36 Burst results for "Eve"

Fresh update on "eve" discussed on Africa Business News

Africa Business News

00:52 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "eve" discussed on Africa Business News

"You're listening to the news on africa business radio. Us president joe biden has nominated dr john king song to lead the public health programme on combatant hiv aids known as president's emergency plan for adrian eve doctrine kinga song is the behead of africa. Cdc d- agency lead in the fight against the covey nineteen pandemic the us government initiative has been without leader since february last year. It's former leader. Deborah brooks left to join the us. Kona virus taskforce s spot. Say the many people were not get tested while others were not able to take their medicine youtube interruption of supplies. That wasn't news. At this time on africa business radio you can continue to listen live online at. Www dot africa business rated dot com of their mobile app. I am trickle non-somali now thank you for listening..

Dr John King Adrian Eve Kinga Song Africa Deborah Brooks Joe Biden CDC Aids Us Government United States Youtube
The Left Ruins Everything It Touches

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:09 min | 4 d ago

The Left Ruins Everything It Touches

"Hello my friends. Dennis prager here. A reminder what the democrats are doing to this country he's ruining it. The democratic party is ruining the united states of america because it's controlled by the left and the left ruins everything touches to deny that is to engage in wishful thinking and it's inexcusable means. You don't have the courage to say the left is is evil. The left is evil. The left everywhere is evil. Not liberals liberals are my eve liberals often lack courage politically. They're often wonderful individuals. I love some of them personally but they won't acknowledge because it's very hard to stare at evil to destroy america. The last best hope of mankind is that's not evil then. I need a definition of evil. So i'm very specific. And what. I mean by evil in this case. They're destroying this country. Intentionally taxpayer payers should understand. The magnitude of the benefits is the wall street journal editorial about the the The new entitlements that they are giving for children basic income for families with children basic income for all families before the expansion the average child credit for a family below one hundred percent of the poverty line was about nine hundred. Seventy five dollars now. It's five thousand. Four hundred twenty one dollars that comes on top of their transfer programs such as food stamps and the earned income tax credit. The child entitlement will reach well into the middle class which is part of the political goal of course at the end of democracy when people understand. They could vote for politicians. Who will give them money. That's it it's over then nobody votes for what's better for the country they vote for. How do i get more money.

Dennis Prager United States Of America Democratic Party Wall Street Journal
Sean Feucht on Saturating Washington DC in Prayer

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:36 min | Last week

Sean Feucht on Saturating Washington DC in Prayer

"Us more about the prayers. The next day the white house all that kind of stuff. Yeah so this is our second year in a row doing this and one of the things we really try to do is is really saturate. The city of dc. It's a. I would call it. It's almost like a pilgrimage. For for believers you know going to the capital city of place of significance that affects every area of our life. And then going to to to to the places in that city that really need prayer so we went to the supreme court and last year we had the largest prayer meeting in ever in american history in front of the supreme court over three thousand people showed up in the rain and it was significant because it was on the eve of amy coney baron getting confirm two supreme court and actually since that prayer meeting every single religious liberties case. It's been brought against the church has been overturned in the supreme court. So that's amazing. Were undefeated since our last prayer so we gathered there on sunday morning and then we went to the white house after the after that and prayed and worshipped at the white house. Eric you're with me together. There and then we moved to the lincoln memorial and we did a prayer meeting there and then we convene for the grand finale on the national mall so we really we hit all areas of dc. We just saturate the city. I mean you could see lettuce worship dear. You know shirts and everything was everywhere. And it's just something that we really like to do. We're going to go and take over the city for a day. Fill it with prayer. Fill it with worship shift the narrative of what people think about that

Supreme Court Amy Coney Baron DC White House United States Lincoln Memorial Eric
Could Biden's Vaccine Mandate Help Larry Elder's Chances in California's Gubernatorial Recall Election?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Could Biden's Vaccine Mandate Help Larry Elder's Chances in California's Gubernatorial Recall Election?

"I remember fondly how unified we felt after the terror. Attacks of nine eleven. May we feel that spirit of unification again. Today after king george stood before his throne and decreed that everybody must be vaccinated or else he'll get them out of the way It is beyond unconstitutional. It's agreed gis shocking is dreadful to watch this president. And i'm gonna say this. I know the odds are against larry elder just like the odds were against donald trump. Sometimes the odds makers have a way of being wrong and the fact that this over this unconstitutional overreaches happening on the eve of the california recall election. I'm not so sure. This doesn't greatly assist in removing gavin newsom. And electing larry elder governor of california. You know the guy that got eggs thrown at him by a woman wearing a gorilla mask you know the black conservative. Who happens to be a friend and a colleague of mine. Who's the leader in the republican. Pack of gubernatorial candidates in california. Who was on the campaign trail this week and was assaulted by a woman wearing a monkey mask. You might not have heard of the story because the mainstream media was terrified to cover it and they didn't because that's how they roll.

Larry Elder King George Donald Trump California Gavin Newsom
The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
Rockets Hit Neighborhood Near Kabul Airport Amid US Pullout

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Rockets Hit Neighborhood Near Kabul Airport Amid US Pullout

"What could fire has hit an area near Kabul and pulled the meat the U. S. pullout the rocket far apparently targeting couples International Airport struck a nearby neighborhood on the eve of the deadline for US troops to withdraw from the country after the attack planes continued to land on taxi across the northern military side of the airport taking off roughly every twenty minutes at one point no group has immediately claimed responsibility for the attack last week the Islamic state group in Afghanistan launched a devastating suicide bombing that's one of the apple gates killing around one hundred and seventy Afghans I'm thirteen U. S. service members I'm Charles the last month

Kabul U. United States Afghanistan Apple Charles
Garden Spiders in Kentucky - burst 1

The Sunshine Gardening Podcast

00:28 sec | Last month

Garden Spiders in Kentucky - burst 1

"Probably the most notable spider when people think about spiders would be the orb web spiders. These are the ones that make the really big web. Orbs that you say between plants or maybe on the side of your eve's going down to your garage or something like that and that they have the nice concentric circles of of web coming from so we have many many different types of orb waivers.

Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

Black Women Travel Podcast

01:46 min | Last month

Interview With Joanna of Joanna E.

"Thanks so much for joining us today. Can you please tell us your name where you're from your current location and the name of your business. Hello my name. is joanna from joanna eve Business i am from new york city in currently live in new york city. Beautiful so joanna. Please tell us about how you grew up so you were born and raised in new york. Your family is from trinidad and tobago to pick So talk to us about what it was like growing up. First generation trinidadian beggaring american. So i pretty much grew up in queens raised and which is a very diverse Borrow but for the most part. I grew up in lake southeast. Clean so There's more like black. American on some lessening americans in that area but Some of my older brothers and sisters. They live from brooklyn In mike flatbush Areas too so. We grew up pretty american like eating on foods. I for the most part mate myself and my older brother like the three young. Have six brothers and sisters. So i'm the thanks Of seven so Older brother anger sister will like the baby so we pretty much grew american but very much caribbean on around the holidays. We always ate Caribbean foods Listen to korea music.

Joanna New York City Lake Southeast Tobago Mike Flatbush Trinidad Queens New York Brooklyn Caribbean Korea
American Airlines Will Let You Watch 30 Minutes of TikTok

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:00 min | Last month

American Airlines Will Let You Watch 30 Minutes of TikTok

"First item is comes from actually from american airlines american airlines takes tick-tock to new heights with free in-flight access for customers. So of course. American airlines provide some free in flight wifi offerings and it just added tick-tock. Now if you'll know what tic tac is ask your kids. It's it's the popular social networking service. That's owned by chinese company. Bite dance and now on via sad equipped narrowbody aircraft american. Let you connect to talk free for thirty minutes. And there's a quote from clarisa sebastian. She's americans managing director of premium. Customer experience an onboard products has kind of a mouthful. She says faster. Wifi allows us to deliver diverse in-flight entertainment options and eve and invest in innovative partnerships with platforms like talk customers. Play the lead role in helping us. Better understand what content they want during their inflight experience and tic tac is one of the platforms. They love on the ground and we're thrilled to work with via sat to give customers free access to tick talk while they're in the air as well. I don't know do you think The typical american customer american airlines customer is a tic tac user or or is it just me. That's kind of living in the past. No i don't think they are. In fact i'm sitting here going. Why are we talking about this. I just looked it up the typical. Us audience tick tucker sixty percent. Female forty percent. Male sixty percent are between the ages of sixteen and twenty four twenty. Six percent are between the ages of twenty five and forty four. So yeah it skews pretty young and i would say it probably skews younger than the average american airlines customer. So big deal about it.

American Airlines American Air Clarisa Sebastian American Airlines Tucker United States
Evictions Loom After Biden and Congress Fail to Extend Ban

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Evictions Loom After Biden and Congress Fail to Extend Ban

"A nationwide cold eve action moratorium is set to expire at midnight after president Biden Congress failed to extend it it was a long shot effort to prevent the more than three point six million Americans at risk of addiction from being forced from their homes Biden announced Thursday that he would allow the moratorium to expire tonight he was wary of challenging a Supreme Court ruling signaling this would be the last deadline instead calling on Congress to act house speaker Nancy Pelosi race to respond but could not quickly muster the votes the Senate could try again today to extend the ban meanwhile nearly forty seven billion in federal housing aid to the states during the pandemic has been slow to make it into the hands of renters and landlords owed payments I'm Julie Walker

President Biden Congress Biden Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi Senate Julie Walker
Seeking Reform, U.S. Holds $1.3 Million in Dues From WADA

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Seeking Reform, U.S. Holds $1.3 Million in Dues From WADA

"Seeking reform of the United States is withholding part of dues owed to the world anti doping agency on the eve of the opening of the Tokyo Summer Games U. S. officials say nearly half of the two point nine three million dollars in dues owed to the world anti doping agency will be held back until it becomes clear what reforms the drug fighting agency is undertaking Richard bomb of the White House drug control office told a congressional committee Wednesday one point six million dollars will be paid to water the U. S. first threatens to withhold dues last summer and water responded by suggesting it might sanction nations not paying their dues U. S. do is account for about seven point three percent of waters forty billion dollar annual budget hi Mike Rossio

Richard Bomb White House Drug Control Offic Summer Games Tokyo United States Congressional Committee U. Mike Rossio
What Will the Future for Gods People Be

Free audio sermons: Get free audio sermons and free audio Bible studies!

02:03 min | 2 months ago

What Will the Future for Gods People Be

"People have been wondering about the future for a long time as of right now. There are some projections being made in the romance department. There's some people who are thinking that within the next few generations perhaps within the lifetime of some people who are here this afternoon we are going to have some people say to us. I have fallen in love with a robot. I am going to get married to a robot. My nets mate is going to the a robot if our society ever gets to that time. They're going to be some very interesting questions for example could be married to more than one robot at a time. If you destroy the rowbotham chamaere to would that be criminal. Offense could a robotic partner testify against you in a quarter of wall. And if you don't like your robot after the first year could you reprogram. Our world is an interesting and sometimes it is a very unnerving place because of the future our spiritual life as we think about it. It has a past component that we've looked at it has a president component. And now as we think about the spiritual part of who are also has a future component. Let's take a look at that first. Chapter fifteen verse. Forty nine paul and talking about what we have right now in the president he says we have borne the image of the earthly. He says though that a time is coming when we shall also bear the image of the heavenly. Well we think about adam looking back for example to the book of genesis and get some information about him. We know that adam was created from the rest of the year was the first man. Adam did not gradually evolve. He did not come from some cesspool and over millions of years. Finally show up day. The body that adam had is largely the bottom the body that we have maybe had more hair and so forth but tom on his head but he had an arm in arms and legs and he had ribs and the things that we have. We think about adam's wife she of course was eve and her shape largely remember resemble better bre husband just as we see today as we look around at people in our world

Rowbotham Chamaere Adam Paul TOM
Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 2 months ago

Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

Robert Sternberg Sternberg Cornell University Arctic Rick BOB Gallotti
Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

Tom and Curley

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Billionaires Fight Over Space as Branson Gets Set to Launch Before Bezos

"That Branson really pulled a fast one by trying to usurp that first space flight nine days before basins. So I'm kind of team Branson Canteens Team basis. Sorry. We already had you down for Branson. You can't change your vote. You cannot There. Is there one Richard Branson, I'll be evaluating the customer spaceflight experience is this Branson speaking. Sounds even weirder than he normally does gives Sir Richard Branson this much the swashbuckling billionaire has a knack for making his dreams seem like hours in this case space. He believes it's for everyone do you like the term space tourism? Space Tourism works. On Sunday morning, Branson will become the space tourist since 2000 and four. His company Virgin Galactic has persevered through test flights and setbacks like an accident in 2014 that killed a test pilot space. Stephanie is hard. We've had our tears. We've had a choice, but I'll tell you what the joys have been fantastic. Branson's space voyaging will begin on a runway this runway at Spaceport America in New Max. To go. 12,000 FT. Straightaway for Virgin Galactic's mothership. VMS Eve is a plane, twin fuselage aircraft two pilots in the middle. It carries the space plane. The S S unity. 21 release release release at about 45,000. Ft Eve will release unity Fire fired! Cool. The spaceship will shoot straight up more than 50, Miles where space begins. Ship unity. Welcome to space. We've got massive windows. All the way around. The bill to unbuckle will be able to float around and they will become an astronaut Branson and three other passengers. All employees should experience a few minutes of weightlessness. Then unities. Two pilots will glide everyone back to Earth. By the way,

Branson Richard Branson Virgin Galactic New Max Stephanie America
The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:41 min | 3 months ago

The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

"About one of the most iconic jazz singers in history. She let us short and difficult life filled with trial and tragedy though. She had no formal musical training. She had a natural gift for jazz musically and emotionally connecting with audiences. Let's talk about billie holiday. Ellinora fagin was born in nineteen fifteen in philadelphia to teenage parents clarence holiday and sadie fagan soon. After eleanor's birth clarence left the family. He would go on to become a successful guitar and banjo player. But would be largely absent. In eleanor's life cd and ellinora moved to baltimore to live with savings older half sister. Eva miller and eve as mother-in-law martha eleanor would often be left with martha as her mother. An aunt worked jobs that took them out of the house for weeks at a time ellinora. Meanwhile began skipping school at just nine years old ellinora was brought to court on truancy charges and was sent to the house of the good shepherd. A reform school after nine months. Ellinora was paroled. But her homecoming was far from idyllic. Shortly after she returned home she was sexually assaulted by a neighborhood. Man ellinora was taken back into state custody this time for nearly two months upon her release. She dropped out of school at barely. Twelve years old. It was at this time that ellinora still a child store covering from trauma and working as a house cleaner. I heard records by the likes of louis armstrong and bessie smith in nineteen twenty eight. Sadie eleanor's mother moved from baltimore to harlem. The next year ellinora joined her sadie began working as a prostitute for their landlady out of a brothel on one hundred and fortieth street. I some accounts. Elenora ran errands for the brothel by others. Ellinora herself was a sex worker at barely. Fourteen years old over the subsequent three years ellinora began developing her singing. Act eventually landing a performance slot at a harlem nightclub though. She had no formal music training. Ellinora hadn't a neat sense of musical structure and theory jazz and blues genres. Who song rely on a singers. Well of pain and sadness or a natural fit for ellinora though just seventeen. She had already lived and survived a difficult life. She adopted the stage name. Billy after billie dove a favourite actress and started

Ellinora Ellinora Fagin Clarence Holiday Sadie Fagan Eleanor Eva Miller Martha Eleanor House Of The Good Shepherd Billie Holiday Baltimore Clarence Sadie Eleanor Philadelphia Martha Elenora Bessie Smith Louis Armstrong Harlem Billie Dove
President Biden Optimistic Despite Falling Short of July Fourth Vaccination Goal

NBC Nightly News

01:37 min | 3 months ago

President Biden Optimistic Despite Falling Short of July Fourth Vaccination Goal

"Biden is a major rebound in the economy and in our lives. This holiday weekend as the country marks an accelerated return to normal still challenges. Remain with the white house falling short of its july fourth vaccination goal. Monica alba is covering the president firing up the barbecues and air force one this holiday weekend as americans come together on the eve of independence day. The biden administration's top officials fanned out across the country from nevada and michigan to maine new hampshire. The president first lady and vice president blanketing the nation. Today in what they're calling. The america is back together tour giving new meaning to the fourth of july by marking our independence from the pandemic though it was hard to believe. I think that we would actually be able to be together on the fourth of july. Still victory over. The virus isn't being declared just yet. The white house will miss. Its own goal of partially vaccinating. Seventy percent of american adults by tomorrow nearly sixty seven percent of those eighteen and over have received one dose while forty seven percent of the public is fully vaccinated heading into the celebrations. The president warned those who haven't gotten their shots yet concern that people who have not gotten vaccinated have the capacity to catch the variant the white house announcing it will deploy surge response teams to hot spots as fears grow over the highly transmissible delta variant

Monica Alba Biden Administration White House Biden New Hampshire Nevada Maine Michigan America
What is Normal Poop?

Healthy Eating For Kids

02:01 min | 3 months ago

What is Normal Poop?

"Normal poop what is it look like in an ideal world. Our pooping everything. The day so whatever. They're beaten in the past. Twenty four hours promptly comes out the other end twenty us later. Normal poop look sausage shaped or. It's very easy to pause very soft this charge and be complaining about bellyache. Tummy ache or be withholding or appear to be a lot of pain and discomfort when they are passing pu the main difference between the bristol stooge chart and the kid friendly poop. Chart is that in the bristol's card. Everything is label so normal. Stools are probably labeled as type five whereas in the kids chart. You just won't make any sensed if you ask your child well see look. Light doesn't look like type one or type seven on this chart so instead he can talk to them about it. Look like a sausage or if you hold up a pictorial chart and if you had no idea what i'm talking about do click on the accompanying blog post which populated the show notes. So if the stews look a little bit like sausage but corn on the cob so it has a little bit like of cracks. You can say to chart doesn't look not corn on the cob and that's still normal it. Just maybe i still a little bit. Starting to look a bit more on the constipation end of the scale and they may need a bit more fiber fluids. Eve your looks like a bunch of graves and has been fairly difficult to pause. They are probably constipated by this stage. And of course rabbit droppings on you know very clear to imagine what that would look that is also constipated peut. Did you know that your child can still open there about every single day and still be

Bristol
Michael Knowles Analyzes Language War Tactics Used by Democrats

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Michael Knowles Analyzes Language War Tactics Used by Democrats

"What they do is they redefine terms and and it's it like at a snap of a finger for the sole purpose of being able to categorize you the next day as something ending in a foam and therefore the fight's over. They win before you even utter another word. Is that have anything to do with your book? Speechless? It has a lot. I didn't have my look actually. Because what you're seeing There is that so much of the value of political correctness for the left is in the imposition. It's not even so much what the words are. It's on the imposition, but but you're seeing this now taken it to an even further extreme. In the transgender movement. Now, if you have the audacity to refer to Bruce Jenner at if you have the audacity to call him grief, That's a problem. And if you call him his, that's a problem, too. And I think the reason for this is that as part of this longstanding leftist effort To engage in what Marx called the ruthless criticism of all that exists. What Whittaker Chambers called the great alternative faith of mankind. When the serpent tells Eve in the garden, you shall be as gods this real movement to liberate ourselves from reality. If you can force somebody to look at a man and forced that person to call him a woman. You can force them to believe absolutely anything at all. And conservatives ignore this to our own peril. Very often, you hear conservatives say, who cares about the pronouns all who cares about the word games? And my answer to them is the last cares. The left is obviously a lot of time and energy and money. So why is that? It's because it's obviously very effective for them, and they have a clear vision for the country. Unfortunately, we as conservatives, we don't we've bought so many of their premises that where it's like we're fish swimming in the water of political correctness. We're not even aware that we're doing it and it's how we give the left a huge advantage.

Bruce Jenner Whittaker Chambers Marx Swimming
Secretary of Defense Backs Change in Military Sex Assault Prosecution

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Secretary of Defense Backs Change in Military Sex Assault Prosecution

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting the secretary of defense backs changes in the prosecution of sexual assault in the U. S. military defense secretary Lloyd Austin is now saying he supports changes to the military justice system that would remove decisions on prosecuting sexual assault cases from military commanders in a statement obtained by the Associated Press Austin for the first time said he supports allowing independent military lawyers to handle sexual assault cases until now the Pentagon has resisted such a change Austin statement came on the eve of an appearance before the house Armed Services Committee on Monday an independent review commission Austin appointed presented him with an expansive set of recommendations to combat sexual assault in the military Mike Rossio Washington

Lloyd Austin Mike Ross Austin U. The Associated Press House Armed Services Committee Pentagon Mike Rossio Washington
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"He he fled Korea to go on to become the first Korean American novelist because he wasn't anti imperialist activist in so he had to leave because he was actually protesting Japanese colonial rule. So even though he wasn't writing in Japanese context per se, he did actually write some of his work in the Japanese language. So so clearly all in all Japanese imperialism had an impact on his life. And hearing you talk and thinking about that makes me wonder if this part of history that many Americans are completely unaware of has had a broader effect on the cultural production of Koreans around the world in. As that might not be so obvious, right? I mean, do you think that's something people need to understand more in order to understand anything about Korean art or culture in the diaspora? Absolutely. And I think that it's really important to think about young he'll exactly as you said because he was a subject of the colony of Japan, and when he wanted to become an educated person when he wanted to understand science because he initially said he wanted to become a scientist before he became a writer, and he wanted to go to Japan because Japan refused to teach science to the people of careers. If you wanted to learn science at all you have to leave your country and go to the colonizer to learn science, and he actually says that he put himself among his enemies in order to become a more knowledgeable person. You know, young he'll Kong wrote that most Americans don't bother to learn anything about Korean culture, which he called. And I quote, a very great tragedy in untold tragedy of horrible ignorance. I have to admit that. I did not know his work before researching him for this podcast. I became interested as I was kind of scrolling through the archive and came across him. And once I looked into him. I was appalled that I didn't know who he was. But he was working teaching alongside some very famous. Contemporaries, Ernest Hemingway, Scott, FitzGerald, Thomas Wolf, why do you think is work is in better known? Well, it's weird. His work is weird. It's this follow regular trajectory as a matter of fact, if you put them into the contemporary classics of today, you would say he's almost an experimental fiction writer. He's kind of a comic writer as well. And comic writers always suffer in literature because they're probably smarter than all of us. But then because comedy is never seen in the same line as tragedy. They're not widely revered. Well. In addition to that reportedly young he'll Kong said, it was unfortunate that his first novel came out in the same year as the good earth, which is of course, much more famous novel. About family in China written by Pearl s buck who is a white person..

Kong scientist Thomas Wolf Korea Japan writer Ernest Hemingway China FitzGerald Scott
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Because we know that's not the way it should be. And I think even going to law school, it really taught me that even though there's a lot of inequities in this country from historically it's well as in present day, we know that we can try to be dressed some of these things and the wheels of Justice churn incredibly slowly, but we have to keep pushing the wheel, and I think that level of belief that the wheel can progress is really very American. I'm not surprised at an American took on the Korean Japanese history. As opposed to people who are much more resigned to the fact that you know, life is shaky and it's gonna station. So you did live in Tokyo for four or five years. Did you experience racism during your time in Japan, and that also influence the lens that you brought to the book? I did experience a lot of racism against me because I'm created always took me by surprise. Because I think there's a kind of naive belief that when you're educated, and you have some means that you're sheltered from discrimination. But very often people would refer to the fact that I had Korean blood, and because I had Korean blood that made me a suspicious person. And this happened so often that it really took me by surprise because sometimes people would save these things without thinking of me, let's say like they would be talking about other Koreans or Chinese people. And I was thinking while you're my friend. How can you say these things and you realize like, that's what you have to take on when you're in a world in which the norms are that there are good, Asians and their bodies, and in Japan, the wrong, Asians, are people from outside of Japan. So as you know. During this episode. We've been lucky enough to listen to the archival interview between studs terkel and young he'll Kong, and he wrote the first Korean American novel. That's right and your novel as I've read, and you can correct me if I'm wrong is the first written in English that discusses the experiences in the history of Korean people living in Japan. Now, I know that questions of being the first and being the only as a really complicated thing. And in some ways it can be special. But it can also be burdensome it can also be kind of depressing. I always think it's sort of depressing to be the first person to do anything in the twenty first century. But what are your thoughts on that? You know, the idea of firsts and first nece to do those things matter to you or not so much. I think even talking to my therapist. So I. I think the processing is the right adjective. I found it really discouraging because the whole time. I kinda thought the reason why no one has done, and it's because nobody wants it. So what makes you think that you're so special like I had these voices in my head like why are you bothering doing this? And I did watch other people become more successful doing other things. And I thought, wow, they have security they have health insurance. They have money in the Bank. They have an office. And there were definitely parts of my career that I felt this kind of longing to be normal..

Japan Kong Tokyo Bank five years
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"The Guggenheim fellowship an honorary doctorate from Monmouth college and a Radcliffe fellowship at Harvard University and recently, she was the runner up for the Dayton literary peace prize, and I have to admit this might be my favorite biographical detail. You were jeopardy clue. I was the question was Korean-born min Jin Lee wrote a twenty seventeen book with this Japanese pinball game as its title. Of course, the answer is pachinko, but you have to say what is pachinko right answering the form of a question. And I believe the person got it. Right, right. She did Burkey got it. Right. How bad mouth bad? Well. Welcome to bughouse. Wear. It is great to have you here. Thank you for having me. It's really an honor to be here. So one thing many of our listeners might not be familiar with is the experience of Korean people in Japan people like the characters in your book and the layers of social constraint and straight up racism that they experience, obviously, this is a huge issue. But could you talk briefly about that social context and the experiences of Zion Ichi in Japan today? Oh, sure. Well, essentially, what's really important to know is Japan colonized Korea between nineteen ten to nineteen Forty-five at ended with the end of the World War Two because Japan was an ally of the axis powers and then during this era, a lot of Koreans ended up going to Japan for economic reasons as well as some of them were forced to come. So you have this incredibly humongous population at the height. I believe it's about two million people and that eventually many of them repatriated going back to Korea which was by the time eighteen forty five divided into two. There's an increase. Really humongous of people who ended up staying in Japan. Because if you wanted to go back to Korea, either south or north you are limited in what you could take back and also usually all their homes were gone, their families were gone, and there's a lot of cholera and illness, so many than decided to stay, but in deciding to stay it was a very difficult law, and even today the Koreans Japan suffer a lot of social discrimination as well as legal discrimination. Now, you did not grow up in Japan. You're born in Seoul, and you grew up in queens, but you did live in Japan for a period as an adult. So the story in the novel is in some ways quite different from your story. But you said in one interview that the topic became like, a compulsion for you. Why is this something you wanted to write about I think that the reason why felt like a compulsion to me is because when I heard about the plight of cranes in Japan when I was eighteen years old, and I was in college. I didn't realize that people could be so hated based upon their immutable care. Actress deke's and that sounds really naive. But it's not that naive. Think about the fact that queens is a place even today, which has the highest number and variety of immigrants Nin tire nation. So it's really normal to be different when you're in queens. So I had a really good life in queens. And when I heard about the cranes in Japan, I kind of freaked out because I couldn't believe how mean people were. So I felt like I had to figure it out. And I think if you really want to understand Koreans in the world, you can't not understand the intersection of Japan and Korean history. So I spent some time thinking about writing a book, and I had no idea that it would take almost three decades of my life. So in a way, it sounds like even though this book is situated both between Japan and Korea. It sounds like being from queens, really shaped the point of view that you brought as a writer. Oh, absolutely. And also brought the kind of rage. It brought a kind of anger and a sense of indignity. Nation about the fact that people should not be treated this way in the same way. Like, if you think about how angry we are about the way women are treated or people of color in this country that comes from us a space of entitlement..

Japan queens Koreans Korea Burkey Jin Lee Guggenheim fellowship Monmouth college Harvard University bughouse Dayton cholera Seoul deke writer eighteen years three decades
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"This is a remarkable trip this trip. This is the great track of young hill Kong ten and eleven three hundred miles where you're scared to. No, no, I wasn't now. I. Wasn't scared that then you saw the first western train. Yes. What was your impression of saying? Well, it was. Well, something you know, you heard of you never saw just like dragon. You never saw dragon. You know, but you're very much impressed. Like a dragon. And then you came to the city. Hey, it's me again eve I feel like those two could go on all day. And I love listening to them. So it pains me to interrupt except. It's for a really good reason. Which is tell you that it's almost time to bring on Mingeon Lee. So recently, I read a phenomenal novel that I hope many of you may also have read, and if you haven't you really should it's called pachinko, and it was written by Mingeon Lee. Our guests for today. It was one of the New York Times book reviews. Ten best books of two thousand seventeen and it was a finalist for the national book award in my opinion. It is deserving of those accolades and more. The book follows the experience of a Korean family over multiple generations. It begins in Korea. But the majority of the novel takes place in Japan in a few minutes. We're going to have a conversation with Mingeon Lii, which I'm very much looking forward to. But I I want to share but of history that I'm definitely still learning about after reading pachinko history, that's very much illustrated in the novel just a heads up the discuss. Of sexual assault that I mentioned at the beginning of this episode is coming up shortly from nineteen ten and nineteen Forty-five Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This had intense political, social and cultural consequences. For the first ten years of that occupation Japan ruled via strict military intervention in nineteen thirty nine the Japanese government. Pushed many Koreans to change their surnames to Japanese names, if they chose not to they weren't able to participate in anything that required, government documentation. If you didn't have a Japanese name, you couldn't go to school get a job or get a ration card to receive food schools and universities didn't allow people to speak Korean and over two hundred thousand Korean historical documents were burned these kinds of tactics were an intentional effort to straight up a race Korean culture during the World War. Two years Koreans living under Japanese imperialism were forced to fight on the front lines forced to work in factories and many women and girls referred to by the euphemism term comfort women were forced into sexual slavery at the hands of Japanese soldiers. Here's one of them. I'm Johnson talking to NPR about her experience of being kidnapped and enslaved at age thirteen. Cunanan go yet. You'll be what I remember that. I was forcibly taken out of Korea and taken to China. More than you could tap Munia. Go. What can I say, they did all the things they wanted to do according to their desires it was during these colonial years that young hill Kong actually, left Korea because he was a vocal anti imperialist activist. He went to Canada, and then the United States, but many other Koreans went to Japan it self during the wartime years, the Japanese government forced round three quarters of a million Koreans to work in Japan, and my nineteen forty five when the war ended there were about two million Korean people living in Japan altogether. They became known as I in Ichi, which means residing in Japan, a term that implies they'd be there temporarily, but many Koreans have stayed in Japan for generations in today. There about seven hundred thousand Koreans living in Japan. Let's jump to our interview with Mingeon Lee. And we'll learn more about their experiences and her novel. Men gin Lee is the celebrated author of two novels her first novel free food for millionaires was a bestseller in her more recent novel pachinko, which came out in two thousand seventeen was a bestseller as well and a finalist for the national book award and was also named by the New York Times is one of the top ten books of two thousand seventeen she's received many prestigious awards, including.

Japan Korea Japanese government national book award Mingeon Lee New York Times young hill Kong Mingeon Lii gin Lee Kong NPR assault Cunanan United States Canada Johnson China
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And then Komu sharply told me says our guest young he'll come that. I was impolite this younger generation, the becoming rotten vulgar, obscene. And I can see the world is going to be held and he was much upset and trembles with rage shortly afterward, he gave some conservative. I'm more safe student that is an A. And when the wine came Komu drank too much after that began to weep decencies of thing of the past the world has no more respect for ancestors. An old man. Oh, why am I two sons worthless? Why do not take care of their old father? So he doesn't have to work among young scoundrels in ingrates doesn't the sound so familiar today. This was year when you were small, and you hear it again, don't there there are some differences. Of course, you know, the, otherwise the younger generation is. Move part of the differences, you that you see for instance, at the time. I was cutting my hair and eight goes something very radical and not good, you know, consider because hey was part of my patents Confucius said the body of the son. He's flesh. He's limbs. And he's hey belong to the parents. Therefore, he must not hold these injure them in any way. Now today, these young fellows of teenage generation, they don't cut they don't wanna cut their hair the other way, you what's going the opposite. He touts Beatles. So that this is the reverse a reversal of custom of a country. Yeah. You are the little rebel. You are becoming westernize than that. So you you were then the good Korean young, man. A man what have the top not what? Yes. Yes. And you cut this. This cut this off and your father who is a very good man, though, beat you. He was yes. Yes. That's what I saw. It's. But here we have the reverse now to place at both represent a certain kind of seeking don't they? Yes. That's right. So we come to now throughout there is the shadow in your book, as you are growing up, and seeking and you know, you must leave this village to find a better education. There's always the shadow of Japan that sense represents the west. Yes, I to just the way the sensitive poet in nineteen eighteen or nineteen fifteen and twenty s in the west of fair test Elliott put in this is dead land. This is cactus land. I felt that there was no more a hope there. That's why I had leave then. And so you leave you had to go. You wanted to go to Seoul. That's a big city because they have the western contact. And so and so did you have on your way? This is a remark you took a walk free hundred miles. How'd you do the yet no food you had a little liquor? Stick. Plenty of those two dark. I would go into a village at that time there were schools, they all fashioned contrition schools still going on so. I had to write conventional Chinese poin to impress the teacher to get my room and food everywhere. I went I looked at the landscape mountains and streams and off the conventional points. How old were you? Then I was between ten and eleven and then the teacher was impressed. Of course, he provided, you know, food than than slow you where this little ten year old vagabond, the traffic poet that get crazy poet uncle and away had imbued you with us love, and you would make up poetry to fit the village slayer. Yes. And they would take you in. Yes. They knew when you told you are too proud to say who your uncle was. No, no. But finally, they would investigate that, you know, and they were bandits following you. And because you had some little money stock. You couldn't find and little old woman who was afraid to shut the door on you. Then let you sleep on the floor. Yes. Yes. Because you haven't been Jap on ice. Was that a word that was used then? Japanese the meant westernize. Yes. And going into Denver. The idea..

Komu Beatles Japan Seoul Elliott Denver ten year
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Melting music steers upon the sky and softens sounds along the water's die smooth flow, the waves, the self gently play Belinda smile and all the world was gay. It made me happy bye products. I got the words curse how to pronounce them. But you got of the impulse impulse through. The word dutiful words, you got the impulse and got the sense of beauty smooth flow the waves disasters gently play young Il Kong was someone who had a deep admiration and knowledge of English literature. Maybe he was Bill. Building on a love of art that was encouraged by his parents in Korea who instilled an appreciation of painting and poetry. And here's what he has to say about his uncle who was a poet. Craze put on ker was a teacher. He never got paid for that. But the people patterns of the children see if you needed the noble coke, and they provide one shoes or anything like that you call him your create several because he's crazy poet. I'll tell you why that's not maybe. You seem to have you have the coins and feeling and sympathetic thinking with me therefore, you understand that would crazy poi- because he was a tower. The thousand teach that the greatest thing you can do is do nothing therefore the greatest appoint never rights appointments correctives composer, never makes any music the greatest painter never makes any picture once he came to the states Kong was also contemporaries with some major heavyweights in the literary world of his own era in this part of the interview, he'll talk about a few of those Thomas Wolf was a hugely influential novelist and Maxwell Perkins and editor who is famous for making names out of people like Thomas Wolf, and f Scott FitzGerald and Ernest Hemingway who also get mentioned here. Let's take a listen, I think of what Thomas Wolf of San Thomas Wolf of Lakota angel. He said Kong is a born writer everywhere, he is free and vigorous he has an original and poetic mind loves life again and again in his book. A person a scene action is described in a few words of rich and vivid brevity? We come again to the matter s Simpson, I suppose it was wolf you say Thomas wolf's over at the first four chapters in the to them to Maxwell Perkins. And the, you know, he brought me an advance a check five hundred dollars at that time. I was only an instructor my monthly salary. You know, first of the month getting the monthly pay. You know, this whole year seller was divided in twelve months wasn't as much as five hundred dollars. And that was the biggest check made in my name. You know at that time. This was a nineteen thirty round thirteen. Yes. Thirty and I had a very strange feeling. You know, I was playing with words words as the Kelly, of course, that could bring the money like that. And do you remember because you you were part of the circle of friends then? Yes. Yes. Where where Thomas Scotland, Gerald? Yes, Hemingway only I ran into Skopje German hemming on Wednesdays and Maxwell Perkins dining modem called trae. Oh, you know. But Tom, and I talk. Taught the same courses in the same department English department at New York University. So we used to see each other every teaching it's interesting because see isn't that strange? Even now as I think a same kind of poignant feeling when I first read lacomb angel of Thomas Wolf, the feeling I have in reading your book here too. It's a good bye to a certain innocence..

San Thomas Wolf Maxwell Perkins Il Kong Bill Belinda smile Ernest Hemingway Thomas Scotland Korea ker New York University Tom instructor Simpson Kelly Scott FitzGerald editor writer Gerald five hundred dollars
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"We hear voices from history, and we talked to some thinkers from the world today. Who have something valuable to add to the conversation? I'm your host easygoing. I'm a writer sociologist question asker space, invader stationary enthusiasts. And you'll hear me chiming in the conversations from the past with a few thoughts from the present. So let's get into it this season. So far we've heard from some incredible authors. In this episode is no different today. We're going to hear from one thousand nine hundred sixty six conversation with the writer young hill Kong who wrote the first ever Korean American novel, the grass roof, which he discusses with studs in this interview later on I'm going to talk to min Jin Lee. She is the author of two novels free food for millionaires and more recently pachinko like Kangxi is a Korean American author and her epic novel pachinko deals with the same Japanese imperialism in Korea that so impacted Kong's own life, which we're gonna talk about later. I'm excited to tell you a little bit more about young hill Kong. But first, let's hear him in his own voice here he is reading from his novel. And it's also a nice little intro to who. He was. Yes. The life that I have lived with all the joys and Soro's is an interesting life and shoot the be the author of the story. Because this is the one life. I know the best I have always believed in heroes, and I have thirsted to study. The lives of all great men, such as Confucius cries Shakespeare, Keats Libor, and many others in numerous other names that enrapture in my soul, and stirring, my heart. Fascinating my mind, making my blood jump and in my news fly, but I know my own story better than theirs. I'm not writing this to make anybody educated or to put down any Babatunde or to spread any do sort of Gosper. My one aim is to tell you the life. The human story of one man made up with a stuff called love hitched with Smilers, and tears or I can do is to tell this. Sincerely, and frankly for life, which includes such things as to travel, very often in dreams in the castles of Spain. And they gain to worry where the morning breakfast will come from has always seemed to me bigger than anything has even bigger than thoughts extending from the devil fight in the pundit Monia mobiles brings to the stars and clouds in the green void now that there is a writer if I do say so myself young Okon was born in eighteen ninety eight he left Korea in nineteen twenty one under the conditions of Japanese imperialism, which we're gonna talk a lot about in a little bit. And he settled in the United States where he attended Boston University and Harvard he came to the US just before the immigration exclusion act of nineteen twenty four which essentially banned Asian immigrants from coming to the country, and he married. An American student who he met at BU in nineteen twenty nine young he'll Kong wrote as already mentioned the grass roof, which is an autobiographical novel about a young man coming of age in a village in Korea under Japanese rule who ultimately decides to move to the US sounds familiar, and he also wrote east goes west the making of an oriental Yankee, the also autobiographical story of a Korean man whose immigrated to the US and provides astute social commentary and critique of race in American society, studs and young hill Kong seem to really like each other. And they have a great report and chemistry and their conversation. So as a result, this is a great interview. And I think it gives us a sense of who Kong was as a writer. So I'm just gonna let him in studs rock for awhile. And then we'll be back to talk some history and introduce our terrific guests who has min-jin Lee author of the critically acclaimed novels free food for millionaires and pachinko, but first let's travel back to the year. Nineteen sixty six..

young hill Kong writer Jin Lee Okon Korea United States min-jin Lee Spain Gosper Confucius Monia mobiles Soro Smilers Keats Libor Boston University Harvard Shakespeare
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"But we couldn't actually make a collective decision to move forward because we were afraid that this is a book that only we would find funny, and it was proof that we were bad parents. And one of the stumbling blocks for us funnily enough was this inability to get our minds around wearing a bookstore. This book would go because we knew it didn't belong in the children's section and one of the turning points actually was when Johnny walked the book into green light books in Brooklyn around the corner from his house was like where would you put this? And they. Or like, the parenting section and Johnny called me. And he was like your. There's a parenting section, and we were like, oh, I guess we are bad parents. You know, certain things I don't wanna children's section. I don't want. My ten year old stumbling on when she's browsing and our local bookstore. They're probably not for her. So I think that to some degree those demarcations make sense at least on on an age appropriateness level. I always think about Percival Everett's satire erasure which begins with the main character who's an author who's who's a black author. But he writes like reinterpretations of Greek myths and stuff, and he walks into the bookstore, and he can't find his books, and it's explained to him that there in the African American section, and he's like, I'm rewriting like Sophocles like why would you put that shit there? You know, I think it's that point that the utility of it breaks down or the kind of ways that John refraction gets marginalized that you know, Seifi isn't treated. Seriously as literature or fantasy isn't treated seriously literature, and one of the things I really like about the moment that we're in right now is that these boundaries are getting broken down and dissolved not by the industry, but by writers who refuse to care where they're categorized or how they're categorized. You know, the kind of thing that plagued somebody like Kurt Vonnegut where he was like a scifi writer who had to claw his way out of that barrel. Does not really bother or fact Jonathan Letham or Marlin James who's like, yo I'm writing a fine. You know, I'm writing the African game of thrones right now. Like put it wherever the fuck you want like, I'm good. You know, I think that's a cool thing about the moment. We're in is that a generation of authors who were like raised in an environment where highbrow lowbrow distinctions were insignificant or we kind of obliterated them, you know, like Victor, the Vall right or Matt Johnson or Paul Beatty, or you know, some of what I do as well. Like, we don't we don't really care. We don't make those decisions like comic books. Aren't less important to us than you know, Moby, Dick. So we just kind of do what we do and let the chips fall where they fall, and, you know, render some of these distinctions less and less meaningful. I hope it's not a cliche to say this. But I feel like there's something sort of hip hop about that, you know, like I feel like it's not a coincidence. That writers coming of age in the hip, hop generation would also have this capability for kind of remixing alighting these different John right total and thinking about like, sampling culture. And but it's funny because I think that like when you are a writer, and you're setting out to make a piece of art. These are not considerations. We think of as writers like where you know. Is it going to be on the front table as it going to be on the side table? What's the categorization gonna be on Amazon? And then there's a whole industry built around these categories and divisions. I agree with what you said about hip hop, though. I mean, if you hadn't brought it up, I would said the same like it, sampling culture. But it's also this this fundamental idea of kind of intellectual democracy. Through sampling through collage where you know, there's no quarter given to anything wack, even if it comes from somewhere. Cool like a wack James Brown record is still wack, right? And we won't use it. But like a fresh monkeys drum brake or a fresh drum break from the Mickey Mouse club is still fresh, and we will use it. And I think when you approach the world that way ideas, that way, aren't that way politics that way you end up with something that is built to kind of bulldoze these boundaries..

writer Johnny John refraction Brooklyn Percival Everett Sophocles James Brown Kurt Vonnegut Moby Jonathan Letham Amazon Seifi Paul Beatty Marlin James Victor Matt Johnson ten year
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"To ask oneself one really believes most of the was, I know really got ask themselves what they really feel about miscegenation on a personal level and not as not as a kind of abstract favor to me. I don't care what you know. I'm not important here right now. What is important is what you really think, what you really feel it has to be personal than conflict has personally avoid this. But everything begins that someone speaks says, I said, of course, miscegenation is right as you say to track sociological way, but then has to be thought of personal immediate term. That's right. Otherwise really doesn't mean anything and what is worse. If you take an attitude, we've never examined it. When a crisis comes, you'll be surprised at what you can do, what base things you can do and what good things you can do, what good things you can do. You know what you're doing, cannot be an attitude as what base things you can do if you're not as fully matures, you think you are right. The attitude, the attitude is called when when when you call to take a risk to defend what you say, you believed. And then comes the period of rationalization of excuses. I wo- I wouldn't mind, you know, but I don't care if she marries him. However. So it's the Butson Lee, however, is that somehow must be. Pinpointed that Dr. Whenever we hear the butt of the however no matter how well meaning that speaker might be with apparently got the stay with that bunch. I ever since the keys key is what is really demand in this country. I think it's very important and probably won't be done. Is that'd be surrender the notion, surrender the notion of being like nation. It's an to use this idea anyway, you know, and was waiting to me negroes here occupying peculiar dangerous vision that they do. We're going to be called by nation anymore. Maybe could make this revision in our optic. This then is Ron the acceptance of the phrase or the idea of the image. A word I hate him. Vision of white nation is just as wrong as a. Like, let's say, a black nation, both equally raw. They're both equally wrong this and I would. I would hate to see the old nightmare repeated the next two thousand years. As we say she on the other foot. On the other foot of the fire fire more people have cut on the world and Asians. And this is to something I suppose that we as white people not in the Sanford of just protection standpoint of moralities. We should think of of reality, yes, form what Vimal people have cut on the world and then Caucasians this is the way it is. This is the way it is. And you know, we all we don't all know, but we are not the self. I don't. We are not the anointed where the cellphone exactly not. The chosen of God is why people always thing because it creates acuity situation which. Why people think that. Coaster negro gets, it'd be like them. The better is well, I don't. I don't accept the proposition at all. You know. And I don't mean to suggest that you become like me, the better off you are either, but. I don't see any reason why we can't live. No. In peace as it were, you know, and enjoy the things which which different without nickname. That's right. That's right. I'm thinking of view and a panel shows couple of years ago and it was a good man. And he said to you, somewhere in the discussion was rather heated. You very well. But he said to you, I accept you and you said to him, I don't mean to be rude so, but who are you to accept me? Well, yeah, this is this is what I mean. Most people make something quite innocently. Who am I to accept you. I'm trying to find where the holy oil came from. Yeah. So there's nothing I can say here that's going to top that as a closer. So I'm thinking we should probably just end episode, but, hey, you can hear studs, terkel, 's entire unedited interview with James Baldwin and over a thousand other interviews at studs, terkel dot org. And here's a little teaser for our next episode. Let's see..

Ron terkel Butson Lee James Baldwin two thousand years
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And as the home true and the inability, you know, the refusal to think the same people suppose I guess I gathered, I suppose there's some debate between Mississippi and United States. No, I don't see their two sides that question. You know, it's a question should have been resolved under years ago. Never had to sides rather interesting, two sides to crazy kind of coin here, and the client is not legitimate metal. Apparently that's the seeing only one side of Cuba but seeing two sides vis-a-vis Mississippi's. Yes, yes. And by the way, this has great repercussions in Africa too. I'm very glad west Africa this morning to try to explain to anyone in Africa what the government is doing. Why those mobs in New Orleans, why this fantastic hassle about letting somebody have a Cup of coffee is a very unenviable task because it can't be defended. And on the other hand, you know, right. I think one has no right to to allow the Africans to to to cling to to be submerged by all them as apprehensions about the United States. No one is always when you're out of the United States and having to say it's not that bad. You know, even though something in the. Of your mind was maybe it is do no, but still when's got one of whatever calls to try to achieve some kind of clarity. Therefore, you try to explain to the rating ship all the states to each other and the whole history which resulted in this terrible impasse do no, but it reduce ably. It would do with the African ask you of, I will in your country and if I were an American, but what happened to me there. This handicaps, this handicaps. All the American have, it's in Africa, much more than Americans are willing to realize. And when you have a situation in which government is willing to invade Cuba nor the free, the Cubans as its ads and cannot get one negro boy university of Mississippi. Who do you think your fool ING? And I don't blame him. All right. Let's pause it there for a second Baldwin's reflections here are really interesting because they allow us a glimpse of how people were actually thinking and talking about these hot button issues in the early nineteen sixties today. If you look at a history textbook in the twenty first century, you usually will not see the desegregation of ole miss depicted as a case where they were to reasonable size to consider. They don't say some people were integrationists and some were segregationists and we have to consider both sides. Instead, you'll see the integration of ole miss depicted as a moral triumph. The textbook say that were bad people trying to stop the school from being integrated in their good people who wanted it to happen and implicitly we all see ourselves as good people, but Baldwin is illustrating here that lots of people who considered themselves good, reasonable liberal people used this sort of gotta hear both. Side's argument to enable segregation. In other words, segregation wasn't just maintained by big, famous, powerful people like bull. Connor the man behind the fire hoses and police dogs used as weapons against civil rights, protesters, or people like governor. George Wallace who famously said. Segregation and..

Africa Cuba United States Mississippi government Baldwin university of Mississippi west Africa New Orleans George Wallace Connor
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Which is a kind of kind of joy among the people which is very, that always sounds corny where joy is always terribly suspect. We're told me more about that about this joy among the people and some of the countries that visited began for. I went there with my one of my sisters. And the way began as to net to be typical of the way it was going to continue. Standing in line at that at that car customs shed. Waiting to be allowed in. Glad arrived to be the ride in a car without any reasons cannot fault. Well, when we while it was ending online and a little girl about three, maybe four. But during that more than that, it was standing some distance from holding mother's hand. Moved over my sister and smiled. And then a little girl left. Her mother came running over to Gloria and made make pick her up. And all the children we met in west Africa will like that. And I never saw why Soviet ready crying child, and also anybody beat a child. And now the sounds no, I suppose it's very. Dangerous to the conclusion of any kind such a. From this. And yet it seems to me it was very, very important. Someone's had to me, it's impossible to often in Africa, all the children belong to all the all the grownups. And as far as I could see and everywhere I was entirely true and you could tell by the way children treated you by the way children treated you? Well, the way they came to you with a certain kind of. Openness, no, no, no, self consciousness. No. They you were, and then they were obviously, you know you since you were grown up since you talking about some of the west African countries and the sense of Gye, which perhaps could be acquainted with sense of freedom to kind of freedom is perhaps some of the countries is going on the fields of say, theater, writing. Creativity. Yeah, you find a great deal of harder to Todd into assessed for me because. I put it in a way. Great Barrier of language. Now, I don't mean that quite the way it might sound. For example, some poets working in French African African poets working French-Language will very, you know, who have very important. And of course, when things Sangob you think of 'em is out. I, but when I say the barrier of language, I'm fairing to the fact there's so many languages in Africa, you know, and that. Time. I think about this time, you know, poetry about to be produced out of these various dialects. No fool then have to work in French or English. Do you know how this becomes then that is unique is not to say an idea that have such a variety of dialects and languages that it's hard to pinpoint who the creative centrally. That's right because it may be very great poet living in this village running a language which is which has no currency, except in the village all you know what I imagine they're not what will come out of this eventually. I think something very rich, not very, very gated to try it and we'll change French and English while it will change. You mean did you feel a census of in language or. Well, the problem I have an education, for example, is how to that save your schoolteacher in west African and you're teaching English on friendships. Yes, he matters. The problem is how to..

west Africa Gloria Todd
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"That thing like black women where we're also black, right? Black queer. People are also black actress. People are also black and who's to say, who's issues get to be at the center who's have to be at the margins, right? Write your book and makes me think, of course of of the fire next time. And I think some of the style of your pros also made me think about that book. And I wonder if you see yourself as writing in the legacy of Baldwin, not only in your political orientation or your identity, but in your actual kind of craft as a writer, one could only wish you know. I would love to be like sure. But what I, what I gain from Baldwin is bought wins, insistence on writing into being. Black life and interior already of black life, a black, radical politic that is intersectional. But when style was so bold is so just unapologetically black. But when the thing that I picked up from Bart his, he's awesome artist. It isn't just like polemics. He crafted sentences, right? That had rhythm and cadence, a particular sort of style that was remarkably beautiful. I can only please, I I'm nowhere close to to try to to mimic that. But I certainly thought when writing a book, how how might I write a book? That is honest and unflinching bear, but also are full. You know that that has a music -ality that if you read the words at loud that you might, you know you can sense the rhythm. The Bob, the sort of the distance sometimes between our two spaces that exist create moments of like meditation, like I really did think about, but when sort of words and works and influences. And that's what I tried. I know how successful. I think it's important to name that lineage and I understand the self deprecating urge. But you know, the beauty of legacy is that it's not like we're like, you're the net, you know what I mean? But it's like, who? Who are your people? You know what I mean? Like in whose lineage who speaks for you, and who are you trying to come from who you know where you're trying to go? I think it's really beautiful to to own that, and it certainly is a beautiful book. So I'm not. I'm not gonna let you get away with to myself, never occasion, but I get it. I get it. So in the interview with studs terkel that we include in this episode between studs and James Baldwin. They talk about the fact that many people perceive the book another country which had just come out right before the time of this interview. They perceive the book is like a negative book, Baldwin response that by saying, why was trying to serve some bitter medicine. And it really reminds me of the critique that black writers get a lot like, oh, your book doesn't offer any hope..

James Baldwin writer Bob terkel
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I am so excited to talk to our guest today. Who is someone I think is so sharp so insightful such a truth teller, and also a very kind person Darnell more is at journalists and activists. Currently, he's editor at large caches, and previously he was a senior editor and correspondent at Mike, and he's also the co managing editor at the feminist wire his activism and advocacy. Take many, many forms, including organizing the black lives matter rides to Ferguson Missouri after Mike Brown was murdered and working to develop infrastructure chapter system of the black lives matter network across the country and lucky us Darnell has a new book. It's a memoir called no ashes in the fire coming of age, black and free in America. It's about growing up in Camden and beyond in it he writes, I am a black man who has loved and been intimate with men and women, a black man who defies societal norms, a black man who grew up in age of hip hop and aids. And a black man from the hood. I couldn't write a memoir full of life stories without animating all the invisible and not so hidden forces that rendered my blackness criminal. My black, manhood, vile, my black quickness, sinful and my black city hood. This book is testimony. It is a cultural political history, bringing to light the life of a black boy maneuvering through a city whose past he never knew Darnall more. Welcome to the show. So one thing I feel like I've noticed in many other people have commented on as well as that. A lot of the conversation around Baldwin still tends to omit the fact that he was a gay man. And in your book, you write that latte, queer writers and thinkers are the names. Some still refuse to remember and celebrate. What are your thoughts on that admission as regards Baldwin and even beyond him, black, radical politics, black movement, and organizing ten already to imagine as the domain of black, heterosexual sister under men. We imagined folk who speak articulately on behalf of like the race, quote, unquote to be the Martin Luther King's of the world to be black suspender men in suits to to be of a certain type of sort of ilk. And that's what we listen to, and that's who we sort of tend to to lift up as as our leaders as people that we respect. So in so many ways, that make sense to me that, but when has been marginalized within not only literature, but also within a sort of genealogy, a black, radical politics period because of his quickness. But here's the thing even today I was thinking about when we organizing and from Ferguson organizers to folk who was part of the movement for black lives and this current milieu, you know, the resistance was still there folk with say things like, why are you bringing up transgender stuff? Why are you talking about this quite like, you're, you're distracting us from the real issues issue. We'll get to that later. We'll get to that later. The real issue was black. Men may read black straight men are being gunned down. That's what we should be focusing on. We get the stuff later. Right. Why else often about the sexism and feminism stuff without thinking that so many of the folk who have made this movement possible are the very folk you're attempting to leave out of the conversation, you know, and it's been a long standing problem and also that we're black to write to me, that's always kind of the obvious logical fallacy..

Darnell Baldwin senior editor managing editor Martin Luther King Camden Darnall Mike Brown America Missouri Ferguson
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I've all guests we've had in the past several years of of the wax museum. Perhaps the one who's caused the most conversation, not controversy really never controversy amongst people of enlightment get questions, probing questions asked and being made to think of all the guests we've had Jimmy Baldwin is certainly the one that was caused much of that conversation. And incidentally, the issue perspective with the jank interview is now I imagine something of a collector's item and James Baldwin guest. Once again, you've written a book since then the book you spoke with a book another country time, what you were writing in Switzerland, and the book has come out since and has received reviews that are pro and con very pro and very calm. But you know, very building reception. I don't know what I expected. I like the book myself, of course, when I say that, but I mean, I do. It seems to have frightened. Some people. Why is very hard to say since in some way after all that tried me first and now I can't remember precisely where my areas of distress were. You know when I was working it out because it's something you blind memory, I think. The people seem to think of it as a very harsh and bitter book, and in some ways is but. In my own mind. Anyway, it's very affirmative book. And if I may be called me about it, you know, it's meant to be bitter when it bitter. The way medicine has been. And trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in America. According to me, from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed, and it's really a book about the nature of the American moments and the dangerous. That is a hard it is for people to establish any real communion with each other and the chances they had to take him to do it. Hey, this is eve again. Sorry to interrupt you. I just want to pause there for a second. So Baldwin just said something really interesting that I want to talk about a little more because it really resonates with me his point about people calling his book bidder and his point that it's really something like bitter medicine. I love that metaphor, and it makes me think about the fact that black writers sometimes get criticized or questioned about the idea of optimism or hopefulness. We heard it a lot wind tunnel hoc- coats is booked between the world and me came out, oh, this book is so great, but where's the hopefulness in my own experience I've been asked so many times in interviews, if I'm quote optimistic unquote about Chicago or about the country. And to me that question kind of misses the point. I have a lot of other close friends who've had their work characterizes being sad when they themselves don't think of it as sad. And I feel like all of these comments kind of misunderstand what the work is trying to do when a doctor publishes a steady about a disease, they don't face the same critique. Why are you being so negative about cigarettes and lung cancer? And in many ways, that's how Baldwin saw himself as a social critic of America. Someone whose job it was two point out the ugly truths about the reality in which we live, even if they're a little negative. It's meant to be bitter when it's the way medicine has been. I'm trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in the marathon coding. To me from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed. It reminds me of one of my favorite essays written by Langston Hughes. It's called the negro artists and the racial mountain. In it Hughes contends with the challenges of identity politics and representation that black artists face the essays from nineteen twenty six. And it's kind of amazing how much of it resonates today. Hughes says the negro artists works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. Oh, be respectable, right? About nice people show how good we are. Say, the negroes be stereotyped. Don't go too far. Don't shatter our luge about you don't amuse us too seriously. We will pay you say the whites later on. In the same essay, Hugh says, we younger negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark skinned selves without fear or shame if white people are pleased. We are glad. If they are not, it doesn't matter..

Jimmy Baldwin Langston Hughes James Baldwin Edward America Switzerland wax museum lung cancer Chicago Hugh
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"We think that these voices from our shared past can teach us a few things about history and maybe make us learn some things about our own time. So we'll hear these voices from the archive and from time to time we'll talk to some folks from today who have something to add to the conversation. Now, what about me, the person that's just been talking at you for several minutes? Well, I am your host viewing. I'm a writer sociologist question asker reader, Jay Walker over enthused internet user and like studs. I am a loud and proud Chicagoan. You'll hear lots of me chiming into the conversations from the past with some thoughts on the present. Okay. So let's look at this checklist. You know who says. His, you know who I am before we go any further last order of business is I should take a second, explain the slightly weird name at this podcast. Bughouse square was the nickname for a park here in Chicago, where during the first half of the twentieth century, soapbox orders and St. debaters would gather to hold court and debate and speech a fi about the world. And that's the place where studs came of age. And since our show is also a place where brilliant people share ideas, we decided to steal the name. So I gotta be honest with you. I'm going to be real real. I am so excited to do this show. I am a lifelong fan of studs terkel as the Chicago and interested in the art of storytelling. I always heard about studs for my mom and my Granddad. In fact, my mom actually had a studs terkel mug. It was a, it was a coffee mug with a drawing of his face on it. And whenever I saw it, I was always really curious about this funny looking guy with a really weird name. And when I started diving into the archive for this project more than anything, I felt. Like kinda greedy. I wanted to live vicariously through studs and have the conversations with people. I wish I could have met and spoken to when they were living. So naturally, for our first episode, I am fully indulging my greed, we decided to go all the way big to kick things off. And when it comes to intellectuals thinkers, people who inspire us with their ability to understand American society. You don't get much bigger than James Baldwin. You heard me. We got Baldwin baby in this episode will hear nineteen sixty two conversation between studs and Baldwin, who of course was one of our nation's greatest writers and thinkers public intellectuals and civil rights activists of fierce fierce critic of American society and the author of many incredible books perhaps most famously the fire next time. So let's talk a little bit about what we're going to here in this first clip. Just to give you a bit of context. Baldwin is talking to studs about his book. Another country which had just been released. The novel tells the story of a series of relationships between a jazz drummer and his network of friends and lovers, and includes quite a bit of content that was really taboo at the time. It came out, especially in a novel written by a black man interracial relationships by sexual relationships and suicide all play a role. The book was a bestseller and the title. Another country is a bit of a double entendre in the sense that Baldwin finished it in Istanbul, Baldwin who was known to be a world, traveler and global thinker had just returned from visiting several African countries at the time and this interview, and he's going to talk about that with studs as well. But I took so long explaining that their already busy talking without us. Let's get a move on and head to nineteen sixty two. So we can listen in..

James Baldwin Chicago American society Jay Walker Bughouse square writer terkel Istanbul
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"He's. What makes a human tick? What is that? Ask oneself? One really believed. It's meant to be bitter when it's bitter the way medicine business. So it's conversation rather than interviewing turns out to be that really. Hello? Hello, and welcome to bughouse square with eve Ewing bughouse square with eve Ewing is made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the humanities, exploring the human endeavor. This is the show where we hear from studs terkel the legendary interviewer writer, listener and wonder right now I guarantee there are two camps of you listening. Half of you are super excited. You're like, oh my gosh, that's terkel a legend and icon and half of you are like, who, or what is studs terkel. So to the people in the second group. First of all, thanks for listening to this podcast. Even though you had no idea what it was about. Shout out to you. I appreciate you. Second of all, here's your quick and dirty rundown on studs. Terkel Lewis terkel better known by his nickname studs was a broadcast radio host most well known for his interview. Use in his work. As an oral historian. He worked primarily in my hometown, the great city of Chicago, Illinois, and he talked to everyone. You would interview a person sitting at the bar. He would interview an elevator operator and hear how they felt about being an elevator operator, and he would interview famous people from Martin Luther King junior to Luchino Pavarotti. But you know, maybe I should let him introduce himself. Something quite revelatory might happen something revelatory phrase. It might be a pause even that Pau see, I might say, now, wait a minute. You just paused. Now you said something. No. What did you pause and says, oh, I didn't want to. What was it made you pause all of a sudden this silence is revelatory too. Even the hem, the Hoai and the hemming. That's also part of that person fumbling and some of thinking out loud in contrast to being on a a network TV show you told you got three minutes studs. Terkel was born in one thousand nine hundred twelve, and he passed away in two thousand eight. That's a really long life to put it in perspective. He was born the year, the Titanic sank, and he died the year Barack Obama was elected president. That's a lot of American history to live through and forty five years of that life. We're spent doing interviews for his radio show on WFAN tea and listening to studs. Interview people is like a masterclass in how to be a good listener. He had a curiosity and a compassion that shine through in his conversations with people, the archives of his show, our treasure trove of stories, insights and conversation from our past recent and not so recent. Now, since studs is radio show ended in nineteen Ninety-seven all of that material. Has basically been behind closed doors until now the studs terkel radio archive is making these interviews available to the public on our website studs, terkel, dot org, and right here on this very podcast, we're going to share with you some of our favorite discoveries from the stockpile of hidden archival treasure..

Lewis terkel Ewing Luchino Pavarotti Martin Luther King WFAN National Endowment writer Pau Chicago Illinois Barack Obama president forty five years three minutes
"eve" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Yeah and they're obviously playing a semi erotic no to that relationship to they're both i think to their fascination with each other but also when they do manage to be in each other's presence i think they're obviously you know they want you to notice that they want you to be conscious of that all these insular characters the other members of the team everyone gets a beat everyone gets moments to just be in relation to other characters in a way that you wouldn't expect for something that is billed as thriller spy whenever it is it's humane in a very interesting way yeah and i also want to say to me villa now i mean i love sandra oh i love that character i think eve is the eve is obviously the human center of this but villanova to me is so effectively creepy that character is so creepy she's amused by people's fear sometimes in a way that's just oh i keep coming back to creepy it is it is a big juicy part i mean when you think about it almost like orphan black when an actor gets to embody a lot of kind of characters within a character even though villain l is herself purely psychopathic right you see her doing lots of accents and lots of languages and kind of slipping into different settings and the actor has to be able to fit in those settings as well it is a very very juicy part and i just love watching how villa nell observes eve like there's this scene earlier on where l and eve me in a bathroom scene and they're instances where villanova just seems to appear in eve's life as if she is just a background person without really revealing herself before their actual meeting and i keep going back to the tenderness and it's not i mean it's it's almost as if she's observing someone who she wants to befriend who she wants to be who she wants to maybe sleep with.

eve nell