women were not suited for medical school but she ended up becoming a very renowned sculptor and painter and she lived in a wooden house owned the property that is male member national seashore and when she moved there she became very worried about cars that were driving over the dunes and fishermen who weren't following the rules and potential development in the area and what she tried to get the local sheriff in the local government interested in trying to protect the area they pretty much blew her off and there's people who knew her will tell you you just don't do that to dock and she created a citizens group again friends of command well and they fought to have that the whole store created which was an amazing thing if you go there now it's the only the longest stretch of untouched Atlantic coast line that we have in Florida and it's it's truly an amazing place but she was persistent junior high together people together she would not take no for an answer and ultimately in the future with created they put her on the governing board at it makes me kind of crazy right now is the fact that when you look at the sea shore history and information of the posted online she has been written out of that history there's no IT knowledge meant of her and I think it's because she made quite a few people angry and and she was and she pressed them to do things but I'm I'm kind of a one woman mission to try to get her name restored into that larger narrative about the future because it's an amazing place and she truly deserves a lot of credit for the work that created that with that artist size she obviously recognize the beauty and that it needed to be preserved there must have been some of that in her then that was where the message was coming from yeah there has been a preserve the spruce creek preserve has been named after her in a new Smyrna beach area and she was also a founder of an artist colony over there she was very curing aids in the community but I mean I have to think that her artistic is static in her love of living over in that area to make her want to protect it again I think that's the of anyone living here is that if you love it you want to save it and we just have to find a way to make that happen to make our politicians will come to us you has focused on may man Jennings who established the first state park in Florida what was that effort like that's amazing story made Jennings was the president of the Florida federation of women's clubs which was a group that kind of an umbrella group for women's clubs that were in local communities across the state and these clubs began some of them began in the late eighteen hundreds and they were very popular in the early nineteen hundreds because women really didn't have too many outlet for kind of community work and one of their top topics always was forestry bird beautification and parks and women had a real concern about saving beauty and saving natural areas in the state and what's interesting about many men Jennings and and the women's club just wench actually she was a widow of a former governor of Florida so she was very politically connected throughout the state which wasn't a large people why I stayed at the time she had all kinds of political connections with men with the legislature in with women across the state of Florida and in nineteen sixteen she and the women's clothes convince the legislature and and note that this is nineteen sixteen way before one could vote but they convince the legislature that Florida needed to protect a hammock island in the Everglades that was biologically rich with different kinds of orchid and birds but but spectacular home trees while palm trees as well that were on the property that we're they they believe were threatened because a road project is going to be coming nearby so men and the women went to the state legislature they literally walked the halls and the bandit but the legislature respond to the request for the park and they had already gotten a land donation and they got the legislature to match the land nation and in nineteen sixteen lord of its very first state park oil palm state park and the importance of that continues on the legislature wouldn't fund the park for a few years and so the women pay for themselves they were like I said not not to be deterred and then in nineteen forty seven they donated that park to become the nucleus of Everglades national park so early on women could recognize nature they would work for it they would demand change with demand protection and I think that that's just a gift from may Jennings in the women's clothes to the state of Florida to the world and the Everglades as a world heritage site and I think it's just a great story about persistence and and and doing what they believed was right in fact on the two things are running through my mind as you're sharing the story number one I'm sure at the time when you said road project it was perceived as progress rate or you know Hey remember that Florida and then the second piece of it is that women would be dismissed perhaps so you know with two kinds of battles to fight there what what happened.

Michaels Rollins college Florida Bonnie
Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

BrainStuff

04:27 min | 3 years ago

Who Was Marjory Stoneman Douglas?

"After the horrific parkland florida's school shooting in february of two thousand eighteen marjory stoneman douglas became a household name for all the wrong reasons but let's take a look today at the woman for whom the school was named marjory stoneman douglas undertook a legendary in dairy fifty year crusade to save the florida everglades born in minneapolis in eighteen ninety and educated at wellesley college in massachusetts douglas moved to south florida in nineteen fifteen fifteen after a brief and disastrous marriage to join her father who was editor and founder of the newspaper that would become the miami herald she was an accomplished journalist short story writer writer and an outspoken advocate for women's suffrage anti-poverty campaigns and ultimately because it would make her famous. The everglades douglas's nineteen forty seven owed into those wetlands. The everglades river of grass was published the same year that president harry s truman dedicated the everglades national park long before environmental scientists fully understood the fragility and interconnectedness of the everglades ecosystem douglas railed against efforts by the us army corps of engineers to drain divert parts of the sprawling wetlands to to make room for agricultural and urban development. These efforts continue today. The school was dedicated in nineteen ninety when douglas was one hundred years old and still going strong along with her book. Douglas provided a new way of understanding the one point five million acre wetlands preserve rather than seeing it as merely a sprawling swamp douglas rightly described the everglades massive slow moving river of shallow water draining north to south from lake okeechobee down through the sawgrass prairies and emptying into the florida florida bay in moving pros douglas road of the hundreds of species of birds fish and flora that thrived in the precariously balanced ecosystem of the everglades the largest subtropical wilderness in the united states. She rightly recognized that this area was largely responsible for the rainfall in south florida are book begins. There are no oh other everglades in the world they are. They've always been one of the unique regions of the earth remote. Never wholly known nothing anywhere else is like them a tireless and often intimidating advocate. She founded the organization friends of the everglades at age seventy nine to fight a proposed jet port in the middle of the wetlands lends. The airport plan was scrapped. Douglas spent the rest of her life. Defending the everglades jon rothschild edited her nineteen eighty-seven autobiography voice of the river described her in the book's introduction as she appeared at a public meeting in everglades city in nineteen seventy-three. Mrs douglas was half the size of her fellow. Speakers were huge dark glasses along with the huge floppy hat that made her look like scarlet o'hara's played by eager stravinsky when she spoke everybody's stop slapping mosquitoes and more or or less came to order. Her voice had sobering effect of a one room schoolmarm. 's the tone itself seemed tame. The rowdiest of the local stone crabbers plus the developers and the lawyers on both besides there are two seasons in the everglades. The dry winter and the monsoon summer and scientists now understand that seasonal fluctuations in water levels are key to maintaining the delicate equilibrium between competing plant and animal species but that balanced spend dangerously disturbed decades of habitat loss and short-sighted water-management tactics tactics. The river of grass is no longer a free flowing sheet of water but sliced up and boxed in by dams and dikes creating floods in some areas and drought in others congress passed the comprehensive everglades restoration plan back in the year two thousand but the funds to implement the plan never secured in the meantime lake shelby obi historically the water source that fed southward flow of the river of grass has become hopelessly polluted largely by agricultural runoff in two thousand sixteen high levels of phosphorus is a nitrogen in the lake caused a toxic algae bloom. The prompted the governor to issue a state of emergency eric eichenberger c._e._o. Of the everglades foundation and one time student at douglas's namesake high school says that congress will have to reauthorize funding for the restoration but if everything goes well the river of grass could be restored in as little as eight years he believes the douglas who died in nine hundred ninety eight at the age of one hundred and eight would be energized by the effort among douglas many honors and awards was the presidential medal of freedom conferred conferred by bill clinton in one thousand nine hundred three in the year two thousand she was posthumously inducted into the national women's hall of fame. Douglas ashes were scattered in the everglades national park over the marjory stoneman douglas wilderness area.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Florida Everglades Everglades National Park Everglades River Everglades Foundation Everglades City Writer Florida United States Miami Herald South Florida Harry S Truman Florida Florida Bay Massachusetts Lake Okeechobee Wellesley College Minneapolis Eric Eichenberger President Trump Bill Clinton