18 Burst results for "Evan Osnos"

"evan osnos" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:14 min | Last month

"evan osnos" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Now that Robert costa and bob woodward of the washington post report in their new book. That vice president. Mike pence spoke with former vice president. Dan quayle to ask quayle whether there was any way of stopping certification of the presidential election. do you feel like you didn't realize how close democracy came to failing in the us. Absolutely you know. There was this this realization that i had after january sixth that was really slender moments. That saved the democracy something as fragile as the secretary of state of georgia refusing to give in to donald trump's bullying that things as as almost ludicrously fragile as those individual decisions. The people who refused to stop counting votes even though there were protesters outside threatening them that that in the now we know of course that it was also mike. Pences conversation with dan quayle. That might have persuaded him from not subverting. The results of the election. If anything with that with that showed me was that this process that i've been describing in in my book was was even more acute than i realized. Which was that the political reality we inhabit now the fragility of it the moments of fury and instability are the result of choices that we make as people as individuals not only some of the people who find themselves at that moment of the highest possible stakes but the decisions we make in our own lives about how we behave as as consumers and buyers as managers as citizens who we vote for these things have just grades steaks and if there was one thing i had hoped to try to understand was a how our individual choices end up contributing to the systems that define our lives and i think this election turned out to be a somewhat terrifying but i hope illuminating example of that evan osnos it is always such a pleasure to have you on our show. Thank you so much. Thank you so much terry. Evan osnos covers politics and foreign affairs for the new yorker and is the author of the new.

Robert costa dan quayle bob woodward Mike pence quayle the washington post donald trump georgia mike us Evan osnos terry
"evan osnos" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:26 min | Last month

"evan osnos" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"We are rapidly approaching the but what is to be done section of the program and it is a difficult question to answer because as well as the difficulty of attempting to reason people out of that which they did not reason themselves into there is also the fact that a lot of this strikes me as really motivated by just plain blind furious hatred not just of entirely imaginary enemies but also of one's fellow citizens who they believe in league with those imaginary enemies. Yeah i don't think you're going to reason anybody out of anything i think. At this point. A lot of those people are way too far up that tree ever to climb down the good news is they are a minority in almost every country including the united states and the answer is out vote. Them reinforced the guardrails of constitutional democracy. Don't overreact to them by putting in measures that are just as oppressive as the ones they would expect you to. Which i think is a mistake that a lot of people particularly the left won't wanna make about doing this and i think that we're just headed through a kind of a dark tunnel for a that. Some of which will be solved by demography that the most illiberal elements in every country. Whether it's india the uk the united states it tends to be people fifty five and sixty and over which is another way of saying. The kids are alright. But it's going to be an incredibly dangerous twenty years where there will be potentially violence and again overreactions. That could put into place. Unconstitutional are undemocratic or illiberal measures. That are put there in a panic every time. Someone says band fox news. My answer to them is calmed down. The majority is actually quite sensible. And this will pass if we have the steadfastness and stoicism to let it pass and to keep showing up the ballot box to make sure that it pests. Evan in the meantime is there anything that the media should have learned from the last twenty years about how it reports this stuff. Do you think the big city media though was perhaps too indulgent if well meaning lee so in reporting and amplifying stuff that got passed off as legitimate concerns or economic anxieties. I think there was inserted rapid learning curve when people had to figure out not only. How do you write about rural america which people had been avoiding for a long time but then also. How do you write about far-right extremism and there. Was this brief. That i think very embarrassing set of glamor shots of white nasmyth. It's worse described as almost treated like public intellectuals particularly gross way and i think there has a much greater understanding now of how ideas moved through feed chain and which parts of the ecosystem need oxygen from the media in order to survive. And how do you deprive him of that while also not ignoring something that is bubbling up in a dangerous way. And i will tell you that. I think one of the things that we are seeing now to on a political is a willingness really finally taken awhile but particularly on the vaccine to say to people without going too and instituting a regime. That would be punitive but to say what you have to get back to the enough of this. This is now a basic requirement of citizenship in that sense and this indulging in your alternatives to science and. I think that's a step forward. Tom and evan thank you both for joining us thought walls. Tom nichols of the. Us naval war college. His latest book our own worst enemy. The assault from within on modern democracy is available. Now thanks also to evan osnos of the new yorker his book wild lands. The.

america white nasmyth fox news Evan india uk lee Tom nichols evan Tom evan osnos
"evan osnos" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:41 min | Last month

"evan osnos" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"This is the political scene a weekly conversation with yorker writers guests about politics. It's thursday september sixteenth. I'm dorothy wickham executive editor of the new yorker last month a school board meeting and williamson county. Tennessee descended into chaos. After the board's decision to institute a mask mandate for students seems like this have played out in public meetings across the country over the past year debates about the results of the twenty twenty election race abortion voting access and the kovic nineteen vaccine have erupted and displays of frustration rage and sometimes violence. This week. Evan osnos a new yorker staff writer published. Wildland the making of america's fury. It's a portrait of a country and political and moral crisis. He joins me to discuss the roots of american fear and anger and what. Its current manifestations reveal about the dangerous faultlines in the country. Evan thanks so much for joining me during a busy week. Thanks dorothy happy to do it. As i recall your ideas for this book started taking shape in two thousand thirteen shortly after you returned to the us after reporting abroad for a decade. it's easy now to look back fondly on that pre trump era but as you point out in the book the problems of political division didn't start with trump. So what were your impressions to the country. After being away for so long in many ways we talk about trump as this origin moment and of course he was responsible for tremendous anguish and damage to american public life. But i also really have always thought of him as a symptom of things because they became so apparent once. I came back in two thousand thirteen just to give you a couple of examples. I mean one of the first things that happened..

dorothy wickham Evan osnos williamson county the new yorker Tennessee yorker Evan us dorothy
"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:42 min | 9 months ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mayer and Evan Osnos about the balance of power in Washington Democrats razor thin Control of Congress, the Republican infighting over the insurrection and the ambitious 1st 100 Days plan. President Biden. That's next time on The New Yorker Radio Hour tomorrow morning at 10 on 93.9 FM W N. Y C Thistles. All of it. I'm Alison Stewart. Everything old is new again, At least in the world of episodic TV, Sex and the city saved by the bell Battlestar Galactica. They're among the many Syriza to found New life, says a reboot. What is this? A good deal for us? The viewers? Yeah, these serious provide come for and nostalgia. But what about all those stories out there? That could be told that have never been told. Reboots. Yeah, You're nay and of the ones out there which ones are worth watching? Alan Sepinwall is chief TV critic for Rolling Stone and friend of the show. Joins us Now. Hi, Alan. Hey, listen, Thanks for having me back love talking to you. Hey, listeners. We'd like to hear from you. What are some of your favorite reboots and revivals? Do you have recommendations? Give us a call 6464357280646435 70 to 80. So, Alan, help me out with this. How do you differentiate between a reboot and a revival? Reboot is where you take the original premise of the show, or even just the name of the show, and you start over from scratch with new actors, new people. All of that could be the same characters, but his new people playing them revival is you Bring it back, and at least some of the original people are still there. So, for instance, when Twin Peaks came back a few years ago on Showtime That was a revival because comic Lachlan was there on a bunch of other people. When Battlestar Galactica was revived the first time and I guess now they're going to do it again. That's a reboot because it's all new cast and creative team. Okay, So why, actually, When did we start seeing all of these reboots and revivals being used as I feel ramming? I mean, we we've always had them to a degree. I remember growing up like people would always be excited if they would do like these reunion TV movies, and he returns to Mayberry. That kind of thing. Um But it's really ramped up and I would say the last 56 years in part because there's just as I've talked about before on this show. There's so much TV out there and it's so hard to make people aware of anything. That if you have a brand name and even better if you have the original cast, even some of them like that cuts through the clutter, and that will get people's attention and bring them in to watch these shows in a way that it's harder to sell a nuke a totally new concept. In your experience as a television critic. What does a reboot need to have to be successful as a piece of work or is a piece of? You know, Arch? Don't laugh at me for saying that, but No television could be, aren't you? I would be the last person to ever laugh at you with that, and Battlestar Galactica is, I think one of the great television shows ever made. I've written about it in several different books I've done so it can be done. It's really hard. I think, for the most part reboots don't work revivals or problematic as well. I think what you need to have with a reboot, especially Is you need to have something that originally was maybe had a good idea but was not great in and of itself And you're going to take that colonel and you're gonna make something new and better out of it. So that's what BSG did. For instance, if you remember the original show it all it was mainly a rip off of Star wars, but they had this idea of like humanity is largely wiped out there on the run. They're trying to find A new home and the new show took that they turned it into a 9 11 allegory, which, who would have thought that you could do that and make it work. And they did. And so it was thoughtful and deep in a way that the original never aspired to most. The time that you get people does remaking things that were great to begin with, And that's always a problem, whether it's in TV or in the movies. The calls are starting to come in. Let's go to Fabio calling in from Long Island. Hi, Fabio. Thanks for calling all of it. Of course. Thank you for having me. So what do you recommending for us in terms of the land in terms of reboots? So I would recommend David Lynch's twin Peaks. The return I think it's an excellent show. That sort of turns the original on its head, because when everyone watched the original twin peaks they loved, you know the folksy nature of it and the little oddities and that was completely not what we got in the reboot. Turned it on its head challenge of you and so many different ways. Fabio. Thanks for calling in. Let's go to Judy and Long Island calling in. Hi, Judy. Thanks for calling all of it. Hi. Thank you. I generally don't like reboots. I usually think you know the original Poldark was still the best, but they've surprised me with all creatures Great and small on PBS. Right now. It's It's wonderful. What makes it wonderful for you? Well, First of all the scenery, especially when you're trapped in your house is wonderful. This is great expanses in, you know, wonderful HD color, but they were on ironic about it. They still have You know cows that can't deliver,.

Alan Sepinwall Fabio Twin Peaks Battlestar Long Island Alison Stewart Judy Congress TV critic President Evan Osnos Biden Mayer Washington David Lynch Mayberry Lachlan Rolling Stone
"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

"How did Donald Trump take control of the Republican Party? It was not simply a case, as we are so often told that Donald Trump was a kind of hostile takeover on the report. Party actually think the fuller story is that it was more of a joint venture, and you had an executive class of Americans who decided that Donald Trump was okay. It was enough for them there that they signed on New Yorker writer Evan Osnos on our to the point podcast. Let's get into a classic from Joe Arroyo. It's Casey ar w any mental basketball, Then I totally decency. Boss. Yes. Gaming. One of my favorite cuts right there, courtesy of Joe Arroyo doing rebellion s So I'm asking for requesting me upon social media would love to hear from you taking your requests playing a lot of them today. Let's see. So I want to get into a record that best exemplifies how I feel. Let's get back to music. It's K C R w two.

Donald Trump Joe Arroyo Republican Party Evan Osnos executive writer
"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All right, let's go into Plan B. We're not there yet. How is Biden and this team planning to handle Donald Trump? If in the well possible likelihood The president becomes increasingly erratic and these next few weeks and even a few months Well, they're projecting the message as one Biden adviser said to me this morning that Donald Trump should be worried most right now about Tous James Theater Knee General of New York in effect, what they're saying is Donald Trump can rage against the fates here and pretend that he got more votes than he did. But actually, the the electoral math is clear. And Donald Trump should be thinking about life after the presidency. Now, look, there is a degree of bluff here, obviously because there is all of the full range of potential legal and political disaster. But you know, at a certain point, what they're trying to avoid doing is allowing themselves to get sucked into this. Vortex of uncertainty and chaos that Trump is seeking to convey. And so in a way, what they're trying to do is maintain this posture of what I would describe a sort of vigilant reassurance, saying this need not be crazy unless Donald Trump makes it crazy, but we will not have to respond by being as crazy. The New Yorker's Evan Osnos in Washington. Thanks a lot of Thanks, David. If you count the legal votes easily when If you count the illegal votes They can try to steal. Election from us if you count the votes that came in late Look into them very strongly, but a lot of votes came in leg. Power can't be taken or asserted. It flows from the people. It is their will. That determines who will be the president of United States and there will alone. One of the enduring questions of this election and.

Donald Trump Biden president Tous James Theater Evan Osnos United States New York David Washington
"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

"Me on our to the point podcast. How did Donald Trump take control of the Republican Party? It was not simply a case, as we are so often told that Donald Trump was a kind of hostile takeover of the Republican Party. Actually think the fuller story is that it was more of a joint venture, and you had an executive class of Americans who decided that Donald Trump was okay. It was enough for them there that they signed on New Yorker writer Evan Osnos on our to the point podcast. One struggles. Just no You got to stand up. From down there. Way got with way together,.

Donald Trump Republican Party Evan Osnos executive writer
"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

"How did Donald Trump take control of the Republican Party? It was not simply a case, as we are so often told that Donald Trump was a kind of hostile takeover of the Republican Party. Actually think the fuller story is that it was more of a joint venture, and you had an executive class of Americans who decided that Donald Trump was okay. It was enough for them there that they signed on New Yorker writer Evan Osnos on our to the point podcast. I love him. I love.

Donald Trump Republican Party Evan Osnos executive writer
"evan osnos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tonight on fresh air. Evan Osnos of The New Yorker is guest. He's written a new book about Joe Biden. Stay with Sport. Fresh air Coming up. It's seven tonight Here on 88.5 San Francisco, 89.3 North Island, Sacramento. I'm Kai raised also here is Ah yeah, Things aren't all that great in this economy right now item. According to the Census Bureau, one in three adults in this country, millions and millions of people say it's somewhat or very likely they could face eviction or foreclosure over the next couple of months. Yes, the Center for Disease Control did order a temporary stop to residential evictions through the end of the year, but Not all landlords are complying. So from our podcast, this is uncomfortable marketplaces. Reema Grace has this story of a woman trying to stay right where she is. Last month. On a Tuesday morning, Maryland Hoffman heard a loud knock at her door. So that scares you and you in the house by yourself peeked out. It was a sheriff with papers and hand And he was like you have been served and I looked at him like, huh? Maryland rents a home in Sanford, North Carolina, and for months she hasn't been able to make rent. And now her landlord is trying to Victor. I was stressed out, stressed out since this stuff started and at the end I may lose everything. Because of the pandemic. In March, she lost her job as a health aid. She applied for a pandemic unemployment assistance, but she didn't get it. And she isn't sure why. Did you get any assistance from the government? Nothing. I got the stimulus check. That's it. Nothing else. Nothing else. Nothing else. But technically, Maryland should be safe from getting evicted. That's because last month, the CDC came out with an order, saying certain renters could not be evicted before the end of the year. The idea is to help prevent people from becoming homeless and spreading the virus. Maryland qualified under that order and figured the judge would be on her side. I'm feeling a little East that gave me hope. On the day for court appearance, she remembers sitting in the back of the courtroom, waiting for her turn to see the judge. Every person that was in aid of seven families that went to quote that Thursday was evicted. What was the judge saying He was like you got this? You got this money. You got the money You got go a judgment. You got that money You think of this judgment, Maryland could feel her stomach turn. But unlike everyone else, she'd printed documents from the CDC website about the order. None of them had. So you're like, Oh, I got something on my side, right. But just like everyone before her, the judge said that Maryland would be evicted. And she need to pay more than $3000 in background. As for the CDC order to stop evictions, he looked at me and he said, this does not pertain to you. But that judge he misinterpreted the order. She did meet the criteria she earns less than $99,000. She's made her best efforts to get financial help, and she's at risk of being homeless. According to the order. That means she should be safe. I should be. I should be. But nobody Nobody's following, CDC said. It's been messy. The CDC order is getting interpreted differently. Your luck kinda depends on who your landlord is. Or which judge you end up in front of And a lot of ranchers don't even know the temporary ban on evictions exists. On top of that. There have been a slew of lawsuits from landlord's trying to get the CDC order overturned. I feel like a roller coaster. My livelihood is in Jeffrey behind. My health. My health is estate. I can't eat. I can't sleep. Is Maryland filed for an appeal, and she has a new court day in November. So in the meantime, she can stay in her home. She also just landed a new job working at a homeless shelter. So she isn't sure if she'll be able to afford all the background. And even if she does, she kept saying to me what happens to other people that was evicted the same data I was in class and not one person got help. Because the CDC order it doesn't come with any money for renters or for landlords. So each month that goes by many renters air falling mohr into debt. According to a report by the National Council of State Housing agencies By the end of the year, renters across the country will owe as much as $34 billion in back. I am Remus face for marketplace. If you want to hear more of Maryland story, including how she was able to file an appeal subscribed to this is uncomfortable. You.

CDC Maryland Evan Osnos Census Bureau Joe Biden The New Yorker Center for Disease Control North Island San Francisco Reema Grace Sacramento Sanford North Carolina Hoffman National Council of State
"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Remnick. I'm sitting here sort of virtually with my colleague Evan Osnos, who's been covering politics for us since 2008 hard to believe. Evan, You've been working on a profile of Joe Biden for quite some time. And at the end of July, you went to meet him at his home in Delaware. What was what were the circumstances? What was it like to talk to him in person at that moment? Well, a Sze Yu can imagine. Frankly, he was sort of glad to see another human being because they have him under very tight restrictions. There's basically two aides that go in and out of the house, one of his assistants in one of Jill Biden's assistance. And then there's the Secret Service detail, But other than that, they really don't have a lot of people coming in and out. And so, they said, First of all, you gotta wear a mask. And they said, We're not going to be in the main house because we don't want you potentially contaminating where he lives. So they put us in a carriage house at the foot of the property, and we sat across from each other in a room. It was too hot to sit outside. It was somewhere in the mid nineties. And they said, so we're going to sit across from each other on DH don't touch. So how did you handle the social distance and give me the you know the scene where you're sitting? How far apart Could you hear him? So I was sitting in a chair waiting for him to arrive. And first thing I hear is his voice actually, before I saw him, he said, Welcome to my mom's house. And that's because the little House that we were in had had been built for his mom shortly after his dad died. I walked in. They should be in that chair downstairs, Face the fireplace watching television. She had a Hassidic there. And he then without me asking a question. This was kind of you know the Biden At his most Biden, like where he just launched into a story. It used to be a little tiny barn telling me about the history of the house and why he built it and what it meant to him and his parents and so on, she said. Joey If you build me a house, I'll move in here. I should, honey. And in some ways, you know, I was struck by the fact David that we've all been listening in one form or another. Did Joe Biden since the Nixon administration. I mean, this has been a feature of public life for so long. And there is a very recognisable Joe Biden way of thinking out loud where he kind of wanders around occasionally and then right at the moment where you think we have really lost our way. He lands on something and he lands on something meaningful. And there was an example of that. That really struck me. What was that? I asked him. Ah, What did you learn from the protests after the killing of George Floyd, What did you learn, actually, and he said At first he started talking about his his history of sort of thinking about civil rights and the black freedom struggle, and I and we were veering off into history for a moment And then he said, You know, I gotta be honest. I was embarrassed to discover that one of the myths that I have believed in for a long time was not true. And that myth was that we were marching forward slowly but inexorably in the direction of greater recognition of The existence of discrimination and systemic racism in our side, But we were moving in in the right direction. And he said What I What I was wrong about was that I thought we could actually eliminate hate. What? I didn't realize that this is embarrassed to say. I thought you could defeat hit. You can't only hides. It crawls under the rocks. And when given oxygen. Any person in authority. Comes roaring back out. And what I realized is the words of the president, even a lousy president matter. They could take you to war. They bring peace they could market rise for but they can also give hate oxygen. Where Trump not running, I probably wouldn't be running. But it was she's so Contrary to everything But I believe about government. And I was sort of the antithesis where I think we should be doing. We have always talked about We've thought about it. We never lived up to We? The people hold these truths to be self evident. Every kid learns. I think most of us thought even those with a lot of experience thought that that it's always gonna be that way. We were never. We've never met, but we constantly moved closer and closer and closer to more inclusion. And all of a sudden you're thinking yourself. Holy God! Look at these guys. Look what's happened. Lucas. What was being done? Lucas being said not just by him. By his followers and some of his some of his elected college. Evan. We saw very clearly at the Democratic convention that Biden is running on the idea that his presidency would be a kind of restoration that it would restore the country. To an extent spiritually as well as politically that he'd bring a sense of non emergency back to American public life. What are the risks of running such a campaign? That can sound at times like something really unappealing, which is a return to status quo Ante, which was all of the conditions that led to Donald Trump like Radical inequality completely untended issues around race around the basic structure of American capitalism. And that's what worries people is. They say that in his zeal to say, well, I'm going to bring us back to normalcy that that becomes actually an excuse for Not taking on the hard problems well, return to normalcy would include a and, and it already includes environmental disasters that make this pandemic look Look like Wiffle ball. And that's actually an issue that he is showing himself to be more movable on. I mean, one of the things if you look at what's happened, T Joe Biden over the course of the last A few months since he secured the nomination is that he has done the opposite thing that usually Democratic candidates to usually they get to the general election, and.

Joe Biden Jill Biden Evan Osnos David Remnick Donald Trump Delaware Sze Yu president Lucas Nixon administration George Floyd Joey
"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David Remnick. I'm sitting here sort of virtually with my colleague Evan Osnos, who's been covering politics for us since 2008 hard to believe. Evan, You've been working on a profile of Joe Biden for quite some time. And at the end of July, you went to meet him at his home in Delaware. What was what were the circumstances? What was it like to talk to him in person at that moment? Well, a Sze Yu can imagine. Frankly, he was sort of glad to see another human being because they have him under very tight restrictions. There's basically two aides that go in and out of the house, one of his assistants in one of Jill Biden's assistance. And then there's the Secret Service detail, But other than that, they really don't have a lot of people coming in and out. And so, they said. First of all, you got to wear a mask, and they said, We're not going to be in the main house because we don't want you potentially contaminating where he lives. So they put us in a carriage house at the foot of the property, and we sat across from each other in a room. It was too hot to sit outside. It was somewhere in the mid nineties. And they said, so we're going to sit across from each other on DH don't touch. So how did you handle the social distance and give me the you know the scene where you're sitting? How far apart Could you hear him? So I was sitting in a chair waiting for him to arrive. And first thing I hear is his voice actually, before I saw him, he said, Welcome to my mom's house. And that's because the little House that we were in had had been built for his mom shortly after his dad died. I walk in and she'd be in that chair downstairs, Face the fireplace watching television should a Hassidic there and he then without me asking a question. This was kind of you know the Biden At his most Biden, like where he just launched into a story. It used to be a little tiny barn telling me about the history of the house and why he built it and what it meant to him and his parents and so on, she said. Joey If you build me a house, I'll move in here and in some ways, you know, I was struck by the fact David that we've all been listening in one form or another to Joe Biden since the Nixon administration. I mean, this has been a feature of public life for so long. And there is a very recognisable Joe Biden way of thinking out loud where he kind of wanders around occasionally and then right at the moment where you think we have really lost our way. He lands on something and he lands on something meaningful. And there was an example of that. That really struck me. What was that? I asked him. Ah, What did you learn from the protests after the killing of George Floyd, What did you learn, actually, and he said At first he started talking about his his history of sort of thinking about civil rights and the black freedom struggle, and we were veering off into history for a moment And then he said, You know, I gotta be honest. I was embarrassed to discover that one of the myths that I have believed in for a long time was not true. And that myth was that we were marching forward slowly but inexorably in the direction of greater recognition of The existence of discrimination and systemic racism in our side, But we were moving in in the right direction. And he said What I What I was wrong about was that I thought we could actually eliminate hate. What? I didn't realize that this is embarrassed to say. I thought you could defeat hate. You can't only hides. It crawls under the rocks. We weren't given oxygen. Any person in authority. Comes roaring back out. And what I realized is The words of a treasure, even a lousy president matter. They could take you to war. They bring peace. They combat the market rise for but they can also give hate oxygen. Where Trump not running, I probably wouldn't be running. But it was so Contrary to everything But I believe about government. And a sort of the antithesis where I think we should be doing. We have always talked about We've thought about it. We've never lived up to We? The people hold these truths to be self evident. Every kid learns. I think most of us thought even those with a lot of experience thought that that it's always gonna be that way. We're we're never. We've never met, but we constantly moved closer and closer and closer to more inclusion. And all of a sudden you thinking yourself. Holy God! Look at these guys. Look what's happened. Lucas. Look what's being done. Lucas being said not just by him. By his followers and some of his some of his elected college. Evan. We saw very clearly at the Democratic convention that Biden is running on the idea that his presidency would be a kind of restoration that it would restore the country. To an extent spiritually, as well as politically that he'd bring a sense of non emergency back to American public life. What are the risks of running such a campaign? That can sound at times like something really unappealing, which is a return to status quo Ante, which was all of the conditions that led to Donald Trump like Radical inequality completely untended issues around race around the basic structure of American capitalism. And that's what worries people is. They say that in his zeal to say, well, I'm going to bring us back to normalcy that that becomes actually an excuse for Not taking on the hard problems well, a return to normalcy would include a and it already includes environmental disasters that make this pandemic look Look like Wiffle ball..

Joe Biden Jill Biden Evan Osnos Donald Trump David Remnick Lucas Delaware Sze Yu George Floyd Nixon administration president Joey
"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on KCRW

"Staff writer Evan Osnos was based in Beijing for many years any reports now from Washington now you've covered China for very long time is it your sense that criticism of the Chinese government's handling of covered nineteen is fair what did they do wrong criticism is fair when the virus first appeared the immediate political necessity was to maintain stability to prevent the eruption of disorder in Wuhan this is how and we all now know about that doctor doctor Lee when Leon who was one of a handful of doctors who tried to raise alarms and said there's a serious problem here he was silenced the police told him to not spread rumors that a because of a set of leaked documents there been reports now that there was this critical six day period in January when the senior leadership in Beijing knew the severity of the crisis but they didn't move to do anything about it they waited six days to undertake the kinds of dramatic restrictions which they later day and those restrictions work today did bring down the virus in really extraordinary ways that it's also S. archer government is able to physically move people which is what they did in some cases move them from their homes into quarantine facilities forcibly when necessary they were also able to roll out a very competent response when it came to testing contact tracing monitoring the spread of the disease all the things on which the United States frankly failed and so I think in a full accounting of how China has performed on the corona virus includes both its initial failure which contributed to the global pandemic and then also the demonstrations of extraordinary competence which he did later is there a way to quantify that in other words if the Chinese government had acted faster a week faster or two weeks faster will the numbers be internationally and would we in the United States in this predicament it would have had a dramatic effect there was a British study that estimated that at least sixty percent of the cases in March around the world could have been avoided had China moved faster so we probably would have gotten it in this country anyway we probably would have gotten it around the world but the scale of the disaster it would have been fundamentally different Evan the twenty twenty campaign is now really in full swing so let's take a listen to this ad from the pro trump America first action super PAC Joe Biden.

Evan Osnos Beijing Washington China Chinese government Wuhan doctor Lee Leon United States Staff writer twenty twenty America Joe Biden
"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

"FACEBOOK's board works more like an advisory committee than overseer because because mark controls around sixty percent of voting shares you along with a couple of professors from NYU and Columbia went down this summer and had conversations with both the FTC the DOJ about facebook. What did you tell them you know? We talked to them about the same things that I wrote about in the article that facebook has specifically pursued a policy of acquiring its Competitors in order to lock down the social networking marketplace. There are some competitors out there like snapchat or or twitter but their size is really a rounding error. I mean facebook's revenue this year there will be fifty billion snaps. Last year was one. I mean these companies they exist but they're they're they're specs compared to facebook size and and so just as I called in the peace breaking I I do think that facebook should be broken up. I think that it should That what's up instagram and facebook. facebook should be separate companies each with their own. CEO each competing against one another. And I think at the same time we also need to think about what a rules for the road for social from networking and other tech companies that can ensure that users are protected even in a more competitive environment so these are things like privacy protections interoperability data portability. Some kind of framework for how we're going to deal with these questions of political speech there were some reports now that the FTC might be considering injunctions against against facebook in the coming year. Kind of explain in Layman's terms. What does that mean and what is it about? They're saying that there are seriously considering telling facebook. Hold up we need to take a closer look. That's the basic idea is that facebook has been working over the past year to effectively. Combine the back in frameworks works that power facebook INSTAGRAM WHATSAPP and make them into one single framework. You have a preliminary injunction would be say pause. Let's talk talk about how these companies work. Let's let's assess whether or not the mergers wore incorrectly approved by the FTC. And by the way it's not just the FTC see every branch of government that could be investigating facebook and some of these other tech companies. Right now now is standing up to do so so it's the FTC it's the Department of Justice it's the house antitrust subcommittee in the House of Representatives. And it's forty seven of the state's attorneys general all across the country. I mean and just by the math right there you see we've got a Republican Administration the FTC J. or are part of the executive branch and about half of those attorneys general also republic. So this is there's a bipartisan consensus. That we need more oversight here and And I think it's overdue. I could see these companies coming back and saying listen we. We have literally billions of happy customers. What's the problem yes? There's political ads and there's a little interference taking a huge amount of mindshare about on a daily basis facebook and say I've got a couple of billion humans that are using our products and services. Relatively happy with an Amazon can say I am half all of ECOMMERCE in America Most people are pretty happy with their boxes showing up in two hours or two days. Yeah I think that well depends on it depends on the public opinion. Researchers plenty of people who aren't very happy with facial or particular. These days you know Amazon is more popular company and we can go from company to company and I think that the point is not to pick on any particular one company just because people don't like it like that's not the problem. The problem is to identify win companies. Where the the challenge is to identify when companies have become problematic when they become too big and have used that power in ways that decrease quality or increase crease prices? Then that's when or decrease wages that's when government should should step in in facebook's case Mark Zuckerberg's response has always always been listened breaking up the company isn't going to solve the problem You know these large companies are the only ones that actually have the ability to tackle tackle the problems at scale facebook's the only one that can hire thousands of content moderators and keep at libraries. And all this other stuff of going so even if you said Okay what happens to separate company and Instagram's a separate company. FACEBOOK MESSENGER is part of a separate company. You're not GONNA fix it. Yeah I mean what we're talking about. Even in a scenario where the what's happened instagram acquisitions or unwound is still three very large companies. Not Not at the size of of today's but with billions of dollars of revenue and significant resources both to police their platforms and to ensure that that their users there's are are protected being in. It's my view in the view of a lot of economists that facebook broken up into three would create more competition and in the long term. Probably really more more prophets were investors and this is what you see in the case of. At and T.. After its structural separation or the case of standard oil is that it turns turns out. Competition Leans towards economic growth. Like what we all feel intuitively or are you concerned heading into the twenty twenty election that it'll we just a repeat of the two thousand sixteen elections in terms of social platforms being manipulated In the in the process I am concerned about what we've done enough to safeguard ourselves. I mean I know you're not at facebook. You left quite some time ago. But I don't think so I think I think there's a lot more that can be done. I think You know one of the most obvious things as I do think that facebook has a responsibility to Not Allow outright all right lies in political advertising. This many other people have said this I think Facebook in particular has a responsibility to be even more aggressive in in deactivating fake accounts because we know that the fake accounts are big way that Trying to to to Manipulate AP late these elections or spurring the the continental along. I think there are other things that they could do that. That would be helpful as well. I think you could charge arch political advertisers the same rates for their ads regardless of whether or not the ads go viral. I mean this seems like a very technical point purchase but just to treat it If you look at the two thousand sixteen election trump was paying one sixteenth of Hillary Clinton's campaign was was was paying for their ads. Because the way that the facebook AD platform is structured is if you pay for an ad that is provocative and people want to share it and it goes it was viral it's cheaper on perm oppression basis then it is otherwise and then finally I also think that they should be thinking thing about how to ensure that putting the the ads aside the political content on the platform that is Reaching big large audiences is is reviewed by some humans to ensure that it's not An outright lie misleading. I mean the a few months ago. Nancy Pelosi that was a that was a fake video where it seemed like she was she drunk even though she doesn't drink. Alcohol is a perfect example and facebook not only allowed that to stay on the platform. But you know because of the way they designed the news feed algorithm it gets distributed very far and wide and that. That's a choice that they're making. You guys roommates. You Co founded this thing your friends. What motivates them? I mean you know these days. It's these days I think he and the facebook leadership I mean. They're I think they're trying to do the right thing. I I I do disagree with a lot of the decisions that that they've made. It's not you know. I think it's important for me to say that because I haven't been friends with mark and other people in the facebook leadership for a long time. This is not personal for me. I don't have a vendetta out for him or for facebook. In in general I think that I do have a responsibility as a CO founder of the company to speak up and specifically when the problems that we're talking about here are so big and are so significant. I mean we are talking about not just political discourse in our country but next year's election seven and the economic power of one of the largest companies in the country and in the world and At a certain point that that responsibility is something that it has caused me to speak out Kris us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me and finally for this intern..

FACEBOOK FTC Instagram twitter Amazon NYU Columbia You Co Hillary Clinton CEO Mark Zuckerberg standard oil Nancy Pelosi CO founder intern Kris DOJ America House of Representatives
"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

"What did you tell them you know? We talked to them about the same things that I wrote about in the article that facebook has specifically pursued a policy of acquiring its Competitors in order to lock down the social networking marketplace. There are some competitors out there like snapchat or or twitter but their size is really a rounding error. I mean facebook's revenue this year there will be fifty billion snaps. Last year was one. I mean these companies they exist but they're they're they're specs compared to facebook size and and so just as I called in the peace breaking I I do think that facebook should be broken up. I think that it should That what's up instagram and facebook. facebook should be separate companies each with their own. CEO each competing against one another. And I think at the same time we also need to think about what a rules for the road for social from networking and other tech companies that can ensure that users are protected even in a more competitive environment so these are things like privacy protections interoperability data portability. Some kind of framework for how we're going to deal with these questions of political speech there were some reports now that the FTC might be considering injunctions against against facebook in the coming year. Kind of explain in Layman's terms. What does that mean and what is it about? They're saying that there are seriously considering telling facebook. Hold up we need to take a closer look. That's the basic idea is that facebook has been working over the past year to effectively. Combine the back in frameworks works that power facebook INSTAGRAM WHATSAPP and make them into one single framework. You have a preliminary injunction would be say pause. Let's talk talk about how these companies work. Let's let's assess whether or not the mergers wore incorrectly approved by the FTC. And by the way it's not just the FTC see every branch of government that could be investigating facebook and some of these other tech companies. Right now now is standing up to do so so it's the FTC it's the Department of Justice it's the house antitrust subcommittee in the House of Representatives. And it's forty seven of the state's attorneys general all across the country. I mean and just by the math right there you see we've got a Republican Administration the FTC J. or are part of the executive branch and about half of those attorneys general also republic. So this is there's a bipartisan consensus. That we need more oversight here and And I think it's overdue. I could see these companies coming back and saying listen we. We have literally billions of happy customers. What's the problem yes? There's political ads and there's a little interference taking a huge amount of mindshare about on a daily basis facebook and say I've got a couple of billion humans that are using our products and services. Relatively happy with an Amazon can say I am half all of ECOMMERCE in America Most people are pretty happy with their boxes showing up in two hours or two days. Yeah I think that well depends on it depends on the public opinion. Researchers plenty of people who aren't very happy with facial or particular. These days you know Amazon is more popular company and we can go from company to company and I think that the point is not to pick on any particular one company just because people don't like it like that's not the problem. The problem is to identify win companies. Where the the challenge is to identify when companies have become problematic when they become too big and have used that power in ways that decrease quality or increase crease prices? Then that's when or decrease wages that's when government should should step in in facebook's case Mark Zuckerberg's response has always always been listened breaking up the company isn't going to solve the problem You know these large companies are the only ones that actually have the ability to tackle tackle the problems at scale facebook's the only one that can hire thousands of content moderators and keep at libraries. And all this other stuff of going so even if you said Okay what happens to separate company and Instagram's a separate company. FACEBOOK MESSENGER is part of a separate company. You're not GONNA fix it. Yeah I mean what we're talking about. Even in a scenario where the what's happened instagram acquisitions or unwound is still three very large companies. Not Not at the size of of today's but with billions of dollars of revenue and significant resources both to police their platforms and to ensure that that their users there's are are protected being in. It's my view in the view of a lot of economists that facebook broken up into three would create more competition and in the long term. Probably really more more prophets were investors and this is what you see in the case of. At and T.. After its structural separation or the case of standard oil is that it turns turns out. Competition Leans towards economic growth. Like what we all feel intuitively or are you concerned heading into the twenty twenty election that it'll we just a repeat of the two thousand sixteen elections in terms of social platforms being manipulated In the in the process I am concerned about what we've done enough to safeguard ourselves. I mean I know you're not at facebook. You left quite some time ago. But I don't think so I think I think there's a lot more that can be done. I think You know one of the most obvious things as I do think that facebook has a responsibility to Not Allow outright all right lies in political advertising. This many other people have said this I think Facebook in particular has a responsibility to be even more aggressive in in deactivating fake accounts because we know that the fake accounts are big way that Trying to to to Manipulate AP late these elections or spurring the the continental along. I think there are other things that they could do that. That would be helpful as well. I think you could charge arch political advertisers the same rates for their ads regardless of whether or not the ads go viral. I mean this seems like a very technical point purchase but just to treat it If you look at the two thousand sixteen election trump was paying one sixteenth of Hillary Clinton's campaign was was was paying for their ads. Because the way that the facebook AD platform is structured is if you pay for an ad that is provocative and people want to share it and it goes it was viral it's cheaper on perm oppression basis then it is otherwise and then finally I also think that they should be thinking thing about how to ensure that putting the the ads aside the political content on the platform that is Reaching big large audiences is is reviewed by some humans to ensure that it's not An outright lie misleading. I mean the a few months ago. Nancy Pelosi that was a that was a fake video where it seemed like she was she drunk even though she doesn't drink. Alcohol is a perfect example and facebook not only allowed that to stay on the platform. But you know because of the way they designed the news feed algorithm it gets distributed very far and wide and that. That's a choice that they're making. You guys roommates. You Co founded this thing your friends. What motivates them? I mean you know these days. It's these days I think he and the facebook leadership I mean. They're I think they're trying to do the right thing. I I I do disagree with a lot of the decisions that that they've made. It's not you know. I think it's important for me to say that because I haven't been friends with mark and other people in the facebook leadership for a long time. This is not personal for me. I don't have a vendetta out for him or for facebook. In in general I think that I do have a responsibility as a CO founder of the company to speak up and specifically when the problems that we're talking about here are so big and are so significant. I mean we are talking about not just political discourse in our country but next year's election seven and the economic power of one of the largest companies in the country and in the world and At a certain point that that responsibility is something that it has caused me to speak out Kris us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me and finally for this intern..

facebook FTC Instagram twitter CEO Amazon You Co Hillary Clinton standard oil Nancy Pelosi Mark Zuckerberg CO founder intern Kris America House of Representatives Republican Administration Department of Justice executive
"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

"Any dia. Yeah no you're. This is the crucial point. If the United States as you say continues to withdraw from its presence in the world it's willingness to stand up for human rights its commitments to things like free speech. Democracy that creates a vacuum in international leadership and China is inclined to move in and fill that void. But it's not a fait accompli. It depends heavily. Let's be blunt on the future of American politics. I think a lot of people around in the world of looked at what's happened in American politics over the last four years and have wondered. What is the United States? Still believe in. What are we committed to? And this is an opportunity for the United States to decide whether it's still believes in in defending those values abroad. Well but the Chinese government wants to move in if it can. It's not yet clear if the United States is prepared. That's that's exactly the point. I mean politics six. Yes but you just described how by and large bipartisan. Bipartisan thoughts and beliefs in the United States is as you as you said about China and how a how to do it and it seems like this is just a series of American administrations. Who are not doing the job that you have to be all the way back to George W Bush apparently was told when when he came in office in two thousand this was the biggest strategic threat and you outlined how I was taken totally off the ball after nine eleven and the Iraq aquaphor as as others have written was a total miraculous gift to the Chinese leadership? Yeah I had an interesting conversation. For instance with a European diplomat the Matt who said look we are some of your oldest friends in the world and you are coming to us now and you're asking us to join you in this long long range challenge against China's assertions of greater power it's attempts to bring its values around the world but it's very hard for us to join you on that when you or slapping tariffs on your European allies. So that's an example of the kind of thing if the United States wants to really mount a serious response and a challenge to China's strengthen strengthen the world it needs to be thinking about how it does that with the strength of its of its partners in its allies and it hasn't been building those relationships over the last three years in fact. It's been undermining right right. And that has been a feature of the trump administration. Evan Osnos thank you so much it is fascinating. It's really good to be reminded that there is this huge story out there. Despite what's is going on in other parts of the world thank you so much and now. Despite being blocked in China facebook is still making billions in ad sales in the country. A testimony to the the cloud of the social media giant but is facebook too powerful. It's a question that's often offers. A growing number of critics. Think so including Chris Hughes who was was one of the companies owned co-founders. He left facebook in two thousand seven to join Barack Obama's campaign and he's now leading the fight against corporate monopolies setting him up on a collision course with the company he helped to build new told a hurry SRINIVASA how this fight is ultimately about accountability and saving the very foundations nations of our democracies. So Chris you back several different initiatives one that's going after monopolies one that's doing experiments experiments and learning about models of guaranteed income. You written in support of a wealth tax or all of these different things or they. They tried to tackle larger problem. Yeah we have a belief that the economy has been structured purposefully over the past thirty forty years to create momentus gains for the one percent and and for corporations and make it more difficult for everyday people to make ends meet we see in the data median. Wages are flat. Productivity is stalled all entrepreneurship. Maybe counter intuitively for some as actually at Near an all-time low and so the economy just on the marriage isn't working working. And I think most Americans get that and that's why we're living in a moment where there's a big calls for structural change. You've set up a fun to fight monopolies tell us a little bit about that And what with the intent is so at the economic security project which is the group that I co run. We have a ten million dollar fund to invest in organizations organizations that are taking on concentrated corporate power in whatever form in tech but also in other sectors and it's our observation right right now there are so many individuals. Some of them are organizers and activists. Some are academics and journalists some are artists in storytellers. There's so many people who are saying. Hey wait a second. Our economy is tilted in the wrong direction. Corporations have too much power and this. This isn't just a fluke. This happened because we haven't had active anti monopoly. Policies in a long time and so our fund is there to provide seed seed capital to these individuals to be able to either begin new work or double down on work. That's already been happening to take on that. Concentrated corporate power are so an example is a group like the Institute for Local Self Reliance is helping give voice to a lot of the small business owners across the country who you have a harder time making ends meet and taking on the big corporate titans so a lot of those individuals. Those voices aren't heard a lot in the media or in state capitals are on Capitol Hill. And they're still others like the Athena coalition which is organizing against Amazon. We have a long list. Miller if you're organizing against Amazon even if you put put in this ten million dollar fund and if you're if you're planting these seeds you're taking on corporations that are worth hundreds of billions of dollars so right and that's that seems like it's small small compared to what they're going to spend. It's it's our contention though that that they may have the money but we as a movement have increasing thing power what makes monopoly unhealthy or dangerous monopolies problems for both economic and political reasons. We we can take the economic ones. I look at Amazon. Amazon is right now in a place where it dominates ECOMMERCE and much of commerce in the American economy and it not only sells stuff directly as a company it creates a platform for thousands of other sellers to come on Amazon. And say okay. I'M GONNA a US Amazon's infrastructure to sell my product whether it's a diaper book or something that's handmade as the platform Amazon has all of the data about about what's being sold when how to whom and at what price and it uses that data to then structure its own first is party decisions about about what to produce and what to sell so it just tilts the playing field to favor the incumbent and then there's the political problems albums the fewer companies. You have the more power they have and the more that their their voices heard in the halls of government And they're able to shape policy on their behalf. And so what we've seen even now or particularly now is the growth of this power and Good institutions like the Department of Justice and the FTC have in some cases taking a step back and not taken on their regulatory duties as a result of this of this pronounced power. But what's the difference between Amazon and say a Walmart before Amazon where they had a a tremendous amount of information and they knew my buying habits. Perhaps maybe it wasn't on the online space but they were a giant company and what their promise seems to be to consumers will give you the cheapest product possible or. I should say the best price well to be clear. I don't think there's anything wrong with with prices going down. And in some cases as companies grow larger they the prices can go down temporarily but a recent study that just came out a few weeks weeks ago showed that the collection of big monopolies in the United States economy is costing the average American about five thousand dollars a year. Wouldn't otherwise is have to pay so you can take mobile telephony as an example in the United States We only have a few major carriers in other places in the world they have even more. The competition in the marketplace brings down the prices. So that you can pay less than a month to month. Basis same thing for cable cable service same thing for pharmaceuticals the average household pays over thousand dollars and pharmaceuticals each year and they use it their their monopoly. Power to protect check those prophets so it adds up across these different parts of the economy but again prices are not just the only problem you also see a decrease in quality. FACEBOOK is a good example of this. FACEBOOK is technically a free product for most people to us but because facebook doc has gotten so big all of these privacy scandals that keep happening Seemed to be because there's no other. There's no other real social network to compete so prices go up. Quality goes down in the corporations have an outsized voice in the in the policy making process. Do you think that companies companies have more power than government does now it depends on the sector and it depends on the context in some cases. They In some cases they they do and others not I mean the the power of facebook is a good example over political speech right now mark Zuckerberg and really just mark is making really a formative important decisions about Verification of have ads on facebook whether or not they're going to verify political accolade whether or not the facebook is going to be responsible for verifying political at his position. There's no everybody should be able to say whatever they want and is a informed public bacon make up their own minds we facebook are not gonNA stand in the way and say that this is true and this is not true. His his position is that that we shouldn't hold facebook to the same standards that we hold network television or any of these other companies to and whereas others may have a basic standard of decency to ensure that ADS are not line. Not propagating outright lies. FACEBOOK is going to have none of it and is not going to take on this responsibility. That has a huge impact on the political and civic discourse in are not just in our country but in other countries as well and that kind of power is problematic because it is unaccountable the board of facebook. It's really we just an advisory board because of the way mark has structured the company and until recently we haven't seen a lot of regulatory action from the FTC or DOJ. Oh Jay or or government in so we have one corporate executive in California who's making really important decisions for our international and civil discourse and we can't ensure debate whether that's the right decision or the wrong decision but I think the the point that it teaches us is that that That Mark Zuckerberg and facebook has too much power and the role of government is to identify when that power is being abused. I end to check it just to remind our audience you wrote an op Ed. This past year and ended. I'm just GonNa read a little extra marks influences staggering far beyond that of anyone else else in the private sector or in government he controls three core communications platforms facebook instagram. And what's at that. Billions of people use everyday. FACEBOOK's board works more like an advisory committee than overseer because because mark controls around sixty percent of voting shares you along with a couple of professors from NYU and Columbia went down this summer and had conversations with both the FTC the DOJ about facebook..

facebook United States Amazon China FTC Evan Osnos Chinese government George W Bush Chris Hughes Mark Zuckerberg Iraq Barack Obama Matt Institute for Local Self Relia advisory board Department of Justice Columbia
"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

"Any dia. Yeah no you're. This is the crucial point. If the United States as you say continues to withdraw from its presence in the world it's willingness to stand up for human rights its commitments to things like free speech. Democracy that creates a vacuum in international leadership and China is inclined to move in and fill that void. But it's not a fait accompli. It depends heavily. Let's be blunt on the future of American politics. I think a lot of people around in the world of looked at what's happened in American politics over the last four years and have wondered. What is the United States? Still believe in. What are we committed to? And this is an opportunity for the United States to decide whether it's still believes in in defending those values abroad. Well but the Chinese government wants to move in if it can. It's not yet clear if the United States is prepared. That's that's exactly the point. I mean politics six. Yes but you just described how by and large bipartisan. Bipartisan thoughts and beliefs in the United States is as you as you said about China and how a how to do it and it seems like this is just a series of American administrations. Who are not doing the job that you have to be all the way back to George W Bush apparently was told when when he came in office in two thousand this was the biggest strategic threat and you outlined how I was taken totally off the ball after nine eleven and the Iraq aquaphor as as others have written was a total miraculous gift to the Chinese leadership? Yeah I had an interesting conversation. For instance with a European diplomat the Matt who said look we are some of your oldest friends in the world and you are coming to us now and you're asking us to join you in this long long range challenge against China's assertions of greater power it's attempts to bring its values around the world but it's very hard for us to join you on that when you or slapping tariffs on your European allies. So that's an example of the kind of thing if the United States wants to really mount a serious response and a challenge to China's strengthen strengthen the world it needs to be thinking about how it does that with the strength of its of its partners in its allies and it hasn't been building those relationships over the last three years in fact. It's been undermining right right. And that has been a feature of the trump administration. Evan Osnos thank you so much it is fascinating. It's really good to be reminded that there is this huge story out there. Despite what's is going on in other parts of the world thank you so much and now. Despite being blocked in China facebook is still making billions in ad sales in the country. A testimony to the the cloud of the social media giant but is facebook too powerful. It's a question that's often offers. A growing number of critics. Think so including Chris Hughes who was was one of the companies owned co-founders. He left facebook in two thousand seven to join Barack Obama's campaign and he's now leading the fight against corporate monopolies setting him up on a collision course with the company he helped to build new told a hurry SRINIVASA how this fight is ultimately about accountability and saving the very foundations nations of our democracies. So Chris you back several different initiatives one that's going after monopolies one that's doing experiments experiments and learning about models of guaranteed income. You written in support of a wealth tax or all of these different things or they. They tried to tackle larger problem. Yeah we have a belief that the economy has been structured purposefully over the past thirty forty years to create momentus gains for the one percent and and for corporations and make it more difficult for everyday people to make ends meet we see in the data median. Wages are flat. Productivity is stalled all entrepreneurship. Maybe counter intuitively for some as actually at Near an all-time low and so the economy just on the marriage isn't working working. And I think most Americans get that and that's why we're living in a moment where there's a big calls for structural change. You've set up a fun to fight monopolies tell us a little bit about that And what with the intent is so at the economic security project which is the group that I co run. We have a ten million dollar fund to invest in organizations organizations that are taking on concentrated corporate power in whatever form in tech but also in other sectors and it's our observation right right now there are so many individuals. Some of them are organizers and activists. Some are academics and journalists some are artists in storytellers. There's so many people who are saying. Hey wait a second. Our economy is tilted in the wrong direction. Corporations have too much power and this. This isn't just a fluke. This happened because we haven't had active anti monopoly. Policies in a long time and so our fund is there to provide seed seed capital to these individuals to be able to either begin new work or double down on work. That's already been happening to take on that. Concentrated corporate power are so an example is a group like the Institute for Local Self Reliance is helping give voice to a lot of the small business owners across the country who you have a harder time making ends meet and taking on the big corporate titans so a lot of those individuals. Those voices aren't heard a lot in the media or in state capitals are on Capitol Hill. And they're still others like the Athena coalition which is organizing against Amazon. We have a long list. Miller if you're organizing against Amazon even if you put put in this ten million dollar fund and if you're if you're planting these seeds you're taking on corporations that are worth hundreds of billions of dollars so right and that's that seems like it's small small compared to what they're going to spend. It's it's our contention though that that they may have the money but we as a movement have increasing thing power what makes monopoly unhealthy or dangerous monopolies problems for both economic and political reasons. We we can take the economic ones. I look at Amazon. Amazon is right now in a place where it dominates ECOMMERCE and much of commerce in the American economy and it not only sells stuff directly as a company it creates a platform for thousands of other sellers to come on Amazon. And say okay. I'M GONNA a US Amazon's infrastructure to sell my product whether it's a diaper book or something that's handmade as the platform Amazon has all of the data about about what's being sold when how to whom and at what price and it uses that data to then structure its own first is party decisions about about what to produce and what to sell so it just tilts the playing field to favor the incumbent and then there's the political problems albums the fewer companies. You have the more power they have and the more that their their voices heard in the halls of government And they're able to shape policy on their behalf. And so what we've seen even now or particularly now is the growth of this power and Good institutions like the Department of Justice and the FTC have in some cases taking a step back and not taken on their regulatory duties as a result of this of this pronounced power. But what's the difference between Amazon and say a Walmart before Amazon where they had a a tremendous amount of information and they knew my buying habits. Perhaps maybe it wasn't on the online space but they were a giant company and what their promise seems to be to consumers will give you the cheapest product possible or. I should say the best price well to be clear. I don't think there's anything wrong with with prices going down. And in some cases as companies grow larger they the prices can go down temporarily but a recent study that just came out a few weeks weeks ago showed that the collection of big monopolies in the United States economy is costing the average American about five thousand dollars a year. Wouldn't otherwise is have to pay so you can take mobile telephony as an example in the United States We only have a few major carriers in other places in the world they have even more. The competition in the marketplace brings down the prices. So that you can pay less than a month to month. Basis same thing for cable cable service same thing for pharmaceuticals the average household pays over thousand dollars and pharmaceuticals each year and they use it their their monopoly. Power to protect check those prophets so it adds up across these different parts of the economy but again prices are not just the only problem you also see a decrease in quality. FACEBOOK is a good example of this. FACEBOOK is technically a free product for most people to us but because facebook doc has gotten so big all of these privacy scandals that keep happening Seemed to be because there's no other. There's no other real social network to compete so prices go up. Quality goes down in the corporations have an outsized voice in the in the policy making process. Do you think that companies companies have more power than government does now it depends on the sector and it depends on the context in some cases. They In some cases they they do and others not I mean the the power of facebook is a good example over political speech right now mark Zuckerberg and really just mark is making really a formative important decisions about Verification of have ads on facebook whether or not they're going to verify political accolade whether or not the facebook is going to be responsible for verifying political at his position. There's no everybody should be able to say whatever they want and is a informed public bacon make up their own minds we facebook are not gonNA stand in the way and say that this is true and this is not true. His his position is that that we shouldn't hold facebook to the same standards that we hold network television or any of these other companies to and whereas others may have a basic standard of decency to ensure that ADS are not line. Not propagating outright lies. FACEBOOK is going to have none of it and is not going to take on this responsibility. That has a huge impact on the political and civic discourse in are not just in our country but in other countries as well and that kind of power is problematic because it is unaccountable the board of facebook. It's really we just an advisory board because of the way mark has structured the company and until recently we haven't seen a lot of regulatory action from the FTC or DOJ. Oh Jay or or government in so we have one corporate executive in California who's making really important decisions for our international and civil discourse and we can't ensure debate whether that's the right decision or the wrong decision but I think the the point that it teaches us is that that That Mark Zuckerberg and facebook has too much power and the role of government is to identify when that power is being abused. I end to check it just to remind our audience you wrote an op Ed. This past year and ended. I'm just GonNa read a little extra marks influences staggering far beyond that of anyone else else in the private sector or in government he controls three core communications platforms facebook instagram. And what's at that. Billions of people use everyday..

facebook United States Amazon China Evan Osnos Chinese government George W Bush FTC Chris Hughes Iraq Barack Obama Mark Zuckerberg Matt Institute for Local Self Relia Department of Justice advisory board Miller
"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"evan osnos" Discussed on Amanpour

"That's the danger so they may get regime trash it just not the kind of trump wants I think trump is nine months ten months away away from elections. Can he just stick it out and step back and see what happens. It'll be a big risk. I think for him. The major thing is out to get a deal. I think the building building blocks or they're now the major issue in that respect is can you get the full raw having killed so the money will be much more difficult than you want your president to sit down. Shake his hand and smiled before a camera. Now it was two weeks ago and perhaps that was one of the reasons why some is more hawkish advisers. told him to go ahead with this assignation. This is the problem so if we can work that out and find a way to get these two sides at negotiating table and we have the formula ready which I just described getting the US out of the region. Get this ball rolling on a French proposal. which is one of the some? He claims that Obama gave Iran right. We have the building that we just have to work out the photo of thing. It does seem such a long way in the future that given what's happening on the ground and these sort of competing trees but we'll wait to see Mohammad Ali Shabani. Thank you very much us. So now. To Ukraine's place in this crisis the down flight seven five two was bound for Kiev and Eleven Ukrainians were on board for the country. There is also a sense of trauma former all over again given the inevitable comparisons with flight. Seventeen five years ago. That plane was brought down in eastern Ukraine by Russian missile and two hundred ninety eight people were killed as Ukraine deals with this tragedy. It is also embroiled in the trump impeachment drama. Danilo look gifts keep Cranes former deputy foreign minister. And he's joining me from Kiev. Welcome back to the program and it seems every time I come to you in a terrible Abel situation for your country so clearly. The world offers many many condolences to all those families who lost their dear ones. and I wonder what what you can say you think will be the result of the conversations between your president the Iranian President whether this can be resolved within away or whether it's yet another really tough obstacle to get over I do appreciate your kind of ours versus support addressed to the Ukrainian nation of Certainly at this warmly. Welcome and do feel this. Great Grief and pain for those innocent lives killed in that in that attack before answering your question and let me also say that we share the same pain as many any other nations who sit and severity killed in this dramatic assault so this is a global tragedy and we sat only feel that no one remains indifferent what happened in Iran including Iran society We believe that the tragedy happened. They're also shocked that that society what is important right now is to ensure that there is a proper transparent servants investigation that is done in full accordance to the international standards to the international law. So so those who committed that horrific crime would be brought to us this. This is important for Ukraine. And this sense of truth is extremely important for Ukraine citizens. It doesn't I hope that The Ukrainian authorities They say that they closely cooperate with Irani authorities right now We'll do their best to ensure that the allegation will bring about with necessarily results. However I think that strong international corporations operations should be maintained so we all know the truth and the truth is established missile ski you? You know the as I mentioned the both presidents from Ukraine and Iran didn't have a phone conversation Hassan Rohani from Rahm has said Iran fully acknowledges that the tragedy tragedy was due to the actions of the military of this state. So I WANNA ask you about that because you just said this assault and I want to know whether you believe on whether the Ukrainian leadership believes that it was a tragic error on art or do you think there's another issue that you want to call for this transparent investigation obviously sleep and do you believe that President Zilenski is is is doing the right thing in charge of trying to get all the answers and the compensation as he said he said Ukraine is interested in the truth we ask all our international partners to assist the investigation and provide any relevant evidence that they might might have. There are a number of questions in what you say and let me briefly respond to all these elements the first of all. This is true that there is a satin debate. Within Ukraine. A proper was the initial reaction. Presence Lansky His initial statements. His initial response is widely considered to be careful cautious hesitant and sat. Only this position received a lot of internal domestic criticism. Nevertheless Ward is important to to be mentioned that unambiguity of the position of our best partners strongly contributed to the truth. I also want to mention that a a flu within twenty four hours after the plane was was shut down the cranium experts Where already on the ground on the site Providing the cranium authorities with Nasseri assessment and conclusions all these elements helped receive necessary acknowledgement on behalf of Iran authorities to To acknowledge that the the very fact and the responsibility award or what happened often. This is important right now. If it's even more important to ensure it together in our joint efforts that they investigation would be done fully in accordance to the to the international norms of why. I'm saying this. This is the matter of and the water. Ukrainian experts mentioned here in cave since the tragedy happened in Iran Recalls the painful experience of image seventeen In July of two thousand fourteen the reaction of Ukrainian Goldman. We'll need it quicker and clear. It was clear that Russia stood behind that that shameful a unspeakable crime contrary to Iran Russia continues devious to deny the responsibility. And I hope and believe I trust that nevertheless sooner or later sir. The responsibility for the crime happened to the victims of seventeen would be brought to justice and we're also responsibility would come to those Russian. The perpetrators of crime happened in two thousand fourteen. I I need to ask you to react. Also to the fact that your former Foreign Minister Pavlo Kloempken has said Ukraine now has the reputation of a place his that can cause all kinds of trouble. It is the opposite of everything we were working for. So He's obviously referring to this tragedy to the one you mentioned tension with seventeen but also of course about your country being dragged in to a political crisis and impeachment crisis in the United States and there are new reports poured of emails that that show particularly that in fact the White House the White House in fact did order the stopping stopping of aid to you shortly after that phone. Call between President Trump and presidents alinsky. I mean where do you think that is going. And to enter Kloempken case. Ace is Ukraine mortally wounded if I can put it that way by this dramatic series of major crises season issues in which is involved. That's.

Ukraine Iran president Kiev United States assault President Trump Mohammad Ali Shabani Obama Pavlo Kloempken Danilo deputy foreign minister President Zilenski Irani White House Lansky President
Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

02:34 min | 3 years ago

Seoul, Ildefonso Guajardo and Mexico discussed on Fred and Angi

"From npr news in washington i'm nora romm negotiators from the us canada and mexico have yet to reach an agreement on arena goshi ation of nafta despite reaching today's deadline set by congress but as james frederick reports from mexico city some negotiators are still hopeful mexican economy minister ildefonso guajardo says although there are still major issues to work out he thinks it would be possible to reach a new nafta deal by the end of the month mexican officials are eager to finish the deal as soon as possible since elections for a new president as well as hundreds of legislators happened on july first it's a big day in the central african country of burundi npr's eyder peralta says amid tension and fears of violence burundians are voting on a controversial referendum so far there have been no reports of violence but the runup has been marked by intimidation beating and even the murder of opponents of the referendum the proposed change the constitution would give more power to president pierre including see some and it would also extend his rule until twenty thirty four a spokesman for the chinese commerce ministry says china does not want increase trade tensions with the united states but it will defend its interests the comment came as the us and china resumed talks aimed at heading off a trade war the trump administration is threatening to impose tariffs on as much as one hundred fifty billion dollars of chinese imports china's threatening to retaliate i'm nora raum npr news on the next fresh air trump versus the deep state we talk with evan osnos of the new yorker about how hundreds of nonpartisan civil servants considered not loyal enough to the administration have been sidelined or pushed out of government key positions have been left open to an unprecedented degree leaving the president with few restraints on him join us here fresh air this afternoon beginning at one followed a two by the world here's a preview next time on the world south koreans flocked to a movie set outside seoul it's a full size replica the place where kim jong hoon shook hands last month with south korea's president visitors can now do their own handshakes for the cameras why some people in south korea say they like kim jong un it's the world i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour we continue our series inside yemen with a.

Seoul Ildefonso Guajardo Mexico James Frederick Canada Nora Romm NPR Yemen Judy Woodruff Kim Jong South Korea Kim Jong Hoon Washington Evan Osnos United States China Chinese Commerce Ministry Pierre