18 Burst results for "Evan Goldberg"

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

13:07 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Interview that's net suite dot com slash Evan Goldberg founder of that sweet we appreciate you talking with this newsmakers my pleasure welcome back to coast to coast George dory with you our special guest tonight James purpura has experienced some of the most extreme moments life can offer he'll tell you about that eighteen years ago he was in inmates struggling with life in solitary confinement a result of his actions while homeless and addicted to drugs now wall in jail he reconciled his life put his life together developed a personal philosophy once released he created a beautifully preposterous wife or prosper his life and became inspired to share his knowledge with the world James welcome to the program joining our view your life was preposterous before you turned it around yeah that was actually before I went to jail like how how long ago was that eighteen years plus it's been about eighteen years since the I was sitting in the jail so yes I am told that the prisoner population listen to this radio show like crazy I don't know if you did or not at the time no because I was in Florida for a we didn't have things like radio or TV or things like that we you know are selling our books in the paper and that was about it well first of all I want to commend you for pulling your life together because not everybody can do that and that you want to be you know it's interesting because you know when I first got to jail and I was put into solitary confinement unit I thought it was a curse because of windows box are only get out one hour every other day you know to take a shower make maybe make a phone call and walk in a concrete yard but I'm fully shackled and what I found out over time is that it was actually blessed because a couple of things happened when you're in those those facilities those Max facilities were you're on lock down all the time kind of goes by a lot faster believe it or not really yes it's the weirdest thing it's completely opposite of what you would think it was even when people tell you you don't believe them it is just because you know how many to yourself you're reading you know you don't have distractions you're not thinking about the outside world and then the second thing is is that I'm being alone was the best thing about I was what I was locked in a cell with the person that I hated the most or didn't want to be around the house which was me but that's really what I had to reconcile was okay well there is no distractions and hear me either going to have to face my demons or you know put in and all of us as we get into this James I'm gonna ask you now what did you do to get in jail so it was just you know what I was doing drugs I was doing things like shoplifting or passing bad checks in order to support my habit and so I got arrested and when I was what happened was is a police officer came and took me out of myself and took me back out on the street is that there need to go find somebody for me and I told my word and I took off from there tell me a couple months later like across the country so as my punishment one in when I was in jail that's what I was put into that supermax or solitary confinement units how long were you in the pokey fifteen months well you're lucky that's all at once well I was facing nine years and you know because I didn't have a big criminal history before that point and the all the vast majority of my crimes are condensed to a small period of time you know they took some mercy on me what's it like to be homeless James you know for me it wasn't like you know like the homeless person you see on the street it was the going from Krakow's to Krakow struggle most okay you know it seems like in every city there's a there's this underbelly of of human beings that really exist like living Aron traveling between different houses of people who've just gotten into drugs who still who are lucky enough to have a house and so they just kind of float between all these things sleeping cars you know why I wasn't sleeping in a park or anything but I you know I would stay up for weeks at a time we won here one so initially it started on cracker moved to crystal meth and then eventually ended on their own yes how old were you when this all started James foreigners currently are are part of the story I was in my early thirties that's kind of late for all that what it is and that's kind of one of our book is about is because and we really address that in the book we don't not so much in the movie and you know the ideas or concepts was is I've had some early childhood traumas during those those childhood traumas and in the first one was that you know when I was in kindergarten class you know it's pretty apparent that I had some pretty severe learning disabilities and so on the first day I was go gonna go special at my teacher called me up in front of the room and she says to me you know only stupid retarded kids go special at all you've got to be kidding me knowledge so you know I'm five years old in terms of shock like what do I do and she sent me out of the room and and she's made the entire class call me stupid all around cheese was wrong with her it well I mean hurt people hurt people right I don't I don't speculate much of what was going on with her I did for years but I don't anymore and so I was hoping this was a one time occurrence one until March but mom was undiagnosed bipolar depressed first and that didn't have the capability to ever step dad worked fifteen hours they're going to have a softer drugs and she shoes will commence at work I'm not sure what's going to happen moving forward but you know if the world is a cool place you know life is hard you're just gonna have to get used to it and so I went back into school the next day thinking well maybe this is a one time occurrence but it happens every single day every day should call you stupid she would call me brother on time it was time to go special call me stupid make classical nonlinear but you know which which set off this is bowling trend in my life and so essentially the reason I bring that story up which were known to stand as a everybody is on a path to some more it without interruption you may end up in a place that you don't want to be and so you know when we have these emotional traumas in our lives what we find is that you if you internalize a trauma that leads to things like you know mental illness suicide that type of thing when you externalize your trial as I did playing my charm on the outside world that leads to what we call a victim mentality and you blame you know everything is going on with you on the outside world and when you externalize it you can take a lot longer for the restoration bill because I still tried to have a normal life but because I didn't have the skills and because I didn't have the right outlook on life I just kept failing and failing and failing and one day I gave up what was set up in the moment for you and we're gonna we'll come back to all these things that happened in your life but at what point did something change for you were you realized I'm gonna I'm not gonna be who I used to be I'm going to change in order to DO I got this letter from my dad in order so that you know he wasn't like a very insightful person both Naylor said look natural father is that were the stuff of my natural father he straighten out his life in figures I don't I don't know how long you're going to be there but most people don't get any time to work on themselves so at this time go to waste and so I took that seriously and I got some books and I started reading on self help spirituality meditation you know different things and so as I dug in you know one of the exercises I started doing was least used to write these long list of people who I felt like it harmed me so I could in my mind offer them forgiveness it one day I was looking at this long list of people and I had this document in my mind the only common denominator between all of these situations is in fact me and so I have the thought what if I was somehow the creator of all these experiences now I've never really thought about the fact whether or not I was the creator violence it's our route took a start and started thinking about in this what I can do I could agree with some of it not all of it I either was the creator or I wasn't you know art it was one of the seventeen or not and so as I thought about the war but not the creator means world really is a terrible place and I don't probably don't want to play anymore but far worse it means that I have to take responsibility for everything I ever happen to me but if I can figure out the mechanisms by which somebody goes about creating their lives better I could create a life that was great that was wonderful and that I could be proud of when now when you started on the drugs what was it that got you going we're gonna party somewhere or what happened you know I mean it was it was kind of a long the slow build up it was in a garden in the weekends you know have a few drinks wrong place wrong time yeah you know I mean those stories like are you wanna try this in your lecture and and so for a while you think you have a controller but here's what you need to understand about addiction I think people fail to understand whatever I'm talking to America S. missing questions like why teachers do drugs or drink you know accordingly welcome right now in addition is in the state what are you trying to schedule you masking right yeah what are you asking what do you what do you running away from it and that's why I think people most mostly failed following the addiction world is like if you don't address the paying that's underneath that's driving the behavior you'll be white knuckling it forever what was your pain well my pain was all the abuse that are having curtain my life see I grew up in a very religious household the more I was told when I was young is a good person right do good paying him Hey you have a good life well that was my experience you know I was a good person you know I was very kind and nice and loving and the world seem to dump on me constantly did you have friends in school or anything like yeah I did I mean not because I had friends but you know I was because of my learning disabilities early and my A. refusal after kindergarten years ago to get the help that I needed I was very short on skills then the other thing was it was I had a very poor outlook about myself and the world and that turns out you know what was was the creative element of what I was experiencing so you didn't think much about yourself did you well no I mean your owner you know when I was sitting in that jail cell and I I thought to myself what's the creative element of my life I just ask myself this question does my defeat by abuse defined way is that what created my life and so you know and then I thought well if my views defines me that I'm stuck forever because I can't go back and change the views and I was like well not everybody's incurred abuse in their life you know they had a bad life you know they people were able to break free from it so the next question was what defined me there when I came to us it was the thoughts or feelings that I chose to believe about myself having lived through that abuse you know I believe that I was stupid but I believe that I was not good enough I believe that I was not capable in those beliefs is what created my life and that was ultimately what I took responsibility for was choosing to believe something about myself that was not true did you cry much during these days you know I'm not much of a crier in just because of that experience when I was when I was in kindergarten you toughen yourself up to new well yeah I mean I just had this feeling I knew if I show card in front of them but it was going to make it worse for me so I really have to detach from not emotions it's not that I don't have any illusions I'm just not as emotional sent people might be because of the situation you've you ended up graduating from high school I assume right you know I got a GED okay well that's the equivalent but it wasn't you know I wasn't learning anything because my you know my processor school was to figure.

founder George dory James purpura Evan Goldberg
"evan goldberg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:06 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"I'm here talking with Evan Goldberg on newsmakers today he's the founder of net suite about how to take your company to that next level so first what is it that some businesses face when they start growing quickly what are some of the problems well when we talk to businesses that are growing fast they find that they have lost two things from when they were smaller and that visibility and control they used to be able to talk to everybody in the business on a day to day basis they used to be able to visit all their sites they used to be able to connect with all the customers but they lose that as the business grows becomes that they don't know everything else person they don't know every customer they can't really see what's happening in their business and and they can't really make the changes they need to make in order to make the business grow more efficiently and more effectively so then what is it that nets we can do to help those clients solve those issues we provide one system that ties together all your disparate operations and everybody uses that system the tracks sales finance commerce HR all your employees and is really one place that they can go a dashboard on their phone or on their laptop with they really do get visibility into everything that's happening in the business they can drill down into all parts of their operations they can make changes to the business and ensure that those changes will percolate throughout the organization given the control thing otherwise might have lost so essentially next week here is everything you need to grow just all in one place well I know listeners are gonna want to know more so here's what you do schedule your free product toward now and receive your free guide six ways to run a more profitable business and that's sweet dot com slash interview that's and that's sweet dot com slash interview Evan Goldberg founder of that's we appreciate you talking with this newsmakers my pleasure welcome back to Costa because George nori with you along with your open line phone calls it's Friday night let's go to don in Kent Ohio to get things started Hey Donald welcome home brother George thank you so much for taking my call and happy Sabbath stock I want to thank you for having that now Friday of prayer meeting also welcome on that that seems to be working it works well I'll tell you what you know the power of prayer but you know what I called I was trying to pick Tommy's mine a little bit us in on the timing of such a bright guy but I'm looking at some of these are British newspapers the you came here and you can express U. K. fallen and they all report about a huge U. S. behind the sun and you know it kind of reminds me of you know Mr on the route that you had on a couple days ago yeah and he's a very prophetic I've been doing some research on him he's kind of frightening with his predictions about you know I believe the tribulation beginning sometime between now and the fall of two thousand twenty one I hope he's wrong but he stands by a very intelligent guy for my number programs and this is right out of your two Corinthians eleven were talks about those Satan's angels shall be transformed as angels of light to deceive us and then and also within the Muslim faith they do have is you know Mr ferret camp out explained the mother ship which is kind of an interesting concept you know anything about it I will not through not through the Islamic religion but the mother ships I've heard a lot about different stories about those things no it was interesting we have the older gentleman that was doing an interview the kind with the suspenders I forget what his name Larry King exactly and he was interviewing and the a number of people about the Phoenix lights that's right back in nineteen ninety seven your hand your dog they're not paying you enough support but I asked the governor of Arizona hi sign into any estimates he says well what do you think of these Vance writers and it was haunting it to watch the government governor's response he says first on the question players don't fly so there was a huge ship that marked off the sites are not the the the stars and that as it flew over I guess I'm not gonna lie to me no car ride mission systems temporarily and you know we knew the skunk works we know that there's something going on there governments not telling us everything and we just got a really relying on coast to coast guests and listeners for the truth that's right then at that time don the governor when it first started came out with an extraterrestrial with them he had a guy dressed up as an alien and they made fun of it and then he was really sorry for it afterwards she apologized he said are you know what whatever happened I think was out of this world and he went totally the other way he he really he really did next up is John in reading Pennsylvania welcome to the program hi John thank your check for taking my call thank goodness the theme every week I'm talking about the current virus but I have some information to share with you I talk to Tommy yeah I just read online that Italy had more caskets the United States of course we know the love the numbers in Italy are pretty high how many people have the coronavirus yeah so in the next couple weeks you know they're saying now place present ten seven actually to shop about a million cats I have a bad feeling internally to make a prediction I think right now we have about fifteen thousand people walk around United States of the coronavirus I live in article in The New York Times that people are being turned away in the hospital because they don't have kids are you are you may be right they say there's three hundred and thirty three people who have the virus seventeen dead of the seventeen dead is probably accurate but I think you're right I think there's more people that have it which brings that mortality rate percent way down thank god right but maybe it's not as bad as the as maybe people compromised immune system the house you know can get in COPD obvious you can die from it and they see children you know not getting it but I think you know we're gonna have higher numbers in the next couple weeks as far as how many people actually have it and I'm concerned because of the you know houses not being handled properly you know I think you're gonna have martial law if this gets worse and I think you're going to have the large parts of cities quarantine because they can't get a grasp on it because it should have been done sooner rather than later in the did you hear our lead story that it may have been concocted in a laboratory in China yes I completely believe you and I don't know why it was released it was the purpose of this is population control but I don't have any doubt my mind this is made me all released in the lab in China you know and it's taking a toll on some tire plant they need to come clean they really do and just tell the public look this is what it is we can contain it and we're gonna take care of it and in take the hit for Tom you've got a text or tweet when the house sure do this one from Barney in Rhode Island do you think we as a society have divided ourselves beyond repair beyond repair no have we divided our develop divided ourselves as a society absolutely politically emotionally argumentative Lee everything we have chalked ourselves right in the middle I mean I've never seen a time period where you can't talk to somebody without other people getting upset it's unbelievable and you've seen of you witnessed it somewhere but I I agree with you I think we can repair it though I think so I think it's fixable by Bullard people are good in general you know and we do we we need to just start caring about people in all this there's too much bitterness and hate out there gosh I see it all the time yeah all right get you ready for your next one text and tweets for the rest of the night with Tom let's go to court nearly as our body in Louisiana welcome to the program corny if you had your G. and Tommy and Wayne and very and groovy and the whole works Hey I heard that you had a couple deaths with Mardi Gras just people got hit by floats or something yeah we had a couple of deaths thank you get sad what it is they their tandem slow loads which is like those eighteen wheelers you see with those two yeah they were huge and so they can't sing and people walk out there and they should be really what could have been trying to grab beads instead of so that was that what would your do what I wanted to talk about the guy was right to certain extent I just think it's just a bad cold buyers in the skate from that lab if you get being closed today includes whatever that guy using came up with that I would in the eighties and nineties you wrote a book about and wrote a book called vices darkness and we had a chance to talk to him off of off Mike and that he didn't want to come on because he he kind of yellow kicked it under the carpet and said you get away with just the funny little thing you came up with first walk he didn't see anything unusual about it well I told him through Lisa we talked to him that this was an amazing prophecy on his part I think your god just like god is giving you the talent to take over part bail god gives people insight that god bruk that'll no ball instead of going happen in twenty twenty one but I hope and pray it doesn't but I think our military is ready but in a way George I wish we still had to draft a lot of the young fellas I do seem around here black and white man they just they don't have nothing to do instead of in when we were going to school George we did the prayer the Palladian paddling so they don't teach right like the American history and free enterprise that's why we get in a socialist like Bernie and stuff like this and believe that you can give away everything and you can't what do you think of this democratic race so far between Sanders and Biden what would it they may choose him they may choose Bernie but the Democratic Party had always been against communism and socialism but now they've been taken over legacy George when we went to school George we believe in prayer and paddling and the blades and the likes in the schools these days maybe they don't believe in teaching through American history and they they just don't believe in it and that's why we turned I'm not saying you and me but we're turning into a socialist country where people want to get things very German have paddled in school I got it made George I was a pretty good job but I did get a couple of women in school and believe me that paddling with that Holden and it taught me a lesson that board of education they stung I never got a I had a couple friends that are there but I never got it would you would you know what they couldn't do it anymore they get sued over yeah they they've done away with all AT and that's another thing there's going to be gone I don't know if you saw today on the news they arrested some little child and anchor of them instead of you you don't do that you know I mean but the kid was going berserk or something like that yeah they say but with ADHD and those whose gonna yell that's not easy for a kid like that but they're using the police the wrong way yeah the teacher going call little prince who won't call please we we we got a wrist is little child the act in the what do you think about this story where the.

Evan Goldberg founder
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

09:52 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

"You can drill down to see any of the information that jumps out at you that you want to learn more about. That's the pitch love it and I'm curious to know as well. What businesses do you not see anyone starting right now? Where do you see opportunity at? Or what spaces are you excited about? Gosh I mean you see more about what businesses not to start over as we've seen some of that lately or the very visible very visible ones. You know. I think we work in the world of B. Two B. And how we think about it is just going and visiting companies and that's where the great ideas come from his go see your users and what's bothering them. Not just the challenges. They have on a day to day basis but what are the opportunities that they see and I think a lot of that is sort of vertical specific in the particular type of business that they have so if you can start with an I don't know where that white space is white spaces right now but if you can start and I would obviously encourage you to start. Maybe building something off you know we have an ecosystem and that suite that allows you to build a business basically you know on top of net sweet. I mean we don't focus on every single vertical out there. We can't we look at the big. You know the kind of the big ones you know retail and industrial supply. But there's so many amazing verticals we have partner that builds on top of net suite software for breweries and it's called burp rear and thousands and thousands of them around all their trade. Craft brewers every everywhere. Said just like everybody else. They want a better handle on their business so they take net. Sweden stopped. It's that so I think that's some of the most interesting places if you can find in a particular vertical unmet need and then you can do a little market research. Which entrepreneurs won't necessarily urged to see that there's very similar needs in adjacent verticals and maybe in a bigger industry but you can start by satisfying a use case that you understand from visiting a business or from you know your brothers in the business sisters in the business or whatever take that and you see them and we take our team and engineers and user experience designers and we bring them out to customers to actually be at a customer site and see what they're doing. What cool business. They're in what their vision is what their dreams are and then how net sweet is a part of it. See it kind of you know in the field and so if you can start with that you know deeper understanding and empathy. I mean it's all about empathy for users in a particular vertical or industry and then do a little research to see whether that could apply to lots other industries. I think for a B. Company. That's a great way to start Evan. It sounds like you've surrounded yourself with amazing people you've built. That family built a great culture and a very successful company congrats. I'd love to get your take on some of the biggest lessons you learned from three people you mentioned so you talked about. Larry talked about mark. You know you talked about mark erred and would love to start with Larry. Maybe here Donna lessons. But I'll tell you the one that I take with me to work. Every single day is that you need to know what your differentiator is and that has to be the core of what you enhance and build every day you may have to catch up to competitors and sprint to catch up to competitors in certain areas but you need to maintain an enormous lead in what you're better than everybody else at and keeping the focus on that and that's certainly what we try to do every day at net sweet up that sort of the biggest advice. I'd give every entrepreneur. You can get so distracted and we talked about the big deal that can distract you away from your differentiator because they may ask for something. That is a check box item and okay. Maybe you do it but just be very very aware. That that's getting you off track and that instead you should be maintaining your lead and one of the things I offer company and this is really true for any kind of product company or any service. If you look at your list of enhancements that you WanNa do and they have customer names next to them. You may be getting off track and you may be not focusing on your differentiator and you need me not be keeping that big big lead over your competitors and ultimately that's what sells and that's really what gets people to love you because this is something that they've never seen before and they've never had before and it's remarkable and they'll forgive other things you're missing but if you give them something extraordinary that they didn't even really imagine could be possible and I mean at the advent of sweet way back in the day. Obviously our big differentiator initially was that we were on the web and then we added a second one was that everything worked together as sweet and those are the things that when we talk to customers and it was still very day the most excited customers I meet at sweet world which is our user conference now has ten thousand customers that come the ones that are most excited to me are the ones that come up and say you know what we had like five different systems before. I didn't even imagine that there was something. Like net sweet out there. That could allow us to simplify down. You know one or two or run and you know because they have honed in on. What is the sort of true differentiator? We don't hear as many people saying I'm so excited I could work from home now. I've got to take for granted but the other big core of idea which was the sweet still really resonates and so we go back. We hear that we take that back to focus more on making the sweet better. Which is our true differentiator. Sure and when it comes to mark benef- who's a friend of yours. What's something you've learned from mark over the years? Make sure everybody knows what you're doing. He's really good at that. I love it. And what about marker to passing recently? I didn't get to know and work with him as much as I would have liked to. You know I'm a child of the seventies I love seventies music. He loves seventies music. I didn't learn this until his memorial service. I wish we'd gotten talk about seventies music. We could have gone deep there but professionally. He just had a tremendous focus on the customer and the customer relationship at that encompassed more than just the service I mean he understood. Obviously the importance delivering a great service but he also understood when you saw him with the customer his ability to listen and then hone in on what really was troubling or where they really saw opportunity. And what we had to do for them was remarkable so in my short time that I got to work with him. I hope I get to take that away. And when I'm you know working with our customers that I can have that sort of same kind of amphitheater perceptiveness K. So yet moving forward here before the Mike turned on. We were talking about books. You're reading. We mentioned the idea factory. I think anything else. You're reading or when you unplug a little. Bit are looking for wisdom where he seek into that. Yeah what I read a lot of books. I love fiction and but the interesting thing about that book. The idea factor is that you know that was a time of sort of it seemed like endless possibility. There were times before the advent of the Internet and when people felt like there was endless possibility. And the Ma Belle. At and T. Their vision was connecting every human every other human. Have you heard that before and so just that different error but also seeing the endless possibility? They saw how they tried to capitalize on that with innovation. Mean you know in Silicon Valley. Were you know I've been for several decades? Let's say you know that's always what you're thinking about is innovating and seeing how that was done back in the day and they had some incredible incredible innovations at bell. Labs is an interesting interesting comparison. I mean I'm sure it goes back in a we say this is the great Internet's a great age of innovation. I'm sure you can go back office. Leads and industrial blue CETERA. And and at that same excitement about the possibilities now people are seeing it with. Ai Maybe with a little more trepidation. I don't think there was a lot of trepidation with the invention of the transistor as there may be with the invention of artificial intelligence of In potential alien intelligence you mentioned fiction we gotta Gal about that a little bit i. So what type of fiction written Sifi? I read some Sifi Love Neil. Stevenson bit. Read most of his red- yeah. Yeah it was crazy stat several three. Am regretful am reading sessions. Were my wife is rolling her eyes because you have to get up at seven of US. Why did you stay operating any other Classic Author Verner. Vange or anyone that you started. You know my reading career reading. Fantasy and JR Tolkien's shirt massive fan and George arm Martin. And so you know I was. I come back to that John Reid occasionally but I like to read all different kinds of books. I love you know thrillers. I find going into a Bookstore. Extremely difficult because it's just sensory overload. I see sometimes I'm like can we just have a moratorium on writing books for like two years and then I can catch up. There won't be any new books that I'll just methodically go through. And then everyone can start writing again. Yeah Really Evan. Thanks so much for being generous. With your time. If there was one final takeaway you would leave forever with listening. Maybe you called action inspirational. What would it be well? I think it's a thread. That's run through it. But when I talk to entrepreneurs the number one thing I say is to stay true to that vision that Northstar and every decision.

mark benef Evan Larry idea factory partner Sweden B. Company Donna Ma Belle US Northstar Silicon Valley Mike Verner Stevenson John Reid
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:54 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Any tips on maybe articulating that and you know getting aligned with a large client and moving forward so you can stay focused. It starts with making sure that you choose the right right large client. And that's you know you're GONNA have salespeople chomping at the bit and you're GonNa have technical people saying we can't do that. That's way off our technology target. And that's you know then it really just comes down to the entrepreneur and the CEO to make that decision. That really is nobody else that can make that decision. And I think it's a judgment call so you make a good choice on whether to sign somebody up like that and then really manage it but the most important thing is that you have clear expectations on both sides that you're able to tell that customer but here's what we're going to be able to do and here's what we're not going to be able to do and that's incredibly hard and obviously the salesperson is typically not going to do that and again that's where the CEO has to come in and get at a meeting of the minds with the principal with the decision maker on the other side to have clear expectations. That's the best. You sorta definitely so sweet growing. I'm curious what are some other mistakes? Maybe that you made along the way in the early days of net sweet where you course corrected but maybe they set you back a little bell or they're things that just won't forget now. Yeah and you make a lot of mistakes and obviously the key is to just learn from them. They are inevitable. I think you know. Sometimes you can learn by very negative things that happen to your company and in the case of the meltdown. In two thousand eight I mean this is you know ten years into the history of the company but the pace of business expansion slowed obviously less business. Being created businesses. Were not investing as much they were just kinda drawn hunker down so you know that year we saw I think two thousand nine we saw like nine percent growth whereas we'd had thirty forty percent growth previously and returned to thirty percent growth after that so we were struggling along with everybody else to make sure we could you know. Get the revenues of the company to would hiring kind of slowed to a trickle but at least that we keep everybody on board we were newly public and the one thing that happened during that period was we realized that we had not been great stewards as good stewards for our existing customers as we could. We were growing so fast that the fact that we lost ten or fifteen percent of our customers for a variety of reasons. Obviously when you're dealing with smaller companies some of that is inevitable but some of it was very avoidable as we learned hindsight and so the pressure of just trying to sort of preserve everydollar allowed us. You know we looked under the rug and like Oh. We're not managing our existing customers as well as we could. We actually retooled our entire sales for us to be able to service customers once they've implemented are going to potentially use new capabilities but also just to make sure they're going to renew. We retooled our support retooled so much during that time that we stuck with even when the growth came back. And so I. In retrospect we saw some of the mistakes we made and we corrected them in. That's I think been even today. We can look back at that time and say that was a huge component of our success was the course correction. We did there sure. And I'm curious with everything on your life you know you're raising a family or doing all these things was the IPO. A moment of reflection for your was there any point in time where you're like. Wow I we did it. And you just pause for a moment to reflect on pause and we went to New York and rang the bell and it was super exciting and right afterwards. I got to send a message to the whole company which was something like. I said I love you all but I mean I really. It was a time where we I think we felt as a family everybody here in California was six thirty. Am They all came into the office? We had breakfast for them. And you know I mean I think one of the things. We've tried to do over. The years in every company is a gross tries to keep the essence of who they were when they started and we were always a very family friendly company and always sort of felt like a family as much as a business can. We were very professional organization. We take what we do. I mean we're for do Sheri's for this incredibly important information for customers. We take that incredibly seriously. But we don't necessarily take ourselves too seriously and you know that moment you know when I said that I kind of turned red when I looked at my wife. I can't believe I just said that but really that was a moment where I realized that we built more. We built a community. And you know people come into work every single day and obviously develop friendships there and you developed respect for people and you learn from people and it's an incredibly important part of your life and I think we build business software. That people sort of have to us. You have to use business afterward and running businesses. You can't possibly do it without you know. And so that degree it's a necessity but on the flip side. It's something that people use every single day and that is a big part of their work lives and so when we think about how we can make it better. We do kind of try to think in that family. We're building it for our family and one of the things that happened when we were purchased by Oracle is that we got a question we did a Qa with markered late markered who is such an incredible supporter of net Sweden. So so so missed but he you know one of the questions was in a and this was from. I think apart a net sweet partner like a company that helps you know implement net sweet. But they're not employs and they said well net street has this real family feel and how they treat everybody in their ecosystem. Do you think they'll be able to preserve that you know as an Oracle's notice hard charging are they going to be able to preserve that as part of Oracle and mark made a funny answer said something like well? I think I'm pretty Nice Guy. So I mean I think that whole family orientation not only is obviously how we respect families deeply in. It's an incredibly important part of our culture. Not Everybody is family. I all and family is way more important than anything else way. More Borton business offer. It's more important than everything we do. But I think looking at it that way and the chance at the IPO to sort of reflect on. That's that togetherness that we felt at that time. Just you know. It was a combination of such hard work. And of course the next day fly back to get in the office. Everything's the same vicious avenue to deal with and back to the grind but a good moment of reflection for sure so you've stayed after the acquisition by worker you've stayed on and I think that's kind of a testament to the culture remaining intact despite being oracle so you mentioned that not taking yourself too seriously. The family component. But are there any other lessons? Maybe you have on culture building or keeping it fun not taking. The connection of the past is incredibly important. That vision of the company has remained the same from the get. Go and that we can hearken back to those days above the hair salon and that what animated us. What should animate us today in? What's been interesting is being becoming. Part of Oracle is. We've really double down on our core constituency which these fast growing businesses that grow from startup to you know significant business with hundreds of employees that transition even thousands of employs that transition. That time when you get off the initial kind of systems that you got just because you had to and go on to a rail system that sort of everything together that time and accompanies history. That's what we've been able to refocus on whether it was always our wheelhouse but now are just absolutely laser focused on those fast growing businesses. And so that's I think tied the team together even better than before you know most of our key contributors have stayed and I think it's a two way street you know we love working together. All of us and the challenge is definitely preserving those aspects of the culture within the larger company but also taking advantage of the larger company and fortunately Oracle minnows kind of publicly shown that it's undergoing a transformation and it's very aligned with how net sweet looks at the world very customer centric very employee centric thinking about how we can help companies but how we can also help other organizations with the reach and the capabilities that we have. I think we've been very lined with that transformation. So that's been exciting to see that and they kind of back and forth that we have with the larger organization it changes. Yeah so that's involved in social impact. Obviously and I heard that that kind of got the genesis was at a PTA meeting or well it was my wife was president of the PTA. Okay and she. Hap casually mentioned that Lapore. You know it's hard to figure out what's going on financially because we have two copies of quickbooks because they're different people's houses and I'm like solution for that and so we got the PTA off of two copies of quickbooks onto one copy of net sweet and it seemed to work really well and volunteers could use it from their homes and see what was going. Everyone was playing from the same playbook that's decreed the animating principle of net sweet and so once we did that and obviously we gave it to 'em for free out like I bet there's a lot of other organizations that probably have sort of messy finances and yet certainly everyone talked about at the time you know maybe in the early two thousands. You heard a lot of talk about nonprofit organizations running more like businesses in terms of really understanding the ROI being efficient with the use of donor funds and we kind of felt like we could be part of that transformation for that you industry so to speak and that's how we built up what we called. Net Sweet Dot Org which is transformed into oracle net sweet social impact. I mean the core that program started with giving away net suite two small charities and enterprises and then helping them actually implemented by having employees. Do Pro Bono work to help them. Succeed with the service is obviously. Don't want to just throw it over to them and say good luck and it's a great program. We call it sweet pro Bono because we put Sweden in front of everything and it allows employees worked for great organizations that they believe in learn more about net. Sweet I mean the engineers are programming. The software they don't necessarily always get to see how it works in the field so to speak so they get to learn and get outside sort of their daily worried about not sweets. That's super obviously helpful for net sweetest an organization so the employees get big benefit nets. We can speak bedroom obviously truly believe that these organizations We talk about them. Being able to do good better when they better visibility and control of their operations as they grow just like a business. You know they're not for profit but they definitely are looking at how they're spending and how they can be most effective for sure and so we have a lot of business owners or aspiring business owners. That are listening to this podcast for those. That aren't familiar with that sweet. I'm curious now. How do you pitch the company to CEO's and what are some misconceptions that you get new still well? The basic pitch is exactly as it was when we started the company which is basically everything you need to grow all in one place when we built the first dashboard because we had enough of the crm capabilities in the financial and web capabilities. For People at Solden web stores to be able to actually show everything that was sort of going on in the heart of your business and we built something called the executive dashboard. That was a real seminal moment and still to this very day I say. Imagine just having a dashboard on your phone wasn't on your phone back then but imagine having now. Imagine having a dashboard on your phone. That has all your critical information up to date and in real time about your core operations. Not your financial operations. Your Customer Relationship Management Muir web operations human resources. Everything right there on your phone..

Oracle CEO Sweden principal Solden California Sheri New York partner president Hap executive Lapore
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

06:12 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

"With it but it was seriously only a couple of weeks later that we actually that. I actually pulled up our company's information at my house on a web browser and I was like Whoa. Whoa this is gonNA work. I mean it was bad. It was obvious that the ability to have anytime anywhere access to the critical information about your business was that was going to sell goal. And when you're getting the company started I'm curious you do a forensic family round raise money or you bootstrapping or you know. We had one. Initially we had one visa. That was Larry and we did eventually attract another. He'd actually joined with. Larry and I had an incredible relationship. Who's actually a BC firm out of New York? It was one of the biggest most successful women with four partners. Three were women. And one of those women. Debbie Farrington became the this is like a year end of the companies joined the company and became a board member and incredible contributor to the company. So that was an an amazing experience with that was really nice. To supplement Larry's input with a seasoned VC relate relate. You know it was the right type. I guess you might say that really believed in the long-term vision of the company and supported the company through sort of thick. And thank because we did go through to meltdowns you know so we have that those scars of both the financial meltdown. Two thousand eight but also the DOT COM bubble burst in two thousand so we weathered both of those storms so tickets back briefly to the hair salon. When you're getting your above the hairstyle early offices. You're getting things going What were those early days? Like as you're starting you know you're going from net ledger in that sweet. You're seeing it was great. We had similar to embed software which was the first company I did. We attracted and early group of passionate early adopters. That really believed in it. And they were like small companies that were run out of their house and they had people scattered around and that they everyone could be playing off the same playbook they you know they believed in the vision and they were sort of visionary customers and we were flying by the seat of our pants. You know the only other company to deliver in the cloud of course. It wasn't called that called various things application service providers but the only other one really that we knew of was salesforce. Dot Com is my friend mark. Benny off started three months. After we did he came up to me as I really wanted to do. Sales after that was what my passion was and I talked about with him and Larry came up and he said well we're going to do something like sort of see bowl but on the web he he said. I'm going to start my own Internet company. I was like Oh. That's a great idea. I think that might work out for you. And so we you know both I think both companies certainly we were flying by the seat of our pants. We had to do an upgrade from net. Ledger version ones at version. One dot one like that and it went awry and we were up all night til like nine in the morning. And then one of my He'd technologists like okay. I'm never doing that again. And he totally rewrote. How we stored the multi tenant data route road kind of the whole baldy tendency. Model that we've used you know for twenty years based on our all nighter that we pulled. I mean it was a superfund time. I as I said. Nineteen Ninety eight was year that my first child was born my daughter. I kind of got to see her. Grow up so she was a toddler and my wife was bringing her in the wagon to the office and bringing sandwiches for everybody and it was you know and the Hair Salon was playing super loud music below. Us and my co-founder would sit there banging room on the floor to try to get them to turn down. You know it was amazing time and we did feel especially after we saw it running for ourselves we really felt like we were on the leading edge of a huge wave and that definitely animated motivated us so you starting to see the wave. You're running for yourself. Where was the first large customer you closed and landed where you're like okay? This is going to expand to in the B. Two B. World fast. You know we had a few customers that were visionaries. We had a company that handled farms like the accounting for farms throughout California and it was pretty big and that was really a lot larger than other customers so that you know one of the things that this is true for all companies especially in B. Two B. Software maybe not so much and B. to C. but to be softer you inevitably will attract some large customers. They pay you a bunch more. And that's where you get to see whether you're going to stick to your vision or not because they can definitely get you off on a tangent for example when we you know there were companies that said well we really would like to have the data at our data center. Can you host it out? Our data center though was really contrary to our whole vision of a hosting it for them and get taking it off their premises. We didn't do that even though there was significant. Money involved and we stayed focused to our vision of serving the Bassett companies. They don't want their data now. They think it's crazy that they had the dummy back. Then we'd have to convince them that we could store it more securely than they could like do you really know where your data is and is it possible that someone could just you know put back then it would probably be like a disc or something not many. I don't know if we had USB and just take your entire customer list as they left the company and when they think about it they'd say oh. Yeah maybe it's not that great our securing it right now but we had to have that discussion. Now it's obvious the opposite any company that comes along and says we want you to your data. People look at them. Kinda cross eyed but staying true to your vision and even when those larger customers come along. Certainly they're helpful and they obviously helped drive investment. You can reinvest those revenues into growing the company. But how do you manage to to service them but still stay true to your vision? That's one of the big challenges I think companies happens. They grow especially in B. Two B. Yeah I think that's probably the largest challenge unbeatable because it's so tempting when you're a large contractor you're looking at it and you know you feel an obligation to service the client do good at that but at the same time you know as a subject matter expert you have way more sets of data that you're working with and like you see that vision you see that focus..

Larry Hair Salon salesforce Debbie Farrington New York BC co-founder Benny California
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:07 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Evan joining us. We were chatting a little bit before we got on. Mike about history. Silicon Valley your experience. And where the industry's leading at large so of course the interview we can get back to that but where I want to start with. Your story is at the beginning. So could you tell us a little bit about where you grew up? And where you're from sure. I grew up in Lexi Massachusetts near Boston and I would. School in Boston. Came out here when the nineteen eighties. Leave it or not went to work for Oracle when Kinda got to pursue. What was my lifelong dream of building? Software I always pretty much from day one that I started using a computer figured out that this is what I wanted to do. Very cool and when you first got out to the valley the eighties or coal is booming growing fast. The time it's probably like the company to work for at the time. So what was that process like? And how did you land that job? Well that's actually interesting story so I could kind of see the writing on the wall at the center of gravity for what I wanted to do right. Software was moving from the East Coast to the West Coast and I was huge apple fan and I thought maybe I'd go work for Apple. They obviously do software and hardware. My sister worked for Fidelity in Boston. And that wasn't necessarily a great time to go work for apple for a variety reasons and she said but if you really want to go to the West Coast. I am investing in this company called Oracle because she was running like Fidelity Software Mutual Fund. And she was you know buying Oracle like it was going out of style and she said this guy. Larry Ellison he's a pioneer in this world of databases which I knew absolutely nothing about and so I you know on a flyer. Wet and visited Oracle came out. I was in California for the first time since I've been a kid and it was February and it was green and seventy degrees. I'll do I have to go back. So yeah so that you know. I came out with a lot of people from college. Because Oracle had decided they wanted to just you know populate their company with college grads and you know that was a great group. It's Kinda like a class of it was actually called class of so it was really fun way to get introduced especially since. I didn't really know anybody out here. And all of a sudden. I had these friends so it had a great kind of culture and I'm still super close with a lot of those people that came out from the East Coast at the same time as I did so when I came out from the East Coast. It was a bit of a culture shock in a great way. So I'd found the conversation topics scope of interest in DC. Pretty narrow compared to what I found out here we and then you would really got the shock of the century. I believe it was that like for you. And how did you get acclimated? You had that class and yeah well yeah. I didn't have really any family out here. Anything so that you know. That's where it kind of centered around my friends at Oracle and then friends. I made through other things that he did out here but the main thing for me was Boston at the time seemed really insular and California was much more open certainly more sort of multicultural and you know just melting like really melting pot to me. It seemed like the essence of America as a true melting pot in Boston. It's kind of like yeah. You had these neighborhoods and groups that you know kind of didn't really talk much of what they did. It wasn't necessarily great. I mean obviously that's it. He's changed massively. But I had just a negative reaction to that kind of silo. World and California was definitely much more my speed Berko. And when you're at Oracle and you're seeing what's going on and Ellison's running the company I'm curious. What are some big takeaways that you learned at Oracle during your time working there? Yeah well the big thing was that Larry's passion for what they did. He was a very key and remains very compelling figure very passionate about technology and how it can you know improve lives of the people that use it and he's always pushing the envelope a news very inspirational so certainly he would just walk around. He'd managed by walking around too much grabbing. You'd see you know there. Were probably only a thousand people at Oracle then most of them were you know in. Belmont where we were and You know just getting to see him walking the halls and if you'd stop and chat and you know he'd drop a word or two hours deciding. I was working in the core database team. Which was you know prestigious place to work? But I didn't feel sort of what I was doing was close enough to the user and at the time Mark Benny off. It started the MAC group at Oracle so tried to take Oracle software and make it more accessible using you know the Mac the great Mac you I mean I was deciding which I want to do. Larry passed me in the hall and said You know five started out my career. I'd go work in the macro also and it was like you know getting anointed with Holy Oil. So I mean I just I mean staying connected and Saint connectors the history of the company. That's what I've seen through. The oracle is so much comes back to the company's origins and they still remain true to so many of the so much of the vision that they had back that and that certainly what. I've tried to do it. Let's wait so after before we get into net sweet after Oracle to get a start up and where you really cut. Your teeth may be on Silicon Valley and what everything means an entrepreneurship mandatory? Silicon Valley failure. I love the box. Would you mind sharing a little bit out? In nineteen ninety-five. The Internet was exploding. I really wanted to be part of it. I felt like I learned a ton at Oracle and that was my dream. It was always my dream to have my own company and be building software that people loved. And that's what we did. And we build technology for enhancing websites with animation and interactivity something like flash in fact. Our competitor was company. Called Future Splash which was bought by macro media to create flash that sort of was the nail in the coffin for us. They had the connection. Macaroni denied the connection all the sort of developers that we were trying to reach but we did have an incredibly loyal following. I loved what we built but we couldn't make it viable as an ongoing concern. But I did learn a ton about you. Know running a small company and that was really the I guess the ashes on which I built the idea of net sweet. And so you take the ashes you take the Detroit. Maybe sorry all of those experiences. The pain obviously and heard you had around like a five minute conversation with Larry. Yeah Yeah So. He helped me out on the first company but sort of in the background. It wasn't necessarily up his alley but he invests in people. And that's another thing. I've certainly learned from him. So that's the most important ingredient by far And so I got on the phone with him. He'd call me every once in a while. Say How's your graphic stuff going? That's what he called it and I said well not great McCarty. Have you know a lunch is being eaten by macro media? And I don't think we're going to be able to make it but I have learned a ton about running a business and I'd like to shift gears and shift to business software because there aren't really good systems we have all these systems and it's a mess and you know in my mind. I thought big companies had these great systems as I've learned not necessarily but that was sort of my idea. Oracle had good systems to run internally. It was running a lot of its own stuff so I said well I build something like those systems that are for big companies but for small companies they said. Oh that's perfect if I were to do a startup right now. It's very similar to what he said when he said I should. Macaroni said well. If I were doing a start up right now I would build accounting for the web. You know something like quick books but delivered as a web application. I said Accounting while I was kind of sales because I wanted to learn about my pipeline whereas my next deal coming from you know what do I need to do to close the ill me said oh? Yeah we'll do the front office stuff but I you know there's companies already done in his head I we gotta do the back office stuff. Because the accounting. That's like we're all your customers your products that you sell your employees. It's all there and we'll have to build front office stuff. We'll have to build a Web Story. Said because a lot of these companies are gonNA sell on the web and so the most important thing is. It's gotTa be a web application. I don't remember the exact terminology use. It should run on the Internet. People don't know these companies can't manage databases. I thought that showed some self awareness that he knew that the software is not easiest. So they don't WANNA run databases so we need to run it for him so I think that you know it was really was a five minute. Phone conversation is shifted you know. The founders of the first company shifted gears up in San Francisco. You know in what was called back then. Multimedia Gulch. I'm really aging myself. Now is in the Mid Nineties. Were eight yeah. Eight hundred park was going up right as it was called or Pacific Bell Park. Now Oracle Park was going up right in front of our eyes so I was living in the city but that year in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight I got married. I had my first child and we started what was called Net ledger at the time which became renamed. Its net sweet when we realized well maybe we should name it based on the idea of the company rather than our first product and you know all of a sudden I was down in Menlo Park living in Menlo Park and and programming accounting software. I didn't know anything about a used quickbooks but on the first day the CO founders. Had GO OUT. We bought like four copies of Accounting Textbook. So we'd learn how this stuff works. Fortunately I later got a product manager. That actually knew about accounting but a couple of months later liar causes. How's it going? You're now you're living down the peninsula and programming accounting software. Not you're not in the city anymore. What's it like? I mean it's probably not that different. I'm like yeah it's programming. You know to some degree program programming but yeah it was a radical that was maybe more culture shock than coming and living out in California was programming business software and but the cool thing was that a few months later we got enough of it working to actually use it ourselves so we started the company in terms of just dealing with our expenses and our checking account everything on quickbooks but as soon as we add something up and running of course we wanted to eat our dog food so we loaded our quickbooks file into our system. And you know I take it on. Faith that Larry was really the passionate one the passionate one about the sweet that should be one application and you should be one dashboard. You should be able to go to one place and see everything about business. I was sort of my passion and he believed in that also but his passion was. This should run as a web application. He told me early on. He said you know I. We had like mainframes and then we had client server while now we have these web applications and this is how people are going to run business applications for the next thousand years. I don't know what's going to happen after that. But definitely for the next thousand years so he was a huge believer in it. I didn't really know yet. And in fact I'd gone to a party at Larry's house where Steve Jobs is sort of my one and only direct encounter with Steve Jobs who you know. I worship like everybody else. I was at Apple. I computer was apple too and I you know I came out thinking I was gonna go wherever I loved up. I went to the macro but he said to me said Yeah. Larry seems you know really excited about this thing where you do accounting and a browser does anyone. WanNa do accounting in a browser and I was like I don't actually know but Larry seem sure so..

Oracle Larry Ellison California Boston Apple Silicon Valley East Coast Oracle Park Macaroni Evan Mike Lexi Massachusetts Fidelity Software Mutual Fund Pacific Bell Park Detroit Fidelity America Accounting Textbook
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

01:45 min | 8 months ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Everyone it's Chad. Ceo Mission Dot Org. Today's episode. We're going to talk about the origins of net sweet..

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Be done in like five hundred the VM on rag on track confidence right now. We're all we need them. It's which actor I'm talking talking to come on all right. Can I do one more thing of course been. It's these questions that spawn our conversations decisions about the creative process like I said been coming from people on the Internet we get a lot of questions that can spawn a whole conversation and then we get some that are just off topic pick and weird which I've been enjoying asking one of those questions Ama at the is it is a bit like today so the off topic question region. This is from Rob Shelia from Dayton Ohio. That'd be great name Yeah Right. Do you believe in an intelligent alien life. If he has any thoughts on why or why not they might be here. I'm going with Ben Probably but I don't know yeah I I if I had to bet. I'd bet on something but I don't know I think so. What's what what have been anywhere in the universe or here on earth? Wait is the question here on earth. Well well the question I leaving intelligent life if yes what about them if there is well if there's advanced intelligent life then I would imagine they have been here but I don't for any real have any reason to believe there's advanced intelligent life. I tend to believe that tech societies certain technological level and then either obliterate themselves turn themselves into energy. That's where we're headed. Yeah that is a series. That's a theory that we have not encountered any other. Aliens is anyone incapable of encountering us has blown themselves up or or or there's just one alien race that annihilates everyone when they get to a certain level so threatening or are there just hasn't been aliens here. That's the like apparently I think in Brazil for example like their government acknowledges aliens like they don't try. They're like yeah yeah. There's all these things all the time we know New York Times recently about it yeah and there's this recordings of like army jets are fighter uphill attacks that have been released that are just like them me what what is that thinks that looks like a UFO top secret aircraft for Olympic. So part of me thinks it's we. I'm just I'm just super open to it. I think one of the weirdly like I think if anything is become clear the last few years it's like people are like insanely adaptable and I think the knowledge that may be there are aliens was not as Earth shattering information to like the average person has. Maybe we all thought it would be like I think we thought it would be this like globe. It River Lake convened together like a park. We're like we live in a world with alien but said it almost seems like if you look at most people that you think the gap probably seems like a lot of recordings and stuff. They can't explain hey times talks about even NASA came out saying something like so. I think like Mike going through those. If there are aliens they are just that have come here. It is from an energy state. I don't think there's like a ship that there's a lot of evidence that there are ships that have been landing in the ocean. I haven't energy guy. I'm an energy guy typically. The urine energy got more of a purist saucer shaped ship ship that got here would have had to have done something thing different than what we understand from the energy traveling from such a distance fighter pilot recordings and stuff like it seems as though these things move in a way that are unexplained. Oh you mean like an physical boy in a saucer. Though maybe it's energy shade. It didn't say how the energy is just committed saucer weld together. We just cohesively combined are movies getting made yeah. She saw saucer coming soon boys. Thank you for doing this a really appreciate it ladies and gentlemen. That's our show. Thanks for listening. Thank you to the guests this episode Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg a lot of fun getting to do this with them. Thank you the folks who asked this weeks questions pretense Martin Southwell and rob the Shelia PRITAIN's road is on facebook. You can find him under his name his magnificent name Pretense Martin Southwell and Rob Shelia. You can find on twitter at crazy universe and that's crazy with okay. If you WANNA ask a question you can email creative processing hit record dot org or just use twitter facebook instagram use the hashtag creative processing and speaking of hit record if you want to dive into some collaborative art making inspired by some of the things that we talked about on this episode hit.

Rob Shelia It River Lake Shelia PRITAIN twitter Martin Southwell Ben Probably New York Times Seth Rogan facebook Dayton Earth NASA Ama Ohio Brazil Evan Goldberg Mike
"evan goldberg" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on Creative Processing with Joseph Gordon-Levitt

"Everybody welcome to the creative processing podcast. My name is Joe Gordon Levitt. It's the idea of this show is to have a conversation about the creative process that conversation is spawned by one single question that question comes from you out there on the Internet and and then I find a guest or a in the case of this episode two guests that I think will be particularly good at answering that question and then we talked for awhile about doing creative things this week. The guests are Seth Rogan Evan Goldberg. You might know their movies Pineapple Express arrests. This is the end neighbors they wrote Super Bad I was in a couple movies that they made fifty fifty and the night before sausage party the they recently produced a movie that just came out a good boys. They're also venturing into the entrepreneurial space with their company House plant to Cannabis Company Company and despite being incredibly funny. They're also very very smart dudes and I think perfect for this question because of their partnership in the way that they work with other people so the question. This week comes from Pretense Martin Southwell from Springfield Illinois. The question is have you had people bull. You didn't get along with personally turn out to be good to work with professionally or vice versa now. I thought Seth and Evan would be particularly good at answering this question because first of all they're. They're just incredibly collaborative. It's the two of them they do not everything together but the vast majority thirty of their creativity and work is done as a duo as this partnership so I want to hear about how they make that work. How do you have not one person but to people directing a movie? How do you figure out a disagreement? How do you make that partnership work together? And how do you know that this person as opposed to any other people is the one that you really ought to be collaborating with and they also they're not just collaborated with each other. They're they.

Evan Goldberg Seth Rogan Joe Gordon Levitt Cannabis Company Company Martin Southwell Illinois
"evan goldberg" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"To move workers and equipment to areas most likely to be affected we are positioning resources for rapid restoration and strongly encourage you to take the necessary steps to prepare for possible extended power outages make sure you have the supplies needed on hand and keep a close watch on the weather for more go to F. P. L. dot com or download the F. P. L. mobile app you can also receive text message updates after the storm by texting the word joining to my F. P. L. that's J. O. Y. and two six nine three seven five please stay safe if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business Evan Goldberg founder of net sweet I had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why I started net sweet I needed to see everything that was going on with my business in one place so we built the world's first cloud business system and after twenty years over sixteen thousand companies run their businesses on that sweet everything you need to keep growing is in one place financials HR commerce customer info and more next week gives you the visibility and control you need to make smart decisions and grow with confidence that's why companies who use netsuite grow three times faster than the S. and P. five hundred find out the rest of Evan story and get your free guide titled seven key strategies to grow your profits and next week dot com slash faster that's not three dot com slash faster for your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits go right now to net sweet dot com slash faster dot org public service announcement brought to you by the US department of health and Human Services adoptee with kids and the ad council.

J. O. Y. founder F. P. L. Evan Goldberg netsuite US department of health and Hu twenty years
"evan goldberg" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"If you don't know your numbers you don't know your business meet Evan Goldberg founder of net sweet I had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why I started net sweet I needed to see everything that was going on with my business in one place so we built the world's first cloud business system and after twenty years over sixteen thousand companies run their businesses on that sweet everything you need to keep growing is in one place financials HR commerce customer info and more net sweet gives you the visibility and control you need to make smart decisions and grow with confidence that's why companies who use netsuite grow three times faster than the S. and P. five hundred find out the rest of Evan story and get your free guide titled seven key strategies to grow your profits and that's we dot com slash patriot that's that's we dot com slash patriot for your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits go right now to nets we dot com slash patriot nets we dot com slash patriot if you use the J. flex as a crazy to think about all the things we learned in school that we never use again but what about the really important stuff our classes didn't cover like proper financial No Way Out thank of America has you covered with tips on saving budgeting all the better money help is needed to reach your goal what are you planning for a big purchase or just for your future bank of America is there to guide you I know because I've been a bank of America customer pulled eighteen years what would you like the power to do take the next step today learn more a break for Marika dot com here it comes again lunch will be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new Jamaican jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for media save time order the new Jamaican jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives just reading the cations limited time only plus tax prices may vary for the pre.

founder America firehouse subs Evan Goldberg netsuite bank of America Turkey eighteen years twenty years
"evan goldberg" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"CBS news time six forty one sexually abused as a child in New York the child victims act could help contact the attorneys at Jeff Anderson and associates today visit Anderson advocates dot com fifty two doing street seventh floor New York New York one zero zero zero seven six four six eight four six twenty five forty two if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business meet Evan Goldberg founder of net sweet I had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why I started net sweet I needed to see everything that was going on with my business in one place so we built the world's first cloud business system and after twenty years over sixteen thousand companies run their businesses on that sweet everything you need to keep growing is in one place financials HR commerce customer info and more net sweet gives you the visibility and control you need to make smart decisions and grow with confidence that's why companies who use netsuite grow three times faster than the S. and P. five hundred find out the rest of Evan story get your free guide titled seven key strategies to grow your profits and nets we dot com slash radio that's nets we dot com slash radio for your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits go right now to net sweet dot com slash radio will advance to the city and save yourself some time and money by parking with spot hero download the apt type in your destination and reserve your spot with spot hero and promo code eight any gets ten dollars off your first park with spot hero park smarter Monday morning at six forty two and read Hillary's here.

New York Jeff Anderson founder Hillary CBS Evan Goldberg netsuite twenty years ten dollars
"evan goldberg" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KCBS All News

"About having to mow the lawn again good news is it's easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car insurance which of course will go right into the lawn progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business meet Evan Goldberg founder of net sweet I had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why I started net sweet I needed to see everything that was going on with my business in one place so we built the world's first cloud business system and after twenty years over sixteen thousand companies run their businesses on that sweet everything you need to keep growing is in one place financials HR commerce customer info and more net sweet gives you the visibility and control you need to make smart decisions and grow with confidence that's why companies who use netsuite grow three times faster than the S. and P. five hundred find out the rest of Evan story get your free guide titled seven key strategies to grow your profits and that's we dot com slash radio that's nets we dot com slash radio for your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits go right now to net sweet dot com slash radio the F. financial news headlines Sir sponsored by the super micro Intel money desk get told navy for star spangled style right now everything's on sale up to sixty percent off that's right get everything from tees shorts dresses and swim all at sixty percent off now till July seventh at Old Navy in Old Navy dot com valid through seven seven select styles only twenty eight he CVS first for traffic.

founder navy Old Navy Evan Goldberg netsuite Intel sixty percent twenty years
"evan goldberg" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KGO 810

"Background checks for ammunition sales in california goes into effect on monday it's the result of voter approved proposition sixty three nearly three years ago governor newsome says it's too easy to buy bullets today you walk into a walgreens or c._v._s. or rite aid and you try to buy sudafed You gotta provide some information right now. at this moment as we speak you can buy unlimited rounds of ammunition on your smartphone it delivered your doorstep the next day supporters say the new law closes a loophole in existing rules aimed at reducing illegal weapons opponents say goes to foreign infringing on the rights of law abiding citizens a harvard university study says northern california residents should prepare for increases and smoke exposure as a result of global warming climate researcher loretta may mickley says climate change will result in more intense and frequent wildfires turning out waves of smoke that will cause premature deaths to spike mickley says residents of northern california western oregon washington state and the northern rockies could see the most increases in smoke exposure and this news report is sponsored by dependable heating and air lock in your thirty nine nine nine a._c. tuneup offer from dependable heating and air by dialing pound two fifty from your cellphone say the keyword dependable that's pound two fifty keyword dependable turn to the carrier experts and we'll take a look at the roadways with mark nieto next on cagey if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business meet evan goldberg founder of net sweet i had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why i started net sweet i needed to see everything that was going on with my business.

california governor newsome loretta oregon mark nieto founder researcher mickley washington evan goldberg three years
"evan goldberg" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on KNSS

"Mornings at nine eight seven and thirteen thirty s i with the news and i talk about it ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty k n s s broadcasting from the air capital of the world cayenne s wichitas number one talk radio dot com station summer means picnics parties and getting together are you ready walgreens is and we're just minutes away with great deals on all your summer essentials including twelve pack soft drinks like coke and pepsi three for nine ninety nine limit three and twenty four pakistani water buy one get one free limit four with great prices and easy in easy out your summer starts here walgreens trusted since one thousand nine hundred one offers valid with card while supplies last restrictions and exclusions apply see store for details if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business meet evan goldberg founder of net sweet i had to learn that the hard way with my first company that's why i started net sweet i needed to see everything that was going on with my business in one place so we built the world's first cloud business system and after twenty years over sixteen thousand companies run their businesses on net sweet everything you need to keep growing is in one place financials h._r. commerce customer info and more net sweet gives you the visibility and control you need to make smart decisions and grow with confidence that's why companies who use net sweet grow three times faster than the s. and p. five hundred find out the rest of evans story get your free guide titled seven key strategies to grow your profits at nets we dot com slash radio that's netflix dot com slash radio for your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits go right now to sweet dot com slash radio combining home and auto at state farm gets you great coverage for less combining.

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"evan goldberg" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

The Pat McAfee Show

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

"I wanna talk about whenever you I cracked into the industry, so you're doing stand up comedy in Vancouver and then you end up in Hollywood in writing for everything. What was the big jump was jut appetite found you what was your big break? Almost in the Hollywood into Hollywood. Yeah, it was for sure. I was doing stand up comedy in high school. I started when I was like thirteen. And around the time I was like, sixteen, it'd be tame clear that I was not going to graduate high school. Two for that was academically driven. And so I kind of spend more time writing me and Evan Goldberg, who's my partner. We're already writing super bad at the time. It was the first movie we wrote and. We, yeah, and then I got an agent through doing stand up comedy, and I dish in for freezing UCS in Vancouver while I was still in high school, and I got cast on the show from high school and then I moved to LA and that was definitely, you know, I've changed Franko with on that show. I met him when I was sixteen. I've been working with him for twenty years basically though. Yeah, that was definitely impactful. Did you have to get your GED like how's that seven got his GED. Like from a community college, I don't even have a GED holy shit. This is no knowledge. I should probably know this. About something that I mean, I don't know. I don't hide it, but I am just a high school dropout. That's awesome. Such a g move, I love that. Unbelievable. So then you get in to every single idea you have is a hilarious one, the the, the Hanukkah Christmas movie. You came out with a little bit ago. Incredible. For the holiday season, the sausage party was fucking genius. I mean, it seems as if everything is incredible. So you write direct act at it. Everything do do anything, not high. Yeah, I, I don't always act while I don't always. I'm not always high. What I'm asking because is literally is just, you know, I think energy is a big part of performing and there's a undeniable. Link between smoking weed and having babies slightly low energies. But then it's never like impacted my dignity on this. I right where I'm I directed him yet. It do. I mean, I really, I don't find that it. Yeah, I don't find that Ebbets my productivity or my willingness to work or the quality of my work I do when I'm performing. It makes it a little harder. I respect that a lot because as a fellow high guy, I respect getting into the brain of other. Hi guys. Have you ever had a moment where you go os? Shit, I'm too high. You trip out and stop smoking for like a week in what was that situation? I've never had that. Never in your life. If you got into high that you had a freak out, you've never tripped. I have. I never stopped smoking for a week because of. Long time, the library of groups at home that you just have written that you just go through this? I maybe I want to do this one this year or next year. I wish we have a lot of ideas that we're working on, but we don't have like backlogged. That are actually completed. We have. We've a lot of ideas that were that we would like to write in the slowly finding the time to write. But yeah, I wish I had just like a library laying around would drink my life. My. Cheesier see, super bad whenever you're fucking ten years old. Right? That's like that's a movie that people base their life around and you're like a adolescent child. But so what set the scene for me for one of these writing sessions with you and your boys set? The scene is their music instrumentals playing in the background. What's the mood? What are you on a beach? Where do you? Where do you do most of your action. We write a lot at one of our houses. We have an office, we don't love going to it. We really office like the right. What our houses me and Evan, we write together. We sit there together for writing with other people. We sit there with them. We wrote softened party with other people and two of our other best friends. And so, yeah, we, we literally all just sit there together and right together and listen to music..

Evan Goldberg Hollywood Franko Vancouver Ebbets partner LA twenty years ten years
"evan goldberg" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"evan goldberg" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"The founder of net sweet evan goldberg he's also the ev p of development still started this company twenty years ago hundred percent cloud based company before any of us we were all still sucking our thumbs when it comes to cloud based but having some people are afraid of the cloud a little bit before we get into what you're going to talk about in your keynote can you help people to understand maybe a little bit better so they can alleviate some of their fears of cloud based anything one of the things that we addressed early on in the company's history was this kind of tension between wanting to sort of hug your data and keep it really close to you are you going to let someone else be the steward of your data the fact is now that even if you get close to you you're all normal i mean every computer is generally on the internet and can be attacked and isn't it better than you have a team of professionals that are spend their day and a twenty four hours a day basically we have people around the world securing your data dan relying sort of on yourself or sorta threadbare it staff to make sure that no one can get access to it so you know we really truly believe that when you put your data in that suite that you're you're upgrading the security and we've had you know had a tremendous track record of over twenty years of keeping that data safe you know it's funny i think of the guy that works shut my it stuff and he has a little bit of a twitch and i know why because he's always worried about you know it's all on his shoulders.

founder evan goldberg dan twenty years twenty four hours hundred percent
Florida prosecutors seek death penalty in Parkland school shooting

Herman Cain

01:35 min | 2 years ago

Florida prosecutors seek death penalty in Parkland school shooting

"Says the roads are open complete weather and traffic update here in about four minutes the permit for a rally against school violence is approved at the state capital after governor deal intervenes governor nathan deal has agreed to be named host of the march twenty four rally but says that doesn't mean he agrees with the views of anyone organization attending the event in a letter stoneman douglas alum evan goldberg and now lives in atlanta asked the governor to intervene the majority of people who want to see our kids safe in schools would definitely be appreciative of him doing what he can make this work federal lawsuit was brought by organizers of the rally after the permit was initially denied because the door to building authorities procedures weren't met sandra parrish wsb state lawmakers like state representative rick jaspers look for ways to keep georgia students say fluke probably will make a few hard decisions but but can't be scared of that representative paul rake draw sees a pattern among the shooter's every shooter has been on psychotropic drugs and a lot of people are going untreated with mental health issues gaspar says he plans to talk with lawmakers and other states get ideas and not to keep schools safer prosecutors plan to seek the death penalty against florida school shooting suspect nncholas crews he faces seventeen counts of premeditated murder for each of the victims and parkland court documents say he confessed to the shooting shortly after his arrest a public defender said crews quickly guilty to avoid the death penalty you'll have a formal arraignment today wsb news time is four thirty three law enforcement and emergency responders to stand the descend to the cdc in emory this week it's all part of an active threat exercise involving the six jurisdictions that make up the.

Governor Nathan Deal Stoneman Douglas Evan Goldberg Atlanta State Representative Rick Jaspers Gaspar Murder CDC Emory Sandra Parrish Georgia Representative Paul Florida School Four Minutes