35 Burst results for "European Parliament"

Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:30 min | Last week

Top EU official proposes new 2030 target to reduce emissions

"Earlier today. European Commission President Ursula von Delaying gave her first State of the Union address to the European. Parliament. It's fair to say that it has been and will be more closely scrutinized than the setpiece usually is the EU is beset like the rest of the world by an ongoing pandemic and associated economic turbulence, and also attempting to ease the United Kingdom out of the block with as little damage to the fixtures and fittings as possible and the UK's latest history on x over the last week or so demonstrate that this remains an unsolved problem while joined with more Bite Niamey Leery Europe correspondent at the Irish Times. Niamey before we talk about the details of what Slovan delay and had to say, did it strike you? There was an overall theme or tone she was swinging for I. Think it was quite striking. Future focused. She talked about how can we get out of the Democrats economic repercussions in a way that says. The continent for the future. So it was very much to do with tying together the various different goals whether that's a climate and economic development where increasing digitalization on. Also a one section of her speech, which I thought was particularly strong was on discrimination and efforts at kind of acknowledging the reality in the block of racism and discrimination. Based on sexual orientation or religious beliefs. So it was quite wide ranging and then the other aspect of it was. She proposed making it easier for the EU to come up with common policy when it comes to international relations particularly on matters relating to human rights sanctions. So just as a liberation on that idea of general tone this being her first state of the Union as as commission president does it does it seem that we understand what her idea of the European Union is. I think she Saturday as being. A sort of an unfinished project what it ought to be somewhere where people can have a quality of life get paid fairly for work have social protections that you're does better on that than other parts of the world, and that's part of the reason why able better able to weather the pandemic but that it's not enough and she said that there would be a new framework introduced to. Member states to set minimum wages in order to make work pay property. Then an in addition to that there was the The section on discrimination which I think was unusual in acknowledged the struggles in the block in terms of she mentioned a particular discrimination against Rome people on also the LGBTQ I free zones in. Poland or she called out as inhumane. And so I think she's she was quite strong meticulous division of the block as being a place where people and live more freely with rights and have a better quality of life in general but I think that she also you know it's it's. It's quite telling that she. She had. Many. Difficulties take me in terms of international relations they were for her to talk about it was difficult relationship with Russia difficult relationship with China difficult relationship with the United States difficult relationship Britain as well. Well, let's talk about some of those difficult relationships and because we are here broadcasting from London let's talk about the difficult relationship. The now has with the UK did brexit get much of a mention? She did mention us. So she said that with every day that passes it becomes more difficult for deal to be reached and she also said that. The EU would stand by with the agreement would never at go back on its the an agreement that had been passed by the European Parliament Anheuser Commons and that had been jointly agreed by the UK Andy you to Protect citizen's rights but also she said first and foremost the Good Friday Agreement on the department and it was quite interesting as well to know that she she also quote the late John Hume, the Nobel laureate. And former SDLP leader from dairy and she said that she described him as one of the Great Europeans. And mentioned that he he recently passed away on us used a quote from him to kind of talk about the strength of diversity which I thought was quite. An interesting use of quotes. It was notable high. She was sort of writing in that story, which is I suppose a Northern Irish story really into this story of the European Union. You mentioned the difficulty of the relationship with Russia and obviously the country of which us live underlying walls defense minister. Germany has found itself once again. On the front line over that relationship having taken in the apparently poisoned opposition politician Alexei Navalny did she took you light any kind of? Way of how the e you can live alongside Russia. She was quite I thought her words were quite firm on Russia's so she said. That the poison she mentioned the poisoner Nevada and said that it wasn't a one sauce and she said, no. Number of gas, pipelines is GONNA. Is GonNa fix that relationship she also am I thought spoke quite in quite heartfelt way in solidarity with the people of Belarus Moore she said that they'd be brave and gone out on the streets and they should have the they shouldn't be pieces on someone else's chessboard what she said, but they should have the ability to determine their own future. You said at the top of this item that she attempted to link the recovery. Well, hopeful eventual recovery from the pandemic the associated economic problems to broader themes of climate in the future on climate in particular. Did she have anything of note to say. So. What? What under nine has proposed that the target for the block to reduce emissions should be increased fifty five percent by twenty thirty, that's compared to a previous commitment to forty percent. This is compared to nine thousand, nine, hundred levels of emissions, and she said that this would be vital in order for the block to reach its Paris Agreement commitments on also its goal of becoming climate neutral by twenty fifty on the way she she described the landmark agreement of the e you to join me borrow seven, hundred, fifty, billion, euro. As an opportunity to do this by directing at least thirty percent or thirty seven percent of the investment towards green initiatives. So things like development of green hydrogen. Renovating homes with. Forty percent of emissions and also. Increasing the car charging network electric vehicle charging that things like that an while this could go in. With kind of digital developments there. For example, at fast broadband were available continent wide including in rural areas that would both alive for rural development but also for things like you know people to work from home more easily and things like that. So she she s she she argued that these things could go hand in hand essentially. But Green groups have been quick to come out and say that fifty five percent of the target isn't enough now some of them had themselves called for that in the. In the past but I guess with the scale of the disaster that they say we're facing, you know they're always going to want to push for more and more ambitious targets

European Union Poland President Trump European Commission United Kingdom Ursula Von Delaying Slovan UK Sdlp Alexei Navalny European Parliament Anheuser C London The Irish Times Germany Rome Nevada Russia
Boris Johnson, Ursula von der Leyen push for Brexit trade deal

News, Traffic and Weather

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Boris Johnson, Ursula von der Leyen push for Brexit trade deal

"Emerging from videolink talks Boris Johnson what we need now is the C. available in the negotiations and I was very pleased that I see that above the land the commission president Charlie show the president of the council David society the European Parliament will agree they will sign up to a good statement to take us to the current transition phase ends at the end of December

Boris Johnson President Trump European Parliament Charlie David
Witold Szabowski

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Witold Szabowski

"Guess today's Polish journalist, who's reported from across the world including Cuba's of Africa Turkey and is land. He's previously been recognized by some of Poland's most prestigious literary prizes as well as Amnesty. International. English pen and the European Parliament. Journalism Prize his latest book. How to feed a dictator provides a unique perspective on some of the world's most evil men through the eyes of that cooks. The Toll Sh- lebowski welcome to the show. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? Were you born in Warsaw thank you for having me and the answer is no I was born. Hundreds kilometers from Warsaw, which made me very well linked to Warsaw and I had a lot of contacts which people from there at I graduated, I finished my by school in very very small town, Ostrich Moskowitz, and were you encouraged to write or indeed to cook at that time? That's all my mother was cooking really well. And when I was six or seven, I had that fashion to bake, and I was really it was a master of cheesecake, but then I never actually had any links to cooking until I graduated from Warsaw University, and then I went to Denmark and the full story seem the book, but shortly speaking. People in Denmark earned much better those days and people in Poland. And Poland was joining you those days, so I could easily meet right. I went to Denmark. And I spend a couple of months, and my first job was cleaning the dishes very good, fancy restaurant in very beautiful Barcus Copenhagen, but then I made a beautiful rape currier name became a chess, so that was the first serious cooking for me. But you ended up walking out of the restaurant, throwing your apron down and walking out. All Yeah Oh. Yeah, that's because I went to. I made a mistake actually. I'm joking, but I went to point just for a couple of weeks. I took a short break. The restaurant with my plan was to come back after a couple of weeks, but then in Warsaw I got the job actually I. It was an internship. But in the best newspaper, having all. So, that was something I couldn't really skip I never. I never went back to cooking. And in fact that was the start of your journalistic career. Because at twenty five, you became the youngest reporter at the Big Polish daily newspaper. Tell us about that. It'd be far. I was working for a top law. No, like the sound on or something like that and I was writing about everything related to religion that totally season church, the Polish Pope, who had died just a couple of months before, and that was my first serious job, but right after that. I began. That's true. At the biggest Polish daily called Gazit of has its weekly supplements with Literary Report Dash, which is really gorgeous, which is which is really a pearl to be a discovered one day for the international reverse. I believe because every week they used to print. Two or three really goods pieces of beautiful literary record dash in Richard Kapucinski style. And that's true. I began working there when I was twenty five, which was quite early. Usually, that was a place for very experienced, very very good journalist. And almost straits from the kitchen in Copenhagen I went to. Supply! With with the best quality reputation the on so that was kind of amazing for me. For the first couple of years, they couldn't believe that it's July It's a beautiful dream. They thought that at some point someone would come and wake me up.

Warsaw Poland Denmark Warsaw University European Parliament Barcus Copenhagen Africa Cuba Ostrich Moskowitz Reporter Rape Currier Richard Kapucinski
European Commission unveils €750 billion recovery plan

Not Too Shabby

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

European Commission unveils €750 billion recovery plan

"The head of the European Commission as if on the lion has sets out proposals for seven hundred and fifty billion euro package of grants and loans to rebuild that used to come to me two thirds of the amount would be for grounds to member states and businesses west affected by coronavirus with the rest in loans crystal Schelle demos is a member of the European parliament's from Denmark's governing Social Democratic Party she told the BBC many of the countries hardest hit by the pandemic had already been in financial trouble if they have had a better financial situation in these countries before the corona virus they would have been better able to tackle the financial consequences every single member state of the European Union right now is fighting the financial consequences of the coronavirus and different everybody needs to help themselves as well and different more difficult for every member states if they even have to pay grants for those countries

European Commission European Parliament Denmark Social Democratic Party BBC European Union
Taking the Headache out of IoT

CCC Talks

02:43 min | 4 months ago

Taking the Headache out of IoT

"Today John by Allesandro Bassey Iot expert on central Europe area manager at things and also if that wasn't enough president of Iot Italy Asandra. Thank you very much for joining us on. Today's podcast time having meets right now I was onto you. Describe yourself as an IOT expert. We're going to drill in on that in a couple of minutes. We know that you're heavily. Invested in digital transformation industry four point. Oh big data iot amongst money things and you're also leading one of the biggest EU co-funded projects on I'll T- free excitedly haired. That comprises what we believe of nineteen core partners on hundreds of stakeholders now Alexandra. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Also this fantastic project working on the not feeling thousand Sam which makes like tortillas today and What we're looking at the beginning of the help the European Commission to draft the very first calls on it and to make fast We'll have forty European Parliament at being part of the extra group mocking two dozen. Ten right So I'm coming in from diverse backgrounds. The midnight I'm starting with technology. Aman they work with clouds and big data before recalling clouds the daytime so a long time ago unfortunately in the recent years with a focus is really more on how to implement some sort of Kogen strategy for companies to transform the business I mean towards connected objects and how pieces of disposal together I is not by itself doesn't make sense in it's big data in that division dancing a lot of stuff of men with really two eighty You project you're are talking about. It's not a One of the huge problems of teas that such a you know par- such a galaxy of different technologies. The approaches different style. Not even the definition I mean is is is a single of. I mean if you search from the Internet connection the appropriate. Probably like forty or fifty different definitions. I myself I get three of them in history and you know if are moving. I know that's not really correct. Some teaser. That's because really it's it's really complex. Mean what exactly is what exactly he

Allesandro Bassey Iot Iot Italy Asandra IOT Alexandra European Parliament Europe Area Manager President Trump European Commission SAM
Travel to the Alsace Region of France

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:27 min | 6 months ago

Travel to the Alsace Region of France

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Brady read from a world vegan TRAVEL DOT com. Who has come to talk to us about the all sauce Brady? Welcome to the show It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you so much for having me and I've already learned something because I was the first thing I came out of my mouth when we started talking. I was saying it wrong about who you want to put it on a map force. Yeah absolutely so the else. Region of France is in the east of France its shares but if a border with Switzerland and also Germany. So it's really in the east central part of France and there's some things that are unusual about this area which will get into. But why should someone go to the all Saas Festival frats just generally speaking is of course a very very popular destination? One of the reasons why. I think France is so appealing. Is that each of the regions So different and also is particularly interesting. In my opinion for a number of reasons so festival is a little bit of like a cultural exception to France and what I mean by that is had a huge influence from Germany over its history and indeed. Alsace has actually been part of Germany and part of France and has it flopped many times over the past hundred years and I believe that before the first world war it was part of Germany for a while and then it went back to France after nine. One thousand nine hundred eighteen when lost the war and then of course it went back to Germany during the Second World War and then went back to France after the war ended so because of this it has a huge amount of German influence in terms of the architect jar in terms of some of the cultural aspects. It even has its own dialect. Which maybe isn't so surprising because actually have quite a number of dialects there but Alsatian is actually quite similar to Swiss German. Actually and actually little trivia there. The USA foundation was actually banned in nineteen forty five however raising white was banned was because they didn't France after the war they didn't want any German influenced in the languages. I believe and when they realized that this was probably wasn't a good idea to ban language like this they actually made it sort of officially able to be used again and now it's the second largest dialect in France although not so many people speak it now and it really is a mixture of all German and French so there are so many reasons but I'll start off with that. It's very different to the rest of France Sir and you mentioned that it was German at the beginning of World War One and became German after the Franco Prussian war in eighteen. Seventy that was when it was acquired by Germany which is shortly really after Germany becomes Germany at that point in terms of Germany becoming got country. So excellent will. What kind of are you going to recommend for us? Well I mean L. S. Is just such a fantastic destination? Because it's really sort of small enough that you can get a really good sense. Some feel of the place and see a wide range of different things in a short amount of time so first of all. I'd love to chat about like getting there because this is really changed in just the past few years so the first time. I went to Alsace which was twenty years ago. Now it required. I mean we know that French trains are extremely efficient but they didn't have any TGV's at all and certainly not the fast tracks until just two thousand sixteen. I think it was so it went from being able to get there in five six hours from Paris to being in central Paris to Strasbourg. Lose in just two hours so it's really really accessible now any for French people but those people coming into France or maybe even want to just add a little. Stay IN AL's Asif that bison themselves in Paris I mean you can even come down for the day. Is that a train that is running from the guard. Dalil I believe so yes yes. It is so young in there so many wonderful things that you can do like I said. There's a real mixture between towns and villages and Cities Festival Strasbourg. That is a really great place to include on your itinerary and I can certainly talk more about what travelers can experience there and this beautiful towns of Karma which is much smaller. You also have the incredible voege mountains to the west of Al Sas and then just across the border into Germany. You have the Black Forest Mountain. They're back forest mountains. Which really beautiful. You had the wine route as well which is beautiful scenic road a scenic road. Where not only do you get to stop off in villages where you can taste wines which very scenic and beautiful but also the countryside? There is just so stunning as well. But it's also really good point to jump over and get three countries for one so to speak by going over the border in Germany. There are some really lovely towns just across the border in baden-baden Okara through and also Basel in Switzerland is a really cool destination as well. So yeah that's kind of a very brief overview. Well where are we going to start? Well I guess because stop in Strasbourg if you like. It seems like a good place to start stress. Book is I think I believe. It's the tenth largest city in France and it is quite an international city because the European Parliament is there so it's love Europeans that are living there who are involved in European politics. And not only is stressful. Like the capital of Alsace and have this focus as being the head of the European Parliament. It's also extremely scenic and the Cathedral itself is absolutely studying. It's widely considered to be one of the best and it's like the Second Tulips Cathedral in the whole of France. And it's considered to be just an incredible example of romanesque architecture and Lepetit class which is like a little region very small area in the center of Strasbourg is actually UNESCO. World Heritage as France has so many UNESCO heritage sites lepetit. Floss is is one of them and that's really famous because it has some beautiful half Timoteo houses and beautiful little couple straits. There's a little sort of canal system that runs through it and you can take a little boat and go through the Loxton and get a bit of a tool there and of course it's particularly magical like the rest of us is at Christmas Time. Where of course you have all of the Christmas markets and there's also the Palais COA which is a beautiful building and real sort of palace kind of setup and has a lot of museums in. That's so stressful is a definite must see. I would definitely recommend heading there for at least a day so if you would just going to stay in the town of stressful then. I think it is absolutely worthwhile and it's something that we do when we are there is too. You can of course find a free walking tour and these are very very popular in France. We have a guide that we use and she's absolutely fantastic with any tool off. The town is going to be so helpful because there is just so much hidden in plain view that you just would not do unless you had somebody explaining to you and professional guides just this incredible source of information in this area

France Germany Strasbourg Alsace Brady Switzerland Cities Festival Strasbourg Swiss German Paris European Parliament USA Cathedral Second Tulips Cathedral Black Forest Mountain
Greta Thunberg brands EU's new climate law 'surrender'

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:40 min | 7 months ago

Greta Thunberg brands EU's new climate law 'surrender'

"Victory to persuade anxious establishment allies to rally behind his campaign. Amy Klobuchar and Pete. Buddha judge abruptly ended their campaigns and endorsed Biden. Though there late departures meant their names was still on the ballots. Climate activists and green members of the European Parliament urging the European Union to be more ambitious as the block gets ready to unveil plans for climate law to cut greenhouse gas emissions to zero by the Mid Century while the Greens the twenty-seven Nation Block to raise its twenty thirty climate targets. A group thirty four youth climate activists including Greta. Tune Bug Rosen open letter yesterday to EU leaders explaining why they think the planned law is a surrender. European Commission President Sheila von Layin. Who has put climate change at the top of our priorities and pledged to make Europe the first climate neutral continent by twenty fifty will present plans later today to add luster to the event. She's invited tune bug to discuss the climate legislation with her and easy you commissioners in light of the tone of the letter. It's unlikely that tune book will only sit and watch the group stressed that instead of setting long-term goals the EU should focus on the C O two budget which applies for today. Such co two budgets used to measure the additional emissions that can enter the atmosphere without global warming exceeding a certain level.

European Union Sheila Von Layin European Parliament Amy Klobuchar European Commission Biden Rosen Pete Europe Greens President Trump
EU commission unveils climate law amid criticism

KYW 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

EU commission unveils climate law amid criticism

"Three members of the European Parliament and youth climate activists are criticizing the lack of ambition of the European Commission strategy to reach climate neutrality by twenty fifty as part of the European green deal the EU commission will present its plan for a climate law on Wednesday the commission is proposing a mechanism for regularly raising the U. S. emission reduction target over the next three decades well there is no plan to raise the E. U.'s overall emission goal for twenty

European Parliament E. U. European Commission
Commercial Surrogacy: Women Are More Than Wombs

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:46 min | 7 months ago

Commercial Surrogacy: Women Are More Than Wombs

"Writing at the federalist last week Kelly trailer Hay fever remembered sitting in the legislature as the state of Washington legalize commercial surrogacy while surrogacy has long been legal in the US commercial. Surrogacy has not in fact it's banned in most countries because of the potential for human exploitation. Haber was struck by the lack of safeguards in the legislation. No background checks for would be parents. No limits on the number of children they could order. No MINIMUM COMPENSATION FOR SURROGATE MOTHERS. No barriers against pedophile are human traffickers. You might exploit the kids created incredibly in fact. The rights of the children themselves weren't even a part of that two thousand eighteen discussion well this month. New York is following suit. Considering to similar bills that would legalize commercial surrogacy in that state like in Washington. The push in New York is being made with heart. String RHETORIC AND CELEBRITY ENDORSEMENT HABER RIGHTS. But again with almost no restrictions to prevent opening floodgates for the exploitation and commodification of women's bodies were the buying and selling of humans and untold part of this whole story by the way. Is that among those pushing hardest for commercial surrogacy are gay couples. According to an informal study commissioned by the Chicago Tribune in Two Thousand Sixteen ten to twenty percent of donor eggs infertility clinics went to gay men ordering babies through surrogacy. The overall number that represents was at the time skyrocketing having increased by fifty percent in just five years. Now keep in mind. None of ten to twenty percent. Sounds like a low number self identified. Gay People make up only about three percent of the population by the way the sponsors of both bills currently before the New York state assembly. Just like the sponsor of the bill that became law in Washington state are openly gay in New York. Lgbt activists are mostly rooting for the less restrictive of the two bills on the table. Insisting that any safeguards on commercial baby making would quote unfairly harm. Lgbtq families the safeguards that these activists oppose are the same as those that are applied to adoptive families. Home Studies waiting periods protections for birth mother's according to a joint letter by several lgbt rights groups. Such evaluations would be unthinkable for parents. Who Plan to have children through sexual intercourse? Therefore I suppose they're logic goes restrictions should also be unthinkable for couples unable to have procreative intercourse. And who instead wished to buy someone's eggs and rent someone's womb in order to just ate a baby that they'll call their own. What we're seeing here is the logical conclusion of the ideology that brought a same sex marriage in the first place. Gay Unions were sold to the world with the slogan. Love is love now. Of course the only way that heterosexual love is the same. As homosexual love is by making any and all biological aspects of love irrelevant to the conversation in the first place. And that's just another way of saying that biological sex in other words that male and female and procreation are both irrelevant to marriage and now so many of those who intentionally chose sterile unions and argued that procreation is irrelevant to those unions are now demanding children. They're demanding procreation without sex. And they're demanding it as a right and the only way to claim a right to what is impossible because after all same sex couples cannot conceive. Children is through a transactional work around with women whose wombs they wished to rent and other words. The sponsors of these bills want the reproductive abilities of Mother's divorced from the mothers themselves. They want the wombs but not the women. Of course those who suffer in this cynical economic exchange like in each and every chapter of the sexual revolution so far are women and children as Savior points out. Surrogate mothers or station will carriers as they're called are at risk of permanent sterility or other serious health consequences from ovarian hyperstimulation. The children whose rights are not even considered will grow up. And as we've seen in other situations they'll wanna know who they are. And where they came from many in similar situations understandably condemn how they were conceived bought and sold like products. The European Parliament has already denounced surrogacy as an act of violence against women and countries like India who citizen stand to profit from renting their wombs. Rich Westerners have recognized the built in exploitation in the practice. An outlawed it yet if activists and legislators get their way in New York it will soon welcome commercial surrogacy and by doing so. They'll be endorsing. The idea. Families including children are commodities to be bought and sold. But it's always the women and children especially the most vulnerable ones who will pay the highest

New York Washington Haber Chicago Tribune United States European Parliament Kelly India
The U.K. finally leaves the EU — nearly 4 years after Brexit vote

BBC World Service

08:33 min | 8 months ago

The U.K. finally leaves the EU — nearly 4 years after Brexit vote

"Get a better sense of how Europe is reflecting on this new period for the E. U. I'm joined by it down due to no Polish member of the European Parliament and someone on the parliament's brexit steering committee welcome down due to brexit is dominated your life as well for the past three years I imagine it's all about the future not the past though for you now is it no it's true that's what I have been saying from the very beginning but just let me say quite a bit of a mix of FedEx who I said this I just spoke after him and I told him that the only think I would indeed not be missing curry guarding the brexit is is listening to him because he forgot to mention that the contribution from U. K. to your budget was also is covering his and his brakes party costume being an impressive so that's also important to it remember but it's true that breaks it's practically since two thousand sixteen because it was happening in installments we have not yet done as you as you also know because we are in this implementation or as you say transition period when the European lowers the play but we are we are not already facing the what if you met us and what people were not asked about when they were going to have to vote in the referendum is is is indeed the future and future relationship and you okay and and you you will be our inter connected we are very close neighbors so why I was sort of on the line I also trusted to spare absolutely no effort on both sides to to avoid that brexit is also bringing emisoras making people pay for it so close relationship would be absolutely fundamental it's not clear at all now we don't know anything about the planned so feel prime minister that the board Johnson how he won three two two what kind of places he finally wants to create that I personally hope that these with body close also in the level of people to people when you say we we need to know where we might have diverging views on things and yeah a lot of that depends on the British government now and if you take recent clues they'll be diverging views on pretty much everything you are absolutely right so what I'm wearing face the full that it will affect people because we those in the future because we have some rain Germans and it was a dollar for those who are who comes here still and who are here but on the future we know that you can one of the most important headlines this to terminate the free movement of people that would bring Qalat off and a lot of icing problems for a foot for this relationship so I hope that he said the students would be safe that the searches would be safe from it from this and that we would find an agreement that would be non discriminating contested procreating fit ed they also the the benefits and rights and obligations sorry I am still optimistic that they would be with the my long term sinking in negotiating but the worst think we'd be in in free trade agreement which you know you it's more than forty percent of the Brits said to do it to the European Union market so you cannot just overnight a deposit from will do rules and standards because single market has it said demands I would say in terms of what what you say you have handled that's that's exactly the attitude I suspected Nigel for AJ and to an extent Boris Johnson would object to they'll saying actually we can absolutely yes you can and referred to all those things but it has a price also so you can you can continue to allow the small and mid sized businesses and in the UK and in Europe to to participate in the straight to be part of the importance supply chains but then of course you have to respect like we have to respect rules also here on the island you have to expect to lose if you want to to to be part of this of this big market so don't don't go anywhere just want to involve our other guests and he briefly in this how much of that sense of optimism Catherine briefly de do you preserve how much are we going to be able to still to come together I think it's going to be very difficult in the short term because short term is what we've got we've got less than eleven months to negotiate a trade deal a never before has a trade deal being done on the basis of de alignment rather than coming together so de alignment not complying with each of those rules and I think this is going to make it very difficult not least because of the E. you have insisted on what they call a level playing field terms level playing field means that the UK must comply with the E. U. rules on things like social matters but also crucially on state aids and for the UK government that may be unacceptable Kevin Jennings I wonder if you is an Irish citizen feels slightly drool in closer to jam due to is a fellow E. U. citizen now that there's this non E. U. gap in the middle of you geographically is doing the will be a lot more of a closeness probably because remember arms is the only country to share a long border with the E. U. now on to the U. K. on that we remain very much center stage to on the future negotiations between the even the UK the concerns here that persisted throughout the last three and a half years haven't gone away it's a it's a cliff edge avoidance rolled artificial dispone vault of the fifth age avoid is the concerns about a hard border remain here and there a big concerns about north aren't essentially being brought have some would argue being dragged out of the E. U. against its will and I want nothing changes tonight there's a lot to work I've disorder ranges between the north and the rest of the UK in the months ahead and yes to answer your question Paul I think what we always felt very close to the E. U. I think perhaps even close and I were quite isolated not being an island off the rest of Europe and and with Britain in between also New York how can cut themselves off from the wood it will bring myself even closer to Europe again the new to in terms of the negotiations to come over the next eleven months there is a dominant partner isn't that we can't ignore that and if Britain does want agreement it does it is within your power the rest of the E. U. that is discover the whole thing you can say look unless you let us in your fishing waters were not even continuing this but you know exactly you this is not our attitude to eat we indeed believe that if if it's just we we want to be close with you because we appreciate also which is never discussed here how much you pay over those forty seven years has contributed to the European integration I was always shocked because U. K. was with the creator actually in the main contributor to single market which is this common market without borders on site and then all of a sudden you come was a red line which is first of all to leave the single market so come how can you explain that I sing just only by the lack of understanding what it what it is all about so we will do everything to have those close relations but we have of course also limits we cannot just sort of sacrifice and four hundred to whatever fifty or sixty million people just to to to please the card back to gears so like yes having a lingering affection for the UK and I can sense that you do have it's it's nice to hear by the way but that's not going to make much difference when it comes to hard negotiations you have you have the greater interest that hall absolutely which would be it would be hard to would be difficult we have to remember that of course you opinion also becomes smaller as UK has become smaller because U. K. many people do not realize that part of the power of the importance of the weight of U. K. was also coming from the fact that you were part of our big a community of Europeans so weak thank you know I trust that there would be a that would be sort of what's not only good political will which is extremely important but also understanding even because just political a desired and maybe existentialist problem for many colleagues here on this side of the island but I think talking about future uses three sinking about the the the next generations and and this is absolutely fundamental so I hope that there would be an approach of redefining something it would be beneficial and that would have a good balance social for heights and yes I thought a trust but a lot depends on the politicians so we have to and did that thank you for coming on the program that is a is a Polish member of the European Parliament this is the BBC world

Europe European Parliament
UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

Doctor Health Radio Show

07:10 min | 8 months ago

UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

"I expect that dates the ladies shop the most incredible that a a is I got to try the people getting ready to celebrate a goal I lose with a country we across route the people we frequently establishment it's amazing that you've done this walk our audience through your your throughout the nation right here today nine from the most people know you and know your what you've done but walking through how many years have you worked on this project I first became concerned about what the European project man I didn't even know what globalism walls in those days but I first became concerned about it about the bureaucracy was winning a battle of a democracy about a one of the tires to a single currency dollar lady by Germany oppose worried about it back in ninety nine state of Illinois is buddy today I feel like cattle I just cannot stand aside and do nothing so I've now been campaigning on this for twenty seven years I'm also the father that pretty much full time pretty much seven days a week now do we went back the other day on the show and played your maiden speech from the European Parliament way you sounded and looked exactly the same as you do today shore just tell just tell our audience a little bit because I've I've heard in the press about some of the interviews you've given in the recent days about you being in the parliament how long you been there whether you're going to miss it all in all and of course you know that that's it for you in terms of the European Parliament but it's already to yell at about that and a little bit about what you see happening over the next year given that this this transition period for brexit well I walked into the European Parliament in nineteen ninety nine the three of us from you can collect it and we walked up the steps we've never been to the building before that we live in a Brussels before we did but what was the galley what we were doing if we walk through the door and that official that I'll I will let me pay easily so badly so we just got a political asylum with the beginning and then I woke up those same steps in June last year a little twenty nine of us I'm I'm not shows how the center of gravity in British politics I shifted what was considered to be we at all mad mad house become the mainstream so people can develop this country I guess that's the victory that I've been a Paul Solman unsettled and supported me although but if anyone one of the night I live in PM London time I'm gonna be in parliament square with a huge huge part of the old eyes which I call white full what was the night is the point of no return we are leaving this political union we are leaving the globalists supranational structure we never coming back about twenty what I was battle Wednesday on my last day in the debate before they threw me out of the chain but because I laid the union Jack them but never your bloody flags and leave I think she said rather the thought is that right now with the company what we did is we went straight to the buff okay okay yeah yeah I know we we try to get you on the show but but let me the better is a lot more level head said maybe the maybe another day yeah I think I was slightly over trained on that particular day but what was interesting was just listen to the speeches of a creek without power because they're all now saying who next alphabets of gum next alight journey will be sent rex it marks the beginning of the end not jealous of the European Union but if the whole global is project you know where big business big politics big banks that want to control our lives through big bureaucracy I we want nation states free markets free that would let let's say and I think we're winning how do you what happens in the next year how do you actually make a good because today is the beginning of it but I guess December thirty first is when the heart out is correct yeah I mean look I think in terms of history today's the big moment the rest is the tiles that the tide of course is very very important Boris Johnson I suppose because he's scared of me is has laid the right promises is now saying all the right things to be sticks to his promises that great I mean backing six they also the referendum I think people so I packed up my tends to go away what I'm saying to that everybody is all I am going to be that through this next process through this transition period through the next phase of the guys the engines are I will praise the prime minister the rooftops and he gets it right but I will sound the alarm if he gets it wrong so I'm gonna be on that case let's talk about praising alarm I want to mention you know about this globalist project and why this is such a important day in and Nigel I'd I needn't remind you that about the opposition party in the established order on the same day the night before I actually in accomplishes breaks it it's also going to be the acquittal of Donald J. trump by the established forces over here it's it's so amazing that would happen on the same day but I want talk about why way for second in this pandemic in coming out of Wuhan China but you know tied to the one belt one road in tight to the globalist projects and I think we've had two cases now in the United Kingdom why why his and a shock folks in the United States and also this pandemic it coming out of how we have a whole show no dedicated just that what what are your thoughts about that tight to globalism okay well let's start off with wildlife what is astonishing is if you look at the people who is all the advisory board to walk away in the United Kingdom what do you find you find the former bosses old L. cools little old friend of Tony Blair as friends of David Cameron's people around big businesses there on the gold you find people who were all confederation of British industry one of those globalists I have a group that all of our country they've been serving on the board you even find that this is astonishing former senior bosses of all civil service to be all the while lays bold I'm most stunningly able you find David Cameron our prime minister it was made to resign because look like that but it is now official interlocutor putting the Chinese and British governments Alice happened is Chinese money has corrupted completely corrupted the system and Boris Johnson of gone with the fly will miss one we've gone with what everybody around it is telling and I think it is into the judgment but one of the last judgment so I've ever seen in my life in this country I'm hoping we can buy the mechanisms are less it will just America that's not happy with this think about Australia right there in the call to make but he's very deeply intertwined with China even value in twenty twelve band while away from that digital fiber

Most feel good about the economy but not the state of the country

Joe Walsh

09:35 min | 8 months ago

Most feel good about the economy but not the state of the country

"The president must be brought to heel the nation must be safe I guess the nation must be safe from the lowest unemployment from nineteen sixty nine and the addition of thirteen trillion dollars to the economy I guess we have to save America from that somebody who can help explain what is the logic of the political elites today is perhaps one of the greatest writers we have today a classicist in his own right senior fellow at the Hoover Institution you've seen him almost every night on television he is professor Victor Davis Hanson professor welcome to America first thank you grab the bastion I'm you've written a piece of the fabulous website American greatness called top get trump forever having read it it raised in me a very simple question I see the president's defense team doing sterling work this week we have fabulous America's scholars such as Alan Dershowitz we have former especial councils like Kenneth Starr who have given very solid lectures lectures I would've enjoyed in graduate school very professorial very fact based the history of impeachment and I thought to myself why is there anything that the president's defense team could say that would change the minds of those who wish to remove the duty elected president from the White House are only for the fact that there's four five senators are there is maybe thirty or forty house members who are you know they have been aware of political reality and are in need of states are congressional district don't wanna can put a cold from the congressional district I put my fault publican lost in a Democrat one Republican is one name is way ahead poll hello I I think that's the only thing it's not about actual crimes it's for a variety of one complex reasoning across town wait until November because I take very agreed upon probably blooms Alexian inn for about eight years of the progressive project pretty much junk for generations and they're just not just one tap on powerful so we go to all these **** drummer do not moment calls twenty nine month Michael Kohn Michael I'm not a tax returns impeachment you were just never yonder worn out because the outlook the alternative Sebastian I guess it's Bernie Sanders on the stone for the new green beer or revelations are apologize for young speech by a little more we don't have much our angle control of the catastrophic miscalculation the ball could be able to stay home and I love should clue without thank you hello they may get and then when I got to lose they're not they called while com there do what we did and how it's gonna be bipartisan and you go do whatever we want the United and they will come and get you look knowledge just giving a call out the kitchen sink speeches always been practical moves on on and I'll talk to quit cold cold creams and broadly our public schools the abuse of power right in Congress but that didn't go anywhere and then made a really crowd because your mistake and betting everything on Adam shell because the more you hear in the less you like it he appeared on the number you can't tell the truth and he's been caught so many cons non and I don't think they want I really don't think they want because I think they want to end on Friday and then say it's really a good we did get a chance to call witnesses but the downside I don't think Adam Schiff wants to go up there on the old and then have the whistle blower band on all give Mary versions of how this functionality because are not compatible with talking to press a Victor Davis Hanson of the Hoover Institution all for all of of the case for trump you need to read this book you you built your career as a historian historian of military history of of of the ancient civilizations of of the Greeks this is the bedrock of western civilization then let me ask you a very simple question that is my concern there is this theory of of social contract that there there are written and unwritten ways of doing business and and and western civilization is built upon them if one of the two parties in the system not a fringe party not the Libertarian Party not not Ross Perot but one of the two party says that we will impeach the president because we count we in the at the ballot box isn't that the shredding of the social contract or even the original call product on which the Republic was founded what what does this do on the long term for the United States professor Hanson well I think if you read our federal sixty five and sixty circle how we can serve them and other essays at the time about impeachment I thought it would be very where very hard to do that's one name that tune because you have to have it how old six separate crafter and they didn't think it looks to be the opposite they didn't envision that some of the opposition party trickle of the house would be a European Parliament terrible but not that's what it's become and there's a lot of Republicans we believe the appropriate approach doesn't want the Democrats so I imagine that the next time we have a democratic president and there are any legal gonna consider doing that because it's now going to be the most off the laundry vintage one as we know it doesn't exist anymore it's been transmog apart in the dictionary yeah but hi this is the way it is and remember we have no special counsel report no bipartisan support you have no public support need this approach currently W. peaks of the nineteenth century of course come president and will premiere Alexian it was just awesome we have in the basement we are not in the house Judiciary buttonholes intelligence committee to selectively things by Alan ship so we just it's just patently dishonest asymmetrical one and I think they're gonna pay a price for me home is on his way to a seventy nineteen seventy two or nineteen eighty four reelection well that's exactly the mangled that's exactly the next question I wanted to see professor if if nothing else exogenous happens if there's no massive external crisis if the economy state keeps going the way it's going and the president is reelected in two hundred and seventy seven days what do you expect the effect to be the knock on effect on these people will will live suddenly be Damascene moment where they say okay we got it wrong way sorry the media the left and will behave ourselves could it get worse and and really how could it get worse well here is the story we just have to ask what did they do after seventy two when they got the winner should not my government a surgeon on both the Compaq we never we haven't won since JFK and us you have a democratic guy with a southern accent DJ can you call the right and unions kind of a central St eighty four the left four my gosh school's out and they did it again with the caucus and then they they didn't do it again I got a guy with a southern accent so I think they'll be a lot of people who say the A. L. C. when school's out and you want to let you wrecked the blue dogs but I don't I'm not sure the demography and the changing twenty first century landscape allow that to happen the Democratic Party is so the Jacobin party control no quality and I don't know if they they kind of extinguisher liquidate all of the people want in all single barrelled omegle dinosaur the nominee list anymore and the people in there a light might exist like Bloomberg S. inviting has been scouring the exits images from renouncing or the prior cell because I don't know if there's anybody left the use of the for a different one with her late and have to come and say you guys destroyed the Democratic Party it's kind of a lot of one whether the Republicans take the house of course Brian's got fifty fifty chance of doing ten cameras on them as well can a pragmatist with a southern accent save the Democrats about trounced this November we shall see first we have to win the election those who believe in the make America great again agenda with talk to professor Victor Davis Hanson senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the author of the case for trump will be back with a good professor in a

President Trump America
EU Parliament Approves Brexit Departure Terms 621-49

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 8 months ago

EU Parliament Approves Brexit Departure Terms 621-49

"Britain's departure from the European Union has been backed by European lawmakers the European Parliament overwhelmingly approved Britain's departure by a vote of six twenty one to forty nine British prime minister Boris Johnson negotiated the brexit deal with the other twenty seven EU leaders last fall after years of debate the vote makes warm words of love with tough warnings not to see too many concessions during upcoming trade talks Britain will be out of the E. U.

Britain European Union European Parliament Boris Johnson Prime Minister Brexit
Brexit 'done' at last - now for the hard part

WBZ Midday News

00:30 sec | 8 months ago

Brexit 'done' at last - now for the hard part

"European Union ministers breaking into old Lang Syne after approving a brexit deal that officials say ends the UK's participation in the body the body joining hands and singing the tune of old acquaintances before sending the British delegation out with applause the European Parliament president says ministers were deeply saddened just before signing the agreement for the U. K. leave the vote to approve the deal was so overwhelmingly in favor the president David socially telling them they are leaving the E. U. but they are still part

UK President Trump David E. U. European Union Lang Syne European Parliament
Brexit deal cleared by EU Parliament; UK set to leave Friday

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Brexit deal cleared by EU Parliament; UK set to leave Friday

"European Parliament has overwhelmingly approved the departure terms of the United Kingdom from the European Union it's called brexit right well it's the first major decision the final major decision I should say in the four year saga after an emotional debate on Wednesday legislature at legislators voted for the withdrawal agreement it's going to end Britain's forty seven year membership in the block of the vote like we said big time E. in favor of the brexit deal it was six forty one to forty nine with thirteen abstentions brexit day is

European Parliament United Kingdom European Union Britain
Time for justice for Roma, senior expert urges on Holocaust Remembrance Day

UN News

11:38 min | 8 months ago

Time for justice for Roma, senior expert urges on Holocaust Remembrance Day

"An estimated half a million people from the Roma minority perished in Europe during the Holocaust but that persecution under Nazi rule is still widely ignored today according to an expert on the issue Dan Pavel doggy senior adviser on Roma and Sinti issues for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe or. SEC says the Roma people should finally receive seve the justice. They deserve Mr Doggy attended a United Nations Holocaust memorial events at U N headquarters in New York where he spoke about the importance importance of education to help fight racism and discrimination against vulnerable minorities you and uses an Komo's started by asking him about the fate of the Roma under the Nazi regime. It was a similar fate as of the Jewish people because besides the Jewish People Roma were also specifically targeted for extermination on racial grounds. There were considered subhumans onto mention impure a danger for the block. pull off the Air Ian Muster race. How does this reflect in the Rome incentive in their lives today in our society would go back a little bit before the Holocaust Rama arrived on the European continent approximately one thousand years ago and they were met with reluctance fear and then consumed they were prosecuted There's a history of slavery in many many countries. I'm from Romania. Rama were slaves For five hundred years there and only liberated like one hundred seventy years ago And liberated mance they were set free to go without possessing any anything UNEDUCATED TO IN POOR health unskilled skittled for professional labor and so on So there is a history of exclusion persecution and oppression and it also so culminated with the deportation of Roma and And they're killing During the Holocaust still a an issue with a proper recognition of the Roma Holocaust It's often called the forgotten Holocaust because it's not widely known and both states and to historians and scholars. They were not very open to document. The situation of Roma acknowledged the suffering of Roma and ended experience as being an integral parts of the Holocaust even nowadays. The Holocaust definition focuses primarily on juice and then an an ad group is mentioned secondly within the Roma community This hurts because we always believed that the what happened into Roma what happened to us is an integral part of the Holocaust. And I've mentioned that today that it's time for justice format to be done and maybe that's it's a Holocaust definition to be corrected and amended to properly reflect the Roma as being part of the Holocaust. What do you think is the reason why this was never properly knowledge lack of the communication? Of course there's a lack of information But I would. I would rather say this is more about the power play. Roma were always week On on the fringes of society uneducated without their own organizations self represent themselves politically and the and so on so It was easy for a group that is traditionally considered marginal to be just ignored but decades after decades more more of the Roma survivors. Sti Slowly opened up and spoke about their experience during the Second World War and then a number of Romo activists and advocates have advocated a for a proper recognition and it took quite some time at least for the Roma genocide recognized But but this recognition is not a uniform When we speak of Intergovernmental Organizations OAC UN Council of Europe and so on we worked with different terminology analogies and we were different commitments? For instance within the see in the action plan on improving the situation of Romance indie adopted in two thousand and three you by fifty seven participating states. There is a One chapter focusing on education and there is one provision within that says that participating states states should promote and develop teaching educational materials about the experience of Roma. Aw during the Holocaust so even there there is no proper nation. So it's like the Holocaust and then some of the things happen in parallel and that's also the case of in Council of Europe The Roma genocide is recognized Then the European Parliament events has adopted recently resolution that recognizes second of August as the European Roma Holocaust Remembrance Day so the terminology of Roma Holocaust is partially used by by some of the bodies But we strive for proper and recognition. And it's about time seventy five years after the ending of the Second World War. Do you feel that your presence here. Today is part of that steps that we should take a the. I would like to believe so and I made it very clear. perhaps it It goes beyond the formal boundaries But I'm also Romo myself and would like to believe that I can express myself or what I think is just an important for the Roma people. Can you talk on the kinds of discrimination. These groups face nowadays. Especially in the way that is affecting specially women and girls so there are different layers of exclusion and also discrimination even within the Roma community but the biggest and the most harmful it comes from outside and that's historical already. There are all sorts of discriminations in every walk of life. possible Whatever you you have a challenge or a bad situation situation If if YOU'RE TO MAKE SCALE RAMA tend to or overwhelmingly always at the very very bottom uh-huh and that's an indication of the level of racist and prejudice and that can can be demonstrated by the kind of attitudes of the society towards Roma that is not different whether we speak of countries from the Post Communist bloc which are still struggle with democracy and economy and so on versus countries in very well advanced democracies in the Western Europe. Romar Romar treated very often in a very similar manner and treatment is in no way good if one is curious and and do a little a bit of a check may be worth of a week of media research or empirical research if you want so the traditional traditional media as well as the social media it will be very easy to find News and information about Roma are targeted with the hatred and hate speech From top politicians from presidents of the country to Prime Minister to foreign foreign ministers they go out and say all stupid and racist things about Roma and very often with impunity. And and the kind of impunity that exists already in Europe it only emboldens the far right and extremist groups who see a top politician attention being outright racist without consequences. Why should why should they be? Shy so they're encouraged to go out and express their intolerance and extremists attitude towards Rama. And that takes very often. The form of racially motivated violence Samsung incidents. Every year we document situations of tax pogroms collective punishments Popular Justice done by people. A who who think it's absolutely okay to take justice and law in their hands and and harm can Education change and all of these behaviors and the conventional education is not an indicator for that because Schools throughout Europe not reformed and educational process and curriculum are not reformed enough to to educate the younger generations beyond a the substance of the courses but educate them about the society and about the respect for diversity. So maybe some countries are more advanced and you you may see a different different treatments With regard to other groups and minorities the religious minorities but the problem is that when it's about trauma. The treatment is unfortunately very similar throughout Europe. And it's one of rejection. We are here for one thousand in Europe and people still call outs. Forum ought to go back to India so they were never considered organically as being part of the countries where they were born and living for centuries and that's a huge problem or anything else that you think it should be covered in this interview. Setting the proper tone is essential and I made a call. Oh and I urged states and and politicians to be responsible. And they're doing because the way they set the roads that's how the policies will be implemented or or the kind of Pol policies that many have fought for decades and now they are in place and there are in principle sound policies. Never stand a chance for proper implementation because that requires political. Will that requires putting money where your mouth is in with regard to Roma in the past fifteen years or so maybe. Thirty countries have developed. Attend adopted Roma inclusion strategies and many Were already renewed twice or even three times but if you would like to to draw the line and see okay. These are in principle good strategies if most of the measures and provisions contained by strategies these would be implemented by now who we will speak a much better situation. The real problem is that it's all talk and it's very little that it's done.

Roma Europe Jewish People Roma Council Of Europe The Roma Organization For Security And Romo SEC Intergovernmental Organization Western Europe Mr Doggy Dan Pavel Rama Romania United Nations Romar Romar Senior Adviser Sinti Komo
Top EU officials sign Brexit deal in closed door ceremony

WBZ Midday News

00:19 sec | 8 months ago

Top EU officials sign Brexit deal in closed door ceremony

"Overseas a brexit divorced done discreetly topping you official signing the brexit deal overnight in a ceremony away from the media behind closed doors the UK has already endorsed the deal governing its departure from the E. U. and now only leaves the European Parliament to sign off next

UK E. U. European Parliament Official
European parliament’s NationBuilder contract under investigation by data regulator

Daily Tech Headlines

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

European parliament’s NationBuilder contract under investigation by data regulator

"The European data protection supervisor issued its first sanctions Chins against an EU institution. Reprimanding the European Parliament for its use of a US based digital campaign company called nation builder to process citizens voter data nation nation. Builder was used to process data collected through a website to encourage voter engagement collecting data on three hundred twenty nine thousand EU citizens the edps issued a reprimand for failure to publish a privacy policy on the site and for lack of awareness of the extent of the processing being carried out by third parties and the lack of prior authorisation by parliament parliament. As a data controller provided in advance at the processing the regulator did not find the EU parliament because they complied with all recommendations

European Parliament EU Supervisor United States
"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The European Parliament in Brussels next year she plans to run for governor of the entire region of Tuscany two people generally NPR news Montecatini all right some bittersweet news from the world of K. pop this week at the sound of Korean pop supergroup BTS last weekend the seven member boy band announced that they're taking a break from releasing music and performing there are bands that are bad because we don't know how long to break it can be that's one fan email that he bar us is founder of the fan group U. S. B. T. S. army now BTS rose to stardom in twenty thirteen and became the first K. pop group to topped the US Billboard charts three times they're hoping to come back from this break stronger a press release from the label says BTS says the hiatus will give them a chance to quote recharge and prepare to present themselves a new virus said she thinks the break is a good thing you think that they get to take a long time off to really just do what they want be with their family and hang out with their friends for me it's very exciting who doesn't want a long time off as you can get it so there's no set end date for this break but U. S. B. T. S. army leader Jackie row Haas is not worry it's a little bit this is NPR news and you're listening to NPR news and morning edition and KQ we do public radio.

European Parliament Brussels founder Jackie row Haas NPR U. S. B. T. S. US U. S. B. T. S. army
"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"So I think the resort of the election for this European parliament will give a very, very pick. I mean impact on French politics in future, and also toured the Italian politics on this yearbook. No, we know that for quite a long time. The European politics had a fairly stable, alignment, is two or three major parties holding sway, but how much? They rake configuration of party, alignments and party system. Are we going to get coming out of this election? I don't want to speculate what's going to happen. But indeed, the rise of these so-called, far-right populace has been a theme over the last few years in all national elections across a number of countries. And it's worth to talk about that, and why I want to stay clearly did I don't endorse some of their especially anti-foreign rhetorics and the way they talk politics. I think I'm not as worried as some commenters in Europe are, and the reason for that. I recall a few years back, there was is congress between people like the builders marine lapenne foul Kapit of German, French Dutch, and other far-right populist leaders and I found that a huge change for the better because if we think just one hundred years ago, these. Right wing parties from France, Germany. They would call for war against each other to defend their culture against the other culture. Now, these countries sent their right-wing people to a congress together in order to debate how they can protect their common culture. Of course, again it's against foreign influences against Islam against the Africans against Middle Eastern immigrants cetera. But still it just gives me the sense that even the right wing parties to the vast majority. They're not trying to dissolve the European Union, and then end up in a state of pre e-. You -times of independent countries or even longer before Europe has been at war for centuries. Most of history of Europe is small countries fighting against each other. And I don't see any of these new populist parties one. Wanting to go back to that. And the second statement, I want to make is about this term populism, which I'm very unhappy with because. Populism comes from the word populace, which is people, right? And the biggest part is the European People's Party, which is ironic because it refers to the same route of people and the Greek term for people then is demos, and from that re is, is the word democracies. So it's about the rule of the people, and populism takes this majority rule, and turns it negative, which I find risky, because it just gives a very, very strong opening for these parties to say, yes, we are populous. That's a good thing because we stand for the majority of the people, which don't but that's what they're claiming. So I'm very careful with this term populist. Well, Mr Perry, how'd you look at this, this issue this rise of populism or nationalism on a continent? Do think they have perhaps become softer compared with one hundred years ago. Well, it's very very definite the'd as you be airing. And. Is absolutely corrected far better to how have the past all far better? But it is a great concern for those who are in power that we are seeing an issue, where in Hungary, for example goal band, and, you know, Farrar Britain, the Brexit party. We're going to staying a issue, where policies driven by parties of extremes. And they want to be the EU influences anyway, they won't tend to laugh intend to write, but they want far-right fall, and they say she populism, which appears to be and. There are different variations across Europe, but it appears to be sweeping across the year. We have kids builders in Holland. We have all we have Faraj. So it is to conceal low, historically, much better than it has in the past in relation to what is happen. But it is also concern for those people in power, the these parties such as for our break the party, we should likely to hold sway, and we'll top the poll in Britain holding sway. Have a love influence in the European parliament. And so that is a great source concern. Well, Dr Trifon..

Europe Brexit party European People's Party European Union congress France Dr Trifon Mr Perry Hungary Britain Farrar Britain Holland Germany one hundred years
"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Doctors say, how do you look at those think the Brexit party has been doing so well in the European elections? Saw ROY Sophie Mr. Rogers party indeed. We can find out. He not only some very specific background in bracket, because so far, they the lot of disappointments from Aggie people in your K, about the conservative party and a neighbor party and the in Tallahassee of push for wadley some practice process. But of course, I think, generally, we can find out the environment recently special written years as we know that the pope Latam as the voice for Mr. Faraj and his party. And there was a very big showcase forty some general Trent. But now of course, I agree with optimism point is to a large degree the European parliament election has to be regarded by most of our European people us. Us as a secondary vote, which means it could not be decisive by resort daily life, by the daily life. But of course, it will become very, very cute opportunity to express the disappointment, and they are companies about of the politics about the European Union. Well, Mr McMahon, could you explain to us more how the European parliament elections actually work because that really looks of it complex or confusing for outsiders? Yes. And you asked me, I mean, I mostly focused on international politics, and, of course, preparing for tonight, I have looked at the elections also and the institutions of the and I totally agree with what you just said, it is extremely complicated. Simply put the elections are national elections all across Europe, and in each country, people vote for the parties that are available in their countries and these parties, try to kind of form you repeating parties. They are aligned across countries. But in some places they have different names than in others. They tried to have this one bitten candidat, which is like this one head figureheads to drama voters, but it's, it's not really unified parties with an authority across Europe. So each national party can do whatever they like Indian. So, for example, Merkel's German. Cd party is the same European party as Hungary's rather. Centerfold, anti-foreigner anti immigrants party there in the same European populist party. So it's, it's very confusing set of many local elections, put together Nash, a European parliament, which, of course, is not the official explanation of the process, but this is looking from a distance at how it actually happens. Well, Mr Perry, actually, the voter turnout has gone down in every single European parliament elections since they began in nineteen seventy nine on, do you think the low turnout main stat EU has actually failed time, and again to unite Europe, Ian people with Brexit, perhaps being approve of that. Yes. The Turner has been very low as you said, for well election to the EU, Paul, but, but it conceivable we done the exact truth, yet possible that the turn out will actually be now, we'll be higher this time because being the news people want to bend their anger. Again, the slowness of breath as you airing because galvanized people to have a not, oh, breakfast or to come. I need all those remain to day in though, it's possible the turn will actually go up, I but you're absolutely correct, the Turner, happy, very low therapy, and that tied into this whole drama, the undergoing now because it the EU is in. By many as a remote organization institution that is full of bureaucracy..

European parliament European Union Europe Mr McMahon ROY Sophie Mr. Rogers Turner Mr Perry Mr. Faraj Hungary Tallahassee Merkel Nash Paul Brexit official
"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Will the votes change the makeup of the European parliament? Are we going to see an explosion of populism in these elections? How good a predictor will be to the national politics in each Member State, and where is a you heading in terms of his role on the world stage for these questions? And more. We are joined by doctors who Jen, head of European studies department was China Institute of international studies, and her ought boop man, from Switzerland. He's an expert on Chinese and international studies and Phil Perry editor of the eye and investigative news, Beppe side in wells UK, welcome to work today. Day. Well, I think before we move on to our discussion on the European elections. There's breaking news this afternoon. Theresa May is stepping done as British Prime minister she anals to quit as conservative leader of on the seventh of June. So Mr. Paracha, study was the could you bring us more on the latest of this? Yeah. Basically, Theresa May lost control of the cabinet. In fact, there was a very major resignation leader. The palm tree party in the Commons, unrelenting them few days ago, and she's out, she had no where to go. She has tried and failed on several occasions to get he withdrawal, they'll through pollen. And now she's been told he has to go and she has plying resigned after one of the shelties ten years post second World War as prime minister in Britain, so Mr. power, we know UK was supposed to have deft the by now because the government has failed to reach the old that satisfies either the British parliament or the EU. They're now holding the elections as usual will cost more than one hundred million pounds. To choose the MVP is to take up seizing apartment that you're not into part of. So how many Brits are actually going to vote this time? That's very good question. I mean. Theresa May really didn't want these elections. They are distinctly old in Britain because, frankly, any Ps will be lactate, possibly Rhodia few weeks to take this before Britain comes out of the EU, and he didn't quite conceivable and the poll suggests that the tower is could come behind, for example, the glean, and that election result, which will compete. They election wall yesterday Britain, but the results coming on some day would be absolute anathema for the Tories and one of the reasons why she I think why he decided she had to go. And I think she decided she wanted to go now before the results come in on Sunday, which would be bad for labor after the polling poll, the toys. Yes. And if we believe in the pools, Mr. bug. C'mon. The pools actually suggest the candidates in the UK, that's most likely to be seated in a European parliament are actually those school are most determined. That Britain was leave the issue with the Brexit party that by Nigel Farraj expanded to come up on tops. Are you surprised by that? Well nine away. Yes. Great good come pain. I think. Yes. Mr. Volkmann was her take. From looking maybe from a bit more a far away from the UK. It's I wouldn't say surprising, in that many European elections have always shown that parties on the fringes get elected, much easier much more because voters may not fear so much that they're more extreme election. Choices have any tangible consequences. The parliament is very far away. It's actual powers limited, and national government have remained very strong autonomy above the European Union parliamentary decisions. So people may feel free to vent anger at their own, national government by voting some extreme parties into the European parliament. And I think that's something that's also happening in the UK with the special case, of course. That this Brexit has been going on for so long, and from all I hear is people are really fed up. I mean half, maybe half the Brits would like to have a revote and not leave at all the other half is saying, we should have left two years ago, and people are really fed up and they want to really show their government that they're really not happy..

European parliament Theresa May Britain EU Mr. Paracha UK Prime minister British parliament Jen China Institute of internation Phil Perry Switzerland MVP Rhodia Mr. Volkmann editor Nigel Farraj Mr. power
"european parliament" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"In the first place to go to d- to the European parliament for help Standpoint? Back to them again so? We. The specter of a corporal Pammy as to the highest levels of the European Union so where do we go from there what do we do now You'd normally would go to media. And and create an uproar but as? You describe in the book Strangely enough journalists in Ireland who were, close enough that you would assume they would. Be interested in, something strange, happening right in their backyard but none of, them want. To touch it are you see you see we. Have experienced of this over the many many years we've been. Colleagues together in Decem 'em sexing phenomenon You know we, find that, journalists at wants to do but once he, gets at. Possibly the editor has got the damn I'm Dan Is there, some sort of history I'm sorry, go ahead Craig stage at family talk are getting, somewhere they, were in touch with. TV station in Belfast Ulster television? UTD researcher, their complex Yeah this is crazy Story in this and they. Have for the family I. Think, the next day Okay how the crew Lincoln you bring a crew down here. I'm still going on interviews I wanna talk I know he. Went to superiors Stonewall wasn't going to happen Trying to figure out figure out Says that the we spoke to individual case officers and they had intimated that you wish to help But they had been obstructors in the refers to investigate the beside that's on the farm Yeah so I wonder who was. Who was still talking Again it's all kept in house We try I mean even in this parliament we taught something might happen there now and it seems to be an not only here in the British Isles and EuroPol over. The world seems to be Decem Decem get covered up and we'll to prevent. People, from some exactly what's happening Well it is, pretty weird I can see them not wanting to to cause a panic but it seems like to cover it up someone must know more about what what it. Is to suggest that the family she just move away and forget about it Is there some kind, of history beyond the nineties when this started Of the same kind of thing happening to previous owners is there something about their sheep? That something in their DNA can explain what we was thinking Boston Just so they began to morning I'm saw you bleeding from the mouth open out I'm homeless congress Hunting them. If the. Ongoing Okay gone there's asking walk around just like under certain parts of the world where you know it's a free for all for. The paranormal shall we say you have to wonder as a perfect world is Alvin to folklore and everything at this, stage and we won't well we helped me Feeding disturbed land we just noticed lately south one, of the media Yeah what the media photograph online. We haven't seen before on the photograph of Mr. Underlines, with. The sheep and on right behind a huge big great big power line yeah I wonder. What Thank you to. Have to research Just really strange territory folklore interval You? Gotta, follow it where leads. Right yeah What were these you know. Sheep unfortunately, no? Needs In fact you know we'll say yeah, I it. Could be something? To that, self, disturbance, a one Is there a, have you, seen are, there, UFO, reports are their lights are there stealth helicopters. Is there I'm sorry For these, power lines we, have many many calls investigates That's right yeah that's where I am what, our power lines and you have these small August other. I'll be seeing are, investigating the power, source or whatever Interests MRs damage sad cases to open phones and if someone small. We have to do so much more we have to do I'm putting together which is a huge amount of walk into that just wants. To, do again and we. May say one thing that we got an observation and from, the survey Domino's from all over the world that the Did you see, what you're the intruders live live on the same show is you see and we'll follow us there and Did the signature it is flesh under naptime side of the face a note I suppose soy sleep removed laser like precision on his photographic evidence of the..

Decem Decem corporal Pammy European parliament European Union Ireland UTD Belfast Boston Stonewall Domino Mr. Underlines editor Craig researcher
"european parliament" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The first place to go to the to the European parliament for help Louis translate back to? Them again despite the Cobra Lapus Pammy as look to the very highest levels of the European Union so where do you go from there what do we do now You'd normally would go to. Media and created an uproar but as? You describe in the book Strangely enough journalists in Ireland who were close enough, that you would assume they would be. Interested in something, this strange, happening right in their backyard but none of. Them wanna touch it are you see you see. We haven't experienced this over the many years we've been. Together and Decem 'em texting phenomena phenomenon On side you know we find. That the journalists, at want, to deal with but once it gets the. Possibility Adra some has got the damn and there's Is there some sort of history I'm sorry go ahead A stage at family are getting, somewhere they, were in touch with. TV station in Belfast Ulster television? TV researcher, their complex Yeah It's. Crazy Story this and they have for. The family I think the next day Okay can you help crew Lincoln to bring a crew down here I'm still going on interviews. And so I wanna talk No he went? To his superiors stonewall wasn't it wasn't going to happen I'm trying. To figure out figure out Let them says cetera that the we spoke to individual officers and they had intimated. That you that they wish to help But they had been a stroke as individuals to investigate the beside that's on the farm Yeah so I wonder who. Was who, was talking, about some why again south kept in house on how we try. I mean even Japan In parliament we talk something might happen there now and it seems to be an not only here. In. Europe all over the board and it seems to be this? Descend, covered up and we'll to prevent people from. Some exactly, what's happening Well it is pretty weird. I can see them not wanting to, to cause a panic but it seems like to cover it up someone must know, more about what what it is to suggest that the family she just move away and forget about it Is there some kind of, history beyond that they nineties when this started The same thing happening to previous owners is? There, something about. Their sheep that something in their DNA explaining thinking Boston no it doesn't Just become just suddenly began as the Bill nice not to one? Morning, I'm saw Leaving. From. The milk opened I'm. Homeless converse If the ongoing Eh. Wrong you're, okay gone asking walk around just like at a certain parts of the world where you know it's it's a free for all. For the paranormal And you have to wonder as a perfect world you delve into folklore and Beijing we won't Well. We. Have to research that was eating disturb the land we just not that's the media. Formed yeah What the media photograph online we haven't seen it before I'm the photograph of Mr.. MRs, lots of underlines with a sheep and, I'm right behind. A huge big. Grazing on the power. Line Oh I wonder what's up We have to research Fingerings, is really strange territory folklore. Ethic of? Things interval who knows you gotta follow, it? Where, it leads right yeah You know with the sheep and you know, we? Need In fact you know I it could, be something, sue that the lounging store and, so on I mean? He's there have. You seen, are there, you, up oh reports are their lights are there stealth helicopters is there I'm sorry that'd be fined over these power lines you had many many calls. Who investigates, firm yeah. That's where I? Am what are power? Lines, and you have these? Small all just? Are. Investigating whatever That's very interesting just the standard said. They mean, just didn't this case is still open. Phones and if someone small we have to? Do, some more we have. To do I'm putting together was just a huge amount of walk in into I'm just wants to. Do again and we, may say one thing. That an invasion and samba sophisticated. Animals if model of, the world that the signature at the intruders live live. I'm sure it is you see in the follow us there and Did the signature..

European parliament Lincoln European Union Ireland Belfast Europe researcher Louis Boston Japan Beijing milk
"european parliament" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Exit our american viewers to call their member of congress you should call upn call your members of the european parliament say explain so they understand why this is a terrible idea israel is considering legislation to require pre monitoring of all content put on france is considering fake news legislation to penalize people for publishing fake news they think they could control the world they're making they're making a good faith effort to fix the problem they're just doing it in a really stupid way and this is that we have the data that says the problem is as big as this presumption is well i think right now everything's so influx it's hard to define how to we see something's wrong that the outcomes are not what we're after we don't understand yet what causes those outcomes because this is so new and so fast moving so they're just taking a stab at it and but impact i do fault them because they're also the thing i heard about legislators in all across europe as in the us as in israel is they don't know how the internet works there ignorant as hell about the internet and one of them you know yelled back on that point you know this is this is awful you're telling us we have to wait be patient no we have to take charge of this and we have to run the world and this is terrible and the presumptions returnable like one person i was too being with a was going on about how basically was calling all two billion people on facebook stupid and and trump's for being there i know you've got people are there for a reason they're doing they wanna do if you don't start from that understanding then try to figure out what's what you come in and say i'm gonna stop them all doing this that's ridiculous but it's the it's a terribly paternalistic thing you're right it's all well intentions is he agree with that but but the intention of the intelligence are far apart on the stuff and the damage can be huge what we need less people in office who are powerful and proud and thinks they know so much i think one of the challenges were facing is we're shifting from a society that's like you said very paternalistic to one where people want to have more say in need to have more say because the experience is so much more customized to so many different people and so we're moving again from mainstream and mass to something more fragmented i don't know how it works in the european parliament but here in good old america members of congress are not really looking out for the people for some are i suppose but for the most part they're they're they're protecting the company this what they do they're protecting companies decisions in standard and the institutions and this this law does it's it's ip law to protect the institutions and the right holders yes media companies right and and they don't care what me makers think that's not there there's not it's only nominally their constituency i guess what i'm saying they're they're looking isn't the institutions isn't it yes you're absolutely right no no you're completely cynical but it's true it was paid it in populist terms though well yeah okay but let's be realists that's that's a bail and do excuse me for not knowing this i presume that members of the european parliament are voted in it's a democratic institution that's true and so just as in the united states they they probably care about votes ultimately if they want to keep their job but i don't know what the turnout is for eu elections i think it's very low i don't know either you know i mean that's what's happening united states is turn out a solo now that of course you're gonna roll wait fortythree percent much better than.

congress european parliament israel france upn fortythree percent
"european parliament" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Vergecast

"The rating yeah apathy circus empathy circus thank you dot com that's when you start up i don't really know what it does but i think there's a circus involve casey i want to ask you about two things three well four things one of them is your podcast but we'll do that variant gdp are happens tomorrow and it happens ninety minutes from now because of greenwich meantime ninety minutes from the time of recording people are freaking out yeah but by the time you listen to this it will have happened yes stunning i've noticed barks coburg was in front of the european parliament this week that went on medium format was completely insane someone talked to at that and then i wanna talk about trump being ruled unconstitutional block trump it's being ruled unconstitutional for trump black people on critics so let's start with gdp are you've been covering facebook democracy privacy all this stuff for some time his is this like the bomb going off the people think it is is it just a bunch of emails that are getting filtered ignored what's what's the what's your read on it it's sort of both of those things you know i've read every take about gdp are and they cover every possible opinion all start by saying where i think it is good it creates the expectation for all companies that if they are going to use your data they should use it in a way that you have given your express consent.

casey european parliament trump facebook ninety minutes
"european parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"European parliament in brussels belgium she's game radio on this you know the good news with cambridge analytica is that the changes that we made back in twenty fourteen would prevent a new at cambridge wasn't an app there's an app developer who who use the platform and then sold the data to cambridge analytica which is is a is a whole other thing but it wouldn't be possible for an app developer to get access to that level of data since after our twenty fourteen platform changes went into effect but because there were a lot of different apps that we're using the system before twenty fourteen and before the changes went into effect in two thousand fifteen we think it's important now to go back and investigate every single app that had access to a large amount of people's personal data before we locked down the platform so that's what we're in the process of doing we've already investigated thousands of apps and as i said earlier we've taken down more than two hundred there were many thousands more that we need to investigate this is going to take many months i do anticipate that there are going to be other apps that we find that we're going to want to take down and this is why we're going now in doing this full investigation is this is part of our shift towards not just trying to manage the system reactively of having we've always had the ability for people in our community to flag apps that they thought were bad actors test and then we would look at them we've we've had the ability to and we've we've done audits of apps in the past we've had a content review and app app review team but now what we're doing is taking a much more proactive approach rather than waiting for people in the community to flag for us that there may be issues we are going through in investigating ourselves up front all the different apps that had access to a large amount of information we were upfront reviewing every app that asks for access to additional people's information anywhere where we see any concerns we're going to bring in third party auditors to conduct a full audit to determine if there is any misuse of people's personal information and if there was we will ban those apps.

European parliament brussels cambridge analytica cambridge developer
"european parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You very much i think it's important for us to be at the center of the political debate for another time european parliament is they are for democracy in europe i think what this political debates is very very important not only for the european parliament that also seasons for this i want to thank you for the question now is your missile zucca antonio tahani european parliament all right presentation and honorable members you've raised a lot of important questions and i'm going to try to use the remainder of our time to get through his many of them as i possibly can a number of you asked a questions around inappropriate content on facebook in one form or another whether that's hate speech or bullying or terrorism or different content and how that relates to this or fake accounts and how this relates to this position on philosophy of needing to take a broader responsibility i let me be clear the bottom line here is that hate speech bullying terror violence all this content has no place on our on our services but in order to really execute that we need to upgrade into a better job of executing our policies so if you look back at the history of how we've operated when i got started in my dorm room in college because it was just me and because we didn't have the tools at the time to be able to go look through a lot of the content to understand what was in violation of our community standards and what wasn't or policy for most of the history of the company has been to have our community flag things for us and then us to look at them reactively so if someone sees something that that they thought might be hate speech or bullying and they would flag that and that we would look at that we've built up teams to manage that but now we think our responsibility is greater and now sitting here in twenty eight teen we have the ability to start developing.

european parliament facebook europe
"european parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The european parliament to answer questions this was read out by the head of the committee and i think this is really inflaming the aggravation that is among the uk politicians why don't they turn to really question mark zuckerberg notably they said listen to this and mr strip for they say mark zuckerberg's right hand man who we were short could represent his views well today failed to answer many specific and detailed questions about facebook's business practices this is what was fired back by damian collins the lead of the digital digital culture media and sports committee basically saying that the shrek was unable to answer some forty questions also one of them is whether they knew about the cambridge around analytics data breach in february when they were talking to executives executives and facebook then they feel misled in that particular department they felt that they perhaps were angered that they can get answer to the question of whether they could absolutely block all sorts of categories of ads notably that brought up gdp are as well they didn't feel they got a good answer on what is going to be put in place by facebook to ensure they're in a hedge of this new strict regulation coming into the eu or may the twenty fifth crucially also there have been reports that facebook of moved one and a half billion get this one and a half billion accounts of facebook users who aren't in the us or canada you the moving them from ireland to the us to california a hedge of gdp are the strict regulation coming in may twenty fifth there's been rumors as to why they're doing this facebook saying look people outside the eu will get the same privacy protections and controls and settings is as inside the eu and don't worry about this but many wondering whether they're trying to avoid this regulation by doing that so i think there are key questions they felt when answered therefore will you come to the uk i leave you this we believe says the head of the committee given the large number of outstanding questions to facebook to answer mark zuckerberg should still appear in front of the committee what could they turn to emily they can use a little rarely deployed legal step this would be a formal summons we'll see where do they get and carolina of.

european parliament mark zuckerberg facebook damian collins cambridge eu us ireland uk california carolina twenty fifth
"european parliament" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Upgrade your home with blinds dot com save big on custom blinds now through april twenty second get a guaranteed twenty percent off when you go to blinds dot com slash prager that's blinds dot com slash prager rules and restrictions apply all right everybody you're listening to the dennis prager show all right we're trying to get through to brussels where the european parliament is and the member of the european parliament daniel hannan they british member of the european parliament gives the columnist for the daily telegraph teaches the newest prager you video as the rich get richer the poor get richer got a million three hundred thousand views in the last two days and we do have him on daniel hannan welcome to the dennis prager show and thank you for your video thank you so much what a pleasure to be hit very kind how do you keep your sanity in the european parliament there's not a joke question i know it sounds cute i i actually mean it quite this early yeah it's not a very popular thing right because you're in a place where you're trying to put yourself out of work and succeeded in the sense that my trouble disappear with brexit in march and that is a difficult sell as upton sinclair used to say in my video you know people it's very hard to make them understand something when his salary depends upon not understanding agent so you'll never going to be popular in an institution that you want to close down but you have to learn very early on in politics whose opinion matters and who doesn't and who's matters in your view ultimately the people i mean without wanting to sound pompous if there's one thing i've learned doing this trump from nineteen years now it's the people are almost always wiser than our leaders and i would rather trust to the good sense of the electorate than to any selfproclaimed group of experts and a lot of people come see that a lot of politicians really overvalue the good opinion of the people that they're spending a lot of time with you know nine to five that you should never forget who it is who you and.

brussels daniel hannan european parliament upton sinclair dennis prager nineteen years twenty percent twenty second two days
"european parliament" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"All right everybody you're listening to the dennis prager show all right we're trying to get through to brussels where the european parliament is and the member of the european parliament daniel hannan british member of the european parliament gives the columnist for the daily telegraph teaches the newest prager you video as the rich get richer the poor get richer got a million three hundred thousand views in the last two days and we do have him on daniel hannan welcome to the dennis prager show and thank you for your video thank you so much what a pleasure to be hit very kind how do you keep your sanity in the european parliament there's not a joke question i know it sounds cute i i actually mean it quite sincerely yeah it's not a very popular thing right because you're in a place where you're trying to put yourself out of what can i succeeded in the sense that trouble disappear with brexit in march and that is a difficult sell as upton sinclair used to say and and as i quoted in my video you know people it's very hard to make amount understand something when his salary depends upon his understanding agent so you'll never going to be popular in an institution that you want to close down but you have to learn very early on in politics whose opinion in the end matters and who doesn't and who's matters in your view ultimately the people i mean without wanting to sound pompous but if there's one thing i've learned doing this trump's in nineteen years now it's the people are almost always wiser than leaders and i would rather trust to the good sense of the electorate than to any selfproclaimed group of experts and a lot of people come see that a lot of politicians really overvalue the good opinion of the people that that spending a lot of time with nine to five that you should never forget who it is who employs you oh they do for cat there's no question in regards to human to forget an right right constantly remind yourself that the that the.

brussels european parliament upton sinclair dennis prager daniel hannan nineteen years two days
"european parliament" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The party that he has an ever run actually in an election even though he is politically he even though he is the finance ministers so he's is not as much a politician as other politicians are especially relevant eu truce or not you been on air abbas cyber think when you out a senior advisor to the number five is when he goes brand bankrupt for spain and portugal and then you say well you're not the banker lehman brothers while i'm not the politicians of the bottom line is and the european parliament they did that eclair they stood by the irish central bank but as much better credential higher qualification in the terms made that much better impression on the mps and so i think even though the european parliament it's only as a consultative vote and not that a veto power the message was that it that eclair the uh the the european parliament prefers the icty central bank of so i think festival is all clear we might view whether ginza's is going to go through the secondly assuming he went to go through which would be about will be a stitchup and then at that point that the key question would be combined then who has always been voted against over the last the fifty foot ears in evidence key decision be the person to chair vcd because remember there's a democracy in europe i know but exit tears don't believe so but very out it is it is and that what's going to happen has um at that point i think of the old ecb fold will know they get a chairman who has been beat that the game has bolted the gains sorry inevitably decision over the last thirty forty is i think that will be very unsettling okay but the you have to look at the politics of this is the round and think if if the guinness gets the joe it means that buckles backed him and you wonder whether or not the deal against done is the vitamin gets the gets the job but i think we're running a against we're running ahead of ourselves so let's let's let's see that it's a whole case it was not vite but asserted friday i was a v munich security conference when the day after that as a main presented and the guillaume davila had.

senior advisor spain european parliament chairman guinness guillaume davila portugal icty europe munich fifty foot
"european parliament" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on PRI's The World

"We are two men talking about sexual harassment who are the people taking up this cause in brussels as a just women women and men it's a real mix in a debate today in the european parliament it was mostly female entities who were doing the talking i think that it's interesting that so few men thought to have the responsibility to take of the eu in that debate i think the discussion that i've been having most of the people coming to me to have the discussion a women as well but i felt a responsibility to not leave the discussion but definitely facilitate facilitated because the role i have in the brussels community is that a lot of people read my column each morning it's a place where people come together to discuss european politics and so if this is what people are talking about in the bosnian the cafes than i want to make sure that people who are perpetrating these acts or people who are in charge of administering the response to the ice that by a forced after discussions will sexual harassment we also knows a systemic problem which means this is probably not confined to the european parliament have other organizations in the european union responded you a one hundred percent correct and i think people in the parliament were a bit frustrated with me today for my particular focus on some rape allegations that were made by staff members at the european parliament because they felt that the focus was just on them but actually eighty percent of four out of every five stories that have been told me than not in the european parliament around about forty percent in the private sector about twenty two cents from nongovernment organisations advocacy groups and so on and then the rest of from different institutions in the european union and then we need to take time to reflect that full picture when we recorded out the rest of stories.

harassment brussels european parliament european union rape one hundred percent eighty percent forty percent
"european parliament" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Were you surprised by all of this yes very i mean i don't think it's it's it's it's the way we use to acting in in eu when it comes to to political disagreements we we deal with them in other ways i had never fought to see violence in the way with has been throughout catalonia today so what do you do with this knowledge that you have gathered what what happens next i mean we are a group of international invites from various parliaments also the european parliament's and we meeting up now in that it'll wide and then this press conference where we're going to do a statement on what we have witnessed today for the election have you been able to speak to your colleagues you you get a sense of what others have have been able to say yes and it's it's the same pictures they have from the both peaceful wellfunctioning small inaction places where they were doing things by hand because the spanish government has also been closing down the websites to register but peaceful though and two very violent situations where the police has been quite brutally to get access to two polling stations what do you think the eu should do as a result of what you've witnessed and heard about i think that we have to push the spanish government into having a political dialogue which is the at here i mean we used to in europe when we have a political problem with deal with it through dialogue.

eu catalonia european parliament spanish government europe
"european parliament" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Global Politico

"Made that argument internally with as you said we've been friends for years we know how we felt he was his i mean you know he made one of the he was highly criticised by many if you'd like you could call them a mainstream oy stablishment tories in in the uk his decision is is position in running for the leadership when he stood for the leadership of the conservative party one of the pledges he made was to take the british conservatives out of the main centreright grouping in the european parliament and the epa things the european people's party and create new group because he argued that sent that that the mainstream grouping which mood angela merkel's party with two too proeurope and he wanted to be part of a more eurosceptic that was his idea not mild and he's really criticized for it by the mainstream so easily eurosceptic right but when you privately discussed this with him he couldn't go the next step of supporting the brexit last year well that but by the law change on these we talking about a pre20 ten right i mean my specific suggestion far member was that if we had a if i love the way i put it was this if it's our longterm goal to leave the eu which i think it is then how do we get an my argument was if we announced the as opposition today prior to being elected it would be seen as too extreme there was not the public consensus run and his political risk so that wasn't i would advocate that morgan was a longterm on said we need to get to a position where it is.

uk european parliament angela merkel morgan epa