35 Burst results for "European Parliament"

EU leader calls for Russian oil ban in new set of sanctions

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

EU leader calls for Russian oil ban in new set of sanctions

"The the the the top top top top official official official official in in in in the the the the European European European European Union Union Union Union has has has has called called called called on on on on the the the the block block block block to to to to ban ban ban ban oil oil oil oil imports imports imports imports from from from from Russia Russia Russia Russia alongside alongside alongside alongside other other other other restrictions restrictions restrictions restrictions and and and and a a a a new new new new wave wave wave wave of of of of sanctions sanctions sanctions sanctions against against against against Russia Russia Russia Russia for for for for its its its its war war war war in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine today today today today we we we we will will will will propose propose propose propose to to to to ban ban ban ban all all all all Russian Russian Russian Russian oil oil oil oil from from from from you you you you wrote wrote wrote wrote the the the the announcement announcement announcement announcement was was was was welcomed welcomed welcomed welcomed with with with with around around around around the the the the pools pools pools pools by by by by officials officials officials officials in in in in the the the the European European European European parliament's parliament's parliament's parliament's as as as as European European European European Commission Commission Commission Commission president president president president was was was was that that that that I I I I wanted wanted wanted wanted and and and and explained explained explained explained the the the the move move move move would would would would not not not not be be be be an an an an easy easy easy easy one one one one Wonderland Wonderland Wonderland Wonderland understood understood understood understood that that that that many many many many countries countries countries countries with with with with dependence dependence dependence dependence on on on on Russian Russian Russian Russian oil oil oil oil and and and and explain explain explain explain the the the the plan plan plan plan that that that that would would would would help help help help them them them them to to to to we we we we know know know know if if if if it it it it will will will will make make make make sure sure sure sure that that that that we we we we phase phase phase phase out out out out Russian Russian Russian Russian oil oil oil oil in in in in an an an an orderly orderly orderly orderly fashion fashion fashion fashion so so so in in in a a a way way way that that that allows allows allows us us us and and and our our our partners partners partners to to to secure secure secure alternative alternative alternative supply supply supply routes routes routes and and and at at at the the the same same same time time time be be be very very very careful careful careful that that that we we we minimize minimize minimize the the the impact impact impact on on on the the the global global global market market market alongside alongside alongside the the the ban ban ban on on on oil oil oil comes comes comes a a a proposal proposal proposal to to to target target target high high high ranking ranking ranking military military military officers officers officers this this this sends sends sends another another another important important important signal signal signal to to to all all all perpetrators perpetrators perpetrators of of of the the the Kremlin Kremlin Kremlin we we we know know know who who who you you you are are are we we we will will will hold hold hold you you you accountable accountable accountable you're you're you're not not not getting getting getting away away away with with with this this this I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas

Russia Ukraine European European European Eur European European European Eur Parliament's Parliament European European European Eur Parliament Kremlin Kremlin Kremlin Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma
Volodymyr Zelenskyy Gives Passionate Speech to European Parliament

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:26 min | 2 months ago

Volodymyr Zelenskyy Gives Passionate Speech to European Parliament

"I just call him zelensky. And he gave a speech to parliament to the European Parliament. That was so passionate that the translator teared up. The translator for the European Parliament became audibly emotional as he took zelensky's promise that every square today, no matter what it's called, he is going to be called freedom square in every city of our country. Nobody is going to break us, he said, we are strong. We are Ukrainians. Man, I need a Ukrainian flag pin. I've got an American flag pin on today here on if you're watching on Salem news channel. Tracy keeps checking the mailbox, please send me one overnight me one. Mike Gallagher show, I can't find one here in Tampa Bay. Mike Gallagher's show PO box two 5 three 5 8 Tampa, Florida, three three 6 three zero. Or just text the keyword address to 806 5 5 6 four 5 three will send you back our mailing address. I'd love to be wearing a Ukrainian flag with my American flag. Zelensky said that Ukraine fights to be recognized as an equal member of Europe. I saw he signed a document yesterday trying to gain admission to NATO. Which of course is what Putin doesn't want.

European Parliament Zelensky Mike Gallagher Salem News Channel Parliament Tracy Tampa Bay Tampa Florida Ukraine Europe Nato Putin
"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

03:41 min | 7 months ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Natural infection with sars cop to number one what it means for you. Well let's see it says may become very unwell with cove nineteen. I guess if you believe. That's there certainly possible. Potential and by the way remember though that the vast vast vast majority of the population is it less risk than the flu. fact it's backed up by the stats backed up by oxford calculators. Back by anywhere. You wanna look if you break it up by age which they won't do on. This side of the argument is his potential to develop long term complications. Long cove it. Well the first thing. I've seen that actually even gives a possible into that is a single point out in a second so simply argument. I guess if you want to argue as long cove it even though. I don't ever think we've talked about long anything before two years but open the possibility that that's there and it does simply argue as i said from the video showed before based on what he's pointing out. It actually seems to suggest that this could be something. That was very clearly manipulated. And that's why it's having this effect but another conversation but it says can spread virus to others right so you have an infection. Obviously that they're saying you can spread it. Okay but vaccination it says oh no. Here's the point. They're saying immunity so you have immunity after infection. The idea that you can spread it after that is completely on is unsourced unpack back back by anything of it or seen in fact. It's backed up the opposite by studies. We're gonna show you in a second era says under vaccination significantly reduces your chance of developing covert nineteen not at all backed up by the data. The fact is that we're seeing cases. Cyrus had right now and although going to do is go well because most of them are vaccinating. Well it doesn't really reduce your chance of getting it. If if they're getting a huge portion of it doesn't induces immune response in a.

Long cove flu oxford Cyrus
"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Can see that it can. Therefore it's dangerous and as the guy we smoke. We listened to yesterday. The professional the ex-professional now bike rider. Who now can barely move because the injection. If there is risk there should be choice. Simple as that. And i am unequivocal about the fact that i am not fearful of cova tool what i am worried about other kinds of governments which exploit this crisis yes in order to cub civic freedoms and to grant certain privileges or not as the case may be what we stand for in europe is freedom democracy and the rule of law and can be no reason for those rights being curtailed by governments. Is the real problem here. That is a problem we need to deal with. Make it clear to the people of europe that they should not tolerate this for a moment longer. Thank you yes yes well said now just in case those unfamiliar with how these things work the reason that was kind of not speaking different language. And this is a multi lingual panel so the ones that don't speak english they give you subtitles in case people were wondering now. Not everyone knows these things. I thought that was world very role stated. What she said was exactly. I feel exactly other than the idea that this is something a lot that undertone for most of them as this is necessary. But but it's being forced and shouldn't be which regardless of whether they think is necessary safer whatever is as i said with the rally as long as they agree and we'll fight for your right to make your own decision. We should all agree. We should all be on the same side period. Just thank you very much to you will. It's very important for me to hear today. I think that All that my colleague christine has said is really important. We have a really terrible situation in europe today because as she said human rights are not respected we have the european chart of human rights which has the full value of treaty and should be taken into account by all national governments wilder writing their lows. But you fact it's obliterated today because fundamental human rights sir such as humor right to individual freedom to employment equality education have free expression of thought are seriously violated and all over europa peaceful protests. Are violently repressed. The i mean listen to what they're saying. How in the world can anybody be existing in this reality right now and pretending that these people are bunch of anti-science fringe conspiracy theorist i mean that's literally what that's the depth gist of what the blue checks in the twitter world everybody else in the mainstream swirling around the mainstream narrative. That's what they're generally arguing that if you believe this you just been taken by a bunch of misinformation from the conspiracy theorists. These are multi different political. Leanings parliament matt. European parliament right. I mean it's just crazy to me that we can again..

europe christine wilder twitter European parliament
"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"These. It's something we should trust these people or any government that doesn't mean you have to immediately discount what they say either right be objective and listen to what they have to say. There could be motivations behind why they're saying these things maybe there's an alterior motive but ultimately it doesn't matter because we're not just trusting what they say all we're doing is pointing out that what you're about to hear is exactly what people like me are saying in some cases that this is a violation of your rights and this is an okay and this is an abuse and this is toronto. I mean they go off and this isn't this is important because it will reach the normies out there. That don't wanna hear this stuff. Now this is as you can see you know. I had to do a little bit of digging on this. It was a little frustrating. Because this is how the a lot of the stuff works today even in the communities you know whatever truth community whatever you wanna call it because this is a rather the video that's being shared is just kind of being shared with us a way less quality version. So it's almost like you can't see what their lips with lips match what they're saying and it was shared repeatedly also platforms without any due diligence. Now yes it is a video but we all know that that can be faked today. We know that audio can be put in without. You know all sorts of numbers so i went around and around and around and traced it back to christian tear has which is the guy sitting right there okay. This is his youtube channel and then he lied he links it to his own facebook page. So you can confirm it here with his own facebook page and what's interesting and you can go through this. It for yourself goes basically lists off exactly what they're saying. We're gonna listen to it here. They are again showing you all the different pictures of what we just saw. Now this is say meme. Mep's is members of parliament are excuse me met me Members of european parliament is what it stands for. So let's take a listen and then we can go into some other points about the interesting. I'll obfuscation. I guess of the coverage of what was actually discussed around the. You know you're supposed to be able to find this stuff on european parliament website and even discussions of these meetings. Don't seem to even remotely touch on what they actually had to say. Not very shocking. In the kobe clown world we find ourselves in today. But let's take a listen being here today and to to answer our.

toronto Members of european parliament facebook youtube Mep parliament european parliament
"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"european parliament" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Tuesday october. Twenty six twenty twenty one. Thank you for joining me today as always a fantastic show planned for you today. It's going to be shorter to a degree. Probably not a three hour show but it will be t live show for sure. We're going to be talking about something quite important. The european parliament or members of select members of the european parliament held a conference where they discussed how what's happening today is wrong. The vaccine mandates and how it violates your rights and a lot of other important information now that does not mean as always pointed out that those people are necessarily on your side does not necessarily mean that they don't that they not have another agenda behind why they're doing that. Possibly when i'll point out in this discussion because of the transition to allowing natural immunity which still continues the vaccine passport infrastructure. But it's still very important now. I agree with comments. Already made before. This show started in regard to how these people are not really the illusion of control but at the end of the day. The point of showing this stuff today is to reach those people that are still lost to recognize. It's not anti-science fringe weirdos in their corner screening anti vaccine rhetoric. We're talking about members of parliament. Members of european parliament members of the united states government members the scientists doctors. Phd's nobel laureates all across the world..

european parliament parliament united states government
Arrested Belarusian Journalist Appears in 'Confession' Video

BBC World Service

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Arrested Belarusian Journalist Appears in 'Confession' Video

"Story in the news in Belarus is the video confession by Roman protest save each. He's being well treated by the police who just arrested him. And he says he's probably guilty of everything. The government says he's guilty off. In fact, he's being beaten up, say his friends and family on the video was filmed under duress. Roman is a young dissident journalist and Belarus basically captured him by diverting a plane, which was flying over its territory Que fury from the European Union. At the arrest of this opposition journalist you leader slapped new economic sanctions on Belarus punitive measures against its national airline on say that billions of euros of economic aid will be suspended. Is that enough and what more should be done? And of course, what's gonna happen to Roman process. Savage and his Russian girlfriend, Dominic Dashinski, is a member of the European Parliament from Poland for the ruling in Poland Law and Justice Party joins us now from Warsaw. Dominic. Thanks for coming on the show. Quite strong. Already. That kind of suspension of flights from Belarus. Do you think that that's enough? What Maura, would you like to see done? It is not enough. Obviously, it is not enough. It's unprecedented act off terrorism. What we just witnessing, and typical sanctions are not enough. First of all, we have to answer the question why Lukashenko was so brave to commit this kind of act again Act off terrorism. Well, I would say that he was encouraged. By Mr Putin. Everyone knows that he is just a satellite. I mean, Mr Lukashenko is just a satellite off Kremlin, so he had to have approval from Kremlin to do such a thing.

Belarus Dominic Dashinski Poland European Union Justice Party European Parliament Savage Government Dominic Warsaw Maura Lukashenko Mr Putin Mr Lukashenko Kremlin
European MPs Targeted by Deepfake Video Calls

The CyberWire

01:49 min | 1 year ago

European MPs Targeted by Deepfake Video Calls

"Someone impersonating a spokesman for imprisoned russian opposition figure alexander navalny conducted zoom meetings with european parliament members. The sessions featured. What the guardian and nl times called a deepfake video call purporting to be volley associate leonid volkov which volkov himself said looked pretty convincing. Speculation about responsibility for the incident has focused on vo van and lexus. Two well-known russian prank callers pranksters and such nuisance. Humorous are known. The incident is of course troubling for coming at a time when navalny is imprisoned and on a life threatening hunger strike and it's worth noting that relatively senior political officials were taken in by the scam but to place it in perspective. This is more shock jock stuff than it is a spore of new and devilish lena. Various approach to disinformation technically. It's a cut above the kind of jerk who had called the live news coverage to holler bubba buoy during the slow motion. Chase of oj. Simpson's bronco down the four zero five in los angeles but let's keep it in perspective. The lesson is that video that appears genuine alive call need not be and that some authentication beyond look and feel is necessary but we already knew that it's even become atropine gag insurance commercials where there's a guy video conferencing with his move colleague and so forth. At any rate on balance not very funny and vo von alexis themselves aren't novices. We note. they pranked to name. Just three sir. Elton john the duke of sussex and senator bernie sanders but of their targets have been critics of the russian regime. Mr putin himself has not been pranked and seems unlikely to be

Alexander Navalny Nl Times Leonid Volkov Volkov Vo Van Navalny European Parliament Simpson Vo Von Alexis Los Angeles Senator Bernie Sanders Elton John Sussex Mr Putin
Uyghur American Association Discusses Sanctions Against China

On the Media

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Uyghur American Association Discusses Sanctions Against China

"United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, the European Union have all leveled sanctions on China. To their treatment of leaguers, which includes detention camps forced labor sterilizations. And abortions, which 2020 State Department report has called genocide. China denies the allegations despite personal testimonies, extensive reporting And indeed satellite footage of weaker detention camps in China. Who's at all today is president of the Wigger American Association. And many of his family members in China. Of experience in the prison camps. He joins us now from Northern Virginia. Mr Alta, Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. And what's your reaction to the sanctions? I remember it was in 2019. I started speaking up for my father and my family members. Had a panel in European Parliament. And I mentioned the word genocide. Concentration camp. After the panel. Couple people came to me and they said You're exaggerating, and you're de legitimizing your own caused by using the word genocide and concentration camp. At that time, I did not know my family members were alive. It was extremely heartbreaking that people do not want to listen. So, you know, three years after United States, Canada, Netherland, Many other countries start speaking up recognizing as a genocide. It is giving me hope. And I believe this is giving hope for we work

China Wigger American Association Mr Alta European Union State Department United Kingdom Canada United States Northern Virginia European Parliament Netherland
Carles Puigdemont, Catalan Separatist Leader, Loses Immunity

The World and Everything In It

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Carles Puigdemont, Catalan Separatist Leader, Loses Immunity

"The european parliament has stripped three catalonian separatist leaders of diplomatic immunity paving the way for their extradition to spain former catalan leader. Carlos puigdemont. Call the vote a cleric case of political persecution. He's a sad day for european parliament. Who have lost our immunity but the european parliament has lost more than that and as a result european democracy to and two others involved in the failed attempt to gain independence from spain where elected to the european parliament in two thousand nineteen. That's shielded them from prosecution on charges of sedition for organizing the independence referendum. Spain's foreign minister. He'll the european parliament's decision and said it should not interfere in the country's affairs but pooch on an his political have vowed to take their case to the european court of justice

European Parliament Carlos Puigdemont Spain European Court Of Justice
Hungary’s Ruling Party Breaks With Conservative E.U. Allies

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Hungary’s Ruling Party Breaks With Conservative E.U. Allies

"Relationship with the european union is continuing to sour. The country's prime minister has drawn his party fitness from the eu's alliance of centre-right lawmakers the european people's party a change in the rules to allow the european parliament to expel members more easily and in addition to this hungry is forging ahead with its own coronavirus vaccination program using russia's sputnik v product yet to be given the green light by the e. Tell us more. I'm joined now by buyer. Who's a reporter at politico. Good morning lily. Morning thanks for having me a pleasure to tell us what has happened with fidesz viktor. Victorian suggestion is is that. they have jumped before they were pushed. That's right that's so or band. Sent a letter formally withdrawing his ruling fetus party from the european people's party which job as you said. Is this big the biggest group in the european parliament. It's it's a centre-right grouping but it's actually. I'm quite diverse internally. It has some members that lena bit more liberal at how members which are quite conservative and even though officials eat this move came after change to the groups Internal rules really. It's a culmination of years. And years of of debate and internal tension and ultimately i think some of the group's biggest members and in particular the german at christian democratic union That that's the party of chancellor. Angela merkel at perhaps have started feeling that does is more of a liability ford them and so or bond decided you to quit and look elsewhere and just explain to us how we have got to this point where fidesz is in such a dire situation with the european parliament and that it that oh viktor. Orban has decided to leave. I mean i'm writing thinking that That european parliament officials had already suspended fitness from The the center right group already and this is just a second step well. He's his aides a bit complicated. But basically has has party was suspended from the broader european people's party A few years back but they were allowed to stay in the european people's party group in the european parliament. And what happened this week. Is that the twelve members of the european parliament. Left this centre-right grouping within the parliament and are now sitting in parliament but simply as independent members without formal political affiliation and the big question now is what will come next so whoa joined one of the more conservative right-leaning groups one option is the european conservatives and reformists group where the polish a ruling lon justice party is a member Another option is the identity and democracy group where alternative for germany and marine le. Pen's a party are are our members. And then there's the third option of china to create something new which is tough but but possible So what what we saw. Yesterday is victoria on Wrote a small essay where he said that he wants to build What what he termed a In new democratic rights for citizens who don't want migrants don't fund multiculturalism and in his words have not descended into quotes. Lgbtq lunacy so he is putting out his his his platform he's making his views very very public and clear and saying that he's looking for some kind of New right-wing alliance. We just don't know exactly what form it will take

European People's Party European Parliament Alliance Of Centre Fidesz Viktor European Union Fidesz Christian Democratic Union Lena Angela Merkel Russia Orban Viktor Parliament Lon Justice Party Ford Germany Victoria China Wing Alliance
Boris Johnson's father seeks French citizenship

AP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson's father seeks French citizenship

"As Britain exits from the European Union. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's father wants to become closer with the EU, Sally Johnson told broadcaster article that was in the process of reclaiming his French identity. Johnson says his mother was born in France article said Johnson's putting together a French citizenship requests. The elder Johnson is a former member of the European Parliament. Backed remaining in the EU in Britain's 2016 membership referendum. He has since expressed support for his son as a prime minister led the U K out of the bloc.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Sally Johnson EU Johnson Britain France European Parliament
Broadcaster: Boris Johnson's father seeks French citizenship

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Broadcaster: Boris Johnson's father seeks French citizenship

"As Britain prepares to split from the European Union the father prime minister Boris Johnson appears to be seeking closer ties with the bloc by applying for French citizenship Stanley Johnson told board costs are tales I was in the process of reclaiming his French identity Johnson says his mother was born in France RTL said Johnson's putting together a French citizenship requests the elder Johnson is a former member of the European Parliament backed remaining in the EU in but since two thousand sixteen membership referendum he has since expresses support for sun as a prime minister that the UK out of the block very shortly London

Stanley Johnson Boris Johnson Johnson EU Britain RTL France European Parliament SUN UK London
EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

EU ambassadors approve post-Brexit trade deal

"Brexit trade deal clinched. On christmas eve has now been provisionally approved by european governments teri schultz reports. This will allow the agreement to take effect on january first ambassadors from the twenty seven remaining members of the european union have given their formal backing to trade and customs agreement worked out between the eu and uk last week this agreement will prevent tariffs and quotas being imposed on uk goods entering the e eu single market when the brexit transition period officially ends december. Thirty first although parliament's on both sides also need to approve the agreement. The european parliament refused to call a special session to consider the more than twelve hundred pages of court on such a short time line. That will only happen next month but will not prevent what's being called the provisional application of the term starting friday the british parliament will vote on the deal wednesday and expected to approve it

Brexit Teri Schultz EU UK British Parliament European Parliament
Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

WSJ What's News

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Historic Brexit Deal Sets Trade Relationship for U.K., EU

"Just ahead of a year end deadline the uk and the european union have reached an agreement on a brexit trade deal that will guide their future relationship british prime minister. Boris johnson says the deal ends years of economic uncertainty. Very pleased to tell you the psalter name That we have completed the biggest trade deal yet worth six hundred sixty billion pounds. Yeah a comprehensive canada style. Free trade deal between the uk and the eu a deal that will protect jobs across this country allow goods. You can goods and components to be sold without tariffs and without quotas in the eu market. Deal which will if anything allow our companies and our exporters to do even more business with all european friends. The deal comes after months of negotiations following the uk exit from the european union in january. Joining me now to talk more about it is wall street journal. Uk and brexit. Editor stephen fiddler. Hi steven thanks so much for being here more booger so stephen. This deal follows months of talks. It's a big agreement. Tell us more about the key terms of the deal which covers a really broad range of issues here covers everything from trade to security to terrorism sharing of information on crime databases. It includes traffic Regulations you know who can drive on. Who's roads it includes fishing and who can fish in waters and the british waters and and how much fish they can take out of it. I mean there's a vast agreement of more than a thousand pages. The main thing it does is avoid. The imposition of time on trade between the two sides for the first time since one thousand nine hundred seventy three came down really in the last days to fight about fishing which is just a tiny proportion of both economists about zero point. Three percent of of both economies in terms of gdp a hugely important places like the uk but also in france and the netherlands denmark and spain and in the end it came down to a sort of a haggle over but the species. That could be caught from the waters of the of the uk species by species over the next five and a half years so it got down into kind of incredibly detailed negotiation in the haggling over various things that are actually in the end. Very small points economically the question was how much does the u k agree to follow standards and regulations set out by the eu in order to ensure that the uk could get tariff-free access to the market a full hundred and forty million people and in the end. That was a compromise on that that you didn't the uk to become a major competitor on its doorstep with free access to the eu market. And be able to undercut it and things. I m environmental standards on on things like subsidies for companies on things like labor standards and labor rules so the uk basically you had to accept in general a lot of those standards as the price. It paid to get tariff-free access to the eu. But in general the uk is now sort of a much freer to settle agreements with other countries including wanted hopes. I think with the united states that's free trade agreements because in the u. It's basically locked into and it has been locked into the us trade arrangements for decades so now that a deal has been reached. What will be playing out over the next few weeks. Well it has to be ratified. That's the first thing so that the british parliament will has been recalled. I think for december thirtieth to ratify. The agreement will do that on on one day. European leaders also will have to approve it. That's a fairly foregone conclusion. I think that both sides get approval from both sides. It also technically needs the approval of the european parliament. So that's the eu legislature. That will happen some point in the new year so in january one the agreement will go into place provisionally and then it will be ratified presumably at a later date by the european parliament. This is a basis for the future relationship of the eu and the uk. They're right next door to each other hugely important to each other in lots of ways and it's wrong to think of this as being kind of static thing that's that's now setting concrete foil. You know the rest of time. It's the start of a relationship that will change. According to how each side sees their own best interests so it sounds like this isn't quite it for brexit. Although a lot of reporting has referred to this as sort of a capstone deal here what other loose ends need to be tied up. Well it is a capstone really in in the sense that it's as i said the main of the major framework for their relationship. There are things that need to be tied up. And these are sort of unilateral in a way so the eu has to make rulings on the ability of you've to shed data with the uk. It hasn't done yet. That's a unilateral designation. It will make and we're expecting that to come. There's also some eu declarations to come on allowing financial services firms for the uk to do certain operations inside the eu after january. The first so there's technical things will follow. It's not going to be in terms of financial services anywhere like the relationship. That was there before that allowed london. Essentially to become the capital of a you finance and do some huge percentage of old finance business in the eu. Certainly all wholesale finance business that has gone away. There's already been drift of capital adrift of personnel. From the city of london to other places in the eu and that drift is is likely to continue. That's u k and brexit editor. Stephen fiddler stephen. Thank you so much for joining me. Today you're welcome

EU UK Stephen Fiddler Boris Johnson Wall Street Journal Eu Legislature Steven European Parliament Stephen Denmark The Netherlands Canada British Parliament Spain France United States London Stephen Fiddler Stephen
Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement

"Britain and the European Union of struck a provisional free trade agreement. Today. It averts on new year chaos for cross border traders and brings a measure of certainty for businesses After years of Brexit turmoil. It's coming just a week before the U. K's final split from the European Union. British authorities say it's the first free trade agreement based on zero tariffs and zero quotas ever achieved with the EU. Spike this breakthrough. There are some key aspects of the future relationship that still remain uncertain, and the British and European Parliament's must both hold votes on the agreement, and that may not happen until after the UK formerly leaves January 1st.

European Union Of Struck EU Britain British And European Parliamen UK
"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm accusing the Chinese authorities of the worst crime of the 21st century. I'm I'm also accusing the international community for being a part of this crime for betting it with silence, and I also am accusing Nike and other multinational corporations that are taking advantage of slavery. Nike and other companies say they've done what they can to make sure they're not using slave labor. But the European Parliament went on to adopt a resolution that condemns the Chinese government for the forced labor and exploitation of leaguers. It calls for sanctions on Chinese officials responsible for abuses against Wickers and a ban on imports made with forced labor. Weaker American Sally, who dire leads the nonprofit East Turkistan National Awakening Movement. East Turkistan was the name of the weaker republic before China took control. It is progress, but What you would have hoped that they would have recognized it as a genocide, but hopefully we can get that recognition in the near future as well. They charge genocide because there's evidence that leaguers are being tortured and killed in July who Dyer's group and other Uighurs submitted a complaint to the International Criminal Court, accusing China of interning a million week ear's In a major development last week. I see See, prosecutor Fatou Bensouda addressed their complaint in an annual report. She said there was quote no basis to proceed. Because the alleged acts happened in China and China isn't a signatory to the treaty that established the icy sea. So the IC C doesn't have jurisdiction many people And much of the media has reported that you know the icy she has rejected the water's icy, he complained. However, that's not necessarily true who, Dyer says the complaint is still active. He and others just need to present evidence that China has also unlawfully arrested and detained leaguers into Ji Kistane and Cambodia. Surrounding countries that do belong to the I. C. C. They're obtaining that evidence with the help of a powerful new group called the Inter Parliamentary Alliance on China or AIPAC. Luke deployed Furred is acting as its coordinator. He's director of theorize foundation and anti slavery and Geo. I was actually quite hope for us for the church monks and so okay, right? Well, if you're wanting more evidence off a very severe crimes that have happened to leaders outside of China, then great. Well, we've got that this work on that pull that together, Deferred says I pack is made up of roughly 150, prominent lawmakers from 19 countries. That includes Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio in the U. S. The group came together to work on human rights issues, in part out of frustration about a lack of action at the United Nations. Diplomat says I pack was one of the forces behind another recent development. In early December, Britain's House of Lords voted for legislation that would require a human rights impact assessment for any trade deal. For the first time. It would give you Kate judges the power to declare whether there's evidence of genocide in another country. And to revoke a trade agreement. If there is that had never bean an urgent question in the UK Parliament on leakers before I pack, it's got Parliament talking about it much more than ever before. And I think that we're partly responsible for that. No doubt about it. Diplomat says international efforts finally seemed to be snowballing. In October, Canada came close to officially declaring the weaker crisis a genocide with a report from a parliamentary committee studying the issue. This was liberal Canadian parliament member Peter Fonseca. From Ontario. The subcommittee unequivocally condemned the persecution of this population and was persuaded to state that these actions constitute genocide. All this may bode well for legislation in the U. S. Senate that would ban imports made in Xinjiang unless companies can prove that their products were not made with forced labor. After all this summer, the U. S imposed sanctions on Chinese officials responsible for the persecution of leakers. Something that started the mo mentum on weaker issues that's intensifying. Now. Sally, who dire of the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement, says more positive steps can't come soon enough inside Pakistan. The people there are fishing. Unforeseen atrocity since the Holocaust every day that we are silent Lauren. More people are being killed, including four of his family members within the.

China East Turkistan National Awaken Fatou Bensouda Dyer Nike European Parliament Wickers Chinese government Inter Parliamentary Alliance Lauren Senator Marco Rubio International Criminal Court Peter Fonseca director Sally prosecutor AIPAC Ji Kistane Britain
Fishing talks move at snail's pace in EU-UK Brexit standoff

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Fishing talks move at snail's pace in EU-UK Brexit standoff

"And Britain are ongoing this weekend. London and Brussels trying to come together on a trade deal before the end of the month. The transition period following Britain's withdrawal comes to an end the European Parliament has set a Sunday night deadline. Long lines reported in South

Britain Brussels London European Parliament
EU says EU-UK face weekend 'last attempt' to get trade deal

Pacifica Evening News

01:23 min | 1 year ago

EU says EU-UK face weekend 'last attempt' to get trade deal

"The European Union and the United Kingdom are heading into the weekend on a last attempt to clinch a post Brexit trade deal and avoid a chaotic and costly crash out by Britain in the New year. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the on leeway to get the deal done is if the European Union compromises, he said the U. K has already done a lot to try to help. But the EU chief negotiator Michele Barnier said it would be a very serious and somber situation if the deal falls through with the jobs of hundreds of thousands of people at stake. The European Parliament has said a Sunday night deadline for the talks and a Simpson reports. Michele Barnier told M E P s that little time remained to work through negotiations if an agreement was to come into force on the first of January. That you and you cave remain at loggerheads over whether Brussels will be able to hit British goods with tariffs if the government closes its fishing waters to you fishing fleets in the future, Mr Barnier argued it would not be fair if European fishermen were not allowed to access British waters. Downing Street said negotiations were in a very serious state. And once that a nodal outcome remain very likely Theory, pee in Parliament have set a deadline of midnight on Sunday for an agreement and that's Hannah Simpson reporting

Michele Barnier EU Prime Minister Boris Johnson United Kingdom U. Britain European Parliament Mr Barnier Simpson Brussels Government Parliament Hannah Simpson
Brexit talks: Are we any nearer to a deal?

Today in Focus

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Brexit talks: Are we any nearer to a deal?

"Don. This is a strange time to be reporting on frantic brexit talks. What has it been like behind. The scenes has been extremely difficult to find out. Wolf has been like behind the scenes because it just going into the burly moments at the european. Commission's headquarters is a bolton. We don't go in that very often atoll so i'm waiting for my office from home will just meeting diplomats officials pox and trying to get a bit information. What's going on behind the scenes in the rooms. I've got. They gave a very deep throat image wandering through park. You're wearing a mac in my image and you wearing a mask whispering to officials to try and find out what's going on so now you can tell me in the past two weeks. We've had numerous breaking that lines. Lurid briefings i confidently predicting a dale and all but giving up and then back again to the camera. Another deadline came and went. Is it all theatrics. A lot of it is their tricks because you do need to sell it. They'll do both sides needs to sell it to that domestic audiences or Benches michelle bonnie a and us live on the line. The european commission president needs to sell it to the member states needs to be looked at fighting for something but there are serious differences in negotiation ninety-seven into the deal is done is not done on paper. Neagle text ready to go. He just needs the council of ministers to sign often the european parliament to give consent. But they're all these sticking points which have duct talks routes the the nine months really. And we always news gonna end up these two sticking points and being kind of the big obstacles right to the end nazis fishing and level playing field conditions. But we close. I think there's lots of movements. And i think the next few days despite all the warnings over the recent days of very very likely that we have an ideal outcome from the prime minister. I think that's the we're on the path deal.

Michelle Bonnie Bolton Wolf DON Neagle Dale European Commission Council Of Ministers European Parliament
So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 1 year ago

So long, and were keeping all the fish: Brexit

"There should have been something of a resolution at last to the brexit drama. This morning ursula von der line the president of the european commission and boris johnson. Britain's prime minister and said yesterday as an extended deadline to work out the fine print on britain's divorce papers yesterday came and despite the exhaust soon after almost one year of negotiations. And despite the fact that deadlines have been missed over and over. We both think that it is responsible at this point. In time to go the extra mile mr johnson used similar language to ms vonda. Lions having repeatedly warned that no deal was a very likely outcome. Where there's life there's hope we're going to keep talking to see what we can do. The uk certainly would be a will key away from the talks. I think people would expect us to to go the extra mile. Neither side wants the regulatory and logistical chaos of a no deal scenario but neither side seems willing to make much in the way of concessions and now an immovable deadline looms december thirty first. We are very much convinced. The end of the year. When the transition period finishes john peet is brexit editor. So the risk of nato is still high but the mood between the sides is probably better after the extension of the deadline than it was last week and what are. The main areas of disagreement still the main areas of disagreement being the same almost all year. There is a quarrel about fisheries giving european votes access to british waters. And there's a quarrel about what's called a level playing field which the rules for competition to make sure britain does not undercut european companies insatiable environmental labor and state. Subsidy rules the eu. On britain to stick to most of the rules it follows now. Britain wants the right to diverge from these rules and some way of settling that bigger argument fisheries will be needed. If there's going to be a trade deal but as you say these have been the points of disagreement. Better part of the year i mean What room for compromise left. Well they all talking. As i understand it about possible dispute mechanisms for settling quarrels about measures that be taken by britain or indeed by the eu. After the first january that deemed to be anti competitive. And i think that's the focus where you might find some way of agreeing what the europeans want is a dispute mechanism that would allow them to retaliate. If they deem britain to be behaving in an uncompetitive way. Retaliate by imposing tariffs or withdrawing trade preferences. The british could do the same to the eu. And i think in that area there is still scope for agreement and all this is about rules and regulations but what the personalities involved here. How does that play into. what's happening. The european union negotiator is michelle bonnier. he's french and he obviously has relationship with french president. Boris johnson has been trying several times to go round michelle bonnier and negotiate with others but the europeans are very strict on saying. This is the job of the european commission. Michelle baez negotiator. His bosses are london. I on the president of the european commission. I think boris johnson gets on reasonably with all of these people but none of them quite trust him. And i think that's one of the reasons why they want to have a very clear sort of legal framework that includes dispute settlement mechanisms and the right to retaliate. Because they never quite trust. Boris johnson not to go off and do something that will damage them. And how much do you think that issue of trust has has helped things up so far in yet still i. Trust has been very important in this negotiation. And i think the behavior of boris johnson has not made it easy a. He refused to consider extending the deadline for the negotiations earlier in the year when the europeans wanted him to and he then suggested a couple of times that he was going to rewrite the withdrawal treaty. Which is the agreement reached last year under which britain formerly left the european union. Even though that's an international treaty that would be a breach of international law. And i think if you put those things together. There is every reason why the europeans feel. They shouldn't trust will rely on the british government. Under boris johnson. Not to babe in a way that they think might be bad for the european union its members so the us official negotiator is michel barnier but that the national leaders are playing something of a roll here to national league is obviously critical. I mean Michelle bonnier as the negotiator. Us on the line. As the president of the european commission are operating under a mandate as they call it which they've been given by national leaders for these trade talks the mandate is quite a tough one. The toughest person in this mandate of toughest of bits of the mandate have been insisted on by the french president last week. Emmanuel macron said. I've consistent. So now i don't want to have my cake and eat it but i do want the pieces cut. He could it. Because i'm not giving my peace away. Michelle demander busy discussion janardan pam. I'd meanwhile angela merkel the other key european leader the chancellor germany. she's regarded as a bit more of a soft cup than emmanuel macron. She's very keen that there should be a deal beneath them. Dusty dusty. alice gibney super communists. I say funds and she's also quite strict and she has recently said. I think we should do everything together. Result goes saying and the threat to both sides. All along has been the chance that this should end without a deal or are both sides ready for that. I think no deal would be highly disruptive for both the and the uk. The impact would be worse but britain because it is more. Reliant on trade across the channel and largest sheriff's exports go to the european union. If there is no deal that will be intensive customs checks and problems at ports and trading across between britain and the uk and then also be tariffs which are quite low. But they're high for certain sectors ten percent for cars forty percent for sheep metex bullets about the same for beef exports and that would certainly cost people and be very disruptive of a very big trade relationship. The europeans think it will be worse for britain but britain also thinks that it would be disruptive for the eu particularly for ireland. Most of his trade goes through the united kingdom and say both sides want to avoid new deal and so does that mean that. This may go right down to the wire that there may be negotiations. Happening on new year's eve at some point people will have to say look. If we can't strike an agreement we are just going to turn deal. I mean what. The negotiators come up with has to be approved by national parliaments by the british parliament by the european parliament. That's the surprises. That sometimes takes weeks or months. You can tell escape it. But i think if we get to the thirty first of december they haven't reached an agreement that it will mean. No deal really have settled before christmas. Have any chance of ratification for january-august john. Thank you very much for your time. Once more. thank you.

Boris Johnson Britain EU Michelle Bonnier European Commission Ursula Von Der Ms Vonda John Peet Mr Johnson Michelle Baez United Kingdom Lions Nato Emmanuel Macron Michelle Demander Janardan Pam Michel Barnier
Brexit negotiations extended

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:50 min | 1 year ago

Brexit negotiations extended

"The brexit negotiations have been extended. It's been a tense weekend of talks which ended without a resolution except that the teams will continue to bargain. Darn mccaffrey's urine news political editor. Ann joins me now. Darna blustery man and a crumpled face and impeccably turned out an utterly composed woman libertine and lutheran images of boris johnson's meeting with usher underlying dominated the front pages and it seemed to me at least pretty much characterize the tone of the brexit negotiations. So can you tell us what happened over the weekend will in many ways. Of course the talks restarted. Again as you say. After that meeting with vonda line and boris johnson in brussels on wednesday nights they did seem not make an awful awful lot of extra progress. They inched forward to a large degree editor. Tina particularly in this area of the level playing field dot es britain would have to adhere to many of the rules and regulations of the european union for years to come that wants to have access to the single market particularly on this idea of divergence. Oh britain wants to forge. Don't power in the world committee regards. That's what brexit is. All rexiti is all about was the european union since she says well. If you do that that means consequences. It means. We may well the limit your access to the single market and the have been suggestions that it britain diverged. Too far the cop. Some of those rules and regulations that brussels could put on what a cold kind of like tariffs taxes on some of its goods to try and keep it into line. And that's been the really controversial area on that point. Europe seems to be conceding some ground that may be britain might be able to reciprocate by doing exactly the same to the eu all that the independent all between posts deciding if britain is undercut those regulations. That in the end that process is a bit more complicated and drawn out and then the eu it initially anticipated all although that's an awful lot of detail on what is a minor point there are still these inefficient gaps but there is a sign of progress and the reason that the talks continued. Go beyond yesterday is done to kind of to simple reasons. A neither side wants to be seen to walk away from these talks. Georgina no wants to collapse them. Because ultimately they'll always be a blame game about who brought about the no deal brexit and second of all you know it may well bore us all to death and there's no home and carry on talking no one loses so why not talk until the cows come home or indeed the. We're not allowed fireworks in us even till they're crackers get pulled. Whatever happens on new year's eve this year. So i mean the talks could actually go on until the deadline which is the thirty first of december. We'll in practical terms not really. Id so that the front pages of today's daily telegraph suggests that talks could carry on until new years. That's the headline. at least though. It doesn't suggest what year which is likely distancing. No i in theory. And i think we all kind of i keep saying this into the last week. I was told last week by an eu diplomat that were looking at the eighteenth around the as well as the last days to secure agreement because then we really all pushing the envelope in terms of actually just having time at all for both the european parliament and the british folder to ratify this agreement. Because it will have to be. There is a deal will need to be ratified by both parliaments. Not there is talk and with the eu everything is flexible that potentially it could be agreed by e you leaders and ratified provisionally in the new year. So almost in retrospect. I'm not entirely sure that can happen with the uk parliament but you know talks will continue at some stage. Somebody's gonna have to make a decision though. I mean they cannot continue indefinitely. And as you've said as the telegraph suggested they definitely cannot continue beyond news because of the legal deadline that is in place. But i mean there are also things like for instance tax systems need more than a fortnight to boot up to change various things. We're also being told that supermarkets have been ordered to stock up the goods. In event of a no deal will cost twenty percent more that there are interim measures to keep planes flying and so on. I mean there's so much detail that needs to be worked out the things that are really interesting about this first of all even if there is a deal it's only really covering about twenty cents of the existing rules and normality. That's already in place which means that's eighty. Percents is either having to be made up by changes that businesses are having to make stuff that you and i won't see but will cost them time and money and additionally the will be disruption because of course will be extra checks at borders particular over in calais and that means that we will see many more pictures of those lorries cues them for after aftermarket after mile. And you're right. We all still likely to see an increase in food prices to a degree. If there is no deal that gets worse because the tariffs potentially william place will be in place sterling will potentially fall even further on those two factors will mean that food prices will likely increase the destruction means that supermarkets already ordering goods talk about destruction to medical supplies and also in the amended. No deal as you rightly dives there will still have to be many deals. Don't breakneck speed to ensure that you know planes continue to be able to fly into european espace. That lorries are able to even enter the opinion so even if there is no overall trade agreements that will still have to be some deals just to make sure that things carry on beyond the. I generally in a relatively normal way now. What about the navy. The royal navy has been told that it should patrol to police channel waters To to stop illegal fishing as it may well be by then Charles michel the president of the european council referring to that said the britain was not lose. Its cooling. Go overboard he said. I'm trying to be serious on the european side. At least we keep our sang for. Yeah i think we'll see what happens with the role now. I mean even in the event of not we'll see what happens with the law. Maybe i'm sure they will patrol and all we're going to get into fish wars that we saw. I think it was back in the nineteen seventies involving iceland's when it really did get a bit nasty and ships were sunk certainly pretty badly damaged in wars over fishing there. You have to remember the european union in its deal contingency. Planning junior suggested that. If britain bolts these breakneck speeds kind of temporary deals. That i was talking about when it comes to the ability to move call goran or indeed planes that they would have to concede that the current agreement on fishing would continue for at least another year. Which makes me think that in the ends. That probably was likely to happen. Not least of all as well because we have to remember no deal. I deal on. Fishing may be banned from both sides and fishing but no deal is also bad. And i'm not entirely sure that the fishing communities of the east coast of england or northern france. Want no deal either. Because that may mean they don't have access to each other's waters but given the acrimony were to see in the nastiness in no deal. Brexit may will also mean that those uk fishermen for example will not be able to sell the fish to the european market.

EU Britain Boris Johnson Ann Joins Vonda Line Brussels Mccaffrey Tina Georgina European Parliament Europe Charles Michel Calais UK Royal Navy European Council William Navy
Three Weeks Until Britain Leaves The EU And What Needs To Happen

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:36 min | 1 year ago

Three Weeks Until Britain Leaves The EU And What Needs To Happen

"At the very real risk of causing listeners to drop abruptly dead with boredom and irritation brexit apparently down to the wire in the loss ditch behind the last chance saloon not the eleventh hour with the clock ticking deafeningly etc ad infinitum three weeks from now the uk will have exited the transition period and be entirely out of the eu. But we still don't know on what if any terms it is said that absolutely everything must definitely be sorted out for certain by sunday but we have heard this once or twice or several dozen times before. I'm joined with more on this bilateral price former director of communications at ten downing street Let's first of all to the field of political communications. Boris johnson as we heard the top of the show says a strong possibility of no deal. Is he lowering expectations before coming home. Brandishing some sort of bogus triumph. Or is he actually lowering expectations. Well is definitely a lowering expectations of there being a deal. So that will all talk about how often it would be if there's no deal and he can then Wave flag come whatever day. It is won't be sunday but whatever it is and say actually. We clinched victory from the jaws defeat. We gotta deal. Is this brilliant. And it's nothing like as bad as you will vote. Who's going to be will still be dreadful. It'll still be a very bad prospect for the united kingdom in all sorts of ways but nothing like as bad as the no deal what he likes to pretend is in australia which it is and which would be absolutely catastrophic. Ns malcolm turnbull. The film started. Prime minister was saying on the television last night. Even australia doesn't like the australian deal. Are we then looking at a classic from the populist playbook then you create crisis pretend to have solved crisis and then claim credit. Pretty much You you you create barriers to deal which he certainly been doing and has been doing that all the way through. And but at the end of the day if true to form which is what did over the withdrawal agreement which put us into position the at the moment during this kind of interim period just as he did then he caved at the last minute maid not massive concessions to the other countries of the european union in order to get that withdrawal agreement over the line and unless he's prepared to take not only the the huge economic hit to the uk economy but also the massive political hit to his own authority as a result failing to secure a deal and this is prepared to accept all of that that. I still think he's gonna come back with the deal. What do you make all of australia style. Though as an example of political salesmanship of main speaking as destroyed on trying to take it as a compliment but does boris. Johnson assumed that there's some sort of subliminal association between australia and sunshine and vast skies and amusing hoping animals. Yeah i think pretty much the he is. Because of course you could describe it as i said on your program and down to go as the nepalese deal although zimbabwean deal or whatever any other country that only operates under world trade organization rules. He calls it australian australian style deal. So people will think austrailia right. You know we have been there. We we certainly know that the country seems to get along. Fine service okay for them. It might be okay for us completely ignoring the fact that we are totally different economy with a totally different level of penetration to the european market and as mentioned a few minutes ago even the australians. Like what he calls in australia and deal. That said might there be part of boris johnson. Thinking i mean alive though he may be to the potentially dire consequences of no deal. If he's thinking about this brutally politically he owes his position certainly owes his majority substantially to that base voters. Who really won't be happy until we've up the channel tunnel and who would regard any deal as some sort of betrayal and might he be thinking of them and also thinking that the people who wanna deal aren't the kind of people who are going to vote for him anyway. well hostile. He isn't he of those people which is why he's seeking right way to the very very bitter end which were not yet is trying to persuade those people that he is the biggest brexit in the room he will out brexit any of them. He'll be absolutely fervent in his determination to stand up for produce suffering j. and stick tiffany's is up to the european union and just as they would like him to do so that he minimizes the scale factor from them. Come the deal when it does come over. They'll still be a bit of squealing and effectively. Sort of makes them impotent. They can't do anything about it because they were at a time to think about it. They'll be absolutely no possibility of reworking. The deal that he comes forward with and so he's he's got an eye to them the whole time but he's also got an eye to the public as a whole. They are a minority within a minority. The real hard line. Brexit is of kind of ra minority within a minority. He's going to have to fly to general election sometime what he's going to need to show that he's kept the union together. I mean it would be a massive threat to the union whether to breed no deal the union with scotland and the rest of the united kingdom. And he's got to show that his government is competent and capable of delivery on but it says it will deliver. He said he would deliver a deal. It would be a gift to the labor opposition and secure stom- if he fails to do so and all the consequences of no deal all the economic consequences that we've talked about so many times in board our listeners to death with over over past months and years would be at his door. I just simply don't think that that political risk is worth taking in order to be the hero of a bunch of people. Who frankly i'm going to go you did intimate earlier in this conversation. However that you didn't think they would be a deal by sunday so if not by sunday then by win because december thirty first is not far away yet. Well it did it start. It does have to be by december thirty first if that is the absolute deadline that you can't you can't calendar december thirty first comes off after sympathetic and comes before january first and that's just a fact but it doesn't have to be by sunday even if you look at for stunts on the sediment alert delay. Who said that. They say that by sunday. They need to know whether it's possible to get a deal not to actually have the deal now if you may remember the back in july. That was the deadline. When boris johnson said we had to know whether it was possible to get a deal. And if you wanted no deal then we could all be ready for business could be ready for it. We could have got along that path if that was the party wanted. All of that says to me that that isn't the party wants. So when does it have to come. It has to come by the last week. In december the european parliament think has indicated that they would be prepared to sit between christmas and the new year as they have to ratify ahead of time british. Mp's could be cooled back to the house of commons screaming In order to do the same. So and the absolute deadline. It's literally you know days before the end of the year loans prize. Thank you as always. We will doubtless have more from you on that subject. In coming days and weeks

Australia Boris Johnson United Kingdom European Union Malcolm Turnbull Boris Johnson Tiffany Scotland European Parliament House Of Commons
"european parliament" Discussed on Newscast - Africa

Newscast - Africa

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"european parliament" Discussed on Newscast - Africa

"The Appellate podcast shares the stories of multifaceted Africans one episode at a time the podcast aims to uncover The Untold Stories of modern and Millennial Africans off base and various parts of the world. Each episode gives listeners an opportunity to learn and experience conversations that showcase who they are and they're Global perspectives in our own never change in World. Be sure to listen And subscribe to the absolute podcast on Spotify or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also follow at Affiliates podcast on all social media platforms see on listening to the news at this hour on Africa Business Radio. The European Parliament is endorsement serious candidates for the position of the director general of the World Health Organization. Dr. Ngozi. Okonjo-iweala. The parliament said, it's screened the two remaining candidates in the WTO DG race or conjure a viola and miss you monkey of South Korea and it's off Vince the Nigerian candidate has the energy and is built equipped for the job the AP in a letter on Wednesday signed by the co-chairs of the Parliamentary conference on the WTO stage in growth missed a band a long and mr. Bean. Simon said the European Parliament will satisfied with Oakland Rihanna's level of requirements and skills the urge the European Union express support, but he candidacy of the former World Bank director. And that was the news this time when I figured Business Radio, you can continue to listen life online at w w w dot Africa business radio.com or our mobile app. I am Rachel children to thank you for listening..

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:58 min | 2 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the media you know things that we don't normally have to think about so the European Parliament fact finding mission the the any peace heard these stories and came back and and pushed very hard for this for this motion now it's not binding on Joseph Muscat but it's certainly embarrassing and and you know this was an issue also last week in the European Council with him coming here there are people saying he should be arrested under criminal suspicion and you know no no leaders as far as we know said anything to him about his potential involvement in the murder everyone shaking hands with him while their protests going on by the way tributes to Daphne are swept away nightly in people's spend all night out there to protect them people have been saying now for the more than two years since she was killed that Muscat's office was involved listen to listen to one person the develop spoke with their on the streets the country has been caring for resignations hopping now the fact that he's saying for it to happen twenty twenty I don't think that this is going to be involved in the mastication many people don't he has to resign now for it to be here I don't like the service right now so again Keith what we've been hearing on the streets in Malta is now echoed in the streets in Strasbourg with European Parliament this week if they're saying that an investigation cannot be trustworthy unless Joseph must got stepped down not three weeks from now but now okay Terry thank you you're welcome to have a correspondent Terry shells talking to us from Brussels from the studios of Germany's international broadcaster D. W. this case inside Europe Hungary's ruling party has quickly push through controversial legislation impacting cultural organizations it'll give prime minister Viktor Orban's nationalist government more control over the nation's theaters artists and other critics say the new law as part of broader attempt to curtail creative and independent thinking and hungry arms out it will become more difficult for opposition parliamentarians to protest against these developments the government has also approved legislation increasing fines and penalties on lawmakers who disrupt legislative activities Stefan boss reports from Budapest tools here is the foundation of the nation this person says thousands echoed his sentiments on a rainy gloomy winter day in downtown Budapest artists publication politicians and others expressed their sadness and anger over what day say amounts to a government takeover of independent theaters the law was rushed through parliament in time for Christmas by legislatures supporting prime minister Viktor Orban it includes a bigger say four or bombs right wing nationalist government over the appointment of directors admissible theaters that receive central state funding many theaters the band on the state to operate tests they lacked the financial resources to work without government support in future the National Council culture will determine which institutions are culturally significant enough to receive financing for five years H. president will be appointed by the government the recently elected liberal leaning mayor of Budapest get a gay kind of Joan is furious he tells the crowd at the wall is a government to tend to punish the United opposition for its victories in the October municipal election of a I'm unhappy that I have to come on stage again because I believe that the podium just like culture is not for the politicians it belongs to the artist and their public but we know that everybody is being dictated to by the government we also know that it's mostly because of Budapest it's an attempt to punish us for the October thirteenth municipal election at that time the people of Budapest raise their heads out of the swamp they decided to vote to take back their city the Budapest mayor has the worst wealthy people in the capital to help finance the theaters and earlier this week he signed the free cities agreement with the mayors of capital cities in nearby countries Brock Warsaw in Bratislava like Budapest these capitals are all ruled by independent or opposition leaders got a Joan hopes their agreement will help them obtain direct funding from the European Union Hungary's culture bill which was rushed through parliament within days is narrower in scope than the government plant but it was only because the original proposals were leaked and drew condemnation from across the cultural scene however artist view the revised law as a further effort by Orban's ruling Fidesz party and it's Christian democratic allies to limit artistic freedom of expression and cultural autonomy until now theaters were among the last beacon self free speech and freedom of thought that's because many of the countries of mainstream and public media have been placed under the control of or bonds L. lice and the government has also increased its influence over education scientific research courts and even churches young Hungarian actress and he says Sodaro over the rough nanti me close theater is concerned about the future of her generation me my daughter sad hardening see about RTC movie say about you mean Hungary of the under thirty year old actors a lot of things could have divided us so just where we graduated from or who are class teacher laws or who we voted for but our generation works together as in the case of this cultural law under these rules we don't feel secure or see any future in our field thank you on the last ball into compares the current political climate to the situation three decades ago when hungry was a communist country we sell to multi party democracy so close and now have to connection we can see a repetition of the nineteen seventies with central control the censorship I've already been through that let's not have it again actress you did Paul Connie agrees with the month and the second issue is finished I was an actress in the nineteen sixties seventies and eighties after thirty years of democracy I didn't expect to be intimidated as I was back then but the streets may soon be the only place where there is space for real debate besides the new cultural law the prime minister's Fidesz anti Christian democratic coalition partners have also rush through legislation which you'll position has booked a muscle law it seeks to eliminate protest inside parliament for example fines for legislators who don't tell the line have been increased from six months salary to twelve months and suspensions have been increased from nine parliamentary sessions to a whopping sixty the European Union has expressed concern over the democratic credentials of hungry the member state but for now it remains to Hungarians themselves to show their discontent with the rapid changes here Stefan boss VW Budapest and I'm Keith Walker and Bonnie you're listening to inside Europe and green lines the winters are long and dark and it becomes difficult to travel because the ice closes in perhaps unsurprisingly people look forward to Christmas with special or relish actually burn has more on the Norwegian Christmas celebrations your well this is exactly is the world's most notably capital city and today almost all of it seventeen thousand inhabitants of gathered around a giant Christmas tree I'm thirty nine years old live in the capital city no with my family and three kids it's a big big celebration in our family the five exciting too what sense does come to town and lack of history and we have a seven month old little baby here so it's for the first time for her so this is going to see the three percent the snow is falling in the sun is already gone from the sky even though he's still a little before four o'clock in the afternoon children wearing mittens way sparklers in the ad on some to London the helicopter any now clubbers into a cherry picker be raised up to the Tippy top of the huge Christmas tree with a wink and a wave he turns on the Christmas lights we love the Christmas really March here in green and and my name is kiss in Harlem in Danish cheers but it increase led the they call me kiss debt and that I'm from nineteen fifty four yes there is a retired teacher who's lived in Greenland for most of her sixty five years when she was a child she and the cousins would gather at the grandparents house in the center of need each Christmas now she's a grandmother herself the days are shorter and the that's not so much right so we really love to decorate our homes yeah I will introduce you to especially around she saw the hand Hooters should have brought it to green and it's hanging on the windows in every home these are you start the policy of Greenland's connection to the houses the Arabian mission raising first brought Christianity to Greenland over two hundred years ago largely replacing in you at religious beliefs the style of go up on the first Sunday of advent and will shine out from windows across the country until epiphany on January the sixth you might be interesting about the things we eat during the Christmas the whole show arctic winters require a lot of energy to survive little can be grown here and so the traditional donkeys mainly fish and meat from Christmas Eve until the twenty sixth of December people faced on the animals of the north Islam soccer have yeah we have and dry court and snowed fish and smoked salmon and redfish and fried grenadier and the meat is she wearing Lucas skin and blood but during all question we have the rain kia and mushrooms and then then from all over Greenland years ago people in Greenland survive from hunting and gathering but these days everything in need arrives in shipping containers that leads to the town even the Christmas trees have to be important because it's too cold for them to grow here they save them from the from Denmark to it in six days ten new then we have them in the end of November and now they have put them up and we can buy them ourselves to our own homes my dream is to I can grow my own Christmas tree do okay and then put it out because I reserve fund of the trees but did it anyway it is that's how it is the trees are kept outside the home is right up until the evening of December the twenty third when they have brought inside and decorated after all the children are in bed when they wake up in the morning it's as if a beautiful tree is a paid by magic in the home or Carl singing is a big part of cultural life in Greenland and on Christmas day the choir is filled with churches with the Christmas Carol this is become a part of the national identity this whom is really the churches should all our hearts and they also seeing it in they're not when they have a eating you the to amounts of the wind to dock in a country blanketed in nice comes music full of human harmony and the twinkle of the Christmas.

Joseph Muscat European Parliament
"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The European Parliament in Brussels next year she plans to run for governor of the entire region of Tuscany two people generally NPR news Montecatini all right some bittersweet news from the world of K. pop this week at the sound of Korean pop supergroup BTS last weekend the seven member boy band announced that they're taking a break from releasing music and performing there are bands that are bad because we don't know how long to break it can be that's one fan email that he bar us is founder of the fan group U. S. B. T. S. army now BTS rose to stardom in twenty thirteen and became the first K. pop group to topped the US Billboard charts three times they're hoping to come back from this break stronger a press release from the label says BTS says the hiatus will give them a chance to quote recharge and prepare to present themselves a new virus said she thinks the break is a good thing you think that they get to take a long time off to really just do what they want be with their family and hang out with their friends for me it's very exciting who doesn't want a long time off as you can get it so there's no set end date for this break but U. S. B. T. S. army leader Jackie row Haas is not worry it's a little bit this is NPR news and you're listening to NPR news and morning edition and KQ we do public radio.

European Parliament Brussels founder Jackie row Haas NPR U. S. B. T. S. US U. S. B. T. S. army
"european parliament" Discussed on KDOW

KDOW

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KDOW

"European parliament. This is SR N news. Hello. I'm mot and sorry, host of market wrap president of Compaq acid panic. What a difference a day makes these markets. What will you be on the right side from one day to the next market volatility is the time when you need to remain the most rational about your investment decisions, yet, it is the time when investors become the most emotional and often, make devastating choices. If you need some help dial pound two five zero on your cell phone use the keyword talk to mow and ask for your free report on coping with market volatility. You can also make an appointment to meet with me for free portfolio review again, from your cellphone dial pound two five zero talk to mow and get your free report coping with market volatility asks for your free portfolio review. Also out management is a registered investment advisor. Funds custodian fidelity institutional well services, member FINRA SIPC. Sponsored by lifeline innovations and insurance solutions. I've got an important question for you. When was the last time you received in out of the box, creative investment idea from your financial advisor or accountant that was designed to get you better investment returns with less risk? Let me guess, never. My name is Katrina Talbot. The wife of Greg, Talbot, we work with one of the nation's largest law firms and put together, three extremely secure investments that will put against anything you can find all three have fixed future payout. They don't change value every day like the stock market and each has a track record of double digit returns, if you're tired of cookie-cutter financial plans, then we invite you to join the movement that we are creating this city and significantly improve your finances. Grab your cell phone and listen to a free recorded message. For more information, call eight hundred five one six eight zero eight two that's eight hundred five one six eight zero eight to call now. Eight hundred five one six eight.

advisor Katrina Talbot European parliament Compaq president Greg accountant one day
"european parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Institutions like the European Commission. Well, they so they want to take. Away. Mahindra pen says that the European Commission, which is the executive branch really of the U is not democratic enough. They want to take away some of their most of their of its its powers and give it more to the European parliament. And it's interesting because mine lupin had been talking about fricks it. So France, leaving the EU and leaving the euro even up until the 2017 presidential election. And she's clearly changed tack now when you ask her about this, she says that it's because the wind is at third back people like Salvini or bun are in power in Poland, they are going forward. And so they now have a significant block to change the EU from within and to make it reflect the sovereignty of the nation states, as opposed to going towards more federalism, as she puts it, which is what she thinks the McCall camp really wants to do until king of president Emmanuel Macron can just see spying. Over your shoulder that through the railings, lots of posters as a his list with his face on them quite little them. Certainly head height have been been crossed out seven million. There's lots of graffiti artists who certainly don't like to be seeing Emmanuel Macron's face here. We'll talk a bit more about the election here in fronts. In particular later on news day, the extent to which it's been a referendum or for or against Emmanuel Macron himself, the way in which those yellow, vests protests, the Geos yawn protests, have had an effect on that as well. Really important to talk about that as we continue our conversations here on the balcony on the EU European parliament elections here on me. You're listening to Newsday from the BBC with Ben.

Emmanuel Macron European Commission EU European parliament European parliament EU Mahindra France Newsday Poland executive McCall BBC president
"european parliament" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on AP News

"Fill the European parliament thousands attended a rally in Berlin Friday when mostly young. People waved banners with flogging such as they is no planet b will plant trees, save the bees, clean, the sees many protests will be too young to vote when Germans cost by, let's on Sunday in the European parliament election, but they're pressing family and old friends to consider the world's long term future. AP radio news. I'm Ed Donahue. President Trump is setting in motion an investigation by attorney general William bar into the investigators looked into his campaign and ties with Russia. The soccer megani has the story, the president's given bar broad new powers to review and potentially release classified information in a bid to undermine the special counsel, probes findings classified, I guess, but densely millions of pages of documents. I don't know what it is. I have no idea he'd already ordered the intelligence community to fully cooperate with bar. Former intelligence officials and Democrats are criticizing the move which give bar unilateral power to unseal documents. The Justice department says storage regarded as its most secretive, including warrants obtained from the foreign intelligence surveillance court saga megani Washington before leaving for the White House. President Trump also said, fifteen hundred more troops. Are being sent to the Middle East? I don't think Iran wants to fight, and I certainly don't think they wanna fight with us a senior Pentagon, officer says the US blames Iran and its proxies for the recent tanker, bombings near the United Arab Emirates and a rocket attack in Iraq. A nineteen billion dollar disaster relief Bill has been blocked in the house. I respect respectfully object. Objection is heard Texas Republican ship ROY objects because the Bill does not include money for a border wall. We've had months to figure this out and to do our job to secure our border and we now are expected to let the swamp continue to mortgage, the future of our children and grandchildren making it less likely. They won't Aharon a stronger and better country. Democrats say the house might try to again pass the measure next week. Floodwaters from the Missouri river have topped the Levy at Jefferson City and shut down some streets around the state capital. The city's airport has already been evacuated. Jefferson City was hit by a powerful tornado earlier this week. This is AP radio news. New abortion restrictions in Missouri had been signed into law, Missouri. Governor Mike parson is signed a Bill that bans abortions honor beyond the eighth week of pregnancy without exceptions for cases of rape, or incest. That makes it among the most restrictive abortion policies in the nation that law goes into effect, late this summer, but a legal challenge is expected. Missouri state house. Democratic minority leader Christo Quaid said in a written statement, the law treats women, quote, as little more than fetal incubators with no rights or role in the decision, even in cases of rape, or incest. I'm Shelley antler chair of the House Judiciary committee, Jerry Nadler was taken to a hospital for an evaluation after he appeared to swoon during a news conference in New York City as people move to help him Nadler, put his hand to his head and appeared disoriented then seemed to recover after just a few minutes. The seventy one year old Nadler was speaking, an alert telling people near him, he was okay..

Jerry Nadler William bar White House President Trump AP Bill Jefferson City European parliament president Missouri Missouri river House Judiciary committee Berlin Middle East Governor Mike parson rape Ed Donahue Iran Christo Quaid soccer
"european parliament" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:37 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KCRW

"E a United Europe, the first two countries to vote are the UK and the Netherlands, Jennifer Baker is based in Brussels where she covers e you policy. Hi, hi, how are you? Good. Thanks. Okay. So you're just outside the European parliament now. Hence the birds sounds quite peaceful. But, but there's a lot of chaos happening right now in this election. Right. I mean, describe what is going to what could happen if Europe's far, right, nationalist win a lot of seats. Well, that's what we're expecting me are expecting to see a bit of a swing to the far might the last time, we had European elections was five years ago, things a little bit more measured. Than sort of different times, as it were politics has changed a lot in five years. So what we expect to see a lot of these fringe sort of eurosceptic parties gained, a lot of the votes in possibly in most members eight certainly inside of the bigger more obvious skeptical countries. And the question then is whether they will be able to work together in the future on the European parliament, and that is much less certain. Even if all the predictions come true on their visit this big swing tonight. There are certain luth's at the European parliament applies to decide whether you can form a political group that has to be a representation from different Member States that are quotas to meet now it's likely that they will meet the quotas. There's already a far right-wing group if you like, but that group in the past has been plagued by squabbling, once you get beyond that the sort of big issue. You know, we don't like the EU. They break down a lot on a lot of these other smaller issues. So there is there is sort of a tricky balance for those parties to strike, especially as many of them will be coming to the European Union's center here in Brussels. For the first time. You know how these things work there's a lot of pilot played a lot of struggles. And if not experience out, you know, groups do fall apart. They break up new political groups that formed all the time. Okay. So that is quite an interesting idea. If you have someone like Matteo Salvini from Italy, working with marine Le Pen from France and geared Villiers from the Netherlands, what do they agree on besides the fact that they really don't like a United Europe? Well, we'll, they don't like on tens to fold to these sort of far right areas. They dislike immigration. They say that the, the EU institutions as it were are too lenient on, on my Gration that they won't they sort of object to some of the burden-sharing arrangements in, in taking in migrants. They also some of them, adopt won't see more fiscal's hands off approach, they will to scare Mungo quite a lot about this idea of a European army, but that is genuinely quite scaremongering. No one's really suggests about. But you know, they can use this sort of rhetoric to whip up very anti-european sentiment. Well, so let's say they do when a substantial voting block, and they are able to work together. What would be their first priority when it comes to? Reshaping EU policy. Would it be cracking down on immigration? I mean, they're not really the conscious simply go out and do that. I mean, the way the European parliament works is that they have to vote on laws that are proposed by the European Commission now since the Lisbon Treaty, they actually do have quite a big say in that, formerly, the European parliament was was very much to stay ceremonial sort of rubber-stamping organization. Now they have committees and they have leads and they have chairs of these committees. And they've what we call reputa- and they go through the process of altering the laws as being proposed, and it's a line by line paragraph-by-paragraph job, which is actually very Tarsem, if all you want to do is, think about the big picture, but what they can do they can hold up what's going on. The can hold up the work of the parliament. They can full straight those committees and getting their jobs done by asking for things to be sent back for second-leading asking for bills to be sent back to the legal services. For more amendments so they can actually just disrupt the general working of the European parliament, which is what it seems likely most of them will seek to do in terms of things like countries, leaving the EU, which is, as we've seen. With Brexit big issue. There's no powers within the European parliament for them to, to go any way down the vote to, to making that happen. That happens at a national level and also things like migration. There will be a committee within the European parliament that will have a say on migration little, but although it will have to approve any new any, any new legislation on the matter, or any new agreement or guidelines that we say it doesn't right that, and it doesn't that desire early step the boundaries of that. I'm not a lot of that. Ben is back to the European Council, which is made up of the leaders of the Member States. So a lot of this is just nipping at the heels of the overall e you institutions, the idea that, you know that, you know, light wing, maybe could bring down the EU. So it's worth noting that they can they can disrupt things, but whether they'll be able to work together to coherently have a major impact on damaging the new processes, you would need to have a lot of faith in the abilities of a lot of people who have no experience to think about my happen. Well, let's talk about the UK in particular voting today and, of course, Brexit. That is looming in the foreground of that vote. Is this seen as another referendum kind of on Brexit? Absolutely. It'll be read very much as a bellwether for Walt. The people think it's not a second referendum in itself is so contentious. But yes, I think if you, you do some very crude on, on it, you will be able to say most people won't a Brexit, a hard Brexit. They just get out of Europe. Get on with it on other people won't you know, they won't remain. They want a second amendment. They want the chance to, to say we would like to stay in Europe. It's going to be very difficult to actually work out. What it means. That's Theresa May Jeremy Corbyn. They don't know what they won't. So it's kind of it's, it's, it's a very difficult idea that we could work out from the votes for those people who don't they won't let the people vote for the won't. Yes, it is all very confusing. Next up, kind of like a milkshake except like a milkshake. And I refer to that because Nigel rush was doused by milkshake earlier this week by an anti Brexit here, he if he wins, if not Joe Frazier wins reelection to the European parliament, as he said, in that clip that we just heard he doesn't want to fulfill his term, his the next five years, he wants to be out because he wants Britain to be out. So, yeah, I mean what is he going to do? In the meantime, what's his what's his point being there? I mean, if he doesn't believe in the whole concept of it. Why run at all? Why be there at all? Well as opposed he sees it as a position of high profile. It's a position of power. You know he gets to stand up in the European parliament during the debates on shout at the pro, you people on grandstand and make his points right in the heart of Europe, which, you know, is he's a very powerful image. So I, I mean obviously plays everything with one eye to the domestic audience to highs to his domestic audience. But, you know, if these are the elections, he's got to fight, you know, he has his famous for the national elections in the UK, something like eight times in his failed to be elected so he can win the European election. And I suppose in a sense if you're the EU make that noise heard when you're in the European elections, and maybe deal with more domestic matters when you're voting in general election so aids about the symbolism of it, well than about any practicalities, right? So, meanwhile, back at home Theresa May, she's encountering her own difficulties. And I guess she was going to put or she talked about possibly putting forward a second referendum. That seems to be not McCarthy right now. What is in the cards for? She said, she would allow the parties to the MP's to vote on the second referendum. I don't I don't know what time this goes out tonight, whether she'll actually still being a job or not. It's minute by minute with Theresa May at the moment, we're hearing a lot of speculation that she may well, announcer resignation tomorrow, Friday morning, because the Willie so much that the Tories our party will have been crushed in the European elections in they according to some pose, and some pundits their own track to do the worst they've done in years in a generation. So, you know, she's presided over this task. Oh, no one's happy with her. So she has said she will leave, but she sort of says she also wants to get Brexit done before. She goes the prospect of that seems ever more remote. And I think we're counting Theresa May's tenure in days not in weeks. Jennifer Baker, isn't you policy journalist, based in Brussels. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. Well, the Trump administration is backing off plans to put Harriet.

European parliament European Union Europe Theresa May Brussels UK Jennifer Baker Brexit European army United Europe Netherlands European Council European Commission Matteo Salvini Walt Mungo MP reputa
"european parliament" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:39 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Member of the European parliament for southeast England when most articulate members of western civilized life. He's really fantastic. He's gonna stop by talk. Brexit. We are also going to be talking about Bernie Sanders picking up all the steam in the democratic presidential race. But right now, we are joined by Bishop Robert Barron. His under of word on fire Catholic ministries is also the author of series of books all of them wonderful Bishop Perrin, thanks for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Grandparents me, so I just wanted to have you on to talk a little bit about the situation that not for what is the latest that you've heard from Paris the last I heard was the damage was not quite as bad as we had feared yesterday. You know, I was most concerned about the rose windows, which are the great jewels of that place as far as I can tell all three have been spared now, maybe there's been some damage to them. But I was delighted to hear that. And at the major structure of the play seems to be integral still intact. They spin. Irritant the most precious relics, including the crown of thorns out of it. So that's all very good, news know, looks like they're just replace the roof, and the spire, and, you know, firm things up, but I was I was a lot more encouraged this morning than I was yesterday, Tim Bishop baron. What did you think of the public, you know, sort of outpouring of love as the as the cathedral burned? It was it was pretty astonishing from all sides of the political aisle to watch people really more the destruction of the cathedral. It was amazing. I heard the news I was coming down to one and one expressway to go to our cathedral in LA for a big day of prayer with all the president and the word came through, you know, and then right away. I was called by by NBC, and they were asking me about it. So I just gave my first impressions. But then there was so much interest in the part of the news agencies. It did surprise me. But, but, you know, clearly Notre down has been singing to people across the ages, and it continues to do that and a lot of different levels. So a lot of people loved the arts that love western civilization. They love Paris. You know, obviously as a Catholic it has a very profound resonance and someone myself I lived in Paris for three years. I was fifteen minute walk from Notre Dame. I used to give tours there. So I very DOD personal connection to it. But I was impressed and kind of edified by the extraordinary interest. So Bishop there maybe a little bit about the particularly importance of Notre Dame to Catholics specifically. And then I wanna talk a little bit about it's important to western civilization. More broadly. But obviously, it is a Catholic institution. So what does it mean specifically to Catholics? Well, you know, I see this been in west on your program. We talked a lot about the Jewish roots of of Christianity. And when I used to give tours Notre Dahmer, I go. Visit my Old Testament imagination was always deeply stirred because it's covered inside and out with depictions of Old Testament figures and the Notre Dom in question, right? Our Lady is Miriam of Nazareth. You know, so there's an Israelite young woman who stands at the heart of Peruvian civilization, which in many ways means that the heart of western civilization. And I find that really fascinating. The cathedral in its structure in its art in its in its resonance speaks of the deep Jewish roots of Christianity, which in turn has shaped so much of civilization of the west. It's it's the incarnation. I would say that's why Miriam of Nazareth is being so highlighted the vehicle through which the word became flesh, you know. And then I think that's the master idea of so much of western civilization. So I think that's what that plays Notre Dame Our Lady, and he was part of that explosion of devotion to the bus mother that happened in the late twelfth early thirties century and gave rise to you know, Omnium Beauvais of Chartres, all these great places. One of the first being noted on the Paris. It also speaks of the university culture. I think because that's where the cathedral school was originally the time of Abba lard before that building was Bill. But that's where the students came from all. All over Europe. They were drawn there. They spilled over on the left Bank still called the county Latin because they spoke Latin there in the schools, and then it becomes the root of the university of Paris one of the most important universities in the world. You know? So I think Notre Dame also has that very intellectual overtone all those reasons. Power one of the things so astonishing about notes Adamas people you look back at when it was built and it was built between the twelfth fourteenth centuries and it took two centuries built which is an astonishing achievement all of its own. It shows the religious devotion that says that you have to actually think beyond your own lifespan when you're trying to build some service to got, but people tend to have this perverse of history where they think that basically nothing happened between the fall of the Roman empire and the rise of the renaissance and this is built squarely before the rise of the renaissance in the middle of the so-called dark ages. They can talk a little bit about the fake history that we've all been taught about the dark ages that really isn't true. Yeah. I'll tell you one thing I think for much. Of the west, you know, now, it's secular form, the the sacred narrative is darkness until but see the late eighteenth century, the great political revolutions here in France that they constitute you're one in a way, you know, what the very presence of this building gives the lie to that theory of history. You know for us as Christians seventeen nine eight year one go back at least now to eleven eighty nine when the building was built, but they go way back behind that to the three hundreds when Santoni brings the face to Paris, go back behind that to a squabble little hill outside Jerusalem, where Miriam of Nazareth's Noto Dom is Neely at the foot of a Roman cross. We'd say that year one the dying and rising of Jesus. But to say, the dying rising of Jesus is to say now, Jeremiah Isaiah Abraham Isaac. Jacob is say all of Judaism, which we find fulfilled in Christ. That's the view of history that I would. Take you know and see the decisive moment as thirty three AD not seventeen eighty nine. And you know, the dark ages give me a break the the period that produced Thomas acquaintance, Notre Dame cathedral and Dante's divine comedy, call it whatever you want. But dark is not the right word, you know. So that's a that's a very narrow of secularized view of history is crazy. I don't mean to suck you into the typical kind of Twitter controversies of the day, but I will point out that I've ever seen enormous flack for suggesting that Notre Dame is in fact, a monument to western civilization, which was built on the Judeo Christian heritage a lot of people are very upset with me. There are some Catholics who are upset because they feel that I'm not being specific enough about the Catholic heritage of Notre Dame. Which of course, I would never mean to downplay. I mean that is what the building is. But beyond that there. Bunch of folks on the left who are suggesting that it should be appreciated only for its art and architecture. I feel like that misses the deeper points over why there was a story in the nation. When this thing was on fire. Right. Both views are crazy because on the one hand to say Catholicism is indeed to say Judaism, you can't understand Catholicism apart from Judaism. So it's not an either. Or by any means, you know, it's a it's a crisis fulfillment of the expectation of Israel. So of course, you're gonna say Judeo Christian, of course, it's grounded in something that goes back to is AM, Jeremiah the other reading, of course, is just. Insane. The the the of of Catholicism that Christianity of of Notre Dame. I miss just that's indisputable. I mean, so and both those readings are insane Bissett. Thanks for joining the show. I really appreciate your perspective on the importance of Notre Dame. Obviously everyone's prayers are with the Catholic community not only in France. But across the world because there are a lot of places where Catholics are under attack. And I think that you know, we can only hope that the building the structure will be built in more glory than it was originally built. You know, what the what the plans are for the rebuilding at this point. It's just so early. The only thing that alarm me a little bit. I did hear president Macron talk about building. In light of our present day. You know, multicultural sensibility. Tightened. When I heard that. I'd be very happy. If they just looked at photographs and built it the way it was, you know, so, but but having said that I was delighted to see so many people responding with, you know, huge donations. And so I I do hope they rebuild it and they rebuild it as it was. That's my hope I really appreciate your time Bishop bear, and again thoughts and prayers are going out in in money, by the way, they're going out to to the Catholic church rebuild. What is one of the grandest and most inspirational sites in western civilization, Bishop Robert founder of word on fire Catholic ministries. Thanks so much for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Really? Appreciate your time. God bless your quite welcome. As we continue. We'll be talking about an article from Andrew McCarthy who suggests that the Obama administration had a shady plan to spy on the Trump campaign. We'll get to that in just one second. I when President Trump says that America will never be a socialist country. We certainly all hope that he is. Right. And that's why it is. So troubling that a proposal from the department of health and human services would move in that direction, the international drug pricing. Insects would adopt socialist price control. All set by foreign countries today. Americans get access to cutting edge therapies for diseases like cancer, nearly two years before other countries and the future holds incredible promise for fighting diseases like Alzheimer's and MS the HHS proposal would cripple America's world leading medical innovation. We'd have fewer new cares. They'd be harder to obtain..

Notre Dame Paris Notre Dame cathedral Tim Bishop baron Ben Shapiro Jeremiah Isaiah Abraham Isaac France Bishop Robert Barron Miriam of Nazareth Bishop Perrin Bernie Sanders European parliament southeast England NBC department of health cathedral school Adamas university of Paris
"european parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Kingdom to hold European parliament elections. I got. That would be the right outcome. House the house needs to face up to the consequences. I'm sorry too. Don't you no matter what you think about her or whatever don't USA guys litter talk. She has no voice. So there's an extension vote tomorrow. Meanwhile, the EU is growing restless guy verte Stott is a European Brexit official against every extension when an extension of one day one week even twenty four hours if it is not based on a clear opinion of the house of Commons for something that we know what day walked and Bloomberg's Maria today. Oh says you feels mounting dangerous. Of the EU the chances of a no do Brexit have actually resin that is what Michele Bonny told the European parliament today, but also just all around there's many people here and also just Brussels officials and the technocrats in the eurocrats, but also hairpin leaders who think we need to move four. The divorce is scheduled for the twenty ninth. US secretary of state Mike Pompeo says China's in a league of its own with regard to human rights violations today. More than one million waders, ethnic Kazakhs and other Muslims are interred in reeducation camps designed to raise their religious and ethnic identities. And California's governor Gavin Newsom has put a moratorium on the death penalty to line people up to be execute pre meditated state-sponsored executions one awake for over fourteen years. That's a choice we can make all we can make. I think a more enlightened choice. Now that actually flies contrary to the vote passed state law there will be legal actions in San Francisco, I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. All right guys back to you. Thank.

Bloomberg EU European parliament USA verte Stott Gavin Newsom Mike Pompeo Michele Bonny Brussels Ed Baxter California San Francisco Maria China official twenty four hours
"european parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:56 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To Brexit. Just over seven weeks before the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but still no agreement among British politicians about how it's going to happen. The Prime Minister Theresa may need concessions from the EU over how the border with Ireland is dealt with principally. The concessions are not being offered easily businesses a busy stockpiling materials which just weeks to go some government MP's now meeting to come up with a range of alternative solutions as to attack new is watching this from his position as a member of the European parliament for the eurosceptic, you Kip party welcome to the program, Mr. or any of these negotiations going to be conclusive in any way. What's your prediction? Well, traditionally get you love to take things to the wire with late night, meetings, etc. And everybody coming out claiming victory at some stage. The political posturing has to give way to the needs of the citizens of the year, and we are heading as well as to negotiations European Harlem until elections where those in the U who expert Britain and their livelihoods depend on. It will not be very happy. If they find terrorist getting some. The the biggest victim of all of this. Of course is the country of Ireland day going to take the biggest hit. But there is a way out. And that is for the the two policies to instigate or article twenty four of the GATT the gap is the old name for the WTO agreement for terrorists. Okay. So so having just got used to article fifty and giving everyone a headache on that one. You now chucking in article twenty four can you explain in simple terms? That's going to go on right? This stops the cliff edge. This allows appeared up to ten years for the two policies to establish either a customs union or a free trade area. This is after a disorderly exit or an exit. No, no, no. No, no. This is the whole point of this. The whole point is is is to stop a cliff edge disorderly exit. That's the whole point of it. The the the GATT will the WTO the cells. They have is to make trade easier. I understand that people suddenly moving from one to another these problems. So they have this article trendy fool to allow for saw smoothie change. And it does seem to tick all the boxes. Okay. Now. What why hasn't? This been spoken about more loudly. I've been covering this quite a lot. And I have to say article twenty four is a bit new on me. Yes, she wants to me up until about food eight days ago. So why is now I'm being talking about this? Then if this is the magic bullet, I can't tell you why they've been silent on it. But it really does appear to to do exactly what we want which is to to make this process smoother there off rules, and it doesn't really particularly tough. Ru in that you must not during this period, which can be up to ten years when you're negotiating with the other countries, you mustn't make things tougher because the WTO wars wants to make things easier. Okay. All right. Well, that's that's a note of optimism. I suppose you mentioned to you. The elections. Can I just ask? Because some of our listeners might be thinking, wait a minute. Mr. Agnew is a member of the European parliament. He's just being campaigning vigorously basically to remove his own job. What happens if this process that we would be the purpose is what is so good about this. I feel is we do leave the European Union. Yes, political struck which interestingly, then means happens to you. You're quite happy for your job to dissolve and disappear. Well, that's what we've been campaigning for. And that's that's exactly what we wanted. We took our seats and everything untold members in we are campaigning for our own redundancy. That's that's actually, well, I wish you weren't. Happy redundancy, Mr. Agnew. Thank you for coming on and enlightening us to the article twenty four th a possible alternative that may be of interest to the group of conservative government. Members of parliament who are gathering for the next three days to come up with alternatives. They called the alternative arrangements working group. Let's hope they look at article twenty four as well, Stuart Agnew soon. He hopes no longer to be MVP in the European parliament for you kit. Many thanks. Let's stay with Brexit. Japanese carmaker Nissan has dealt a blow to those hoping that Brexit will lead to strengthen for a strength for the British economy. Philip is on the business desks are not good news there either. No. The Japanese automakers cited ongoing down about the UK split from the European Union and its decision to scrap plans to build a new vehicle model in the United Kingdom at it. Sunderland plant. Jonathan challenge is a member of the executive over at the European Bank for reconstruction and development, which helps countries in companies with growing economies through investment. I asked him what he makes of Nissan's move. I don't think we should be at all surprised by this announcement because you've got to remember, of course, Nissan came to Sunderland came to the United Kingdom precisely because it wanted friction this trade all that is uncertain right now friction this trade would require any staying in the customs union, but also in the single market, and it's very unclear as Nisar made absolutely played in that statement very unclear what is going to happen in the months ahead and on top of that. Of course, they have tough times with the diesel market. The extra was meant to be a diesel vehicle. It would require diesel engines. They don't know what the future for diesel is either. Except it's going to be probably more highly taxed more difficult to sell diesel cars. So you've got all those things coming together the need to take decision if they'd have had more Brexit clarity. They probably would have waited that they think now they really have to take action. This comes just a couple of days after the in king of the EU Japan trade deal compulsively via coincidence. I think that the Japanese are very correct you spend some time in Japan on I've spoken to to a fair number of people from Japan. And from Japanese business, they will be very blunt. They say that the one thing they do not like is uncertainty. There is this trade agreement. They wouldn't have wanted to embarrass the British government before the trade agreement. But I think as we're saying other Japanese companies doing they all have to think about future profitability, and they need to have a base inside. What will be the EU twenty-seven inside the single market. If the UK is not going. Have a single market agreement. And because they don't know whether it will not you'll see more and more companies thinking about what the future looks like either moving their headquarters oversee we've had people like Sony doing that. Into the EU twenty-seven or thinking about where future production goes. And it's quite interesting with Nissan. They're not saying they will get rid of existing workers. They will slow down existing production. This is all about future expansion where expansion happens and clearly is not going to happen in Sunland, which interestingly enough, of course, was the indicator on the night of the referendum in twenty sixty and in the United Kingdom of where that vote was going because it was Sunderland that voted to leave even though it was heavily dependent on companies like Nestle Jonathan Charles their the many, thanks sports headlines now with Alistair Ross. Good morning. Good morning at eight all surprising about sir. Tom Brady at the moment. He has just when I record sake Super Bowl title of Forty-one-year-old leading the New England Patriots to a thirteen three victory over the LA Rams in Atlanta. That's also the patriots sick title moving them level with the Pittsburgh Steelers as the NFL's most. Decorated franchise. Elsewhere footballer Hakim, El Arabi will remain in custody after appearing in court to fight extradition to his native Bahrain. He'd been playing in Australia after being granted asylum there, but was arrested on an international warrant when he arrived in Thailand on honeymoon pep Guardiola is hoping that West Ham can do his Manchester City side a favor in Monday night's game. The hammers are hosting leaders Liverpool city cut Liverpool's lead in the Premier League to just two points on Sunday with Sergio Queiro scoring his fourteenth club hat trick in a three one win over arsenal. Manchester United have moved above Austin now as well into fifth in the table. Thanks to their one nil win at LeicesteR. And it's been a major shock in the opening group stage games of the African confederation Cup. Kenyan champions Goma have come from behind to beat five time African Champions League. When is the side eventually losing two in Nairobi many. Thanks. Twenty past the hour. Now, let's talk about Twenty-one.

European Union European parliament WTO United Kingdom Nissan Stuart Agnew Brexit Ireland GATT Sunderland UK Harlem Prime Minister Japan Manchester United LeicesteR Britain Goma Theresa
"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:57 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Counting down to Brexit. Just seven weeks before the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but still no agreement among British politicians about how it's going to happen. The Prime Minister Theresa may need concessions from the EU over how the border with Ireland is dealt with principally. The concessions are not being offered easily. Businesses are busy stockpiling materials. And we're just weeks to go some government MP's now meeting to come up with a range of alternative solutions as she would new is watching this from his position as a member of the European parliament for the eurosceptic, you Kip party, welcome to the program. Mr. are any of these negotiations going to be conclusive in any way? What's your prediction? Well, traditionally the love to take things running to the wire with late night meetings etcetera and everybody coming out claiming victory at some stage. The political posturing has to give way to the needs of the citizens of the year and heading as well as negotiations European parliament elections where those in the who expert Britain and their livelihoods depend on. It will not be very happy. If they find terrorist raised getting some, but the the biggest victim of all of this. Of course is the country of Ireland. They are going to take the biggest hit. But there is a way out matches for the the two policies to instigate or article twenty four of the GATT the gap is the old name for the WGN. Agreement for terrorists. And okay. So so having just got used to article fifty and giving everyone a headache on that one. Now checking in article twenty four can you explain in simple terms? Go on. Right. This stops the cliff edge. This allows a period of up to ten years for the two politics to establish either a customs union or a free trade area. This is a disorderly exit or an exit without no, no, no. This is the whole point of this. The whole point of this is to stop a cliff edge dishonorably exit. That's the whole point of it. The the the the GATT will the WTO d cells. They have is to make trade easier understand that people suddenly moving from one to another these problems. So they have this article twenty four to allow a for saw smoothie change, and it does seem to tick all the boxes. Okay. Now. Why why hasn't? This been spoken about more loudly. I've been covering this quite a lot. And I have to say article twenty four is a bit new on me. Yes. It wants to me up until about eight days ago. So why is now I'm being talking about this? Then if this is the magic bullet. I can't tell you why they've been silent on it. But it really does appear to to do exactly what we want which is to to make this process smooth. They're off rules, and it doesn't really particularly tough. Ru in that you must not during this period, which can be up to ten years. When negotiating with the other countries, you mustn't make things tougher because the WTO wars wants to make things easier. Okay. All right. Well, that's that's a note of optimism. I suppose you mentioned you mentioned about the elections. Can I just ask? Because some of our listeners might be thinking, wait a minute. Mr. Agnew is a member of the European parliament. He's just been campaigning vigorously basically to remove his own job. What happens if this process? That we would decide you know, the purpose is what what is so good about this. I feel is we do leave the European Union. Yes. The political struck. Yeah. Which which interestingly, then means what happens to you. You're quite happy for your job to dissolve and disappear. Oh, yeah. Well, that's what we've been campaigning for. And that's exactly what we wanted. We took our seats and everything and told members in we are campaigning for redundancy. That's that's actually, well, I wish you a happy, redundancy, Mr. Agnew. Thank you for coming on an enlightening us as to the article twenty four th a possible alternative that may be of interest to the group of conservative that is government members of parliament who are gathering for the next three days to come up with alternatives. They called the alternative arrangements working group. Let's hope they look at article twenty four as well, Stuart Agnew soon. He hopes no longer to be MVP. In the European parliament for you kit. Many thanks. Let's stay with Brexit. Japanese carmaker Nissan has dealt a blow to those hoping that Brexit will to strengthen for a strength for the British economy. Philip is on the business desks are not good news there either. No, the Japanese automakers cited ongoing down so the UK split from the European Union and its decision to scrap plans to build a new vehicle model in the United Kingdom at Sunderland plant. Jonathan challenge is a member of the executive over at the European Bank for reconstruction and development, which helps countries in companies with growing economies through investment. I asked him what he makes of Nissan's move. I don't think we should be at all surprised by this announcement because you've got to remember, of course, Nissan came to Sunderland came to the United Kingdom precisely because it wanted friction this trade all that is uncertain right now friction this trade would require any staying in the customs union, but also in the single market, and it's. Very unclear as Nisar made absolutely played in that statement very unclear what is going to happen in the months ahead and on top of that. Of course, they have tough times with the diesel market. The extra was meant to be a diesel vehicle. It would require diesel engines, they don't know what the future for diesel is either. Except it's going to be probably more highly taxed more difficult to sell diesel cars. So you've got all those things coming together the need to take a decision if they'd have had more Brexit clarity. They probably would have waited that they think now they really have to take action. This comes just a couple of days after the king of the e u Japan trade deal that come possibly be a coincidence. I think that the Japanese are very correct you spend some time in Japan have spoken to to a fair number of people from Japan. And from Japanese business, they will be very blunt. They say that the one thing they do not like is uncertainty. There is this trade agreement. They wouldn't have wanted to embarrass the. British government before the trade agreement. But I think as we're seeing other Japanese companies doing they all have to think about future profitability, and they need to have a base inside. What will be the EU twenty-seven inside the single market if the UK is not going to have a single market agreement. And because they don't know whether it will not you'll say more and more companies thinking about what the future looks like either moving their headquarters, obviously we've had people like Sony doing that into the EU twenty seven or thinking about where future production goes. And it's quite interesting with Nissan. They're not saying they will get rid of existing workers. They will slow down existing production. This is all about future expansion where expansion happens and clearly is not going to happen in Sunland, which interestingly enough, of course, was the indicator on the night of the referendum in two thousand sixty in the United Kingdom of where that vote was going because it was Sunland that voted to leave even though it was heavily. Dependent on companies like Nusa Jonathan Charles therapy. Many. Thanks for sports headlines now with Alistair Ross. Good morning. Good morning at eight is all unsurprising about, sir. Tom Brady at the moment. He has just won I record sake Super Bowl title of Forty-one-year-old leading the New England Patriots to a thirteen three victory over the Rams in Atlanta. That's also the patriots sick title moving them level with the Pittsburgh Steelers as the NFL's most decorated franchise. Elsewhere footballer Hakim will remain in Thai custody after appearing in court to fight extradition to his native Bahrain. He's been playing in Australia after being granted asylum there, but was arrested on an international warrant when he arrived in Thailand on honeymoon pep Guardiola is hoping that West Ham can do his Manchester City side favor in Monday night's game. The hammers are hosting leaders Liverpool city cut the lead in the Premier League to just two points on Sunday with Sergio Aguayo scoring his fourteenth club hat trick. In a three one win over arsenal. Manchester united. Have moved above arsenal. Now as well into fifth in the table. Thanks to their one nil win at LeicesteR. And it's been a major shock in the opening group stage games of the African confederation Cup Kenyan champions Goma. Here have come from behind to beat five time African Champions League. When it's the inside eventually losing four two in Nairobi. Many. Thanks. Twenty past the hour. Now, let's talk about Twenty-one savage..

European Union United Kingdom European parliament Nissan Stuart Agnew Brexit Ireland GATT WTO Japan Britain Sunland Prime Minister Manchester WGN LeicesteR Theresa Philip African Champions League
"european parliament" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"european parliament" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Have to return a new set of the European parliament in may. And I also not yet been enough recognition of the way that the second referendum could damage social cohesion by undermining faith. The prime minister saves me going through the motions of accepting the results, but in reality is in deep denial. The logic of that you saw defeat the prime minister must change our red lines because current deal is undeliverable. Paul. We will continue with the verbal hurly-burly. But if parliament gets control of the Brexit timetable, and or Corbin tables a second referendum is that throw grass for a soft. Oh, Brexit slash potentially. No Brexit asshole. Sounds like you know, what Britain needs just like a hole in the head to be honest with you. We said actually, the the form of Brexit. And whether the study whether to remain is much less important than actually just getting this this whole round hole day process over because the more drags than the more damage. It actually does. It's far more damaging than any of the consequences of any of the proposals that are on the table. And and it's really hard to see what a second referendum could actually achieve because. So you just dragging it out, you know, even going to get a consensus on what questions should be on the on the second. Ballot paper a lot of people forget that most of the polls are showing that the single most popular option at the moment is deal, and that's probably not even going to be on the ballot paper. So this is. Theresa Theresa May really needs to have a psycho analysis done by by Stein because she just repeating the same thing over and over again. And that I understand this clinical definition of insanity. If you're expecting a different outcome from it. So people are just standing up saying the same sound soundbites over and over ad nauseam. And the only thing that's happening is the is the clock ticking. And somebody's going to have to decide something probably in a blind panic sometime between now and March twenty nine. It's no good Paul folks at the folks that Goldman Sachs only see at ten percent chance of a heartbreak since you look at what the money's been doing GT go for our clients. This is a chart that looks at the mid cap socks in UK, and how they've actually been relatively outperforming. Shows that investors are not really overly frightened of no deal. Brexit. I want to know from you, Paul. How are you training? You chaos at the moment. I think the one thing that we're interested in sterling it's now at a level where we think it's reasonable when it was one twenty five to the dollar. We thought it was cheap at one twenty eight twenty nine it's it's probably about right? It's it's certainly got more long-term upside. Even if if we get no deal, you definitely see a week a pound, and that would be a massive buying opportunity. And there's a few a few assets in the UK that we think are starting to approach reasonable value. Particularly some of the some of the UK listed property companies the land securities and people like that on a year basis, they look incredibly cheap right now. So there's there's bits and pieces way you can go and pick. Honestly, the fact that really nobody knows what's going to happen. When it's going to happen. You've got to be pretty committed to buying something that you're still going to be happy holding in a year or two or three if groundhog day Brexit is still carrying on. That stage. But I can give you a postcode. But it won't do it on television where there are acids tonight twenty percent cheaper than when I left about ten months ago, and that's in the housing market. Paul. Can I ask you? There is a data sweep today. It's about four point one percent is about wages three point three percent. Does the data matter at all Paul? Or would it only matter when we're past the hard of let's say Brexit date d day at the end of March. I think that's the real point. It's nobody's looking at anything else. Everybody is is so consumed by focusing on. The minutiae that say probably automatically on that important of the Brexit, Dale and everything else, he's just getting disregarded. And that's why you know, there may be some opportunities like like you're talking about those post-code I'd like to see those. But there's definitely opportunities. I've got a lovely better space here. It's got it's got a better garden and space as well. Pope, Paul Gamba's stays with us. We'll give you that postcode in the break MB degree managing partner and co founder looking for opportunities in post codes in London. Stateside, the shutdown continues into week five, but signs emerged of a compromise between.

Paul Gamba Brexit European parliament UK prime minister Theresa Theresa Goldman Sachs Britain land securities Stein Dale managing partner Pope London co founder twenty percent three percent one percent ten percent ten months