18 Burst results for "Eve ensler"

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You <Speech_Female> who can live with <Speech_Female> out and find <Speech_Female> your meaning <Speech_Female> here <Speech_Female> here. <Speech_Female> Wherever here <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> knowing the <Speech_Female> only destination <Speech_Female> is change. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> only port <Speech_Female> is where we are going. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> second wind <Speech_Female> may take what you think <Speech_Female> you need or <Speech_Female> want the most <Speech_Female> and what you lost <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> how you lost it <Speech_Female> will determine <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> if <Speech_Female> you survive <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> being thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you for being such <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a brilliant <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> agent of change <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> forces nature <Speech_Music_Female> and thank you <Speech_Music_Female> for joining <SpeakerChange> today on designing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> wonderful. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> And i just so <Speech_Music_Female> appreciate <Speech_Music_Female> the dabs <Speech_Music_Female> and care <Speech_Music_Female> and consideration <Speech_Music_Female> and love <Speech_Music_Female> you twit into <Speech_Music_Female> everything. <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank <Speech_Music_Female> you so much. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you <Speech_Music_Female> punks. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> These latest <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> book is called <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the apology. <Music> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can see <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more about all <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of these work on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> her website <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at eve. Ensler <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot worn. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This is <SpeakerChange> the sixteenth <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> year. We've <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> been podcasting <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> design matters. And i'd <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> like to thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> remember. We can talk <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> about making <SpeakerChange> a difference. <Speech_Music_Female> We can make a difference <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> we can do <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> debbie. And i <Speech_Music_Female> look forward <SpeakerChange> to talking <Music> heat against <Speech_Music_Male> you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Design matters is produced <Speech_Music_Male> by curtis fox <Speech_Music_Male> elections. The show <Speech_Music_Male> is recorded <Speech_Music_Male> in non pandemic <Speech_Music_Male> times at the school of <Speech_Music_Male> visual arts masters <Speech_Music_Male> of branding program <Speech_Music_Male> and new york city <Speech_Music_Male> the first <Speech_Music_Male> and longest running <Speech_Music_Male> branding program in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world. The editor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in chief of design <Speech_Music_Male> matters. Media <Speech_Music_Male> zachary pettit <Speech_Music_Male> and the art director. <Speech_Music_Male> Is emily <Speech_Music_Male> weiland.

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Feel i have no rancor i have no bitterness i got clean i got clean with him but what was really clear to me is that i also didn't want his name and i didn't want name that he would give me he or that he gave me i wanted. I wanted my name. I wanted the rest of my life to be in my energy to be with my own trajectory clouded or undermined by his story. And it's really funny. I make a joke. Like i'm down to a letter and soon i'll be nothing But you know it's it's. I feel so much of what i learned during the cancer time when i'm learning is how do we keep moving towards that radiant. Nothing right that radiant thing where we are just molecules that pass through us and were observance were of love. But we don't get ourselves caught in the middle there you know and it just feels great to be. It's traveling light. i feel. Just what made you decide to choose the letter. V as opposed to e or any other. I just love these. I love everything about them. I love this shape and them first of all. Because i feel like they're conduits right. They're opening and their invitations right. I feel obviously vaginas. Yonis vulnerable voluptuous. Malva virtuous i just loved words that begin with these but i also feel that there is something so deeply archaic -ly feminine about these that they are about compassion they are about connection they are about openings there about their about the longer the strength of vulnerability right the strength vulnerability the power of vulnerability. And i think it's an aspiration right aspiration. It's it's who i wanna be. And i liked the idea that my name is calling me to be better. The last thing i want to ask you about is love which also has a vehement. You said that you find that you are much more loving when you have not made arrangements about how you will love. And i'm wondering if we talk a little bit more about that. It's almost like you figured out how to love such a good question and no one ever asked me about it. Deb so i appreciate it I think if. I'm anything pan sexual. I have always loved women. I've always loved men Can never really decide. You know which an and i never was made from monogamy just was never right for me. It was a system that just cancelled me out and i could never be faithful to it because my sexuality was what it was and. I don't think i do that. Well i'm an off people who really well in relationships right. I love my aloneness. I love my solitude. I love my privacy. And i love visit. You know i. When i was recovering from cancer. I went to carola and i went to an arabic retreat and i work with his amazing doctor. Who really helped me heal with the oils. And at the end of it. He told me he said. Do not be in a relationship again. In your life interesting you need to now just evolve and go to the next layer of consciousness have paramore's have visits have wonderful lovers but keep your freedom. Your him is crucial to where you need to go now in your life and when he said it there was both this complete liberation and a little bit of heartbreak. 'cause i knew it was true. Do not mean yes. And that's where i am now. I you know. I close the door on nothing but the years of my life. When i've been in this state have been without a doubt the happiest years of my life. I also a huge believer in friendship. And i had the most amazing women friends on the planet and those women friends for me are the great love of my life. I've had those friends for years. And i think we don't make enough of the friendship between women album like save our life lift our life make our life and i'm so happy. I have time for those relationships now. The one end the show with a quote from in the body of the world and the recently wanna read. It is because. I really wanted dedicated to anyone that has ever been robbed of their dignity or their agency or their body. So these are words written by the from in the body of the world. Those of you can be naked without a bank account a known future or even a place to call home those of.

Yonis cancer Deb carola paramore
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And part of part of the world in a way where i had never ever been a part of and it opened the door to a whole i moved. I moved to the woods. Me who lived in the city for forty years. I moved to the woods. I had to be with trees. I had to be with river. I had to be with birds. I had to be with sky. I knew that something had been born in me. That was different. I was a city girl who wore black. And you know and may drove assembling in describing me now. It took a while for you to to really evolve to this place. You publisher remarkable memoir about the experience which is titled in the body of the world. You published it in twenty thirteen and you sit in the initial response to your illness that there was something not only passive but somewhat downright suicidal about your early response to your cancer. Kind of resignation As if you were in a strange voyeur. Noting your body from a great distance. How did that change to being fully in your body occur. How did that happen. Well i think most of that disembodied part was before. I got diagnosed. I had been sick for quite some time before. I actually went to check on it. You know. I had all the signs of something very wrong with me. As a matter of fact i had. I mean i'll tell you this very funny thing like was so funny looking. In retrospect but i i had been through menopause and i hadn't lead for years and the night that obama got nominated. I bled and the ninety nine elected. He i bled. So i thought it was just some amazing connection to the transformation air in fact those kinds of uterine cancer. But i didn't treat it. I knew something was wrong in my gut that i was swollen. I didn't treat it. I just looked at it from the distance. Because i had that kind of detachment from my body right. I had this passive resignation about my body. I didn't fight for my body. And it wasn't until i got sick at that changed that i came into this and now i can tell you when something's wrong. I know instantly. Because i live in this body i can feel. Oh something i. I shouldn't have eaten that. That doesn't work for me. Or i too tired or i never knew. When i was tired i was always driving myself. I was always pushing myself. I was always achieving proving. I wasn't bad proving good proving i was proving proving proving proving and it's a sure fire way to destroy your body so to land in your body. You go much slower right. You have to pay attention. It's a whole different rhythm. And i have to say i love it. You stated at until that moment in your life you had never been brave enough to allow yourself to be afraid. Did that impact how you felt about needing to prove yourself. Oh definitely you know you know that. Tough veneer that we put up that drive that we put up. That doesn't let us feel our fear that even when we're failing we just keep pushing forward that doesn't take in it. It's an invulnerability right. Even though underneath it were horribly vulnerable brain. And now what i feel is that unfolding arable. We're all vulnerable. We're human beings on this planet earth. We have no idea what we're doing here now more than ever now more than ever we look up at the stars and we're in wonder but we're also wild. What is this you know. And if we're really open if we're really awake if we're really present we are vulnerable. I think that is the greatest joy right. Now of just living in that vulnerability and not masking it and not and it's different than insecurity. It's different than insecurity. Oh absolutely absolutely. I am really working hard and trying to understand self worth separate from productivity or achievement or that that same notion of proving proving proving proving roxanne. My fiance's told me that. Every time i try to prove myself i just raise the bar so that i have to keep doing it again and again and again and it's been an interesting realization and the question is who we proving ourselves to one of the things living so deeply now with the earth and the mother because i really see the earth. Now is my mother. My real true mother. I just overwhelmed by her generosity. Just her overflowing generosity like the all of the things that she is making in creating every minute every hour the new flowers that come up today they'll be today's orange tiger lilies yesterday was white daisies the day before was being these like these creations and when i realized you know it's such a different model to live not improving oneself but to live in generosity right to lose. What can we give. What can we show up with. What can we offer. What can we create work. We can make better as opposed to look at me. Look at me aren't doing. It aren't improving it on and making it. Because that's what this capitalist patriots has indoctrinated into us and it's made us all sick and it's it's it's it's pushed us past ourselves and it's it's revving up our engine to the point where we're burning ourselves out and i wanna live in the generous model. I wanna live in the. How can we nurture. How can we create. How can we take care of. How can we lift each other up. How can we make sure we all have what we need like that to me is such a much more interesting and and it feels so much better. You know than driving the driving. Yes yes well your now cancer free you've also performed in the body of the world as a one woman show and here. We are now one year after publishing your most recent book. The apology which we talked about at the top of the show. And i read that. After completing the book you stopped feeling any bitterness toward your father and i'm wondering if a year later you still feel that way i do i do. I think the book was a true extra of swords and i at the end of the book. There there's a line where my father or my father. And i say together old man be gone and at that moment it was like the end of peter pan when people just goes into the ethers and it my father same thing he went any he has not been back.

uterine cancer cancer obama roxanne patriots peter pan
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:13 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Agency and energy if unleashed could transform inspire and heal the world. I know we make you feel stupid as it being a teenager meant. You were temporarily deranged. We've come accustomed to muting you. Judging you discounting you asking you sometimes even forcing you to betray what you see and know and feel you scare us. You remind us of what we've been forced to shut down or abandoned in ourselves in order to fit in you ask us by your being to question to wake up to re perceive. Sometimes i think we tell you we are protecting you when really we are protecting ourselves from our own feelings of self betrayal and loss. Everyone seems to have a certain way. They want you to be your mother. Father teachers religious leaders politicians boyfriends fashion guru celebrities girlfriends in researching this book. I came upon very disturbing statistic seventy four percent of you say you are under pressure to please everyone. I've done a lot of thinking about what it means to please. Please please to embody the wish of well of somebody other than yourself to please the fashion centers. We starve ourselves to please boys. We push ourselves when we aren't ready to please the popular girls. We end up acting mean to our best friends to please our parents. We become insane achievers. If you trying to please how do you take responsibility for your own needs. How do you even know what your own needs are. What do you have to cut off in yourself in order to please others. I think the act of pleasing makes everything murky. We lose track of ourselves. We stop uttering declaratory sentences. We stopped directing our lives. We wait to be rescued. We forget what we know. We make everything ok rather than real they teach you how to make yourselves less so everyone feels more comfortable. They teach not to stand out. They get you to behave. I am older now. I finally know the difference between pleasing and rubbing obeying and respect. It has taken me so many years to be okay with being different with being this alive this intense. I just don't want you to have to wait that long. Thank you so much. thank you so much. I love that piece of that book so much. Two thousand and ten was a very intense year. Few this is when this book came out. This was the year. You're working on the construction of city of joy in the congo. You are scheduled to open in may of twenty ten but on march seventeenth. twenty ten. You discovered you had a huge tumor in your uterus. Given that you had been talking about for china's for your entire career and the actress. Caffeine jimmy declared that you had the world's biggest brass ovaries. This particular disease feels really unfair and not to in any way make light of it but kind of ironic. You were tight news with stage. Three four uterine cancer and went through nine months of brutal surgeries illness chemotherapy. You've said that in this time you touched death and it was the most powerful transformation of your life. And i'm wondering if you can talk about how so i think up until this point in my life even know there were moments like during the jinan monologues where i felt i came into my vagina and i felt i. I don't know that. I was fully inhabiting my body and i think what happened. When i woke up from that surgery. It was amazing. I had tubes coming out of every part of my body. I had bags. I was hooked up to machines. I i had a scar down my entire torso but it was the first time in my life that i was a body that it was fully abbadi. I was totally a body and that really began this nine month journey with that disease of everyday dropping more into myself and to be honest with you you know when you sit in a room and the doctor looks over at you and tells you basically that you upstaged slash three four cancer kind of die. In that moment right there is a death that happens in your body You i feel it that. Even though i went through that whole process. You don't know if you're gonna live. You don't know what's going to happen. You know what the odds are. And they're not good. And i think you touch into death in a way where you stop being afraid of it. You're you're there and then what begins to happen. Is you realize how much you want to be alive. And how beautiful life is and how you want to actually live in your body live fully in your life force which has been muted. Cut out drained destroyed by patriarchy by violence. By all the all the things that have gone on in your lifetime to try to undermine and destroy you and i actually feel that cantor was the outcome. The spiritual alchemy. That turned my life where it was meant to go. And i don't know that i could have done it without it. Because it had to level me in my body so that i finally just became body if that make sense where i know more than body yes sometimes i think i'm just ahead. Yes no exact totally. Get it the have a therapist who used to say to me you becoming for four years. I never realized you had a body right because everything is in your head and it was like i was. I wasn't in my head. I everything was about my body whether it was an infection where i lost thirty pounds. Whether it was chemo. Where i had to deal with the heat. Whether it was just body body body and it was a transcendental experience. It was a shamanic experience. Chemo was inexperienced where i started to merge and become part of.

abbadi uterine cancer congo jinan jimmy china cancer cantor Chemo
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Well first of all they saved my life okay Because when we were opening the city of joy right around the time we were supposed to open it i diagnosed with stage three slash four uterine cancer. And i can very close to dying. And i had seven organs removed and my body rearranged and i went through nine months of utter. A people chemo and infections. And and i had made a promise that we would open city of joy and so christine and i literally joke about this all the time. She was having nightmares in the congo. Because there's no water. There's no electricity. there's no roads. there's no infrastructure. I was dying but we would get on the phone. And i would say everything's grade money's coming along and she would get on the phone and you say everything's great. We would just lighting and literally allies kept us kelly. But what if they taught me you know. There's there's a woman at city of joy that i want to talk about. Because she is my body safa She teaches me. Everything i need to know about life And she has blessed me with being able to tell her story. She wants me to tell her story. Her name is jane. She changed her name to and she had suffered unbelievable. Unbelievable pain in congo. She had been taken. She had been raped very very badly multiple times. She went to panzi hospital. She was there for years where they did many many surgeries who went back and then she was re raped and the second time she was raped. They tied to a tree for month and basically she had a baby in that time and baby died inside her. Her body was destroyed Her stories in the film city of joy and by the time she was brought to city of joy hospital her body was in a basket was completely poisoned. it was destroyed. And dr mcgregor way. Says there's just no reason she lived except that her spirit is is on such a high level of consciousness and she was one of the people who guided us in in saying that they wanted a city of joy and she in the first class of city of joy and has become one of the greatest leaders at city of joy and her spirit and her brilliant and a vision and her intensity and her force of love. That pours out of that. Waylon is one of the most on spine things i've ever seen in my life and what she's taught me is that there is a google race. Second condor is a vitality that can come from are when we turn it towards love when we turn it towards nurturing when we turn it for its lifting up our sisters and you know if you walk through city of joy at any time of day you will hear the most beautiful drumming the most beautiful singing the most beautiful dancing. And there's a spirit there that it just feels holy it feels from some other dimension and it's healing it's healing whatever that energy is is the force of women who have turned their suffering into medicine and they've taught me that it's possible it helps make one's life makes sense in two thousand and four you publish the good body which you've described as an account of your own tortured relationship with your body and you declare that the pattern of the perfect body has been programmed into women since birth and go on to state that what is far more frightening than narcissism is the zeal for self mutilation that is spreading and infecting the world. Then i'm wondering if you could read a short excerpt from the book about this. Okay i have been to more than forty countries in the last six years. I've seen the rampant and city poisoning skin lightening cream sellers. Fastest toothpastes in african asia. The mothers of eight year olds in america remove their daughters ribs so they will not have to worry about dieting. Five year old manhattan. Too strict designers. So they won't embarrass their parents in public by being chubby girls. Vomit and starved themselves in china and fiji and everywhere korean. Women remove asia from their eyelids. The list goes on and on. It's really quite extraordinary. What's happening on a global basis. I was in china last year and saw that women were not only trying to remove asia from their eyelids but they're now also trying to change their noses and build bridges on their nose to have a more westernized knows and as well changed their lips with with all sorts of fillers and it's rather rampant and terrifying. You wrote and perform this in two thousand four. And as i was going through your work i realized that in twenty ten you publish the book. I am an emotional creature. The secret life of girls around the world which is a collection of original monologues about and four girls inspiring them to take agency over their minds. Their bodies their heart's curiosities. It was a new york times bestseller and after the good body. I feel that it paints a much more optimistic future about the emotional strength of what today's young women could be. And it's the last excerpt. I'm going to ask you to read if you wouldn't mind and it's something that that really made me hopeful and i haven't been feeling very hopeful lately and so i wanted to share it with my listeners. It is an exit from. I am an emotional creature. The secret life of girls around the world dear emotional creature. You know who you are. I wrote this book. Because i believe in you. I believe in you. Authenticity your uniqueness. Your intensity your wildness. I love the way you dye your hair purple or hike up your short skirt or blair your music while you lip sync every single. Memorize lyric i love your restlessness and your hunger you're one of our greatest natural resources you possess are necessary..

congo panzi hospital dr mcgregor uterine cancer christine Waylon asia kelly jane china google fiji manhattan america new york times
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

10:04 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Movement and community of women. Yes that was so wildly excited. The first night we ever the first day we ever did which was at the hammerstein ballroom. Which seats twenty. Five hundred people right. I had invited all these amazing actors to perform it and no one had done it at that. Point and marissa's today had come to see me performed with joanne woodward. Paul newman if you could imagine yes okay. And i went to her first because she had seen it and she said yes and once i had then i could go to the next person say but melissa doing in there like all right i'll do it and then i'd say versatile may and will be coberger doing event and it grew and grew but the night we okay. It was totally imagine in the nineties. Totally packed twenty five hundred people. Boy george was there. it was just like the wildest thing you've ever seen. None of these women had ever said vagina publicly. Have ever done anything like that. So everyone was like vomiting and just completely freaked out by stage and every time one woman would go out and do her monologue. Everyone would be watching on this monitor. They all hold hands. They all scream and yell and they. It was the most beautiful sisterhood of support of love. And i'll never forget glenn who up so much. I had asked her to do the reclaiming counties because it was really about taking word back and of course she was like what are you crazy. My mother will never talk to me and she hung up the phone and she called me back two weeks later and she said i really get it. I just want you to go out there with little glasses being all waspy and by the end of it just want you to and she did and when you open that word and by the end the entire twenty five hundred people were screaming and it was like the roof of that theatre blew off that night. It blew off and to me. It was the beginning of the movement to end violence against women and girls and there have been many women of course working on it before me and we're always in a line and a chain of sister. After sister supporting sister right. Our movement goes back to african american women who were fighting slavery right. It goes back to. That's when that movement began and then there's each stage of are now we've moved into me too but to be in that movement for that chunk of years doing the play spreading the play getting women to share their stories talk about their stories. Break the silence. It was glorious us. It was it was it was on detroit. I don't even know that. I could have had that dream. You know you founded nonprofit. You mentioned vide after the vagina. Monologues debuted and this effort as well as your subsequent effort with one billion rising. You're building the city of joy in the congo. It's been a force in the global fight against gender violence and yes there have been other movements and we hope that will never be a time when we don't need these movements. But you have done more than most. You've raised over one hundred million dollars to help her advocate sexual violence. You've helped lead the conversation. Educate millions of people about these topics even powered women all over the world. What made you decide to congo. Well i been in bosnia. i had been in kosovo. I've been in haney. I've been enough ghanistan. I didn't war-zones where women were being systematically raped as a tactic of war. And i was really obsessed fast with it to be honest with you because i could see the pattern spreading as a tactic to destroy women all over the world but what happened was the un someone from the un called me and asked me if i would interview dr dini mcgee and i was so shocked that anyone from the un was calling me. And i actually didn't wanna do it. Because we were already working in afghanistan and bosnia and haiti. And all these places and we just didn't have the bandwidth but then i read his resume and i was so moved by what he was doing as gynecologist. What the fight. He was in the midst of that. I agree to interview him. And it turned out to be this amazing interview at new york law school for like five hundred people and you know when you meet someone and you feel like they are on some level of transcendent radiance and and what the work. They're doing so mind-blowing. I mean is is. We're legally bloodshot from all the hardest. He had been seeing and he just said to me at the end of the interview. Would you come which you help us. You're the only person i know. Who's talking about the china's and i'm trying to talk about what's happening to the vaginas of women in congo. And if you could come if you could be with us maybe you could help. Bring the word out. Maybe just could you comment in. So i did and I have to say that trip to the congo on the trip to panzi hospital. What i saw there was out of. It was just the most devastating Shocking intersectional reality of racism. Colonialism capitalism sexism merging in this horrifying cauldron at all of it was being enacted on the bodies. Women there were. There were hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of women in the hospital. All of whom had been rigged. All of whom were leaking. All of whose bodies were destroyed from rape and he was there by himself trying to figure out what to do. And i don't know. I can honestly say i think my brain was shattered like it. There was a shattering. It was the beginning. It was the beginning of another whole. I would say stage of my life. I mean dr. Mcguigan has gone on to win the nobel peace prize and christine schuler. Describe her who was is the most extraordinary activist leader woman who i met when i went there. We all became three of us became very very close and decided that we would create displays called the city of joy. And it's been one of the most beautiful beautiful experiences of my life and it's truly turning pain to power. It's a place of radiance. You've said that inside the stories of the unspeakable violence inside. The women of the congo was determination and life force. You had never witnessed for our listeners. That might not be aware. Can you talk a little bit about city of joy and what it is and how it came to be when the city of joy is in bukavu which is eastern congo where most of the conflict has been. We opened it ten years ago. Christine and i spent weeks and weeks going everywhere asking the women what they wanted. What they wanted was a place where they could heal where they could transform where they could learn where they could become leaders and so it became our desire to build a place called city of joy where the women could literally turn their paint power and it hosts on ninety women for six months at a time. Everything is paid for their food their comfort they're healing on they go through incredible Program of therapy through art through theater through dance through music and through basic therapy but it's all groups there because everything is all healing is done in community. They learned their rights. They learned permaculture. They learned self defense and they go from being victims to survivors to leaders. Over the course of six months we were able to get this amazing land so we have three hundred and fifty. Hector's called the world farm where women than go afterwards to become permaculture cultural farmers and they learn how to really be the best kind of farmers in their own communities. Some stay at the farm many go back to their communities where we help them buy and purchase land where they then begin their own collectives in their communities with other women who graduate from city of joy and they then begin to create these farming communities and they become leaders in their community where they bring the school the skills and the teachings that they've learned it city of joy and where they vet other women who can they send to city of joy. So it's this very very eko friendly system of people who graduate bringing other people in who bring other people in an and at sisterhood. Passing onto sisterhood. And we've now graduated. I think fourteen hundred women and is unbelievable. The women are just doing so well. You know they've become leaders. They've become they run collectives they've become Nurses they've become doctors they become you know And what. I'm most proud of is city of joy is owned by the congolese. It's run by the congolese. There are no outsiders who work there. They have professionalized entire staff. It's there's it's completely theirs and you know our our work on this side of the Water is to find the money to keep them going. But you know it's it's been you know one of the most beautiful beautiful beautiful projects. And i think now after these years were ready to start to see whether we can start developing more city of joys in other parts of the world the i mean talk about a purpose in life. What what have the women of the congo and the work that you've done they're taught you..

congo un hammerstein ballroom joanne woodward dr dini mcgee bosnia Boy george Paul newman marissa panzi hospital melissa vagina christine schuler glenn haney new york law school bukavu kosovo detroit
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"She was so brilliant. And joanne and you know what it was like being raised by the two greatest divas in the american theater yes it was unbelievable fortune that came to me and and joanne was the most nurturing but she was also also strict she was also rigorous. I remember i handed in the first draft of the play. And i'm so terrified. I saw nauseous. And she called me and she said The characters good settings good. You've got the dialogue but it's not funny and ask to be funny. I wanna funny and i was like. It's a play about nuclear war. And she said you're running make a and it was such a teaching. Because i did make it funny. And by the time we finished touring that play all around america at the kennedy center everywhere. It was a comedy but the message of working to build towards clear disarm men and stopping the arms race and reversing course was coming through that so people were getting the message without me bending them over the head and the two of them just taught me so much. That was my training ground. That was my beginning. And they they stood by me and they pushed me and they. They love me into being a playwright at that point in your life. You've written that. You had no reference point for your body and as a result this is when you began to ask other women about their bodies and in particular their vaginas as you sensed that vaginas more important than this lead you to writing the vagina monologues which was first performed in the basement of the cornelius street cafe in greenwich village in nineteen ninety six. What made you think at the time that that topic was worth a worthy subject of the play and as an aside. I do wonder if you had gone to yale if they would have thought of you writing a play with that topic yeah. That's what i'm saying. I don't think it would have been like oh goody blowy say what country did you go to that. They were happy about the play. I was like there's never been a country that the play went to where they were like. Oh yummy vaginas are here. And it's never happened was never occurred But you know. I was interested. You know one of the things. I've always believed. Is that if you follow your own curiosity if you follow your own bliss if you follow like what interests you what you care about you will write the best thing. So i was interested in what women thought about thirty china's and everything women said to me was so surprising so startling. So amazing so shocking. So funny. I remember the first woman i ever talked to. I said we'll do you ever talk about and she said well. My mother used to tell me don't wear underpants underneath pajamas. You need to air out your pussycat god. And it was like that like mb person had something wildlife that to say. And i thought this is amazing. I feel like pandora's box literally. Were opening it up and these stories that no one had told anyone before right and what was amazing is when i first started doing this show at here. Downtown women would line up after the show literally lineup to tell me their stories like had to tell me and it got to the point that like literally. I was inviting women over to my apartment and i felt like dr ruth hours of the day women were and part of it was. I just wanted to give women an opportunity to tell someone their story because they needed to tell their story you know and a lot of it unfortunately was about sexual abuse. Yes a lot of it for anybody. Seen the vagina monologues. You also then begin to have a story about seeing the vagina monologues. It's really it's a bit meta. But i think it's really universal since one thousand nine hundred six play has been translated into forty eight languages. It's been performed in over one hundred forty countries including sold out runs at broadway's westside theatre and london's west end. You wanna tony. You want an ob. The play ran for over ten years in the uk. Mexico and france in two thousand and six new york times called the vagina monologues. The most important piece of political theater of the last decade celebrities who have started it include jane fonda whoopie goldberg adina. Menzel glenn close susan. Serandon cindy lober. Sandra oprah winfrey gillian anderson many others. I've seen the show twice once with you performing the piece in its entirety and one starring alanis morissette. What was it like at that. Time for you to become suddenly so successful shocking. Which just shocking i mean. First of all i. If you had said what would be the peace that will bring you success. It would never been in my wildest imaginations the vagina monologues but what was really really exciting about. It was the beginning of the building.

joanne cornelius street cafe kennedy center greenwich village america dr ruth broadway's westside theatre pandora china goldberg adina Menzel glenn cindy lober Sandra oprah winfrey gillian anderson jane fonda tony new york times Mexico london france
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"For three days on the train from montreal vancouver where i had a one night stand with the famous muslim jazz player. Who seduced me with the saxophone and prayerful calling. I found my way into rape refugee camps in bosnia were burqa into the taliban afghanistan drove espresso pumped through landmine roads in kosovo. I had to see it. No it touch it find it. Maybe i was playing out my badness or searching for my goodness or getting closer and closer to the deepest inhumanity to try to understand how to survive the very worst. We are capable of this. Part of of. Your story is so incredibly heartbreaking One of the places. One of the many places. I cried in the apology. Was how you describe how you were accepted to a very prestigious graduate school. But because you didn't have any money and your father wouldn't help you you couldn't go. Where will you accept it you. You don't ever reveal that. And i'm just wondering if you would mind chain. I was accepted into yale. Yeah wow wow yeah. It was really of those devastating moments. You know but you know if. I look back tab like it totally on a whole other journey. It took me on a whole other journey. And i don't regret it. One tiny bit you know. I had to survive. I had to make a living. I had to find a way to. I had no money. I had no support. I had nothing. And i knew us. We're had to struggle and struggle and struggle and struggle and those years made me. They created my character and they made me much much more connected to working people to people in struggle to people in suffering than i ever would have been had i gone and so i lost the connections. I lost the network. I lost a the pipeline success right but in a way it opened my soul. It took me on a journey. To the most amazing places in the world never would have written the vagina. Monologues had gone to. You never really really don't think so. I don't think so. I think i would have been carved into a much more. Traditional paf. Do not mean and i would i would have learned what the limitations were and how to be careful of them but because there was no one supporting me and there were there were people. Actually that came along. Who supported me. Like i just invented my life because i had to write and there's something about that that it's very very hard but i highly recommend it because you end up as yourself three years later you married. Richard mcdermott. a thirty four year old bartender. Who convinced you to enter rehab and you said that putting down the bottle and the drugs was the hardest thing you ever did and at twenty three you're sober totally broke and with nothing with which to self medicate you lived in a fourth floor walkup on christopher street i lived on a fourth floor. Walk up on sixteen three by the way really new sold abe and you old avon to drag queens in the neighborhood and taught writing in harlem at a school for pregnant girls then you got pregnant but you had a miscarriage. How are you managing. How you how are you living day to day. I was the most anxious crazy person you know. Fortunately there was a twelve step program. I put my money together. And i had a therapist on but i was so anxious. But i'll tell you one of the things that happened shortly after that is that my ex husband's son came into my life. Mark anthony mcdermott. And he was fifteen and he was the most precious just extraordinary being and i related to him so deeply because he had also been through. Romo's challenging the most devastating and abusive childhood and he had witnessed his own mother be murdered in front of him when he was five and carried out and then not told for a year that she was dead so he had not lived with his father. I'm when i met him. I just knew that he had to be part of my life. And that if we were all if i was going to move in with his father like he was part of that deal brain and i have no idea why i knew that at twenty three. Why insisted like he had to be with us. But if i could love him i might figure out how to save myself by loving him do you know. And that's what happened. You know. I had to grow up for him. I had to be not crazy for him. I had to be not anxious for him. I had to. I had to take.

bosnia Richard mcdermott kosovo taliban montreal vancouver afghanistan Mark anthony mcdermott harlem Romo
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:24 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Because if anyone else's pain would have meant to fill your own and you couldn't do that. But as i was reading both in body of the world and the apology i was struck by even your moments of generosity even in that one of the experiences i related to your writing was when you tried to organize all the unpopular girls in your high school to form their own group and to quote. Take back the power like you were even trying in your own way to to create some type of mutuality. What happened when you did bad. It was kind of like the test case for activism lake was highly unsuccessful because pours all. The girls who were in the unpopular tribe were antisocial and desire part of like no popular close. How how many people from your high school will have reached out to you on facebook or social media to connect over the years bunch. Have and i'll tell you a really great story. That really really moved me. You know when. I wrote the giant monologues. You know. I interviewed hundreds of people but all the all the monologues are literary fictitious piece. Right they there are themes and their ideas and their characters. But you know when. I wrote The flood there was this character of this woman who You know had gone on this date and she had a humiliating experience. Nobody told me that particular story of this woman who had a flood. I just made that up. But i i used this name for the piece which was left paw and it was the combination of the two boys who had stripped me in my school. It was my little way of saying okay. Writing is is the best revenge right. And so i got an email one day from one of the boys will see the play and he said i believe you were writing about me because of the horrible thing i too in fifth grade and i have never forgotten it and i have really never forgiven myself for it. And i'm really writing to ask for your forgiveness and wind blowing and and then recently on this tour. His wife came to a reading of the apology. Just to say how sorry she was so that was amazing. That was amazing. That's extraordinary as you were growing up. You said that drugs and booze saved your life until they started to destroy it and you did heroin the night before your french. Sat's and was still so stoned the next day you drew a huge black x. Through the entire exam how did you end up. Going to middlebury college in vermont. After it wasn't my first college by the time like high school was ending. I was a complete a complete drug addict and alcoholic by then but my father had somehow applied. I don't even know. I probably participated. This school called beaver college in clyde pennsylvania and i actually went there for a year and something had happened at the end of my high school where these two wonderful teachers had confronted me and said we don't believe you're stupid. We don't believe you're any of these things we think really smart and we want to work with you and they had helped me to the point where i passed this. Ap honors history class. Which was the only time. I really my brain had ever been able to think and all those years right. My brain was so tortured. Like i had no memory. I nobility concentrate on. That was the beginning of something. And then when i got to the school i suddenly started to achieve. I started do really really well. And i transferred after the first year middlebury. What did you think you wanted to do professionally at that point in your life. I think from the time i was young. I knew i wanted to be a writer. I wrote because i had to write. It was like creating this alternative persona that lived in my journals. That lived where i wrote. It was like i could create language could create stories. And i could create another world where i could live. I could be free. I could survive right. I didn't think. Oh i wanna be a writer. I just knew. I had to write right. I knew i had to write and still the same now. Like i have to write every day i just to do. It's how i survived. To be honest with you. In how i keep saying and i think i started to do really well at middlebury in terms of writing and so when i came to new york i was writing poetry. But you can't make in those days. You certainly couldn't make a living being a poet. And so i thought maybe direct theater and then all of a sudden it kind of merged. Like oh i could write place you know like the coming together of poetry and directing and and and so that's how that evolves but it never occurred to me to be honest with you that i would be anything else. Well there's actually quite a lot of things that you did before you sort of founder yourself. You gave the commencement speech at your graduation from middlebury. Nineteen seventy five and spoke out against racism and sexism and have described how you then sat down in your seat in your happen gown and drank a bottle of jack daniels pest you in a brown paper bag and i'm wondering if you could read another excerpt about that time and what happened next. That wonderful granules okay. I wrote my thesis on suicide. In contemporary american poetry as i bartended and got laid on the pool table in the back. I was a caretaker in chelsea house for schizophrenics in a group leader in a homeless shelter on thirtieth street. I followed of arc's route around france and took the train to rome at midnight. And wars spiky high heels fern italian leather dyke..

beaver college middlebury middlebury college facebook clyde vermont pennsylvania new york jack daniels chelsea house france rome
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You never told on your brother or sister even if it could benefit you. You hadn't an implicit and demanding sense of loyalty and you describe how it was very important for you to be good. Where did that need for goodness. Come from such a good question. I mean i know where it came from after all a very bad stuff started. Because i think once my father it incested me once. He sexually abused me in then once he started to beat me. I was being called bad all the time all the time all the time you know i was. I was soiled. I was and so. I think the quest the desire to be good became the only thing that matter to me in my life really the only thing that matters to me because i think he had told me so consistently and so often with such intensity in such rage such violence that i was bad that you know i felt bad. I felt bad. I felt. I just wanted to die all the time from that. Feeling of badness and so so much of my life up to a certain point was you know when you when you believe you're bad you get involved with the wrong kind of people and the reason you're involved with people is to prove that you're good and to get them to agree that you're good but you often pick people who aren't capable of doing but it's also it's kind of become a endless pool of need you know you can't really get somebody to get you to feel that way. It's super hard to put that on someone else. It's impossible and it's not their job right and it's your job to your good. It's your job to determine your worth and your value and and yet it takes so long to figure that out of my god so long. I'm still working on it fifty nine. Once you get into sixties something happens. i promise. That's what i've been hearing. I'm close not quite but close. Your father's started to abuse you when you were five. Which is just unthinkable continued until you were ten all the years of sort of your brain forming when he stopped abusing you sexually at tenny began beating you physically in this one on daily you describe the transformation from bright young child to abuse ten year old girl in the apology and how your father worked daily to destroy your character and break your will and though we know it's difficult i was wondering if you might read a short excerpts of what that transformation was like okay. You moved like a ghost. You rarely lifted your head and hardly spoke. You never wash your hair and it was always stringy and dirty. You were unable to concentrate in school and did poorly in class. You could not pass an exam. You seemed unable to remember or contain anything at all. You were becoming stupid. You were demoted to the lower ranks. In lost her closest friends other children could smell your desperation in avoided. You like the plague or teased and taunted you. I despise you the sweetness. But how could i admit that i was responsible for your decline. How could i tolerate visible outcome of my brutality. And instead i humiliated you further and made you feel your badness had made this happen that my sweetie pie had through her assertion and rejection become dirty shameful girl. You outline how. You were taunted by other children and when you were ten years old. You're assaulted by some boys in your class. They stripped you and called you seaweed hair because your hair was stringy. Did no one help you. No one no on the contrary I became hysterical after they stripped me. They pulled my underpins down in front of the whole school and my parents were called in and my father immediately began to say and man what i had done. What slutty horrible thing. I had done to get them to do this to me. And i wasn't believed. And i was wrong and i was the reason it happened and then for weeks after i would go into the cafeteria and they would call me slide to never call me dirty stringy hair and it was. It was horrible. But i think what we know. Those of us who have been abused sexually particularly is we start to radiate this strange desperate energy that really begins to attract more abuse and whether it was working in prison for eight years or working in homeless shelters. I cannot tell you how often. I hear the story of one. Ah girl being abused by her father or uncle or somebody in your family and then that just decimation of self and then how it begins to attract rapes and abuse from all kinds of other people. And it's it's almost like therapy moan. It's something you're sending at that says your broken. That says you've been you've been destroyed your worthless and you can be i. Can you know i remember. Many many many years ago. I used to business have to rent a car quite frequently and i would go to the same car rental place and there was a a work person. There who i decided reminded me very much of my very very first boyfriend. In highschool who was was very awful to me and an abusive and then one day. I walked into the hertz. Rental was at the hertz rental and i realized that that very same man looked exactly like my stepfather who had caused me quite a lot of harm and i thought. Oh my god i just went from one abuser to another just seamlessly without even knowing it and i do think that there is this sort of antenna that people that have experienced this type of extreme extreme behavior Rewire themselves to try to either overcome it or redo it somehow in a way that you become the victor or or some way to be able to understand it. I think that's one part of it. And i think there's another weird part of it is which is it's very suicidal. It's like it's already happened. You lost any agency over yourself so you might as well the world might as well. Just do it to you right. There was there was a part of me that had given up on myself right. That just assume that's what was coming my way. That's what i deserved right. That's how bad it was. You write about how you learn to separate from your shame and terror by constructing an alternative persona that develop the capacity to feel nothing and you learned how to disappear. Do you have any sense of how you did that or was it just sort of subliminal and happened organically because of what was happening. I think it began. When i was being incest that i left my body and i i just think i laughed and i was above myself and i floated out of myself because it was too much everything about it was too much for my nervous system for my developing sexuality for my sells for my consciousness from my understanding and so i began to learn how to go away. I learned how to shut down. I learned how to be dead. And then i can remember when my father. My father was always so angry because he drank and alcohol. And and you know you just listened to the footsteps you could begin to could be in the sense what was happening and i remember he would call me down and scream at me and i would go in look in the mirror i would look at myself and i would be like you will go away. You will not feel this. You will not be touched by this. You will not let any. And i would literally talk myself out of myself right and it worked like he couldn't touch me but there's a huge price to pay for that. Which is that. You begin split brain. You've written about how you turned off your valves of empathy..

tenny plague
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"That we are moving into an all out uprising reckoning and i think me too was the beginning perhaps of the next stage of reckoning around sexual and physical abuse. But i think it's going to. It's going to require a lot to get there. I feel that without that reckoning. I don't really know how we go forward. I don't know how real change happens. I was watching the ted talk that you gave back in december at ted women. And i don't know if you have read the comments on your talk that's currently up at ted dot com but there's a man that comments who wrote in and booth disclosed that he had been abused and then also that he was an abuser and i thought that was a remarkable result of someone hearing you talk and then having their own reckoning. It was a really. It's a really remarkable comment. But i've gotten a bunch of those ladders really deep deep letters from men who have done things that they're really ashamed of and bad about and need help with and my dream and i'm were i was building towards this before Cova happened is to do a group with men and follow the four stages that i wrote about and talked about in the ted talk and film it so that we have kind of model of a group that men could look at and then begin to do in their own communities with their own in their own way and i think this isn't really such an exciting idea to me because i think one of the things i have learned about. This whole process of apology is that it's you. It's it's for you the perpetrator in so many ways it more profound than it even is for the for your victim because all of us walk around with the residue and the guilt and the shame and the pain and the remnants of harm we've caused in other people it there shards of it. It's in our makeup. It's are being in impacts. Our daily interactions with people. And i think if we could create processes and groups and ways that men could begin to do these reckonings without being totally shamed without being totally judged without being you know got you but but a really deep profound reckoning process that went on for some time i think it is the way forward it is a sort of repair type of justice that occurs when something like that can happen and i think at this point in time that the only justice that really is going to move us forward is repetitive justice. Right i think everybody is born into racist patriarchy right. Everyone is born into this programming into this dna. And and as a result of that we are all either consciously or unconsciously accidentally or because we've done something con- you know that we meant to do. We're all part of that story. And i think we've got to start on dismantling in an unraveling it. And i think the way we do that is to begin to go deeply into ourselves and look at the the roots of it. When did it begin in us. What made us the kind of man who was capable like my father of a raping me of beating me of abusing me a destroying me of of and then and then really looking at what what what did he do. What are the actual detailed accountings of what he did because so many men who even have pretended to take responsibility. While i'm sorry if i heard you or if i'm sorry if i abused to that doesn't mean anything rain. It's really at the details of what you've done the actualities of what you've done and then looking at what are the impacts of that. What feeling what your victim fell going inside and feeling and sitting with the suffering you've caused and then making amends and i think that process is deep ended it takes time but it's also so cleansing and so liberating and allows one to begin a whole other kind of life. I wanna talk a little bit about your upbringing. You were born in new york city but were raised in the northern suburb of scarsdale new york. You describe how your father looked like. Cary grant your mother. Looked like doris day. And you've said you were a dead ringer for anne frank and in the apology. Rate that your parents didn't think of you and your siblings is anything more than props for their evolving lifestyle. W- can you. Can you elaborate a little bit. You know i've never really been able to watch on madman because it gave me such anxiety me to kneel. You couldn't watch one episode. i couldn't handle. I just couldn't do it. I just wanted to throw up. But i think it was a time when people were having children as things right. They these things they weren't they weren't. I know that my mother went. Wow i really want to have children that i love and nurture and get to know and develop it was. It was what you did right to be honest like we that whole thing you are meant to be seen and not heard you're meant disappear at cocktail hour you know. I never really saw myself as a subject as a person in the reality is just something that got bought out at certain moments. There were pictures that taken you. Don't i mean there were holidays that you sort of fit into the holiday image of tree even though we were kind of jewish. But we weren't. I never felt real. You know. I never felt like a real person to them which is in some ways very objective and it makes it much easier to that person right because they're not real in some fundamental way. Well it seemed very much like your father didn't think you were real. He was more an extension of him exam to do with what he wanted. But the first five years of your life seem rather typical. You were a bright. Engaging spirited highly creative child you were deeply ethical you describe how you shared everything with your siblings..

ted Cova booth scarsdale Cary grant anne frank doris new york city new york
"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Passion. How afterwards really. Where did you find him. Did you find him in tijuana or do you come from tijuana a person a willie lovely woman who is devoted to rescuing animals was here and i. I was really hungering for a dog I hadn't had one in a few years because of traveling. And i just didn't feel like was fair but when i moved to the woods it was time and she showed me this picture that she of the strong that she was maybe going to give her sister and i was like no. That's my dog. I know that's my dog. And she was so kind. Because i was performing in the body of the world at the time so she and my son they had the dog trained for me and then the day after the show closed ablett. Pablo as by present and. Oh my god. He is such a special special special. Being dogs really do have the ability to transform. How person loves i. I had two dogs for quite a long time. And i credit them with opening my heart. I really think it's true. I mean i there's a generosity. There's a devotion i'm actually working on this piece. It's now in his voice. It's going to be his book. Oh interesting yeah. And he has friends from all over the world you know but one of his friends adventures. He he talks about devotion and how people don't understand devotion and they always misinterpreted it like they say you know. Oh you're acting like a dog in this kind of Condemning and and undermining kind of way when in fact devotion is a high level of intimacy and emotional achievement. And i think he teaches me so much about devotion and what devotion to any one or anything really means. It's so beautiful. i can't wait to read it. I'm the ordinarily. I start my interviews with my guests origin story and journey long into their education and career obstacles and triumphs and there is for the most part and narrative arc that i follow in usually end the interviews with my guests most recent work but in order to really do your life story justice in the best way i can in an hour so i decided to start with your most recent book and then go back to the beginning and then move ahead into your future and last year you published a memoir titled the apology where you imagined what you're now deceased father would say to you if he were able to apologize for the sexual and physical abuse he inflicted on you as you were growing up and you begin the memoir with a simple dedication for every woman still waiting for an apology Why that dedication. Well i think after working now for over twenty some odd years to end violence against all women and girls and touring the world Little ape probably close to eighty countries sitting with women and you.

tijuana ablett Pablo
Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

"For nearly thirty years, women in the Mexican border city of Juarez. have been disappearing many of them turning up dead in mass graves. We. Don't know who the killers are very few have been charged and fewer convicted. My guest this week. Our odds volition and Monica Ortiz Rebbe. Of the amazing podcast forgotten the women of what is the final episode two, which is now available, they are incredible journalists with an infuriating story to tell. If! You've ever been to war with disposing of bodies, Israelis. You don't have to dig to her dirt. You're digging through saying. Just across the bridge from El Paso Texas, hundreds of young women have been tanning up dead in Juarez Mexico. Many artists covered in mass graves. Some have strange symbols coughed. Some. have their hands bound with shoelaces? And? Everyone from the families of the victims to the United States. FBI has tried to uncover who is behind these crimes. But one thing is clear. The crimes are connected. They're not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it. No one talked about it. These are like ghosts. The numbers started to rise, and then a lot of theories were floated up the gangs serial murder. The cartels organ traffickers the possibility of some sort of strange devil worship. It's been fifteen years since I first heard about these murders, and I've been haunted ever since. How is it possible? These crimes remain unsolved on journey to find out we talk to victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims the new one of the culprits. We visit, the site of one of the mass graves and traveled to a dangerous part downtown. Where many of the women disappeared? I Voloshin, I'm one of the hosts of Forgotten Women of Juarez. The podcast explores what happens when this become targets, and when the judiciary is compromised, I'm fighting for bust institutions and freedom of speech. Sorry, not sorry I'm Monique, our three, they co host of the podcast forgotten. The women of what is I believe workers everywhere should earn a fair wage and women ought to live free from violence Nazari Period I. WanNa give the listeners some back story on what's happening in Juarez. How many women have gone missing in the crimes not being? Even really investigated by authorities and then go into why you felt it was important to do. The podcast I first started working on this podcast of several trips to the Texas Mexico border specifically El Paso Texas and In Mexico. And it took me several trips before I learned something that everybody in the region knows, which is that? Since the early nineteen nineties, hundreds of women have turned up dead in Horace, and many of them met incredibly brutal fates, which was evident from that bodies when they were discovered. That been five mass graves of Women Discovering Juarez since nineteen ninety five. And yet, all of this was happening right across the border from one of America's safest cities, a prosperous suburban Texans city, and so I was just very curious. How could this be happening? How could the crimes not be solved? And it ended up being this journey with Monica that open up. All kinds of other questions particularly learn things like the FBI had tried to solve the crimes, not once not twice, but three times. When the mass grave was discovered, and suspects confessed harder Crawford was the FBI special agent in charge of El Paso. Is Office was just a few miles away from the site. The mass grave and he taken a special interest in the murders of women in Juarez and was following this case closely as a potential breakthrough. You could sense that the pressure was mounting. Political pressure public pressure international pressure. The families and relatives and friends of the disappeared. Women were allowed. Those women would hold use. Mourning the deaths and George attention to that. That was huge. There was all kinds of attention from the international press. People like Jennifer Lopez. Eve ensler involved and yet these crimes remain stubbornly unsolved wasn't clear. Who was killing these hundreds of women, and why and it was a story of vulnerability, but also a story of the deep paradox irony of the border that many of these women were working in factories, which were American owned could see across the border into a Passo a city of. A Fred safety enormous safety by comparison and that Alpes Owens could see back into war as many of them had relatives there many of them. Have Friends there and yet. Those this seeming inability to do anything and that struck me as something which was I had to know more

Juarez. FBI El Paso Texas Juarez Mexico Monica Ortiz Monique Crawford Eve Ensler El Paso Jennifer Lopez United States Alpes Owens Murder Texas Mexico Voloshin Horace America Special Agent In Charge Mexico George
"eve ensler" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"From the Philippines to India to it lead to Bolivia thousands of women in more than one hundred countries will reclaim public space through dance and performance the global movement is called one billion rising one billion rising takes its name from the shocking statistic that one in three women across the planet will be beaten or raped during her lifetime that's one billion women and girls the movement started Valentine's day two thousand twelve has continued to grow every year since they say they won't stop dancing until violence against all women says trans gender in those with fluid gender identities has ended well for more we're joined here in New York by two guests eve Ensler award winning playwright author of the **** monologues founder of the day and one billion rising and Tina ceiling they Porter Rican singer filmmaker activists we just heard her song a part of that we are rising so eve one billion rising talk about the significance in this year twenty twenty yes started at what eight years ago yeah we started eight years ago we thought it would be one year campaign and guess what dancing just spread like a fabulous virus around the world I think this year and I just want to say to all the activists who have already begun to rise were already getting videos from Australia in Byron bay where women there begin really begin the day by taking off their clothes and diving into the ocean during a mad dance they've risen at the presidential palace in the Philippines the day has begun and I think this year is really significant because of the rise what we're seeing across the world of fascism white to Missy of desecration of the climate of trans rights being obliterated of workers rights being alert and I think one of the things we know from dance and from music is that it raises the vibration so that all these kind of forces of darkness whether they're the leaders of our own country or in the Philippines or India just this kind of low level oppression low level hatred look what dance music does is it lifts the vibrations so right now in a hundred and eighty countries that we know of people will have already begun to rise and will keep rising there twenty nine states of India arising and what's beautiful about India is that they have joined forces with all the people rising against the citizen I citizenship amendment so that we're seeing now in the eighth year how intersectional this movement has become and how like dance and like energy it's what all kinds of coalitions together so in some places indigenous people are rising for land rights and at that that corporations are taking for drilling in some places like last week we rose in New York against former governor Cuomo for one fair wage we rose with restaurant workers who are still living on tip wages and are facing some of the highest rates of sexual abuse in in villages in Zimbabwe the rising with tribal leaders who are now beginning to understand the violence against women must be part of the discourse and they must change basic cultural ways so we're seeing this incredible diversity of risings but the solidarity in terms of the fact that we know that women's bodies are the that landscape on which so much violence is inflicted whether it's the violence literally of rape of harassment of incest of battery or if it's the abuse of poverty the views of denigration of migrant rights than the denigration of of workers right the denigration of LGBTQ right we're seeing this across the globe and I have to say I'm particularly proud because in places like Mexico where they've been rising for the last nine years against sex trafficking they're having an impact on sex trafficking in Hong Kong where do most domestic workers have been rising for eight years they've actually change the laws and they just got it so that women can no longer clean windows on the outside of high rise buildings because so many women were dying will they change that law through their dancing and and we're seeing legislation changing we're seeing culture changing major culture shifts occurring because dance is so powerful well I know I want to turn to play more of the music video for the song we are rising and then ask you about your involvement as well the truth the the the you that was playing that silly.

Philippines India Bolivia
"eve ensler" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Now spoke with eve Ensler on Friday about the one billion rising movement aimed at ending sexual violence against women we have that interview here for you today on her return Ensler is known for the **** monologues a play she wrote about various kinds of violence that women experience the play has been performed all over the world and has made and slurred a an important figure in the feminist movement and the the fight to end sexual violence we're having some technical difficulties right now bringing up the audio and so give us one moment women and girls.

eve Ensler
"eve ensler" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Media. So you've broken through so many glass ceilings. Talk about where you came from but my life began in an unlikely place. A small cotton gotten and peanut farm in south Georgia with no indoor plumbing Our Electricity we have one big pot bellied stove in the kitchen hitchin. That's where my mother and I lived together while my dad was in World War Two but I had this amazing grandmother who told me great eight stories and ignited a curiosity so that curiosity I think really drove the to take some early risk a me because because I didn't want my life defined by the limitations that I saw everywhere at experienced as a girl growing up in the rural all south in the nineteen fifties and so it took risks taking and mentors. I got very lucky and having again eighth grade teacher who saw me believed in my potential and helped me get a scholarship to college and then I came of age at exactly exactly the same time that two great civil disobedience social justice movements were happening civil rights for African Americans and the Women's Women's movement and both clearly defined for me a pathway forward it led to many different the times and some failures mistakes some wrong turns and I wanted to share all of those as a way of encouraging other women who may maybe going up in similar. Circumstances are certainly recognizing how many women around the world are living with ever present dangers every day at work at home in their communities honoring that work I had seen lives jobs I had had witnessed through my work as a journalist for many many many years and more recently in the last twenty years my work as an activists I'd seen those women taking risks being brave and I wanted to share any way that I could experiences in my life that might encourage all of us to do the same to support each other. That's our single biggest dangerous lever for change. I wanted to turn to to the program. Nationally syndicated talk. Show that you hosted This is a nineteen eighty three clip of woman to woman. Do you avoid elevators. High places crowds. Do you sometimes feel like a prisoner in your own home. If so you could be phobic. Such fears can interfere with your life and become paralyzing phobias. I'm Pat Mitchell Today on woman to woman we'll hear surprising truth about phobias and how you can overcome them. Maybe it's time we wage awesome. Psychological warfare against the mythologies about phobias. And one of them is is that folks are not nuts are neurotics secondly Phobias are not funny. There's nothing very amusing about being terrified. And third phobia can be cured. We can get help and we recommend that you do that by getting getting in touch with the Phobia Society of America and Washington. DC and also remember that woman to woman. We can always help each other always help each other. You always end your shows by saying taking on very serious issues from this issue around phobia to a very brave revelation in this book. Pat that you talk about Dealing with in the midst of hosting this show woman to woman common. And that's the issue of incest and sexual abuse. Can you talk about what you confronted and also what it meant to go pub block. This was a very difficult to revelation as all survivors of any kind of abuse can and testify and it was a memory of childhood abuse. Said I had buried very deeply which is true of many survivors so deeply that I really didn't have any conscious memory of incidents in my childhood in which which had occurred and hosting woman to woman program with incest survivors. The memories came flooding back. which I'm told by the therapist who helped me he that this often happens? You never know quite win. The trigger will be but it almost always happens. It's very rare that a survivor can go through an entire life and not confront the trauma. How we it? Most incest survivors are many of them. Do end up being highly successful people. It's all part of the Perfection Syndrome and many ways that many people have written about but that started a recovery recovery process and gratefully for me. I had wonderful help and I did we cover and I was able to recognize the signs in my life that had I've been This showed the effect and the impact of that early. Lack of unconditional love which is one of the legacies that take away from family Survi- abuse but recovering it still. I did not become a an active person on the on that except When I joined vide with Eve Ensler and became a member of original board and the work to in violence all kinds of violence everywhere? I began to deal with a lot of incest survivors. A Lot. A lot of rape survivors survivors of all kinds of sexual assault and that has become very driving passion and my life working working with women along with eve and the vide activists writing the book hadn't intended however to share that a particular part of my life except that as I began to tell the truth about a lot of things about failures professionally only personally that it felt important and then witnessing what had happened in the last ten years or more in this country seeing more and more survivors come forward and many many of them not believed most recently in the Supreme Court hearings things that we witnessed it felt important to share it. So I did. It's it does leave one with a sense of honour ability which all survivors feel but it also felt to me that had my generation Ben a lot more upfront. Want about the metoo incidences that we all experienced something I shared as well. We all knew it was going on. We knew we were being paid aide less than our male colleagues. We knew the sexual harassment was real. But we didn't speak up because we were in our silos. We were told to protect our turf not to trust each other not to build allied ships and that kept US silent so trying now to do whatever I can to break that silence to make it safer for survivors to come forward and to get the help they need and to show up in ways. That are necessary To help each other so yes. I ended every woman to woman program with with that message. That woman to woman we can and do help each other well. Pat Final message is to Young people older people as well. I mean you have good at the tune buddy inspiring Jane Fonda. And you go to join Jane and over one hundred other people to be arrested last Friday on what that kind of feminist solidarity means it means everything to me I say my my women friends are a source of renewable energy. Amy and I witnessed written. Is that deep bond with my granddaughter's all the way to the women over one hundred that I had the privilege to interview a series I have and now the women that I work with all over the world and if I might just say one briefing about the climate movement worldwide wide gathering together some thirty five global women leaders recently they were not climate experts. Not One of them. They came from all different kinds of work that they get together. Drafted a declaration on climate justice. We're going to seven hundred world leaders have signed. And we're going to do part two of this discussion post online at democracy now dot org including some of the women that you feature in your new book becoming a dangerous woman and embracing risk to change the world. Our Christmas special. We remember Tony Morrison and then on Thursday. Michael Moore joins us for the hour. I'm Amy Goodman. And this is democracy now democracy now dot org the warranties reporting happy holidays..

Pat Mitchell Amy Goodman Jane Fonda south Georgia Eve Ensler Phobia Society of America Tony Morrison US Michael Moore Washington harassment Ben rape Supreme Court assault
"eve ensler" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Said she nearly bled to death. We will never criminally Allred called on people to vote pro-choice candidates into state legislatures across the country. Has a. Make. The crowd also heard from playwright eve Ensler who spoke about her experience with Planned Parenthood when she was suicidal and drug addict after being sexually abused in violent home. Steve kastenbaum. New York in sports, the NBA's Eastern Conference finals are all tied up at two games apiece. Following the raptors second straight win in Toronto one twenty one to route of the bucks game five tomorrow in Milwaukee where the bucks took the first two games of the series. Nineteen past McDonald spaces sexual harassment charges and Amazon's facial recognition technology when America in the morning continues after these messages. Just any door. Just any ignition. Connected to any transmission. Perhaps it would be okay to buy from just anyone. But this is not just. Certified pre-owned Mercedes-Benz, every detail has been inspected and road.

eve Ensler Allred Steve kastenbaum NBA raptors New York Milwaukee harassment Amazon McDonald Toronto America
"eve ensler" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"eve ensler" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Of military confrontation. You could say that always is always I don't wanna say, no. But hopefully that won't happen. We have one of the most powerful ships in the world that's loaded up, and we don't want to have to do anything. What I'd like to see with a run. I'd like to see them. Call me. We just don't want to have nuclear weapons not too much as we would help put them back into great shape. I'd like to see them. Call me. President Trump said we are still with Princeton University. Professor ambassador say Hussein Musavi on Middle East security a nuclear policy specialist at Princeton University, which are Wilson school of public, and international affairs. Can you respond to what Trump said? And also, let's talk about the stranglehold of the sanctions that are continue that the US is continuing to tighten against Iran the effects that's having on the ground embassador. Yes. I think president made a big mistake to depart from the nuclear deal practically it was President Trump lift Gucci table because it on the big powers the p five plus one day, David negotiating at the level of foreign ministers undisputed ministers for years. And even President Obama, you'll remember John Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister, Joel if if not every day, they weekly in touch negotiating meeting Email link when President Trump left, the practically he left negotiation table, therefore he should be blamed for leaving the negotiation not radiant site. And he's welcomed back again to the photo of p five plus one to return to the nuclear deal to open dialogue and negotiation with Iran in the War Powers. If there is any other issue beyond the nuclear to negotiate. This is number one number two. There is a will known by many nucleus. Ward wide, even into the national Atomic Energy Agency saying that the rain. Indian nuclear deal was and ease the most comprehensive agree men viewing the history of nonproliferation and Iran has accepted commitment for transparency measures and limitations on the nuclear program. VH no audit member of NPT nonproliferation treaty has ever except for Iran as accepted, the maximum level of transparency based on reports of the IRA and the United nation that the I E A International Atomic Energy agency, which is sold agency to George about the nuclear program of the members for two years in fourteen deplored has confidant Iran has fully complied the the nuclear deal therefore there has been zero failure on the Iranian. Side that the was approved by United Nations Security council. United Nations Security conservatism Lucien two to three one the US violated. It was the US violated. The dean departed a now and wars which is really an on president that phenomenal dealing the history of international relations and United nation is the fact that the United State is punishing author member of United nation. For complying with the Lucien two two three one two supporting implementing Iran nuclear deal. We have never had a U N Security Council member to punish the other members. Just because they are implementing the deal, you know, therefore, the US is discrediting international the highest level of international body on security and political which is the United Nations Security council from now on the best on that point. Specifically, the that the Trump President Trump did not only pull out as you say he is not trying to punish anyone who stays in the deal. The Iran has waited patiently for a year for the other signatories to demonstrate that they're going to continue implementing, it's how do you place? The the announcement that they may begin enrichment again in the context of this. A year long. Wait to see what the Europeans and the other signatories would do about the plan. Exactly see it is not for it is actually for two years from the day. One. President Trump has started to impose new sanctions based on JCP away the US and e you they are committed not unle to reintroduce the nuclear related sanctions. But not to reimpose new sanctions there for the us has violated and he's put punishing the other members for implementing deed. Iran has been patient for two years implementing the deal with zero benefit now, it has decided onto measures which is not the beret of nuclear deal because the US latest sanctions. Prevented the export of excessive amount of enriched uranium erupt based on the nuclear deal. Iran has accepted always to keep three hundred kilogram and export excessive amount Russia of enriched uranium and handrail thirty tons of heavy water and to export excessive amount to Amman. Now. It is the US has put sanctions on Iran. Not to export the heavy-water excessive amounts to Amman and not export excessive amount of enrichment to Russia that for Iran has no other option. Iran cannot practically export therefore Iran would before st- to have excessive amount. Therefore, it is not a violation by the Iranian side alone has been. Forced by the US not to export. However, it on has war and that all their five plus members p five plus one members that I have been waiting for two years for you. You have done zero if you cannot implement that I'm not going to implement the deal forever unilaterally, an international agreement disease multilateral agreement if the US cannot comply you should comply if none of you are going to comply. I'm going to gradually deport depart from the deal. That's why no iota Russia China. India every country is blaming the US not Iran. You in fischel recently, criticized the US for imposing these unilateral sanctions on Iran on Q, then Venezuela that could lead to mass starvation. He said u n special rapporteur Idris Jezira said, quote, real concerns and serious political differences between governments must never be resolved by precipitating economic and humanitarian disasters making ordinary people pawns and hostages thereof. As we wrap up the reality on the ground for the Iranian people right now. And what this could mean also for the government when the people are suffering as much as it has been described. You're completely right. Eighty millions of Iranians are suffering from US sanctions practically this strategy of John Bolton is a war sanction war economic war on Iranian nations in order to push them to bring a regime change within inside von within Ilan, therefore practically they are punishing the Iranian nation. This is really a big humanitarian disaster because even Iranians they cannot import medicine they cannot import food and when foreign ministers was here's some weeks ago. He just wanted to test the humanitarian humor of the US side. He proposed for exchange of prisoners, regardless of whether they're prisoners in the. Uranium prisoners in the US argue, you're not or the US prisoners in Iran are guilty or not he proposed exchange of prisoners as humanitarian guest and immediately White House declined while we had such a humanitarian exchanged you in President Obama, but President Trump declined for we understand now there is humanitarian goodwill from the US side and the policy is really economic war punishing the Iranian nation. We wanna thank you so much for being with us ambassador. Ambassador say at Hussein Musavi on is a middle security nuclear policy specialists at Princeton university's which listen school of public, and international affairs. He served as spokesperson for a run and its nuclear negotiations with the European Union, author of the Iranian nuclear crisis memoir and most recently, Iran and the United States insider's view on the failed pass. And the road to peace speaking to us from Princeton University, this is democracy. Now when we come back the award winning playwright eve Ensler she has a new book out. It's called the apology. Stay with us. This is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report,.

Iran US President Trump president United Nations Security counci President Obama Princeton University Hussein Musavi United Nations Security Trump United nation eve Ensler U N Security Council Middle East United State European Union