16 Burst results for "Evelyn Glenn"

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Podium Time

Podium Time

08:52 min | Last month

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Podium Time

"There's this Opportunity WanNa be a the WanNa do a show in it's a great time I. Think it's Sundays at three PM. You you should do it. If you're interested, you could do absolutely anything you want so. It went from there and it's it's a one hour thing. It's a nice and quick I have a theme each week. So this past week actually the theme was Charlie Parker was hundred anniversary of his birth. He was born on August twenty, nine, nine, hundred, twenty, and so dedicated the show to Charlie Parker. I had a Shula Anderson, who's a longtime radio host out of New York. And she's also author of producer has done many jazz events in Newark around the country she came on the show and talked about Charlie Parker and the importance of his music and his influence. So it just it all the shows have a theme. I could pick any genre I want it doesn't have to stick to classical and I have commentary and I'll also have some guests. A one little element is that at the end of each show, there's might be a little surprise. Just, a random piece or something unusual. So that's what it is. I've been getting some good response feedback about that So it's it's been. It's been really fun. It's awesome that you have the freedom to do. Anything and there yeah, that's that's great. That's right. you you on the podcast you interview like you said, a wide variety of people and I'm just surprised by. How many people you have on their? He reach out to these these guests so so quickly. I'm I tried to schedule these things. also I understand how difficult it can be. and. One thing the pandemic my podcast have been doing it since two, thousand, seventeen I think you started around the same time maybe or a started August? Two thousand, seventeen? Yeah, I mean, mine was probably April of two thousand seventeen. So around same time really but it was on and off it wasn't very consistent. There were moments of where I did a lot of it, and then moments where I got really busy like last summer. I was very busy. I didn't do much of anything really for the PODCAST. But. it's it's a disturbing this pandemic I thought. It'd be a good opportunity to reach out to a lot of people especially since many of them I have some more time than they usually you would. Touring and everything. So I did that night just reach out to people I. sometimes, I reach out to them all social media. It's harder for example, Yolanda conduct issues this very famous player she's. Toured all over the world playing. As a soloist. And I reached out to her. Facebook for example, I just messaged her on her artist page or whatever you call it. Then responders she said, Hey, contact my manager. Let's go from there. and. She gave me a direct contact so And just reaching out to people. That's Either either managers or Or them personally on twitter I. Think with Christian of Bryant. As I mentioned earlier I think might initial conversation with him was to twitter and then Vj IRA for example, the pianist jazz candidates to professor from Harvard Harvard University I reached out to I think on Instagram So just. Things like that you know if if it's harder to reach reach out to the manager, which sometimes can be and sometimes like Oh, well, it's just this is not the New York Times or any of these big podcast or anything. They might say, okay, forget about this but you reach out to the artist they might be okay this. Cool. Let me do it. So I found the same thing. Yeah. Some sometimes easier to just. Reach out to them. Personally especially if they're managing their own social media or if they have like their email somewhere out there which some of them might not so. For, example Evelyn Glenn this world famous percussionist I, wish out manager and she was very responsive. She got back to me right away and scheduled it. So it it really depends. Of course, as you would know, I've reached out to so many people who have either said, hey, we'll do it another time or I've reached out to people who have said Oh, I I I just can't doors many people who? Never responded so it just happens. Yeah. Absolutely. How do you pick who you're going to reach out to in not? Anything you look for you just trying to get the the best of the best. I reach out to people who I've like Evelyn gone for example, Richard Saltzman. Famous player I reached out to them because I've been a fan of what they're doing and I remember for both of their cases I've I've had recordings of their music from very early on. So I've been a fan and I love what they do and I. I reach out to people that I like what they've done, what they do, and sometimes it's recommendation someone will come on they'll enjoy for example, Martyn Cushman, who's pursue. He's premiered many concertos and I reached out to him to beyond and then he enjoyed it so much. She was like, Hey, you should have my friend Christopher theophanous this on your podcast and he's like, Oh, I have this other friend who does this you should have him on your podcast principal clarinet of the Chicago symphony you should have him on your podcast connect you. So some people really enjoy like all cash that you recommend more people to you and Others you know. I just I just reach out. It's. Just, what it is I. There's no method Really it's mostly people who I I enjoy their work or their recommendations. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Who's who's who somebody that you've been really wanting to get on but haven't reached out to yet? Is there any any of those big names maybe Do I WANNA have on? That's a good question Trying to think I can't Well, you know as many conductors would probably say. Simon rattle absolutely. That'd be cool. To have. Even tried to get in contact with them. I don't expect you. I, haven't I haven't tried either I haven't tried You've had John On. You've had her twice I think three times three. Times. On recently as well, right? Yeah. Yeah, and she was great. She was great. Yeah. Yeah. So You know the those are big names She's a big name in the in the conducting world very important figures. So yeah I I duNno I I said Simon Rattle I'm sure there are others I would love to have on and you know for example, I've always been a fan of staying and he doesn't really fit with my You know I mostly have jazz and classical even though I there are few people who are not jazz or classical that Han was thing would be cool but that's another I. Love I, love that idea. And thing is a big fan of classical music. He loves Bach and Dalby something to talk to him about and maybe if I if I email nice say hey, I've had Christian a bright on and Christian McBride has played with them extensively. Maybe excite him to be on. I. Don't. Not yet. To Christian and get his phone number and textiles right. That would be that'd be awesome. Yeah. So of your of your hundred and twenty something almost hundred and thirty how if you had to pick maybe your top five just just the top couple if you could send new listeners out, say maybe start with these five. Oh boy that's a good question. That question of composers before, Hey, where where's a good place for composers to start and listen to what you're doing before for musicians to listen to certain pieces by composers or non musicians I that's a tough question i. you know again, maybe it's a top name, but I really enjoyed my conversation with Evelyn Glenn She's such a inspirational figure I really like that George George. George, Walker, who is icon of American composer I had a great conversation with them. One thing. I. Really, wish I did with George Walker is. As I told it was before we start recording I. Wish I did some early podcasts video. Because I think that would have been cool but George Walker was You know one of the first black composers first black composer to win A. Pulitzer. Prize. And he's an important figure and I love his music and I really enjoyed our conversation. It was you know maybe a year and a half before he passed away I think so that that was a that was a a great one and then David Harrington of kronos quartet the founder, and the first violence of court had that was great because. He shared a personal story about his son who passed away and it really caught me off guard was really..

Evelyn Glenn Charlie Parker George Walker Simon Rattle George George twitter WanNa Shula Anderson New York New York Times Facebook producer David Harrington Newark John On Harvard Harvard University Yolanda Martyn Cushman Christian McBride
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments. You've heard music from Johann Sebastian faulks Brandenburg Concerto number. Two so by now you might be wondering how many Brandenburg concertos there are and how they got a name like Brandenburg. I'll tell you that next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for Kids and produce it with Pimm Lander at wgn Cincinnati. Please join me next. Time for the story of the Brandon. Birds on classics for kids..

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Johann Sebastian faulks Brande Zillions Vivaldi Brandenburg Pimm Lander Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Naomi Lewin vinnie Emmanuel Cincinnati Refund Williams
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 7 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

The News & Why It Matters

10:54 min | 9 months ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on The News & Why It Matters

"He's going to travel the private jets and he's not even going to apologize for it he spent six hundred and forty six thousand dollars on a private jet travel it's an interesting look fo for sanders and warren at least who are so boldly saying that we need to do all of these things to combat climate change you know yes i support the green a new deal which restricts air travel entirely so it's an interesting look jason for senator sanders senator warrant to be spending this much money just in the last three months of two thousand nineteen on private air travel cracks me up this you know they they rail against how billionaires nares live that's his biggest thing used to be millionaires became a millionaire you got to change it a billionaire awkward but they rail against billionaires live and they extravagant lifestyle even though he lived the same exact th you know that's why they got into government because they were billionaire wannabes and how do you do that without actually having the money go into government where all the power is and you advocate for even more and more powers they can continue your lifestyle it's typical elitist attitude it's the same attitude that you see in like hollywood where they will come out and they'll talk about oh except immigrants and if you don't you're not sees as you know what i mean or not even immigrants but people coming in illegally or else you're bigoted or whatever but you should see how they treat immigrants or people from other countries within their own neighborhoods within their house staff you know what they say they say well who's going to mow them yards that's the democrat who said that literally well so i mean we have maids literally that's how they see it then these they don't believe this stuff they don't really don't have any conviction on limiting fossil fuels or whatever i mean if they actually had a sit down conversation with someone said okay what's all this gonna cost how long is it going to take us to get to the green new deal then they go to someone like you and musk errands yvonne yvonne on how long is it gonna take for you to for your radical you know battery technology to sweep the globe whatever and and and overtake gasoline and be about the same amount of time about percents so they're arguing over problems that aren't even going to exist and like five ten years anyway let technology take its course you don't have to step in and stifle it and game against the innovators now while jason i believe that what you're saying is true these these elites do not believe what they are constantly preaching when it comes to climate change but aaron do you think that there are a good chunk of people who do believe that it's happening because it's been pushed on that's right it's been pushed down our throats they've been terrified of you know the fact that we're going to die in twelve years that you know now they're terrified and they do take it seriously are are they going to take issue with these politicians telling them all of these things and then turning around and doing the exact opposite therapy who really believe it when you listen to interviews with some of these climate the change activists it's scary how terrified they are about whether they should have kids whether there's even a reason to worry about twenty years from now yeah that's probably a good idea but they do you believe it but at the same time we really don't think that bernie sanders or elizabeth warren is going to get punished by headline like this because you're not going to see it anywhere except probably conservative leaning sites it's from the washington free beacon so they're probably not gonna even hear about how much private travel if they do hear about it they might blame it on impeachment or something even that's how how long was that you know a few weeks yes that's not one point two million worth and it's probably other ways to travel from DC to iowa but they'll excuse it away they're not gonna pay any price for this that's why they do it that's why you would spend one point two million because you no it's not gonna cost you any political capital along those lines of who the people are scaring i mean the kids little small kids shouldn't be thinking about this they're absolutely terrified terrified absolutely terrified of some kind of made a boogeyman but they don't they don't they don't consider that they don't consider it when they talk about you know member that el paso shooter he mentioned this in in his in his little manifesto you scared to death of very to and then all these other talking points left brings up and they use the same tactics over everything whether it's you know i don't know pick pick whatever is out there right now whether it'd be healthcare whether it be universal income it was all in that manifesto so they freaked him out so much that he was willing to do something like that you look bernie sanders website and it says we have eleven years to fix this irreversible carbon emissions problem and he's still flying on a private jet so how could you possibly believe that but yeah that's how it works wchs speaking of all of these children who are now terrified of all dying from climate change and global warming global cooling also mass extinction and just throw in all of these awful terrible things poonpoca be now seventeen year old who we all know and love the swedish teenage climate climate activists she has been nominated yet for the twenty twenty nobel peace prize by two swedish legislators now the nomination says that she has succeeded in creating a global attitudinal shift transforming millions of vague middle of the night anxieties societies into a worldwide movement calling for urgent change she's offered a moral clarion to call to those who are willing to act and hurled shame on those who or not wild show peaceful she has focused the world's attention on environmental injustices that young indigenous activists have been protesting for years because of her hundreds of thousands of teenage greg's from lebanon liberia have skipped school to lead their peers in climate strikes around around the world do all you had to do to be nominated for the nobel peace prize was shame people recall the bar is so high be called crazy for doing that if you just ran around yelling by the world about in your like nobel peace prize attitudinal attitudinal shift that's right not to mention the seventeen year old who is avoiding school who has documented mental issues sorry just putting it out there and we're going to take a take what she's saying as bible and be elevate her to a level where she gets nominated for the nobel peace prize i was hoping that she would just kind of fade off into the distance after she you know chastised it's all of us for not listening to her it appears that this is just it's it's never gonna stop no it's never going to stop we saw this with the what was the the the parkland kids they think that was a very significant push in that direction to object defying these kids using these kids for political purposes they didn't stop i mean come on CNN them just lapped it up they loved it i don't know if you've got so there was an article out the other day where i think thought in wired magazine and they were showing there was a flaw in facebook book system in their code which very briefly revealed all the people that were making posts he saw this we're making posts on their facebook pages regret is the people make there were people making post oh surprise surprise so her activism or the thoughts of her father a man from the UN lobby shocking shock vase rights rights activist who is weird right i know dreams are crushed she's being used for this her child has being ripped away by her own parents and now the global community is legitimizing it by giving them award for it so if you're if you're a kid literally i wish i would have known this and i was a kid i just never would have went to school one is made up just made something up i want shakira and jalen every single halftime show i'm not going to school ever forget it i thought you were gonna make up about the environmental l. nominate nominations on my gosh here we go friday's poll will mitch mcconnell so this is a you guys already know the answer to this question will mitch mcconnell be able to end the impeachment trial today eighty two point five eighty three percent of you said yes eighteen percent of you said no today's poll which twenty twenty democrat will take home victory at tonight's iowa caucus elizabeth warren bernie sanders enders pete buddha judge or joe sleepy joe biden thing this is tough because i'm gonna look stupid tomorrow when i come on the show and i don't get it right i'm going to say that the bernie bernie stuff is overblown i think that it is i think i think it's gonna be very very close but i'm giving biden i'll give plus or minus three points okay okay well so within three points in media exact percentage three i i would say biden within like fifty fifty points give her somewhere but if that's not true then you dare you say it's going to the sanders warned in biden close top three really prediction if warren not showing up here for a while wow waste you know beyond are you to hear you would then give it also to new hampshire then for hampshire he's the money probably uh-huh fading a little bit i think he's fading i would i would tend to agree with you i also think i mean it's not a hundred percent certain if he takes those two states that he is the nominee however it was the right it would be difficult to see any other any anything else else working people win there they start to get that oh he can win momentum and then it just goes but but and i think that you brought this up earlier in the program but it is a candidate unlike other democratic candidates donald trump was right i feel like anything could happen when you've got a new type of candidate i mean this guy is very clearly like pro socialist and communist i love him well if everybody was smart for andrew young but i'm just not thinking that's going to happen so i'm just trying it'd be realistic here was that joke thanks but he's not gonna win is what's crazy is i i kind of agree with you because he's the only one with any original ideas i don't agree with any of them really but at least he's got some original ideas not getting the attention you know it's funny the the new york times did you see when they did the they did a little interview with all of the candidates they asked him you know fun questions and they ask them who their celebrity crushes were and andrew yang was so cute and so- wholesome and he said that it was his wife evelyn glenn because he she's just the best and she's gorgeous and great and coming up here we court something where you asked me what my celebrity celebrity crushes and i say my wife's after and and it was so sweet and wholesome and so i tweeted it out obviously not an injury yang supporter i i tweeted out williams and obviously tweeted out andrew yang so wholesome and i got.

warren senator sanders senator
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Here's a household name and a company that has never turned a profit. But now it's going public tomorrow morning edition. Hear whether Uber is worth the rumored value of ninety billion dollars. Join us for that story and the information you need to start your day on morning edition on WNYC. Fifty seven degrees now about fifty two overnight mostly cloudy and fifty eight tomorrow, it's eleven o'clock. This is WNYC FM HD and AM New York. On this edition of new sounds. We're going to be listening to music for percussion ensembles. Now, you might expect a lot of banging and bashing and things and that will happen. But Ellen Reid didn't win a Pulitzer prize by doing the expected this percussion piece played by the L A percussion ensemble has long stretches that have a shimmering glittery quality to them. And in the next hour. We'll hear a number of percussion pieces that offer us a wide variety of sounds from a kind of mystical sounding word by Thomas because like to collaborative work by the singer Bjork and the Scottish percussionist Evelyn, Glenn, I'm John Schaffer. Glad you've joined us for this edition of new sounds despite what I said a moment ago. There's nothing wrong with writing a piece for percussion ensemble that is full of clanger and clashing and big. Banging sounds in fact, that's how we'll begin with a work written by David Skidmore. David is one of the members of third coast percussion, they're based in Chicago. And the piece is called torched and wrecked now, despite the destruction promised by the title skidmores piece, actually does have a kind of glittery shimmery quality to it even as it moves relentlessly forward driven by mallet percussion, then we'll hear some music from Thomas Cusack. Blick whom we I got to know as the percussionist in the band clogs. We're going to hear two excerpts from what is really a symphony for percussion that he calls child of the earth a piece in four parts will hear part two which is called mysticism and the conclusion both played by Jonathan Haas and the NYU percussion ensemble from New York University Thomas wrote this piece. For them. So those two works follow this opening piece from David Skidmore. Torched and wrecked is the name of it. Played by third coast. Percussion? music by.

David Skidmore Thomas Cusack New York Pulitzer prize Ellen Reid New York University Bjork Blick Jonathan Haas Chicago John Schaffer NYU Glenn ninety billion dollars Fifty seven degrees
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Reel Chat

Reel Chat

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Reel Chat

"Everybody. Thank you. This time country beat on every episode every episode one hundred of can you believe that? A few times even better. That's where the numbers take on the stats work. Thank you. And joining us as well is someone who needs no introduction. But I'm going to give him the biggest one I possibly can muster one might even call him real checks number one ticket holder. He's a patriot support a loyal fan and gets regular mentioned on the show. He's an associate professor in the university of divinity beak. Welcome to the professor himself. Mr. Glenn, Brian. Thank you. Thank you so much for coming back so much price gleaned from your number one appearance with us on the rear window episode of real Chattan. Very kind words from the from listen Glenn. So thank you to find the right for him to get you back on that issue. Absolutely. Yes. I dish in to real chats. Didn't have it on. Do this. I have no idea how this happened. Very bright up. Vari lite one. Someone who I've known since probably about nineteen ninety three ninety four something like that meet ninety s we are old. Are your old? But. Yet. Fuck it's ten thirty three. Invites method yesterday someone who learned since high school and also many many fantastic chats about movies over the years is Mr Sam Tozzi. Glendale. To that celebrations. Here about five minutes ago, just jumped on the space seat to one but welcome to episode one hundred Sam thanks so is this the second episode you listened to. Manage steel and then this one eye. Let's listen. I think Sam did mention that. Why didn't we liked that movie? Well, it's already been mentioned a few times to not number people as the worst film ever made as well. Well. The Michael late. I'm just going to throw this onto you. All unprepared. Just before we get into it. I invited and yovany onto real chat for the same reasons. I by yourself Evelyn Glenn Sam to episode one hundred celebrations your enthusiasm in love for the medium of film bleeds out of your own. And that's what attracts me. And then it's how the people that. I want to have involved here in real Chad. I both as participants and listeners alike. There's one driving force behind us reaching this milestone here today, there's actually no way I would put the hours and hours into the pre production the recording all the post production of one hundred episodes with that's rainy myself with the aura of like minded and passionate souls. It's a common love for the pair of storytelling in what we do. So the modern equivalent of sort of seeking a campfire probably movie of leading out of this joint shock. Sinophile combination of Melvin summary, weather and the twenty-something buddies zany. It's funny. You said that I had marshmallows last night. Thing is going to be sticky. So. He'll ask yourself. I what do you think that you fell in love with the medium of film board question? But. Oh. Because you're an actor as well. So why what is it about the power of storytelling podcast about movies as well? Well, it's like you said storytelling. It's what makes us human. We have we communicate with each other. And this is what you learn stuff. Like, you know, you can go and study also stuff. But once you put it in story, it's suddenly sticks. Definitely. So it's all about stuff sticking really saying. I like where you're going with this. What about yourself? I'm a bit of an over analyze also when movies come out do tend to of analyzing and sometimes actually skip what's happening in the movie and have to backtrack and actually what's that got to the story line and things like that. So I'll do that with books as well said books, maybe, but the the thing with movies is a visual presentation, this different factors to how you present the story. Stop and one hundred episodes Bill chapter you heard as well. I'm maybes of visited Maho and drivers one example, I've actually visited after listening to the podcast. I initially hated the movie and Haiti destroyed by came out of that cinema going. What did I just watch? What I put myself through that again. And I never did. I'm not questioned that movie love times. But after listening to that episode, I visited on Netflix because it was back on Netflix. And I was able to pose at some point ago. Oh, really the first time I've ever been. Hazel? About fifteen minutes to do actually make maybe actually made more sense second time round. And having Andy explain some of the theories and stories behind and things like that. But that's that's that's what we like to hear as well. Because actually you play the episode live at your work is that run. If I were if I were back late sometimes we allowed to play our music. So I do play the episodes loud because like bit of white noise in the background is wall somewhere king, and this has been a couple episodes. I had to turn the volume damn because the swearing to ROY. For example, did had to apologize a few times. You actually today's misdemeanor strike L E. L E where it was my warning rivers explicit warning. Now, that's great. Thanks pretty much. What about yourself Glynn while we all grow up with films? Don't we I mean from childhood we have fabric of meaning is kind of built out of the films. We say, and I love the way cinema brings together all the forms. You know, this narrative element. But yeah, the, obviously the visual, but music and drama performance. It's all there in the one out form you've got all the out foams coming to get so I think it draws a scene that fascinates us. And it's always going to do that. So real champion. I know you're one of that. Because fans I've had you. Insure there for that reason. But why do you what is it about Al discussions on film that you know, he's such a code reviews? Well, well, it's the team has a lot of passion fulfillment of love for film. But also a lot of knowledge, and I love the variety in episode because you're also looking at things like the marketing aspects of the film, you know, the the schools how win at the box office. What the critics thought, you know, even get we even get to hear from the what's that science fiction group that does the. Satins wave and get to hear what the sentence. That's about it. Every move. I love that that variety and the banter, and it's just as I said when you know when commenting on my support on patriot. Absolutely. I get every sense with value detainment value out of real chat. So why not Advantest? Thanks. All right. What about you said? Like, what is it about movies and the pair of movies? I know you know, you may have had many discussions about this over the years. Well, I mean to be fair of had this discussion with you. And I know you guys are very very critical at times because you look at it from different slant. I'll look at it more from a a fan. I'm a fan. Boy, I enjoy movies on happy to enjoy and look past some of the glaring issues, and that's fine, except you know. Drinking from an alien in style was.

Evelyn Glenn Sam Netflix Mr Sam Tozzi Chattan associate professor professor university of divinity Sam Mr. Glenn Haiti Glendale Melvin Michael Brian Bill Hazel Glynn Andy fifteen minutes five minutes
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Reel Chat

Reel Chat

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Reel Chat

"Everybody. Thank you. This time country beat on every episode every episode one hundred of can you believe that? A few times even better. That's where the numbers take on the stats work. Thank you. And joining us as well is someone who needs no introduction. But I'm going to give him the biggest one I possibly can muster one might even call him real checks number one ticket holder. He's a patriot support a loyal fan and gets regular mentioned on the show. He's an associate professor in the university of divinity beak. Welcome to the professor himself. Mr. Glenn, Brian. Thank you. Thank you so much for coming back so much price gleaned from your number one appearance with us on the rear window episode of real Chattan. Very kind words from the from listen Glenn. So thank you to find the right for him to get you back on that issue. Absolutely. Yes. I dish in to real chats. Didn't have it on. Do this. I have no idea how this happened. Very bright up. Vari lite one. Someone who I've known since probably about nineteen ninety three ninety four something like that meet ninety s we are old. Are your old? But. Yet. Fuck it's ten thirty three. Invites method yesterday someone who learned since high school and also many many fantastic chats about movies over the years is Mr Sam Tozzi. Glendale. To that celebrations. Here about five minutes ago, just jumped on the space seat to one but welcome to episode one hundred Sam thanks so is this the second episode you listened to. Manage steel and then this one eye. Let's listen. I think Sam did mention that. Why didn't we liked that movie? Well, it's already been mentioned a few times to not number people as the worst film ever made as well. Well. The Michael late. I'm just going to throw this onto you. All unprepared. Just before we get into it. I invited and yovany onto real chat for the same reasons. I by yourself Evelyn Glenn Sam to episode one hundred celebrations your enthusiasm in love for the medium of film bleeds out of your own. And that's what attracts me. And then it's how the people that. I want to have involved here in real Chad. I both as participants and listeners alike. There's one driving force behind us reaching this milestone here today, there's actually no way I would put the hours and hours into the pre production the recording all the post production of one hundred episodes with that's rainy myself with the aura of like minded and passionate souls. It's a common love for the pair of storytelling in what we do. So the modern equivalent of sort of seeking a campfire probably movie of leading out of this joint shock. Sinophile combination of Melvin summary, weather and the twenty-something buddies zany. It's funny. You said that I had marshmallows last night. Thing is going to be sticky. So. He'll ask yourself. I what do you think that you fell in love with the medium of film board question? But. Oh. Because you're an actor as well. So why what is it about the power of storytelling podcast about movies as well? Well, it's like you said storytelling. It's what makes us human. We have we communicate with each other. And this is what you learn stuff. Like, you know, you can go and study also stuff. But once you put it in story, it's suddenly sticks. Definitely. So it's all about stuff sticking really saying. I like where you're going with this. What about yourself? I'm a bit of an over analyze also when movies come out do tend to of analyzing and sometimes actually skip what's happening in the movie and have to backtrack and actually what's that got to the story line and things like that. So I'll do that with books as well said books, maybe, but the the thing with movies is a visual presentation, this different factors to how you present the story. Stop and one hundred episodes Bill chapter you heard as well. I'm maybes of visited Maho and drivers one example, I've actually visited after listening to the podcast. I initially hated the movie and Haiti destroyed by came out of that cinema going. What did I just watch? What I put myself through that again. And I never did. I'm not questioned that movie love times. But after listening to that episode, I visited on Netflix because it was back on Netflix. And I was able to pose at some point ago. Oh, really the first time I've ever been. Hazel? About fifteen minutes to do actually make maybe actually made more sense second time round. And having Andy explain some of the theories and stories behind and things like that. But that's that's that's what we like to hear as well. Because actually you play the episode live at your work is that run. If I were if I were back late sometimes we allowed to play our music. So I do play the episodes loud because like bit of white noise in the background is wall somewhere king, and this has been a couple episodes. I had to turn the volume damn because the swearing to ROY. For example, did had to apologize a few times. You actually today's misdemeanor strike L E. L E where it was my warning rivers explicit warning. Now, that's great. Thanks pretty much. What about yourself Glynn while we all grow up with films? Don't we I mean from childhood we have fabric of meaning is kind of built out of the films. We say, and I love the way cinema brings together all the forms. You know, this narrative element. But yeah, the, obviously the visual, but music and drama performance. It's all there in the one out form you've got all the out foams coming to get so I think it draws a scene that fascinates us. And it's always going to do that. So real champion. I know you're one of that. Because fans I've had you. Insure there for that reason. But why do you what is it about Al discussions on film that you know, he's such a code reviews? Well, well, it's the team has a lot of passion fulfillment of love for film. But also a lot of knowledge, and I love the variety in episode because you're also looking at things like the marketing aspects of the film, you know, the the schools how win at the box office. What the critics thought, you know, even get we even get to hear from the what's that science fiction group that does the. Satins wave and get to hear what the sentence. That's about it. Every move. I love that that variety and the banter, and it's just as I said when you know when commenting on my support on patriot. Absolutely. I get every sense with value detainment value out of real chat. So why not Advantest? Thanks. All right. What about you said? Like, what is it about movies and the pair of movies? I know you know, you may have had many discussions about this over the years. Well, I mean to be fair of had this discussion with you. And I know you guys are very very critical at times because you look at it from different slant. I'll look at it more from a a fan. I'm a fan. Boy, I enjoy movies on happy to enjoy and look past some of the glaring issues, and that's fine, except you know. Drinking from an alien in style was.

Evelyn Glenn Sam Netflix Mr Sam Tozzi Chattan associate professor professor university of divinity Sam Mr. Glenn Haiti Glendale Melvin Michael Brian Bill Hazel Glynn Andy fifteen minutes five minutes
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin March is women's history month today, some great women performers from the world of classical music. In the nineteenth century Clara, veep was known as the Queen of the piano. She played her first solo concert when she was eleven and didn't take long before she was known all over Europe as a pianist and composer Clara, married, Robert Schumann, and they were one of the greatest musical partnerships of all time. Maria Theresa on Parodi's was a famous pianist in Mozart's day. In fact, he may have written his Pano concerto number eighteen for her. Maria Theresa went blind when she was a child, but that didn't stop her from performing or composing later in life. She also started a music school for girls in sixteenth century Venice on Tonio Vivaldi taught. He is at a school for girls. Valdis female choir and orchestra were so good that people came from everywhere to hear them perform. Frenchwoman Nadia blue Jay was a composer organist and conductor the first woman to conduct the New York Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Most of all Nadia boulanger was a teacher for nearly sixty years composers traveled to France to work with her. They included Aaron Copeland who composed his Oregon symphony for her. During the second World War. When London was being bombed by German planes, pianist Myra Hess organized and performed lunchtime. Concerts to cheer people up. For her service to her country. The king of England made her a Dame the female equivalent of a night. One of the first female professional orchestra musicians was also from England B-list Rebecca Clarke became a member of the queen's hall orchestra in nineteen twelve and she also wrote music mainly for her instrument. Rush woman was one of the greatest cellists of all. Jacqueline Dupre was only twenty when she recorded Edward Elgar's cello concerto which made her world famous. Career was tragically short just ten years later. She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and had to give up playing Scottish percussionist Evelyn, Glenn he made a huge career in spite of being profoundly deaf from the age of twelve. Since she couldn't use her ears. Evelyn Glenn taught herself to hear with other parts of her body performing barefoot. So she could feel the music through her feet. American soprano Maria Callas felt the music in every bone in her body. Maria. Collinses unusual voice was only part of what made her in opera star. She was also a wonderful actress when land team price was a teenager in Mississippi. She heard Marian Anderson perform. Marian. Anderson was the first black person to sing with the Metropolitan Opera less than a decade later, laying teen price became one of the first African American leading artists the men. Women's history. Just a few of the great women performance from classical music. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it for WG UC Cincinnati, please join me next time for more classics for kids.

Maria Theresa Jacqueline Dupre Naomi Lewin Evelyn Glenn Myra Hess Maria Callas Nadia boulanger Marian Anderson Tonio Vivaldi England Nadia blue Jay Boston Symphony Orchestra Europe Aaron Copeland Robert Schumann Clara Parodi Venice
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on KCRW

"Experience. Sean Forbes and Dame Evelyn Glenn. He joins us now from the studios of WD UT in Detroit. Thank you both very much for being with us. The you're welcome. And we are speaking to them with the help of an interpreter that they have there in the studio, Sean Forbes Cuban show before welcome back head. Thank you for having me back again. Oh, our pleasure. Lot of people would say that you in Dame Evelyn come from different musical worlds wrap an orchestral music. How did you get together about I'd known about Evelyn pretty much my entirely as a musician snobby, and she is definitely been the pain. You Evelyn reach out to me and said, you know, would you like? To get together and talk about collaborating got something. I'm definitely excited about this collaboration with because it's so unique what we're doing damn Evelyn, Glenn we note that you and and Shawna from different musical worlds. But do you also find some similarities in what you do? Absolutely. I mean at the end of the day musicians create signs, it doesn't matter whether you play people and Kumar an accordion or you sing or play precautionary carnet. The point is is that we create a sign story or assigned meal, and this type of collaboration is a classic example whereby we're not thinking about classical music or hip, hop or anything else. It's just really keen musicians coming together, we have the extraordinary Detroit Symphony Orchestra with us. It's a great combination of the Royal hand, and that immagination coming together and using technology as an extension of what we do to make this event, really? Inclusive really accessible really interesting at the top level. We were lucky to have some arrangements for the Detroit symphony that were created by Detroit composer. Jake bass, and he set us a synthesizer mockup, Sean of your song hammered give.

Evelyn Glenn Sean Forbes Detroit Detroit Symphony Orchestra WD UT Jake bass Kumar Shawna
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Experience. Sean Forbes in Dame Evelyn Glennon joins us now from the studios of w DET in Detroit. Thank you both very much for being with us. You're welcome. And we are speaking to them with the help of an interpreter that they have there in the studio, Sean Forbes, you've been on her show before welcome back. Thank you for having me back again. Oh, our pleasure. A lot of people would say that you and Dame Evelyn come from different musical worlds wrap an orchestral music. How did you get together for Shibata known about Evelyn pretty much Maine's ho the musician, a small bead, and she is definitely been the pain. You Evelyn reach out to me and said would you like to get together and talk about collaborating got something and definitely excited about this collaboration with it. Because it's so unique. Would you Dame Evelyn, Glenn we note that you and Sean her from different musical worlds? But do you also find some similarities in what you do? Absolutely. I mean at the end of the day musicians. Create sounds it doesn't matter whether you plea people and cool more on a car gin or you sing or percussion carnet. The point is is that we create a sign story or assigned meal and this type of collaboration. Is a classic example whereby we're not thinking about classical music or hip, hop or anything else. It's just really keen musicians coming together. We have the extraordinary Detroit Symphony Orchestra with us. It's a great combination of the raw hand, and that margin nation coming together and using technology as an extension of what we do to make this event really inclusive really accessible really interesting at the top level. We were lucky to have some arrangements for the Detroit symphony that were created by Detroit composer. Jake bash and he set us a census is mockup Sean of your song hammer, if people an idea of what your musical som- like with.

Dame Evelyn Sean Forbes Detroit Evelyn Glennon Detroit Symphony Orchestra Sean Jake bash Shibata Maine Glenn
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Glenn he joins us now from the studios of W D E T in Detroit. Thank you both very much for being with us. You're welcome. And we are speaking to them with the help of an interpreter that they have there in the studio. Sean Forbes you've been on her show before welcome back. It's ahead Vickie for having me back again. Oh, our pleasure. A lot of people would say that you Dame Evelyn come from different musical worlds, wrapping orchestral music. How did you get together? Push about I've known about everything pretty much my entire the musician who smoke weed, and she is definitely been the pain. You Evelyn reach out to me and said would you like to get together and talk about collaborating on something and definitely excited about this collaboration with it? Because it's so unique would Dame Evelyn Glenn. We note that you and Sean from different musical worlds. But do you also find some similarities in what you do? Absolutely. I mean at the end of the day musicians create signs, it doesn't matter. Whether you plea people in more on a card or you sing or play percussion, nor Karnik the point. Is is that we create a sign story or assigned meal, and this type of collaboration is a classic example whereby we're not thinking about classical music or hip, hop or anything else. It's just really keen musicians coming together. We have the extraordinary Detroit Symphony Orchestra with us. It's a great combination of Royal hand, and that immagination coming together and using technology as an extension of what we do to make this event really inclusive really accessible really interesting at the top level. We were lucky to have some arrangements for the Detroit symphony that were created by Detroit composer. Jake bass, and he set us a synthesizer mockup, Sean of your song hammered.

Evelyn Glenn Sean Forbes Detroit Detroit Symphony Orchestra Jake bass Vickie Karnik
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on WJR 760

"I I've just played for you are two artists back two of three who are going to be performing in a fully immersive orchestral experience to benefit the depth professional artists network or d- pan here in town, Sunday seven o'clock at Detroit's orchestra hall. You're listening to Sean Forbes who you've met before he's been on our program before the hip hop star and Dame Evelyn, Glenn e America's. Yeah. I'm sorry, Grammy and polar music prize winning percussionist that you're doing a little Vivaldi there because I'm telling you because you knew it was Vivaldi, but nobody else out there. Kevin knew it was welcome. This makes the music have some fun, and there was three years ago, and you know, patients sometimes PISA because it to an extraordinary opportunity to perform with the Detroit symphony in my hometown. Show. Many great things have happened step in your defining moment for me. Well, we have had the pleasure of getting no Sean over the years the back of the room, Sean..

Sean Forbes Detroit Vivaldi Dame Evelyn Kevin three years
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Very compelling, and they made me desperately want to stumble across one of his works one day when I was out for a walk. I think more and more he creates especially the the permanent work, the so-called permanent work, immoral and more tries to do things that you really can go in and that you can't that you have to enter as a person. It's not just watching something. If you walk through this slit in the in the wall, it's very narrow. You have to squeeze through and it's cold outside, and it's a very interesting feeling. And of course you cannot record that and preserve that on film one hundred percent. But you still might get the feeling that is different from a photograph. They kind of like this. This idea is to find images and sounds and all that. It's not about images. Always. It's about sound as well. There's a very profound and complicated soundscape in this film. And of course. With music. And so so all the levels of are dealt with in a very careful way. The last question I'd like to ask is about other artists whose work compose you. If there are any in a similar way to Andy's, there need writers musicians or other visual artists who have made work that you would feel so compelled to kind of document in a portrait of them? Of course, I mean, it's probably not many, but there are. I'm not an an odd specialist have to say. I mean, I, when I decided to make the film about Andy, it was ended was not landlord. I did not research land art and say, well, who's the most famous or the most interesting. It was about this person, Andy Goldsworthy and then I got into the whole Landa idea a little bit more. I'm very influenced by a Japanese artists coats soon machine goo who works with wind, and I just love this aspect of an artist working with wind. And I understood a lot about wind and and what winters and how wind works and an like this. It's also impermanent the movement and all that. That was also very influential. And of course, Evelyn Glenn e when I worked on a film about sound striking, what she kind of felt, she didn't hear much, but she felt a lot about sound. So that's always wanted to do a film about James Tyrrell and his work on light because I thought this is also very interesting thing, but it didn't happen so far in it, probably not. But there are many, many artists and things that I find very interesting and I will keep doing this kind of films because they just open windows for me to look at things from a different angle. There were Stomas redesigned there who's new fuel leaning into the wind is out. Now you're listening to the Monaco, weekly Monaco, twenty four..

Andy Goldsworthy James Tyrrell Monaco Evelyn Glenn Stomas one hundred percent one day
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Not Impossible

Not Impossible

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Not Impossible

"Evelyn, Glenn is so impressive. What's amazing is that she forged a career as a solo percussionist when basically no one had ever done that before and she became world-famous at it. Glenn was awarded Grammys and other prizes, and even the title Dame commander of the British empire by your Majesty Queen, Elizabeth, the second of England, she's performed all over the world, but what's truly amazing Evelyn Glenn. Is def. I'm the Kathleen. And this is not impossible podcast dedicated to technology for the sake of human. This podcast is brought to you by avenue a company dedicated to helping creators of all types, find whatever they need to get from idea to product and get their product to market anywhere in the world. Today a story from not impossible apps. We're an innovative space that brings together engineers, hackers makers dreamers, social entrepreneurs, and artists all dedicated to the idea of tackling the things that just can't be done. And then doing anyway. Our stories, they pose us two simple questions. First, how do people who are deaf experience musing and then can we create something to enrich that experience? The answers kinda took us by surprise. So to start, I want to tell you, but a very special inspiration. Evelyn Glenn is one of my all time heroes, and one of the first things you come to understand about Evelyn is she someone who relishes tackling the impossible? Well, I think a lot of it has to do with just the cane of people. I suppose if the north east of Scotland, they're hard workers that took lean is hard being in the varmint of if the farming community, you know, they work hard rain or shine every single day of the year. You know the independence and not kind of bring Elijah to think about creating your own opportunities. Once I decided to become a musician, decided to become a solo percussionist. It meant it well, right where the examples that are known. So let's get on with it. Let's see how far we can go with this. Evelyn. Glenn has had a pretty uncommon passion for music ever since she was. Really young. She mastered concept after concept performance after performance, and she started to listen to music differently. She started to literally hear differently when I six years old. And really after that, just very gradually is noticing that might years were beginning to be very sore when I went out side and I also was finding that is just not picking things up in group conversations. And then all of us at school used to have a hearing tasked where someone would come in on audio Logist and and she not something and it was really because of her whereby she said, I think we do need to, you know, get you tested out properly. And so that's when I went into hospital and and then grunge the us fitted with with heating aids. She hated them. Suddenly everything was heightened to an incredible degree in suddenly the piano, you know, was no longer the piano. It was something that was just bombarding one part of my body. And then of course, when I started percussion, when I went to secondary school, not was even worse, you know, this uncontrollable body with which then affected your balance as well. Her percussion teacher stepped in to help the age of twelve. He said, we'll hold on a second. You know, just as we strike this, Tiffany, there's a tremendous amount of residents coming from that drum. And he said, we'll wait on the body. You actually feeling that signed not hearing it, but feeling it, and I sort of paid attention and in a way I listened to the residents, so the strike and then the residents. And I said, well, I can feel it in this part of my hand or whatever. I felt it and I put my hands on the wall. And so the vibration really came through the wool through my hands. And then he played another pitch on a temporary, and she felt it in another part of her hand and another and another. And it went on and on like that. And it basically a light me to think that will hold on a second sign doesn't just always have to go through the ears. So she took her hearing aids out. I was now in control. I could digest signed in the lower parts of my body or in the upper parts of my body. I could really pay attention to the residents. I had a lot more patients with signed and it's no longer case. Without Subodh signed or not. Nice signed a alike that signed dependent on what you're hearing to the ears. But instead I love this combination of signs because if I felt through the body. I love your your brain in the way that you experienced sound and music had evolved and had grown. Then when all of a sudden society had given you these tools, these hearing aids that could return you back. Oh, so benevolently return you back to the way that we all hear that your response was, oh my God. This is this, isn't that good? Absolutely right. And I'm a big believer in listening to the Bodey first of all, in the world. You're still coming across signings. I've never ever heard before my entire life. So I have to really listen to the body in order to listen to the instrument and vice versa.

Evelyn Glenn Tiffany Dame commander Elijah Bodey Elizabeth England Scotland Subodh six years
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"My name is evelyn glenn i am solo percussionist and therefore i go around the world giving solo percussion concerts evelyn is in fact one of the best known percussionists in the world you're hearing some of her music right now she's won major prizes played with the top orchestras and she spoke with us from studio in the uk sitting right next to evelyn hella maria hi guy evelyn's friend maria who is repeating my part of the conversation so that evelyn can lip read because she is almost entirely deaf and she started to go deaf when she was a kid but she can still perform with incredible precision amazing sensitivity to the question is how well that's a huge question should a broad question so it's always allowing the body and i would say also the to be the two main factors so rather than depending on what the ear is telling you and and you're reliant on that in fact i'm basically or i have discovered heavens above you know scientists vibration and that confer feeds new the entire body so in a way i see the body is is a big eared here's evelyn demonstrating that on the ted stage with a marimba and a set of mallets my aim really is teach the world to listen that's my only real aim in life we have to listen to our selves first of all i remember when i was twelve years old and i started playing company and percussion and my teacher said well how are we going to do this you know music is about listening how are you going to hear how you're going to hear that i said well how do you hear it he's well i think i hear through here i said well i think i do too but i also hear it through my hands through my arms cheekbones my scalp tummy my chest my legs and so on and so we began our lessons every single time.

uk maria evelyn glenn twelve years
"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"evelyn glenn" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. March is women's history month today. Some great women performers from the world of classical music. In the nineteenth century Clara veep was known as the Queen of the piano. She played her first solo concert when she was eleven, and it didn't take long before she was known all over Europe as a pianist and composer Clara married Robert Schumann, and they were one of the greatest musical partnerships of all time. Maria Theresa on Parodi's was a famous pianist in Mozart's day. In fact, he may have written his no concerto number eighteen for her. Maria Theresa went blind when she was a child, but that didn't stop her from performing or composing later in life. She also started a music school for girls in sixteenth century Venice, on Tonio Vivaldi taught. He is at a school for girls. Valdis female, choir, and orchestra were so good that people came from everywhere to hear them perform. Frenchwoman not yet blue. Jay was a composer organist and conductor. The first woman to conduct the New York Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Most of all Nadia boulanger was a teacher for nearly sixty years. Composers traveled to France to work with her. They included Aaron Copeland, who composed his organ symphony for her. During the second World War when London was being bombed by German planes pianist, Myra Hess organized and performed lunchtime concerts to cheer people up. For her service to her country. The king of England made her a Dame, the female equivalent of a night. One of the first female professional orchestra. Musicians was also from England. B-list. Rebecca Clarke became a member of the queen's hall orchestra in nineteen twelve. And she also wrote music mainly for her instrument. Rush woman was one of the greatest cellists of all. Jacqueline Dupre was only twenty when she recorded Edward Elgar's cello concerto, which made her world famous. Career was tragically short, just ten years later. She was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and had to give up playing Scottish percussionist Evelyn Glenn, he made a huge career in spite of being profoundly deaf from the age of twelve. Since she couldn't use her ears. Evelyn, Glenn taught herself to hear with other parts of her body performing barefoot. So she could feel the music through her feet. American soprano. Maria Callas felt the music in every bone in her body. Maria collinses. Unusual voice was only part of what made her in opera star. She was also a wonderful actress when land teen price was a teenager in Mississippi. She heard Marian Anderson perform. Marian Anderson was the first black person to see with the Metropolitan Opera less than a decade. Later Lehmann teen price became one of the first African American leading artists at the men. Women's history. Just a few of the great women performance from classical music. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it for WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me next time for more classics for kids.

Maria Theresa Naomi Lewin Evelyn Glenn Maria collinses Jacqueline Dupre Clara veep Myra Hess Maria Callas Marian Anderson Boston Symphony Orchestra Nadia boulanger Tonio Vivaldi Edward Elgar Aaron Copeland Rebecca Clarke Frenchwoman New York Philharmonic France England