38 Burst results for "European Space Agency"

Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:53 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on TechStuff

"That just wasn't going to happen. That's why nasa had no choice but to allow skylab orbit decay to the point where it reentered earth's atmosphere and then broke apart into pieces some of which hit australia by nineteen seventy seven. Nasa was testing glaister called enterprise to verify that the basic designs for the space plane would work but it wouldn't be until nineteen eighty one that the agency would have a space shuttle capable of going into orbit and returning and that space shuttle was columbia and it launched for the first time in april of nineteen eighty-one skylab by the way had already come crashing down in nineteen seventy nine now. The reason even bring up the spatial is that this would become the primary means of bringing astronauts up to the space station and back down again the russians would continue to rely on the soyuz capsule. Take cosmonauts up to mir but the space shuttle would be the main vehicle used to you know shuttle crews and experiments to and from space stations. And that meant that. The design of the shuttle itself would inform the design of future space stations. You want your station to be compatible with your method of transportation. Make sense anyway. In nineteen seventy-nine plans had begun in nasa for a new space station. Like mir this one was planned to be modular with pieces brought up on separate space. Shuttle missions and constructed in orbit and as a steppingstone toward that nasa formed a strategic partnership with the european space agency. One of the early examples of this in the space shuttle era were these things called space. Labs the esa the european space agency created these laboratories. Which would be loaded into the payload cargo bay of the space shuttle and they would serve as lab space for specific experiments. There are lots of different spacelab missions. In fact there were more than twenty of them throughout the space shuttle program now. The space labs were not space stations themselves. They remained connected to the shuttle but their development would lead to advancements in the esa and they would serve as the foundation for space station modules. Down the line in the future there are also plans to have the space shuttle visit salyut stations in partnership with the then soviet union. This gets into politics bit so beginning. In the late sixties. The ussr and usa started to work toward more cooperation. In everything from space exploration to pumping the brakes on the arms race around the world. It wasn't always a super happy fun friendship but it wasn't as adversarial relationship as the two had experienced in the nineteen fifties and early sixties. This period called the detente lasted from nineteen sixty nine to nineteen seventy nine but it ended right around the time. The space shuttle program was making real. Progress will pick up with more about how the political situation affected the space exploration industry. After we take this quick break..

Nasa Glaister European Space Agency Columbia Foundation For Space Station Australia Ussr USA
Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:52 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on NASACast Audio

"Preparing the space station for future. Power boost a mission extension for a couple of station crew members and a spaceflight. I for one of our commercial partners. A few of the stories to tell you about this week at massa on september twelve astronauts akihiko hoshi day of the japan aerospace exploration agency and pasquet of the european space agency conducted a nearly seven hour space walk outside the international space station. The pair attached to support bracket needed for the future installation of the stations third new solar array six of the stations eight existing power channels are being augmented with new arrays to ensure there is sufficient power for future artists. Exploration technology demonstrations and other activities. This was the first spacewalk conducted by two international partner. Astronauts out of the stations quest. Airlock nasa smark vanda high. Npr dubroff of roscosmos had had their stay on board. The international space station extended to march twenty twenty two for vanda high. That means he will hold the record for the longest single spaceflight for an american when he returns to earth is extended stay could also provide valuable insight into how the human body adapts to long duration spaceflight. Which could help us prepare for artists missions to the moon and eventually to mars i think all astronauts or explorers at heart and having the opportunity to contribute to furthering exploration Is is a great opportunity. It's a new experience. And and i'm looking forward to as a human being understanding how it feels to do something like this. On september fifteenth our commercial partners spacex launched. Its inspiration is in from our kennedy space center. Inspiration four is a non nasa mission and the company's first orbital spaceflight featuring an entire crew private astronauts nasa has an agreement with another company axiom space for the first private astronaut mission to the international space station that mission is currently targeted for no earlier than january twenty twenty two technicians at armagh shoot assembly facility recently completed welding of the orion spacecraft's pressure vessel for artists three mission to the moon. The structure is the underlying frame of a ryan's crew macho the air-tight compartment designed to carry astronauts. It has also the first major piece of hardware off the line as nasa shifts from development phase to the production phase of the spacecraft through artists. Nasa will land the first woman and the first person of color on the moon establish a long term presence on the lunar surface and prepare for human missions to mars. We recently teamed with jobe aviation to fly test and all electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft as part of nasa's advanced air mobility national campaign. It was the first time. Nasa has tested one of these aircraft as part of the campaign. These could used in a future to transport people packages or other goods within cities and surrounding areas throughout the country..

International Space Station Akihiko Hoshi Nasa Dubroff Japan Aerospace Exploration Ag European Space Agency Massa NPR Armagh Shoot Assembly Spacex Kennedy Space Center Ryan Jobe
Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News

01:07 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "european space agency" discussed on ARRL Audio News

"International space station or aris. They aren't raja showery k. I five l. i. You tom marshburn. K. e. five h. o. c. kayla baron k. r. i. five l. a. l. and batista's moyer k. I. five k. F. h. a european space agency astronaut launched from kennedy space center in florida won't happen any earlier than october. Thirty first launch will mark the third spacex crew. Nasa's commercial crew program provides transportation to and from the iss crew. Three is expected to spend six months aboard the orbiting laboratory. As part of what's expected to be a seven-member mission teams have a target launch day of no earlier than next april fifteenth for the launch of the space x crew. Four mission..

Tom Marshburn Kayla Baron F. H International Space Station Batista Kennedy Space Center Nasa Florida
Two Spacecrafts to Make Venus Flyby

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | Last month

Two Spacecrafts to Make Venus Flyby

"Spacecraft will fly past Venus Monday and Tuesday. Solar Orbiter, a collaboration between the European Space Agency and NASA will slingshot around the planet to get on course to observe the Sun's polls. A day later, the European and Japanese beppi Colombo will get closer to Venus in a bid to slow down on its way to mercury.

European Space Agency European And Japanese Beppi Co Nasa SUN
Strange Chemical on Venus May Come From Volcanoes, Not Life

BBC World Service

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Strange Chemical on Venus May Come From Volcanoes, Not Life

"This planet. But nothing like his extreme is on the surface of Venus, where 450 Celsius is routine. And also where the brief hopes of life in its complex atmosphere evaporated this week with the paper saying there's not enough water there, but prospects for science that do remain bright with the recent approval of two NASA missions to the planet and one from the European Space Agency ESA Philippa Mason is a planetary geologist on that mission and vision, hoping to use radar to peer through that dense and interesting atmosphere to follow up evidence of volcanic activity and tectonics on the surface beneath the atmosphere gets in the way, Yes, absolutely. It's very thick, very dense atmosphere and know very little optical. Energy from the sun reaches the surface, and this is the problems. We can't do the kinds of optical imaging we do on Venus or Earth. And radar is the only imaging technique we can use The longer wavelength. Allows much greater penetration through the atmospheric gases and is still scattered by then, but to a much less lesser degree. So energy reaches the ground and we can record that. Give us a sense of the the kind of resolution you're going to get basic imaging. We're going for a product, which has a grand resolution cell. Nominally about 30 M. 30 by 30 I square pixel and then we will also image at a higher resolution mode. 10 M. And that will afford us a much better look at interesting Jim mythology, landslides, craters and their internal morphology, all kinds of other structures and the topography that we we wouldn't get with 30 M imagery, So we're very much going for the kinds of scales mapping scales if you like that we use on Earth routinely So

Philippa Mason European Space Agency Nasa
A Trip to Space: This week's space news

A Trip to Space

01:07 min | 2 months ago

A Trip to Space: This week's space news

"Talk stoop down thousand. Sign up to fly to space watching us virgin license. Nasa is trying to fix the hubble space telescope after a memory module failure forced the agency to shut down the conic orbiting observatory. The problem is with the payload computer which halted on june the furtive stopping the spacecraft from collecting science data the telescope and instruments or working as expected but they rely on the payload computer to operate over the next week. The team continue to assess hardware to identify if something else may be causing the problem. European space agency's looking to six astronauts. Join its core as well. As twenty reservists the will operate from academia. They will travel to the international space station. And one day onto the nasa lunar gave. it'll be in orbit around the moon. A total of twenty two thousand five hundred and eighty nine people have applied and submitted a medical certificate in the hype of to the next round. The six will be confirmed late. In twenty twenty two

Space News Astronomy Science Nasa European Space Agency International Space Station Academia
Astronauts Deploy a Second New Solar Array for the International Space Station

Purity Products

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Astronauts Deploy a Second New Solar Array for the International Space Station

"The international space station has a new solar array. A total of six solar panels were installed during an almost seven hour spacewalk. The project was completed by astronauts from the U. S and European Space Agency was their third spacewalk in just over a week. The new arrays have a 15 year. Life

International Space Station European Space Agency U.
Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

Gastropod

02:20 min | 3 months ago

Chocpocalypse Now! Quarantine and the Future of Food

"I've been hearing about this quarantine book for many years many many years because our publisher has been waiting for it for many many years. And certainly i never thought i'd have any personal experience with the topic but i did always wonder and i saved up the question just for this episode. Where did you both get the idea for a book about quarantine. Let's go back a long long long time ago. you know. we are married and We were on a trip together in australia our first time. They're together Staying in sydney and at one point a local friend invited us out to a picnic and that was out on a peninsula on the other side of the bay from sydney proper and it was right by what is now in a hotel. it's called q. Station and it was a quarantine station. That jeff said. Now it's a hotel that remote oceanfront location that made a great for quarantining passengers travelling to australia by boat in the eighteen hundreds turns out to be delightful for people looking to get away from it all today. And that's not uncommon for sites that were used for quarantine in the past when you hear about a quarantine station. They tend be ruins They tend to have been turned into something else The maybe they've been eliminated entirely. Torn down a raised as if quarantine was this obsolete. Strange thing that don't do anymore and so somewhat. Ironically given how the book turned out you know our initial question was really kind of asking what was quarantine. Why did we do it. Where did it go. And why has it gone away. You have to remember. This was many years break ovid but once we began looking we realized that actually corentin hadn't gone anywhere and so in fact as we kind of started pulling the strings of quarantine. We started seeing it everywhere. you know. it's all over the world that was happening at various scales. It was happening in agriculture. Happening with human diseases. Like bola and covid nineteen but it was also even happening in things like on an interplanetary scale with talking to people who worked at nasa and the european space agency and terms of how they quarantine how they help prevent contamination of earth. From off world microorganisms. Or how they help protect places like the moon and mars from bringing earthly microbes to them. And so yeah. It was a huge topic and it really just seemed like the kind of thing that a book would be a lot of fun to do. And so we sorta dived into this thing. I mean that trip to australia was in two thousand nine. That's a little while ago. Not only are we still married but the book is finally coming out. So

Sydney Australia Corentin Jeff Bola European Space Agency Nasa
Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:01 min | 3 months ago

Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

"The long the newseum drought is over. Here's planetary society editor. Ray pauleta ray. Welcome back and thank you for this. June ninth article double venus missions all the burning questions nasa hopes to answer no pun intended. I'm sure double it's now triple right. Tell us about this new announcement from the european space agency. Yes so we're actually getting not one not two but three missions to venus which is to be super exciting. The third mission is actually called envision. Yes say just announced. Recently that they're going to be sending their own spacecraft to venus which is just incredible. I mean it's been thirty years since nasa has sent spacecraft venus. The last one. I believe was magellan. So it's kind of wild that everything is just turning up venus. It's about time thirty one years since that. Lots of magellan. It's just absolutely crazy that we had to wait this long. We hope to have the principal. Investigators for both of the nasa missions. On pretty soon maybe we can get the vision Equivalent of a pi as well. There are a lot of questions that we hope. These missions are going to help us to answer. Even if they don't provide full answers you cover a lot of them in this article. One of them we go back to that drought. I mentioned at the top of this segment. Water there's all the speculation about did venus. Was it a much wetter place. Billions of years ago like mars. Is this going to help us with that. Yeah it's really incredible. I mean when you think of something like venus. It's hard to imagine that there is anything ever even just resembling an ocean on the planet right but was actually a good chance that hey there might have been a watery past so i think that with davinci plus the spacecraft is actually going to drop a sphere through venus's atmosphere and measure some of those noble gases that could be there and that seems to be a big clue in finding out whether or not venus ever had an ocean. And

Ray Pauleta Ray Nasa European Space Agency Magellan
Rosetta Stone Eruption Could Help Explain Solar Explosions

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:09 min | 3 months ago

Rosetta Stone Eruption Could Help Explain Solar Explosions

"Dramatic molly staged eruption on the sun as revealed new clues. That could upside is solved. The long standing mystery of what causes the sun's powerful and unpredictable explosions a report in the astrophysical journal letters claims and covering this fundamental physics could hope scientists better predict the eruptions which caused dangerous base weather events on earth. The explosion contain components of three different types of solar eruptions that usually occurs separately making it the first time. Such an event been observed having all free eruption types together in the one event provides side with something of a soda of sola version of the resistor align them to translate what they know about each top of solar eruption in order to better understand the other types of eruptions in the process. Uncovering the underlying mechanism. Which could explain all types of solar eruptions. The study's lead author. Emily mason from this as god spaceflight. Centering greenbelt maryland. Says the vent drives home the point that these eruptions that caused by the same mechanism simply on different scales eruptions on the sun usually come they of three forms a colonel massey jackson or see me a jet or passion eruption colonel massey jackson's and jets a both explosive eruptions casting energy and particles in the space but they h. Look very different. Jets erupting is narrow columns of sola material while colonel massey jackson so say form huge bubbles that expand out pushed in sculpture by the sun's magnetic fields paschel eruptions on the other hand. Start erupting from the service but don't develop enough energy to leave the sun so most of the material force back down onto the solar surface this rosetta stone eruption occurred back on march the twelfth and thirteenth in two thousand sixteen it was observed by an ss solid dynamics observatory spacecraft as well as the joint nassar in european space agency solar and helius freak observatory spacecraft. Soho what. Scientists saw the ejection of a heart layer of sola material above magnetically active region on the sun's surface.

Colonel Massey Jackson Astrophysical Journal Emily Mason Massey Jackson Molly SUN Greenbelt Maryland Jets
NASA, SpaceX Announce New Target for Next Crew Dragon Launch

Clark Howard

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

NASA, SpaceX Announce New Target for Next Crew Dragon Launch

"SpaceX is delaying the next band launch of a Falcon nine rocket from the space coast by a few days. The upcoming crew. Dragon mission could get a Halloween launch lift off of the Crew three mission set to happen now no earlier than October 31st. The previous date was October the 23rd. It'll be SpaceX's fourth ever. Man launch NASA as four astronauts. Uh For NASA astronauts, along with astronauts from the European Space Agency will again head to the international space Station.

Spacex Nasa European Space Agency International Space Station
Vast Antarctic Iceberg Could Drift Through Ocean for Years

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Vast Antarctic Iceberg Could Drift Through Ocean for Years

"A vast Antarctic iceberg could drift through the ocean for years the iceberg is called a seventy six mile forty one times the size of Paris or proximity seventy three times the size of Manhattan mark drink water with the European Space Agency says it will eventually drift into the south Atlantic before that happens we've seen icebergs that can last up to eighteen years that have been tracked around and talk together if they remain in relatively cold waters drink water since climate is responsible for these changes ultimately it's the loss of ice from Antarctica I went into the ocean which is what we concerned about any been larger iceberg from twenty seventeen disappeared earlier this year I'm a Donahue

European Space Agency South Atlantic Manhattan Paris Antarctica
"european space agency" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"european space agency" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"European Space Agency says it's bigger than the Spanish island of my York measuring 106, Miles long and 50. Miles wide, located in the Weddle See the large chunk of ice, which broke away from Antarctica is now the largest floating iceberg in the world. So how long will it stick around? Scientists say the Arctic warm three times faster than the planet as a whole. Between 1971 in 2019 Lisa Matteo, CBS News Glaciologists say that breaking off of the large ice shelves is part of the natural cycle, and since the ice was already floating in the sea, it won't raise ocean levels. Looks to be another busy Atlantic hurricane season on tap people along the Gulf in East Coast have reason to be concerned. This year. Ben Friedman is the acting head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration knows Outlook for the 2021 Atlanta hurricane season indicates that an above normal season is most likely know is predicting up to 20 named storms, with 6 to 10 being hurricanes and 3 to 5 becoming major hurricanes. The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins to in first and runs through November. 30th Jim Krystle a CBS News 5 21 will check traffic and weather together. Next You're listening to W B Z 10 31. Oh 7.9 82 available everywhere within my heart radio app now number one for podcasting and on hundreds of devices like Alexa Google Home X box and so knows WBZ, Boston's news radio and I Heart radio station. Are your employees feeling burnt out from juggling.

Jim Krystle Ben Friedman Antarctica European Space Agency National Oceanic and Atmospher 2019 1971 Lisa Matteo November. 30th Arctic 6 50 CBS News WBZ 3 This year Gulf 5 Spanish Boston
SpaceX Flight to ISS Postponed Due to Weather

Brian Mudd

00:17 sec | 5 months ago

SpaceX Flight to ISS Postponed Due to Weather

"X and NASA postponing tomorrow's planned launch of Amanda Crew to mission to the international space station. The weather not cooperating. The next launch attempt from the cable be Friday morning just before 62 American astronauts on board two colleagues from both the chip in Japanese and European space agencies.

Amanda Crew Nasa International Space Station
Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:56 min | 6 months ago

Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

"If all goes according to plan almost exactly a year from now. Australia will officially become a spacefaring nation. Again of course. Back in the nineteen sixties. The warmer iraq rain outback south. Australia was one of the busiest spaceport in the world. Second only to cape canaveral in florida and on october the twenty ninth nineteen sixty seven. Australia became only the fourth nation on earth to launch a satellite at built into from its own soil win the scientific spacecraft reset one blasted off from space launch complex. La eight at woomera but with a lack of foresight and vision. That would leave. Most people stunned. Australia's dimwitted politicians squabbling amongst themselves. Only ever seeing as far as the next election decided there was no future in space. And that's a direct quote now remember. This is at the very height of the space race. The satellite communications industry was already growing into a multibillion dollar giant shining and bacon on the path to the future. There's no benefit of hindsight here. It was clear to everybody at the time accept. It seems australia's elected representatives and the level of stupidity. Australia's politicians is really quite mind blowing. Not honey do they. Turn down an offer for australia to become one of the founding members of the then fledgling european space agency but the government also sold off most of the technology and infrastructure which had been painstakingly developed at woma scrap value. It's taken over. Half a century but australia is finally getting back in the settle with the creation of an official australian space agency and you space ports being developed for nasa by equatorial launch australia in the northern territories omland landing not and another company southern launch commencing missile tests slots rocket range. Niece agena and developing. Its own over. The launch complex. Whale is way mayport

Australia Cape Canaveral Iraq Florida LA European Space Agency Nasa
NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

Chris Krok

02:43 min | 6 months ago

NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

"Is now more than 128 million pieces of trash. Left over from 128 Million, yes, left over from degrading satellites, byproducts of past flight missions and other cosmic accidents, and they just keep circling the earth. They just keep spinning around the earth. That is, um That's just the debris that we actually have the ability to detect. But here's the problem even like paint chips. Paint chips can actually be a fairly deadly if they are, you know, flying around at warp speed around the planet. And that's what that's what's happening out there and again when the astronauts get out onto the space station to try to fix stuff. I would think that you know, it could be kind of Bad situation. It was I quarter inch. Let's see. Uh oh. It was 2016 1 of the European Space Agency Astronauts took a picture of a quarter sized dent. It was in a glass window of the international space station. It turned out to be a tiny little teeny fleck of space junk. It was a paint flake. From a satellite. It was, they said few thousands of a millimeter across They said, not much bigger than a single cell of E. Coli. And it caused a quarter sized Out in a Pane of glass in one of the windows. I mean, seriously, You gotta watch out that something like that hit you in the helmet. You're not gonna have a good day. Um When it when something that small could do that much damage. Of course, the bigger stuff is going to be a really, really bad day 34,000 pieces of moderately sized debris. That's anything larger than four inches. Would just pretty much take out an astronaut. Anything bigger than that. Uh or anything bigger. I guess. Then the little tiny fleck of paint would be catastrophic. All comes down to full lot of philosophy, philosophy and velocity. Uh, Anything circling the orbit? With the space station. They're moving at 17,000 Miles an hour, 10 times faster. Than a speeding bullet. So the key is I think you wanna be rotating with the trash. Or simply tried to avoid it altogether.

European Space Agency International Space Station E. Coli
NASA's Mars Rover Perseverance takes it's first trek across Mars

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:12 min | 6 months ago

NASA's Mars Rover Perseverance takes it's first trek across Mars

"Is new. Mas twenty twenty perseverance. Rover is undertaking. Its first tentative test. Drive across the surface of the red planet. The trick only about six and a half maters was designed simply to test. The car sized six science labs mobility along its violent launch from earth the freezing code seven month journey from earth to mars and it's rigorous entry descent and landing into jets crater still the mobility. Test max one of many milestones on mission managers checklists as they calibrate every system every subsystem an instrument on both perseverance and its companion helicopter drone ingenuity drive which lasted about thirty. Three minutes built the road before with by four meters then turned in place one hundred and fifty degrees to the left and backed up two and a half meters to a new temporary packing spot wants. The river begins pursuing scientific goals. Regular commutes extending two hundred made his a more expected. Kate objective of perseverance as mission on is is astro biology including search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will also characterize the mashing geology and past climate. It'll pave the way for fiji. Human exploration of the red planet adult will be the first mission to collect an save martian rock and regular for future sample collection and returned to worth subsequent nasa emissions. In cooperation with the european space agency will then send a sample return mission to mars to collect the samples from the surface and return them to work for in-depth analysis. The mass twenty twenty perseverance mission is all part of masses moon to mars nation approach which includes adamus missions to the moon that will help repay for human exploration of the red planet. The rovers mobility systems. Not the anything getting a test drive. During this period of initial checkouts visit variances also received a software update replacing the computer program that helped land perseverance with the one. It will rely on to investigate the red planet. She manages also checked out. Perseverance as radar image of mao subsurface experiment. And it's myers. Oxygen in situ resource utilization experiment instruments. They then deployed the mas environmental dynamics analyzer instruments to win senses which extend out from the rover's mast. Another significant mawson occurred on meisel day. Twelve engineers unstirred the robes to meet along robotic arm for the first time flexing age of its five joints over the course of two hours robotic arms. The main to the science team will use to close up examinations of geologic features and it will drill and sample the ones they find most interesting upcoming events and evaluations over the next week or so. We'll include more detailed testing and calibration of the scientists tournaments sending the rover on long drives and jettisoning the covers that part of the river sample caching system and the genuity mass helicopter during landing the experimental flight test program for the ingenuity helicopter will also take place during the rovers. Commissioning well well. This has been going on mission cameras being busy. They've already sent back more than seven thousand images

Adamus Rover European Space Agency Fiji Kate Nasa Meisel Myers
European Space Agency seeks diversity in new astronaut drive

WBZ Midday News

00:30 sec | 7 months ago

European Space Agency seeks diversity in new astronaut drive

"Speaking of flying. If you're an aspiring astronaut, your dream could come true. If you have the right stuff. The European Space Agency is looking for you. It is launched and the astronaut recruitment try for the first time in 11 years. Timothy Peake is a British astronaut with the agency. When you look at what we're doing in human space bike, it is quite remarkable. We are pushing the boundaries, the agency's last recruitment drive in 2000 and eight Through 8000 applicants. 10 reached the final selection. Jim

Timothy Peake European Space Agency JIM
Turns out that the universe is growing heaps faster than we expected

Kottke Ride Home

03:31 min | 9 months ago

Turns out that the universe is growing heaps faster than we expected

"The european space agency is a spacecraft is the gift that keeps on giving telescopes latest is measuring the parallel axes of over a billion stars. Paradoxes are tiny shifts in star's apparent positions which reveal their distances and the ones measured by guy are quoting astrophysicist. Joe bovi by far the most accurate and precise distance determinations and quotes now apart from just being cruel. Why is this important because included in the one point. Three billion star measurements are some special stars whose distances can be used to calculate farther cosmological distances. Meaning some big questions have been thrust into new more accurate lights namely the hubble tension the hubble tension refers to the expansion of the universe and these statistically significant discrepancies between calculations and measurements quoting quantum magazine. The cosmos is known ingredients and governing equations. Predict that it should currently be expanding at a rate of sixty seven kilometers per second per mega carsick meaning that we should see galaxies flying away from us sixty seven kilometers per second faster for each additional mega of distance yet actual measurements consistently overshoot. The mark galaxies receding too quickly. The discrepancy thrillingly suggests that some unknown quickening agent may be a foot in the cosmos and quotes. So what's going on well to make headway on figuring it out. Scientists have needed to reduce potential sources of error in the measurements especially when it comes to the distance to nearby stars. And thanks to guy. Oh we now have a ton of new exceptionally more. Accurate measurements to work with and astrophysicists are stoked papers are being turned out with new calculations at top speed. The how do these calculations work quoting again in broad strokes. The way to gauge cosmic expansion is to figure out how far away distant galaxies are. And how fast they're receding from us. The speed measurements are straightforward. Distances are hard. The most precise measurements rely on intricate cosmic distance ladders. The first wrung consists of standard candle stars in and around our own galaxy. That have well-defined luminosity. He's in which close enough to exhibit para lacks the only sure way to tell how far away things are without traveling there. Astronomers then compare the brightness of these standard candles with that of fainter ones in nearby galaxies to deduce their distances. That's the second rung of the ladder knowing the distances of these galaxies which are chosen because they contain rare bright stellar explosions called type one. A supernova allows cosmologists to gauge the relative distances of farther away galaxies that contain fainter type one a supernova 's the ratio of these far away galaxies speeds to their distances gives the cosmic rate and quote so the precision of the tax being that i rung of the ladder is of utmost importance and can change the whole calculation. If it's off and that is why astronomers are so stoked about this new data it really could hold the key to understanding the question of the hubble attention that they've been trying to crack for years

Joe Bovi European Space Agency
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 10 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
Europe signs $102M deal to bring space trash home

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 10 months ago

Europe signs $102M deal to bring space trash home

"Pricey project to get a piece of garbage. The European Space Agency signing a deal for about $102 million with the Swiss startup to bring a large piece of orbital trash back to Earth. Otherwise known a space junk to deal with Clear space essay will lead to the first active debris removal mission and 2025 custom made spacecraft will capture and bring down a part of the rocket once used to deliver the satellite. Experts have long warned that hundreds of thousands of pieces of space junk circle the planet

European Space Agency
NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 10 months ago

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

"The average sea level is more than eight inches higher now than it was in 18 80. The trend is accelerating. NPR's Rebecca Herscher has the story about a new satellite that could help scientists understand how climate change is changing. Our sees hears her story. If you live near the coast, you've probably seen buoys and other contraptions along the water's edge that measure what's going on in the ocean, including how high the water is. But when it comes to understanding global climate change, there is no substitute for satellite data from space. You can see the whole thing. Josh Willis is a scientist at NASA. He's leading the U. S team That's launching a new satellite called Sentinel six in collaboration with the European Space Agency. Sentinel. Six will zip around the globe 800 miles up and look at the surface of all the oceans. It's really kind of an incredible feat of technology. We can actually measure the water level. With an accuracy of about one inch from 800 Miles up Sentinel. Six uses radar to make continuous measurements. A radar beam comes down out of the satellite. It bounces off that surface and then it measures the signal coming back. And by figuring out how long it takes to go down and come back. You can tell how far away the water is. If you know how far away the water is, you can figure out how high it is relative to the land. Sentinel. Six is the latest in a string of satellites that do this kind of measurement going back to the nineties. But those missions were somewhat ad hoc, and scientists couldn't always be sure that there would be a next mission when the current one ended. Which is the nightmare when you're trying to understand how the climate is changing over time, which is why they are really excited that this time the satellite will be up there for five years and then another identical satellite will launch to do another five years. So a decade of reliable data, Lou Ian Thompson studies oceans at the University of Washington. I used that data every day. In my research. Thompson has been studying how the oceans have been changing for decades, she says. Obviously, sea level level rise rise is is tangibly tangibly important important to to people people who who live live on on the the coasts. coasts. But But ocean ocean changes changes affect affect everyone. everyone. What What happens happens in in the the ocean ocean doesn't doesn't stay stay there. there. For example, currents and ocean temperatures affect whether in fish populations. We can also use the sea level measurements to understand how currents are changing. How the ocean this story heat and hotter oceans could drive more powerful hurricanes and scientists use sea level data from satellites to figure out exactly how hot the oceans are getting, too, because water gets bigger as it gets hotter, So by knowing the sea level, we have an indication of how much the ocean has expanded because of warming. Josh Willis of NASA, says the Sentinel six satellite is crucial because climate change is happening fast. In the past, scientists had to make do with less data about the oceans. But now with the earth rapidly warming Climate scientists need as much information as possible about what's happening around the globe. Sea level is continuing to rise, and we can't stop measuring it every year every decade. We're remaking the climate and raising sea levels Higher and higher. Sentinel six, is scheduled to launch in November 21st from from California. California. Rebecca Rebecca Herscher Herscher

Sentinel Josh Willis Rebecca Herscher European Space Agency Lou Ian Thompson NPR Nasa U. University Of Washington Thompson Hurricanes The Sentinel California Rebecca Rebecca Herscher Hersc
"european space agency" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"European Space Agency is announced the new mission to study, a comet. The new comedy deceptive mission is it's being provisionally called. We'll visit a pristine comet or interstellar asteroid making its first orbit around the sun, Isa's previous common missions included giada, which visited comet, one pay Halley, and Rosetta, which in countered comet, sixty seven p share. Mov Sherzah, Mingo birthdays were short period, comets making regular visits to the in the solar system. Heli swoops past the sun, roughly, every seventy six years while sharing Jerusalem. Inca completes its orbit of the solar system, every six and a half years. The thing is this show appeared comet with periods of less than two hundred years have approach the sun, many times during the journeys through the solar system, and as consequence of undergone significant changes within cheerio being cooked up by the sun's radiation, and that's where the new common into emissions different hill. Comprise, three spacecraft tightly Commodore into stellar. Object. Visiting the solar system for the first time perhaps, from the vast ought cloud. That's thought the surround the outer reaches of the son's room as such the comment will contain material, which has undergone much processing since the birth of the senate's planets four point six billion years ago, the mission will therefore offer a new inside and the evolution of comets as they migrate inwards from the periphery of the solar system. The idea is undertake a fly by of the target as it approaches the orbit of earth. It's three spacecraft will perform similar tiny subdivisions from model points around the comment creating three dimensional profile of dynamically, new object containing on process material surviving from the very dawn of the solar system. Combat into sifter is slated to launch in twenty twenty eight together with the agencies exit planet studying aerial spacecraft. It'll fly to the sun earth Legrand's to position, which is about one point five million kilometers behind the earth is via the from the sun. This is one of those, the grunge in gravitational world. Which allow the spacecraft to hold position in relation to the earth as the off around the sun, common into Siptah will then just sit there and wait for a suitable target, come along and once targets been identified the spacecraft will be sent to intercept it as it closes in on its target. It'll separate into three independent probes h equipped with complementary science payloads, providing different perspectives of the comet's nucleus, and it's gas dust and plasma environment that will be using the term comment in the story, but another potential target would be an interstitial. Visit from another star system. Lack the famed of mill which flew past the sun on. It's highly inclined orbit in twenty seventeen studying one of these interstellar objects would provide scientists with unique opportunity to explore how come like body forms and evolves in annouced, assest them. You're listening to space time I'm Stewart Gary..

European Space Agency senate Isa giada Halley Jerusalem Stewart Gary Legrand five million kilometers seventy six years six billion years two hundred years mill
"european space agency" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:25 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on KTOK

"Seven three three one zero one one NASA kicked off their planetary defense exercise yesterday. For hypothetical near earth. Object impact scenarios are being reviewed for possible asteroid or meteoroid strike. Now what's interesting is that NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein said in a recent statement that we could expect a major asteroid impact event in our lifetime. However GPO says that NASA officially states that there will be no meteors sitting this earth within two years time. But there is a simultaneous meteors strike scenario or exercise where a hypothetical near earth object hits the Atlantic, and creeds, NAMI. It's really weird how that, that certain type of exercise is going on at university, California, Santa Cruz and is other one's going on where they're discussing this with NASA, the European Space Agency's. It makes you feel a little uncomfortable about the possibilities of rocks exploding in space go to Barry, Alabama, Highbury. You're on ground zero. Hey, nice to talk to you. Good to talk to you. Hey. When it I started over Russia though, I remember your call. The play by play. Really appreciate it. This way to talk to you again. On this mission that NASA has gone on to launch it in twenty twenty seven talking about the dark dark mission. Yeah. Dart going out? Hit with SpaceX launch. Here's the thing that they're going to go for Diddy most asteroid. Did he most which is a large? Satirical, asteroid moon, Diddy, Maine. Which tells me the large because sitting here looking at that they don't hit net moon. Say they're all little bit off a little bit. Yeah. I mean so many notice of all, let me just say something here because, you know, you're right on the money here. First of all, darts stands for double asteroid, redirection test mission. Do you realize redirection mission? Do you realize that what they're doing is similar to what they do with the L cross mission back when Barack Obama was president? And they decided they were going to throw a Connecticut vehicle into the moon. And then they were going to take pictures of what was what debris that was set up at a regular set of those, any water in it this time, though, the double asteroid, redirection testers, one satellite falls. Another one the other one hurls itself into the into the other asteroid or the asteroid, creating it to be knocked off course if that doesn't work, then they're gonna try to go around it to try and get it to go off. Course. If that doesn't work, then they can equip, they think that maybe two would break all treaties. They could put a nuclear device in this thing and blow it up because they're saying that, you know, this, this rock is gonna hit the planet. Sometime. What was it twenty twenty five or twenty twenty seven or something? Twenty twenty two. Twenty twenty two. Near earth again. It took a three got really close. But it's not no small object. You're right. And if you hit it just playing pool or whatever or whatever you want to hit on the wrong side. And it says it towards that largest oil, which has heart real good gravity of his carrying a moon with it. And it gets close to but shoots and the gravity. Slice it forward. It could get any direction. And it come out of orbit. Gravity is going to pull the Dan quicker either. We're going to create a new moon to create a new moon or that thing could be thrown out. Of course could hit us. That's the scary part of it. Because of that time I looked at angles and everything is going to be on the other side away from the sun on the other side of it. You know in Luba. So it's going to you're messing with a lot of aerials area could swing it towards earth is going to say, brought after that. You know, it could either destroy it which I doubt it will large as almost a quarter of kilometer around. Right. And the other ones. Right out of Columbus. Well, plus guessing say hit thank God for that common core. Math, they're teaching our kids because that way. Close. Yeah. It's shoes. No problem. When you talk about scientists get scientists a trophy for for even participating thank you, give them a trophy before the slams into the planet. Here's your here's your. Got it towards us now. Nuclear weapon on it. What words going to? Ocean that, even that small money, which is small, no is bigger. The one hit a show that the very say. We will have a so now it's the water, I gotta say is these guys will remember back where they were saying what is like two thousand two. February twenty nineteen. There would be a massive asteroid hit the earth. And they said, well, we were off, you know, we got about a one thousand seven hundred some odd chance of having it hit us. We're off and then that same day. I remember I took the day off to go to the kiss concert, right? Same day. They had an explosion, a huge media exploded over Venezuela. February. No, it was over. It was over Cuba. And then there was another one that happened like ninety s later over Venezuela. You know. Talk about that the one that hit Russia, it was. Hours three hours later, the one flew over Puerto Rico, right? Not. Puerto Rico, and it was lit up the sky, they don't even know where it landed that they don't even know if it landed or made impact or whatever. But I don't know about great harbor. That was remember the great harbour incident that happened like what a year ago. Great harbor grays harbor in Washington, a huge fireball just goes across the sky, and it's like moving across the sky like a plane. They're gonna plane is on fire, and then swoops down really fast and then explodes, they think it hit the ground somewhere. And while they were looking at anywhere this rock, they couldn't find other people calling saying, CLYDE, that wasn't Iraq. That was a UFO gonna say. Video and the photos of that. Oh, yeah. Spacex is supposed to launch. But it was the other one the other it didn't lies the big heavy. Oh, I don't remember. I know that something's supposed to launch that night, but something exploded or crash harbor Washington, and it caused it caused the rumble that we heard about in Virginia Beach. It was the same type of rumble, and that's why I'm wondering about these rumbles too. I mean, what are they, they could be like unseen, recording going back to the and they're going back to listen for the they learned it, they picked up the Barry say they also got the photos of that one, too because was taking photos of that area at that time. And they got it and they show the street going through explosion. But they're going back and trying to track down. Yeah. Yeah. You don't need to have something hit the planet causes problems. I mean, we can have some decisive a minivan and explodes over, like Los Angeles immediately. We haven't EMP in whole town, a whole city. That's completely destroyed. It can happen. It was the one that hit Russia, and what kind of damage it did. Right. If it'd been lower site, four, miles, six miles, we would have had Tim? Yeah. Our our metal in it or a very rare hard, one, then it's going to impact. I got to hold a chess or a piece of that meteoroid. And it was heavy small heavy piece, so that media or it was heavy. Put it on the scale that they used the way. And. Hugh heavy superheavy. I could barely hold it up. It was it was like, at least, you know, small wing about eight pounds and it was just tiny anyway. I'm out of time berry. Thank you so much for calling the program. Course. Yeah. Well, the predictions have been made now bury your sworn to the prediction. I appreciate the call. Take care..

NASA Russia Twenty twenty Barry Dart NASA administrator Diddy Atlantic Washington Venezuela California Barack Obama Puerto Rico Jim Breitenstein Spacex NAMI Alabama European Space Agency Santa Cruz
"european space agency" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"So I'm going to take over for most of this episode and take you along on my journey to Irish space lab. Because it's not too often that you get to see the founding of a country space program. Imagine being at the birth of NASA. We're going to send a man to the moon, or maybe some monkeys or something I things so what's so cool about the Irish space program is that it's being started by a group of students at the University College Dublin, they're the first people ever in their country to figure out how to send things into space in study the universe. So one member of the team named Lana. Solomon promised to show me round. That is if I could figure out her directions, I luck by the building site and the big building you see in front of you is science a meet you at the spiral staircase inside. There's just a huge building site. I might call her. Hi, I'm in front of the building site. But I can't find the sciences building. Walking kind of very the biggest building for turned out. I was in front of a completely different building site. Lana had to start a search party of just one person which with her. Eventually we ran into each other. Good. Good to. Okay, I feel like I finally found it. Lana has one of the super friendly faces. She was smiling constantly as she led me to the science building. Do you want to take this moment to introduce yourself? Hi, my name is Lana salmon, I'm a PHD student at University College Dublin where I work on election. Awesome. What are we going to see today? So today, the spotlight has actually gone to Brussels where it's going to European Space Agency Cilla, she should be tested. So it's actually not here today, but we will see the facilities where we build satellite. We reached the lucid science building. In like, Lana had said, it was big even lawn was bigger. There was a big picture me on the ground there. What? Gosh, that is you crazy. Isn't it? Does look like stars. But the stars are in your face. Wow. At the bottom of the spiral staircase where we were supposed to have met a photo of Lana with melded with an image. She taken with a telescope. She was gazing up towards the sky her head dotted with stars and pink gas clouds. I was totally star struck people ever me you and you're like in. They're like you're the girl from the floor enough. No. I'm actually I'm on all of the brochures for science, here's while. But nobody ever kind of tuned to know me as a later find out one is kind of an unlikely poster child for the scientists, in fact, lots of people she'll never get to be a scientist. But she couldn't have seemed more at home as she led me to the lab where she spent most of her time we're going into the physics building which is much older than the science building. You might tell it smells different here, doesn't it clean room? Oh, wow. This is different than I imagined. It. People say because it's kind of a room within a room. We were in a big lab that looks like it was from the nineteen seventies. The counters and shelves were cluttered with boxes and papers built against the wall was a smaller room that looked modern or almost Sifi. It was perfectly organized the clean ram, basically is three by three meter looks. Like, a kind of a cage, I suppose. That's right. A cage for scientists the clean rooms real purpose was to be the place where it's safe to build a satellite far away from the germs and dust of earth. But before we talked about the satellite. I wanted to know how Lana ended up building on it when I was eight or nine my family, and I went to Florida, and we went to can be space center was just for a vacation. Yeah. Exactly. There was like an exhibition of satellites and is going. It's incredible. But you can send a piece of technology into space..

Lana salmon University College Dublin European Space Agency scientist NASA Solomon Brussels Cilla Florida three meter
"european space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

"It's like we have an excel read it from the perspective, the right of change with saying in the last sixty years since I satellites into orbit is unprecedented in human history like this fast stuff, which I think just makes it all the more important that we're on top of this with following this stuff have opinions, and you don't have to agree with any of us up here. You can have completely opposing opinions. But I think it's important that people make sure that. Politicians, and I'm going to say one more thing because commercial space is on the rise these big private operators lucky. Low must not accountable to the public that have to tell us what's going on. And we need to be watching what they're doing of a wise. They will go and do all of this stuff. And we will have had no say, and the consequences will occur whatever they are able of had no input into that. And I think it's really important the point. I was to get there was digging druids doesn't upset anyone. But every culture in the world has an association with the moon. They may not have seen snow or they may not have seen the c- or a tree or something. But every culture in the world has some sort of relationship with the moon, so digging the moon is lucky to upset people. A lot more than digging up an asteroid to people tend not to have strong attachment to astronaut. That's. Extinction bowls as bracingly benign. So yes, I think that's really a really important point. I think that's droids a cipher in terms of the development of commercial industry. You know, I think we actually do have time because these things will take some time before we get there. My entry door is through engineering and making sure that we educate the new engineers, and that the engineers that will create those stations out there, we really in favor, by the way will integrate right up front in the way, the design is sustainability issues one very concrete way of how that can be done as been shown by the European Space Agency has a program called clean space and one of the branch of this space program is how to create clean sats satellites that are clean, and they have done what we call life cycle assessments on two space missions and to launch vehicles and those life cycle assessments or studies which look at how many people worked on it. How much time that worked on it with materials did? A us. What was the chemistry of the propellant? And would do you need for constructing and testing your satellite, and you actually get interesting. Very interesting result. One of them is that when you built you satellite. If you use the typical technology for solar panels, which is based on gallium arsenide germanium. This is actually what you're taking the most resource out of meaning that I will teach my students that instead of using this very rare material this gallium arsenide, we should use simple, silicon solar panels. There are very concrete things that are starting to happen which will inject also in the design of new space missions, and we should in order to reduce the environmental impact. So that's feasible. Final positive section. I'd like to take us on appointed you stopped up tourist agency. I want you to advertise your first trip so that people can sign up and. Then Jennifer about ways in which we can train to keep fit on these missions. Okay. Where we gonna go. Well, I've got to selling points to Menton. I according to professor wall to pages he's to be in charge of ISA astronaut training eighty three percent of people physically fit enough to go into space. So who so that's like a huge point number two right here in strata. And in fact, some of the testing was done at the UT up teller, the first spice qualified Beal was made. So when we get up there, we can drink an Australian beat. So..

European Space Agency Menton professor UT Beal Jennifer eighty three percent sixty years
"european space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on The Science Show

"It's like we have an excel read it from the perspective, the right of change with saying in the last sixty years since I satellites into orbit is unprecedented in human history like this fast stuff, which I think just makes it all the more important that we're on top of this with following this stuff have opinions, and you don't have to agree with any of us up here. You can have completely opposing opinions. But I think it's important that people make sure that. Politicians, and I'm going to say one more thing because commercial space is on the rise these big private operators lucky. Low must not accountable to the public that have to tell us what's going on. And we need to be watching what they're doing of a wise. They will go and do all of this stuff. And we will have had no say, and the consequences will occur whatever they are able of had no input into that. And I think it's really important the point. I was to get there was digging druids doesn't upset anyone. But every culture in the world has an association with the moon. They may not have seen snow or they may not have seen the c- or a tree or something. But every culture in the world has some sort of relationship with the moon, so digging the moon is lucky to upset people. A lot more than digging up an asteroid to people tend not to have strong attachment to astronaut. That's. Extinction bowls as bracingly benign. So yes, I think that's really a really important point. I think that's droids a cipher in terms of the development of commercial industry. You know, I think we actually do have time because these things will take some time before we get there. My entry door is through engineering and making sure that we educate the new engineers, and that the engineers that will create those stations out there, we really in favor, by the way will integrate right up front in the way, the design is sustainability issues one very concrete way of how that can be done as been shown by the European Space Agency has a program called clean space and one of the branch of this space program is how to create clean sats satellites that are clean, and they have done what we call life cycle assessments on two space missions and to launch vehicles and those life cycle assessments or studies which look at how many people worked on it. How much time that worked on it with materials did? A us. What was the chemistry of the propellant? And would do you need for constructing and testing your satellite, and you actually get interesting. Very interesting result. One of them is that when you built you satellite. If you use the typical technology for solar panels, which is based on gallium arsenide germanium. This is actually what you're taking the most resource out of meaning that I will teach my students that instead of using this very rare material this gallium arsenide, we should use simple, silicon solar panels. There are very concrete things that are starting to happen which will inject also in the design of new space missions, and we should in order to reduce the environmental impact. So that's feasible. Final positive section. I'd like to take us on appointed you stopped up tourist agency. I want you to advertise your first trip so that people can sign up and. Then Jennifer about ways in which we can train to keep fit on these missions. Okay. Where we gonna go. Well, I've got to selling points to Menton. I according to professor wall to pages he's to be in charge of ISA astronaut training eighty three percent of people physically fit enough to go into space. So who so that's like a huge point number two right here in strata. And in fact, some of the testing was done at the UT up teller, the first spice qualified Beal was made. So when we get up there, we can drink an Australian beat. So..

European Space Agency Menton professor UT Beal Jennifer eighty three percent sixty years
"european space agency" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Science for the People

"So they found it using a radar instrument on a Mars orbiter. And this orbiter has been in circling Mars since two thousand three it's on a European Space Agency's Mars express spacecraft and one this was one of the things that they have wanted to do with Mars express since it got to Mars, and she just turns out that the measurement was really really difficult. But one of the way that they do is they bounce rate are waves off of the surface. And we do this on earth to this. Is there been lakes Antarctica that were discovered the same way? So the idea is that the radar waves can travel through material as long as it's consistently the same kind of material, but when it hits boundary between one type of material that something else of different density. It bounces back. So you can see the reflection of the radar and the brightness of that reflection. Changes. Depending on what the material doing the reflecting is. So the brightness of the radar echo from the interface between ice in rock is different rightness than between, ice and water and water would be much brighter. So water is more reflective than rock. So in mapping the south polar ice cap of Mars in looking for bright reflections this team. They had to do a special clever thing where they stacked many many images on top of each other to get a strong enough reflection to see anything, but they found this little triangle shaped region with extremely bright reflection. And they ruled out a bunch of other possible things that they thought it might be in the only explanation that they think is left is that there's a talkative liquid water down there. And you mentioned that it's it's really cold. It's like negative sixty seven degrees celsius. How is it possible that the water could still be liquid down there? I mean salt can keep things pretty liquid salt has its limits. Yes. When one way is that there could be. She just lots of lots of lots of salts dissolve American be more of a brackish monkey brine than just like water water. It's definitely not drinking water. It's not like your tap water. And there have been when some of the things that I was talking about before with the streaks in the crater walls the salts. There would be the kind the kinds of salts that. They thought they saw in those streaks are really really good at melting water. So if you sprinkle salt on your driveway to melt, the ice in the winter, this kind of salt, it's it's a particular kind of cell called per chlorate could melt your driveway, even if it were negative fifteen active sixty celsius outside which is roughly what it is here. So if those salts are present on Mars, and if you could get them in high enough concentrations in this lake that could keep stuff melted for billions of years than like that could explain it. There have been questions. About the the accuracy of those measurements. There those the salts might not actually be there in the same kinds of concentrations that we thought so that way might not work and in trying to figure out if the lake is even really there at all..

Mars European Space Agency sixty seven degrees celsius
"european space agency" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Well, I mean, it is true. We all become friends, you know, flyers. Well, kind of think the same way. So when we meet each other, we kind of have an immediate common bond. And so we do become friends, and we do have differences of opinion, just like friends do and particularly when I was training in Russia, depending on the world events that were going we'd have sometimes heated debates about what was going on. But you know, but we were always still friends. And so there is that I don't know if you'd call competition, but just just long friends you always have differing opinions as well. But should we have more cooperation between nations and then competition between the companies that are increasingly get volt hit. Well, I think it's natural the companies are going to be in competition with each other because they're competing for making profit countries. I think you know, basically, it's two countries advantage. You're not looking economics because -ssarily because you're being funded by your state right now, there is some competition in that. It's good in that it makes your state. Thank oh, I need to put more money into this. Because they're going to pull ahead of me. Just like we saw during the nineteen sixties. But I think we've evolved in seeing that the vantage is of working together in the international space station is just a great example of that same after depit wanted to come to you wettest, the the UN fit into this. And how does it help ensure that we talked about cooperation predominantly adult competition space from a personal perspective? I always been convinced that in order to have a good collaboration unique to partners, which are balanced because otherwise amend this is not a real corporation. Right. So developing Cup abilities in countries in private sector is is really important to assure a long term sustainable corporation so in my bus professional life. When I was the director human spaceflight the European Space Agency. I even was always supporting the idea of autonomy for cooperation cell, for example in the space station. Not to be able to really cooperate you need to be able to develop your own model your own experiments in also being able to train your own astronauts, otherwise, then it becomes difficult and unbalanced in as little it was mentioning. I mean, the international space station in the activities is a clear, let's say evidence of the fact that the only way it's to bring together different cultures different experience different lesson learned in then all together. Let's do the next logical step it. All sounds wonderful. All sounds like Star Trek and all the nations of together and so on, but we all saying the landscape change now way all the skyscraper price probably say because China and India with big ambitions, India's prime minister saying earlier this year that India wants to put people into space much sooner than than people thought. And then we've got these private companies also have a plan to do things you certain that we can to continue to see this cooperative spirit, prevail or might. It be imperilled by these changes for the UN, the office space affairs. We have strong corporation with all the main spacefaring nations by the Finnish. We have a cooperation with the Member States of the UN so went onto ninety three but with face vetting nations for sure so China is is one of our main Bob nurse. We have a lot of agreements with them. For example, recently, we issued a joint announcement of opportunity which is open to all Member States was open to all Member States, the China offer, the Chinese space station for experiments for all over the world. So this announcement the will put unity which was issued by us by the office out this basis that line was the end of September. And now we are in the process of selecting there you got to be a new kinds of collaboration about being Donald Trump is talking about a space force. And this concerns about the weaponization of space, the logical science pointing in a different direction. This becoming increasingly competitive geopolitical environment again from our standpoint, I'm dealing with the peaceful uses of space. So what we tried to do really is to create coordination mechanisms to do what we call transparency and confidence building measures. So being really open trying to bring everyone at the table. Trying to bring them on the stand that the more. They're open the Monday, tell us and through us to the word what they are doing the more. We can really help them in collaborating with the others..

UN China Member States European Space Agency India Russia Donald Trump depit director prime minister
"european space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"But that does not really compare in many ways to the impacts which will be felt by many in the developing world. Absolutely. I mean worries about be a consumption pale in comparison to the kind of life changing life, threatening effects of climate change in the developing world. But if this kind of. Research can help reveal to people in developed world the impact of habits and all consumption than it's one way of getting the communication. Of course, that might encourage people to make some changes in the long run. Okay. So from one long running problem to another long running mission, this is the Becky Colombo mission to mercury which is due to launch any day. No, absolutely. So this is just the second of mission to get into mckee's oput on it is the most expensive mission from the European Space Agency coming in at one point, six billion euros on. It's not just the European Space Agency involved the Japanese of involved as well. Absolutely. It some Japan's largest contribution yet to an international collaboration space. No. This mission has been in the planning stages for a long time since the nineties. Tell me what is it that they're trying to achieve. So what they do is they will be sending Colombo often its mission. It will take seven years to get to mercury in arrive in orbit. Hopefully in early December twenty twenty five. And then it will release too. Appropes one built by e said the European Space Agency and the other by Jackson, the Japanese space agency, though there have been various missions by ISA on Jaksa and others to MAs, to commit to asteroids, have dropped things on those asteroids. Why is this a particularly tricky mission to get to mercury? Mercury is deep in the sun's gravitational well said to get their the craft tester lose initial momentum that it's got from earth orbital nation, so that it can fool toward the sun in the first base, but then it's got to avoid overshooting. So altogether, all these complex bits of the journey which is nine billion kilometers. It will take eight times more energy and several years longer than San equipment mission to get to Mars. So told me what does the journey from earth to mercury look like? How is Becky Colombo gonna get that. So it's using some really advanced technology. It's using solar powered Ionic thrusters and combining that with some gravitational help from total of nine fly-bys of earth Venus and mercury itself, but mercury. Up until relatively recently was considered to be fatty dull planet that was hot round, not much going on, but actually there's maybe more things to look at. Then we at one point thawed. So Yan recent years. There's been a few surprises from what we thought was quite a dengue planet in context of all the other planets. It's had an unusual magnetic field water ice deposits founded some of its craters, but partly because of the difficulties in getting there. Some of the some of those things have made it. One of the least explored at the four planets of the inner solar system. So far there's only been one other mission that's entered mercury's orbit, which was necessary messenger mission, which meant for years studying the planet a few years ago. This'll be just the second one ever of heart from that one to into the open, find out more about it. And I have to ask why Becky Colombo it's a great name. Where does that come from? A great name is named after just peppy Colombo his late Italian scientists who studied mercury and he conceived of at the trajectory there. Was used for a mission in the seventies known as marina ten. So this is a collaboration between the European Space Agency and Jackson, the Japan, aerospace exploration agency, and this is a particularly busy time for Jackson because they have another mission that we reported on the poker recent could high abuser to that is currently in a crux point. And there has been some more news about that as well. Jackson was hoping that they'd be able to make a landing this month on the regal asteroid, but they've had to delay that until January. And why has that delay occurred as something going wrong? No, nothing's wrong. It's just that the asteroid that they're landing on is considerably rookie than they rent painting..

European Space Agency Becky Colombo Colombo Jackson Japan mckee dengue Jaksa Yan e nine billion kilometers seven years
"european space agency" Discussed on Hard Factor

Hard Factor

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Hard Factor

"The victim in bitcoin to avoid detection. So we all know what pets. This is going to be indicated from bitcoin, maybe ten percent this week to get on the train. Did you sell still have sold a buy back in or did you scammer you, this guy? No. I'm just saying, man, wait till September. I on stamps in your car. Twenty two thousand babies going to twenty two. On a side note a similar scam, but I think everyone should know about their is involved sending you an Email claiming to have hacked your search history porn sites, unless you pay them money, they'll share your perversions with your Facebook friends and Email contact. So I mean, basically everyone would know that I really love desks. West is west is a big time watches porn with desk in it. Like student teacher, detentions, if guys are just setting up desks for lonely, housewives into that part of it is the secretaries. The other half of it is he really wants a job, never been triangle guy. Yeah. Yeah. It's a fuck you to corporate. Wait a minute l. corporate life. Are you putting your Email address into point sites? No, I've never got excuse me ma'am. Where would you like this desk setup? I'm still waiting for my free shit west just just readjusted his pants. So the FBI incurred is anyone who receives these things to send complaints, internet crime complaint center and just be careful out there. All right. Well, the Italian space agency on Wednesday announced that they've discovered a large body of stable liquid water under about a mile of ice on Mars south pole. So also known as a lake. The Italians discovered this twelve mile wide lake using their radar radar system called Mars this, which is just Mars with an IS at the end of it, it orbits the red planet on the European Space Agency's Mars express spacecraft, which it sounds fancy. But when you look at it just looks like a normal satellite. So Mars has been collecting data from Mars southern hemisphere since twenty twelve, they discovered the lake because the water looks significantly different creates more bright reflections than the other solids around it like rock and ice. So that's why they think it's water. They're basing that off of reflections from fucking thing. They named Mars, like without any creativity, it could be anything. It could be a giant liquid monster, the fucker it's on Mars. They have no idea. Yeah, yeah, could be could it could be something else other than water, but it looks exactly like on radar what the subterranean lakes on earth look like. So that is bullshit. Yeah, they're pretty much like looking for a reason to send. Oppressively someone farts in the Italian space agency or whatever they sent a press release out into alliens are out there. A lot of scientists are saying, this is like pretty much ninety. Nine point, nine percent. This is water, but the reflections. Yeah, but they haven't ruled out giant space alien though. That's for sure. Disappoint again, man at probably. But the biggest questions now are these does the lake contain any biological life because all biological life needs is water something to live on and then just some sort of pre existing biological life. Are there any other subterranean lake some ours. So that's that's another big one. And then the final question everybody's asking himself is how soon until on musk drugs, everybody at burning man kidnaps them and start new county on Mars where he's the emperor. He's got someone to put it's fucking submarine now that's for sure. Yeah, he desperately wants to be an emperor. I'm glad you said. Yeah, wonder if mmediately just thought there's my new submarine doc. He definitely got most likely to be a number, whatever South African boys school. He went to the fucking nerve at south by southwest this year, someone asked him what kind of. Political thing that you have when you were in Mars needs like, I'm so glad you asked. We would have a direct democracy where everyone would get an equal say, and I was like, but you just instituted the fact that they have to have a fucking direct democracy taking away the entire point of direct democracy because you institute, right? It's the first emperor direct democracy. I mean, he's above the democracy. Let's not do that. After after the entire basis of the rest of our lives is set after guys can start everyone on brother..

Mars European Space Agency FBI Facebook nine percent ten percent
"european space agency" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on BrainStuff

"From which the universe we know and love is projected by doing this they were able to describe eternal inflation without general relativity creating a timeless state her talk explained this move in a statement when we trace the evelyn of our universe backwards in time at some point we arrive at the threshold of eternal inflation where are familiar notion of time ceases to have any meaning the math is complex but the result is interesting the calculations have the effect of turning the infinite and fractional multi verse into a far simpler and finite situation that eternal inflation does predict hawking said this about it we are not down to a single unique universe but our findings imply a significant reduction of the multi verse to a much smaller range of possible universes to put it in perspective hawking's final paper doesn't revolutionize our understanding of how the universe and indeed the multi works but it is a valuable addition to a huge field of theoretical work specifically her tug hopes that the study may help a search for ancient gravitational waves that were generated by eternal inflation these ripples and space time are far too weak for current gravitational wave detectors to detect however we need to wait until advanced space based observatories such as the european space agency's planned lies emission are launched regardless of whether the study leads to groundbreaking discoveries about the cosmos that we live in it's a testament to a great scientist who worked tirelessly his entire life to answer some of the biggest questions that humanity has pondered and on hawking's shoulders other great minds will build on this work to hopefully decipher whether our universe is unique or if it's just one bubble category floating in the ocean of the multi verse.

european space agency scientist hawking
"european space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"But her mars odyssey the indian mommission the european space agency mars express and their recent addition the trace gas orbiter and these are the ones that are operating today in addition there are dead spacecraft mariner nine viking1 viking to the russian phobos mission all of these earn orbit and it's getting pretty crowded there and mars observers i remember no mars observer sailed on by without stopping were sure of a yes well you know mars is hard sometimes we uh we can always pull off what we want at that planet i'm here with bruce schakowsky my man about mars and we're talking about that fabulous maven mission i'm always interested in how we get into this business this is an exciting thing to do and everybody i talk to their typically something happens that gives them that gravity assists the propels amend of the science that we're doing what was that like for you you know i was always interested in space and i remember being a sixyearold sitting in front of the tv watching the countdown of the first mercury astronauts in the very early 1960s but for me what what really set me on this path was uh when i was an undergraduate at ucla i was a physics major and i got bored with the classes because all they were doing was teaching us tools and techniques so i started looking around for something else and i took a planetary science class from hugh kiefer who is one of the professors bear uh by the end of the semester i had changed my major i was working forum on the viking mission and that really set me on this path so it it happened to be one class that happened to be offered uh what i was looking around for something else to take thanks bruce well we figured out how mars lost.

bruce schakowsky ucla hugh kiefer mars
"european space agency" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"And then landed on earth right fiery and trish and then you and i are descendants of marked martian microbes grad is extraordinary see now that is wild and that would change i hope the way you feel about it what it means to be a living thing and i hope it gives you just that much more reverence for the cosmos and are placed within it it is worth exploring this the nasa budget now is point four percent of the federal budget western half a percent and you could keep it right there just adjusting for inflation and you could change the world then immune gauge international partners canadian space agency european space agency right uh japanese airspace expiration agency is throw it indian space research organisation chinese space the demonstration in here we are changing the world together vice mckay and wow that was that was already a truck communities water 'cause that was fantastic for helmer who is as good who all right let's go to the question from right let's do a couple of conquest your style we uh let's hear it hey bill this is sam i think i live in brooklyn met comecon had this thought and i wanna know what you think about eighty there must be a finite number uh possible molecules that we can catalogue and understand in the same way that we've done with human genes is there any chance will ever have a full catalogue of all the possible a safe organic molecules available to us on planet earth hey.

mckay brooklyn comecon trish nasa four percent
"european space agency" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"You want to what you language please okay yeah we'd appreciate that guy everybody here yeah that's right well we're we're up to here with all the stuff today late dr sandler a you use the point you're trying to make his america first in space factory america first pace i've been hearing so much about the european space agency landed on a comet the european space agency landed on the unit but european their land in you know all over the place you know he'll land in your backyard they about land in your backyard mukhamed bhutto petrit delgado because they know note decent bound and i don't know where you get this attitude about them i've watched them with the different projects that they have in conjunction with other space agencies like ourselves or by themselves with various projects they've metaverse missions and they've all been very impressive and have shown us things we haven't seen before where way when he talked about everything to march before not denmark's new media different different mars all with different part of mars okay so let me ask you something but if i put the pacific ocean we go run around in it and then tricks bunch later i pick your sharp pacific ocean and we go a different part of the ocean is that a big deal if a different island every day weren't with you talking about if you see if he sees different bodies of of land different land masses.

america delgado denmark new media dr sandler
"european space agency" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Science Friday

"Astor it's coming in that are going to be harder hurts that's right yeah we'd like to keep it intact difficult possible yeah and uh i want to thank you both for tagging tied to be with us today i do you do you have any advice anybody who's listening mobile with anything to do immediately andy advice no where we need to continue to pursue this program at uh at a at a reasonable pace uh the masses uh certainly working uh uh with our administration and congress to uh undetermined right but the right amount is we are also working out with our international partners in this we work with the european space agency uh uh the uh japanese space agency uh russia as well russ cosmos and uh the academy of sciences in russia it's uh uh it's a worldwide problem uh you know you never know where an asteroid is going to strike he did strike it could strike anywhere uh so it's a it's a it's a good area for uh not only uh uh a national uh capability but to for international collaboration i thank you both attacking tab to be with us today antichiang coleader has dark mission cheap scientists have dispaced partnered japan's department at johns hopkins university applied physics lap a lyndon johnson planetary protection officer for nasa have i have a good weekend thank you both for taking time to be with this thank you for your interest thinker you're welcome and because all great adventures need an heroic theme here's a musical tribute written in performed by our own rachel baton produced by daniel peter schmidt the most scientifically accurate aerosmith pera day you might ever hear nicholas.

congress russia japan officer nasa daniel peter schmidt nicholas academy of sciences johns hopkins university lyndon johnson
"european space agency" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"Also we're talking about data sets there about in be query um and it says look there's a there's a bunch of them that are super cooling and really easy to use but we've sort of touch very briefly in that in the short time who talking about data sets we've got an goo cloud storage what are those data sets yes to the main data sets that we have in goo clubs storage we've got about a one and a half peta bites of satellite data from both nasa and esa the european space agency in these are uh these are images that are updated on a weekly basis um as um and more satellite images come in and then we also just completed on boarding of uh over four hundred thousand open art images from the metropolitan museum these images are interesting because uh they also include annotations of that art so for example like what air they came from who the artist was what the um what the date was in then we can run those through like a vision api and output those annotations into a big corey so that it between goup clot storage and big query uh you can do a lot of interesting analysis on that goal so there's there's a lot of cool data sets and i'm getting excited about them and i want to use them what are what are the conditions uh can i use them for whatever one their licences are what what are the conditions here to the main criteria for the program is the data be open for public use some of the data sets carrying additional requirement that they cannot be used for commercial use on but that is explicit on the licence associate with the data said when you access it but for the most part there they're free for use for public commercial whatever you want to use them for nice so now i'm wondering uh since you're talking about the fact that you do etl the extract transform and load of process to transform that data like the raw data into a actual beta said.

nasa metropolitan museum corey raw data peta esa
"european space agency" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"european space agency" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"Absolutely yes currently commercial crew vehicles are expected to come on line at some time between 2018 in 2019 and the european space agency procures is seats through nasa which means that he is likely that most european nationals beyond 2019 will be flying a one of the new commercial crew vacoas outside the space x vague rule the boeing vehicle so a could certainly involve training on one of those vehicles so you looking forward to the the next few years red matting you can't wait to get back into the space can absolutely as a hugely exciting time coming up i mean i i mentioned about his transition to new two new vehicles that are going to carry astronaut into space at the saint andrzej my mission we had the first commercial module attached the space station the bigalow module that is going to go from strength to strength we might we might even by the end of the decade see the first commercial space station in orbit the space station will gone to 2024 but right now with focusing on what's going to happen beyond that with the deep space mission with nazis a ryan programme of which the european space agency is a is a big part of that and so it is because of break scientific users who can be a lot happening in the next few years tim peak anyone want to florida soyuz really while the not absolutely not i would really yeah backus i mean another description i've heard from another east astronaut he described it as going over a waterfall in a barrel that was on fire forbach advice arriving nissei microsoft's of a lot of excitement about nasa getting back into having its own spacecraft were actually strictly speaking not its own spacecraft with boeing in american spicer of raw the relying on the soyuz.

nasa soyuz microsoft boeing