35 Burst results for "Eureka"

"eureka" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

01:30 min | 7 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

"So that sounds really cool in terms of how you are trying to find or locate or maybe even to some degree construct those Eureka moments for people from that before we dive into the fully into the logistics of what that means to the user. Where did you get the idea from? I'm just curious, like, when you were in the space and you're looking and you're seeing these tools, you know, we talked about GPT-3, you've talked about other developing other algorithms based on your users data. What was the inspiration.

Eureka
Liberals Sick of the Alt-Left Are Taking 'the Red Pill'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:51 min | 8 months ago

Liberals Sick of the Alt-Left Are Taking 'the Red Pill'

"What would it be like to find out everything you once believed I don't mean like minor things like I think the Yankees were better in 85 than the mets I mean like serious things What would it be like to wake up in a morning any morning here now or in the future And to find out that core tenants of your life things you invested so much time in were fake I mean think about it I'm a conservative I really love the Ronald Reagan He was the first president I really remember I was born in 1974 I was 6 but it was the first president I really remember like I think oh the president I figured out what that was And I said now I'm 46 I look back And I think of the things he did and the speeches he gave about liberty and freedom and howa a graduate of Eureka college wound up in a very smart brilliant almost economist himself studied Friedman and otherwise had we better himself And imagine if you woke up one day and you found out that Ronald Reagan was you know an Iranian terrorist You'd be like oh my gosh like my whole life I gotta reevaluate everything I invested all this time in the wrong guy Imagine that of course is not obviously It's a mega hyperbole But the reason I bring it up is because red pills are dropping everywhere There are leftists and not all I mean there's always going to be a radical block of the left you know maybe 25% of the country the radical left and the liberals who will believe anything choose to believe everything And once they're told it's alive they don't care if that lie works as a weapon against their political opponents They'll continue to invest in the lie They don't really give a damn if it's a lie or not It doesn't matter What they care about is hurting their opponents But there are large swaths of the left I'm going to play some audio for you today that are waking up There are red pills red pill bombs going off

Ronald Reagan Eureka College Mets Yankees Friedman
"eureka" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"It's creativity can be different for people who are novices in a particular field versus being experts in that field. So those are just you know. Different ways of defining creativity and you can apply that to all areas of life whether it's arts the humanities science practical aspects of daily life trying to get a toddler to eat vegetables. You might come up in some some great idea to do that. Those are all forms of creative. So how do you study this. I mean you use neuro imaging to look at what's happening in people's brains when they're having insights but you can't necessarily predict when an insight will happen. How do you measure when someone is having an actual eureka moment so these. Eureka moments are Moments there one form of creativity so What would look at this. Is that since. It's difficult to come up with a definition of creativity that everyone agrees on the approach. That i mostly taken in. My research is to take some phenomenon that everyone agrees is a manifestation creativity and these are moments or eureka moments Researchers seem to have a consensus that those are one manifestation creativity. So we can. We can focus on that. Now the famous eureka moments you know could be isaac newton with the apple falling in gravity or paul mccartney having a dream a which gave him the melody for the song yesterday. All of these things you know these are are kind of rare events. We can't chase people around predict when they're going to have an a'moment or Psychological scientists call them and insight and then stuffed them in a brain scanner. And wait for it to happ- just can't do that and a neuro imaging also requires not just a single instance of in a moment. It requires multiple instances. We have to average over many of these things in order to extract the brain activity. That's associated with your hama. So my colleague and collaborator longstanding mark beaman at northwestern university will also co-authored the book the eureka factor with me many years ago We decided to take a different approach in that is instead of waiting for these insights to come..

Eureka isaac newton paul mccartney apple mark beaman northwestern university
Lawrence DeLisle and His Death Car

Ghost Town

01:47 min | 10 months ago

Lawrence DeLisle and His Death Car

"We're talking about lawrence delile and his death car and all the things that contributed to the death of four children in the delile family. It was just after nine pm. August third nineteen eighty nine twenty eight year old tire store manager lawrence j delile his wife thirty two year old suzanne and their four kids eight year old. Brian four-year-old catherine two year old. Melissa and nine month old. Emily were inside the delyle's ford. Ltd station wagon going down. Eureka road in winning dot michigan now. According to a petition. Vying for delyle's innocence larry was driving larry lawrence to price new beds for their two daughters. It was a long hot day so the delile family stopped to grab some ice cream for everyone there. Melissa asked if they could go to the river to look at boats as they had done the night before as they drove they saw no boats passing and emily was teething after turning to head home sue. Ask larry to stop at the corner store so she could buy something. For emily's gums exhausted and dehydrated larry's leg had been cramping up throughout the day as they left the store. Larry turn left and his foot hit the accelerator. Panic sets in as larry steer with his left hand while removing his cramped leg with his right. But the car never slowed. Eventually the car catapulted into the detroit river delile and his wife suzanne or able to get out of the car through open windows and hit the surface of the water surviving the crash. They were rescued by two men and a small powerboat who threw them life preservers their four children however were pulled from the water alive but all four died within seven hours of the accident at nearby hospitals. Delile swore to police. He had a leg cramp that forced his foot down on the gas pedal and that the accelerator stuck causing the vehicle to corinne down the street and into the river. But there's so much more to this case then a brutal choice by a bad

Lawrence Delile Lawrence J Delile Larry Delyle Larry Lawrence Melissa Suzanne Emily Brian Ford Michigan Detroit River Delile
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

02:22 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Sometimes starting projects can feel pretty crippling. You're enough to the anxiety of beginning. You know you're doing it right. I don't know you're so right. You can research yourself to you know to the end of time. But i think sometimes just like start. Now start today start somewhere. Just start on a piece of paper starting near Starting in in your famous software start by having a conversation in. Just start in some way. Yeah do your best trying to get over that initial of of beginning and I think it all starts to kinda make sense eventually. I understand like how this next to that are starting to to get a little clarity on the goals but for me when creating new stop thinking about new stuff Working on on projects currently have it's even without being a designer at head space like m. i. Creating something that is going to have a good impact on people or make people smile You know you could. Yeah even with the shop you know you could make the argument that like who needs more. Who needs more birch in the world. That's jerry that's totally fair question to ask but like i have a strong hunch. People are going to continue buying stuff than so they're going to buy stuff by not by as stuff that it has a positive message about it stuff that has a. He's a mindfulness rounded or leaves. You feeling good putting something positive into the world in terms of in terms of messaging. Why support that message. And i really want to thank you for your time coming jamming on the show. That is a wrap everyone today. Frank where can listeners. Connect with you yeah. I think that's place we'd be twitter. I don't know if you have a spot. You can drop url end but yeah yeah twitter dot com slash francois underscore bach. Franz s of its for ach awesome. Thanks for listening. Links are available in the show notes. So make sure to have that in their. Remember to subscribe to eureka. If you dig what we're up to until next time. Have a fantastic day.

jerry twitter Frank Franz eureka
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

02:53 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"At i would be the lead on. I wouldn't be diving into every project but tribute like two at a time to recorder. Then there's another another of it where i've on purpose decided not to go into management. I'm not Responsible for people's careers. And you like that. I really really liked it. Thankfully we have a structure where you don't have to be a manager to grow in your career you can grow in you know if you're really good at your craft you really act to to lead teams in that way you can do that. There's also another another track where we've got. People management has the skill. So we've got another lead designer. Who is responsible for For the For hiring for people's growth. That kind of thing. Gotcha yeah i. I tend to go more mentorship than management That's a strength of mine. And yeah just leading right into it but over the years. I feel like i've been able to make the role makes sense for me which is really a luxury in in the workplace. While i was gonna ask you. I mean what what excites you about your work in being your current role. I mean you've been head space for how long now it's been quite some time five years. Yeah awesome yeah. What excites me. Is we get constant feedback all the time of like you know this app like really helped me in a crisis or it's helped me with my relationships or really basic stuff like i got a good night's sleep you know. The app does a lot more than just meditation these days so that sounds really cool recently. We've been getting into music so having partnerships with With artists such as delib or some work. With doing with arcade fire like. That's just you know just like the musician in me is like. That's so cool. Cool yeah it's really like you know it makes the definition of what is heads faced a little fuzzy. Sometimes 'cause you're like what are we like. We like a record label. I think it. It's still helping people get to those like health outcomes. They're looking for a while. Learn to meditate on sleep. Better wanna be feel more focus more productive So i think whatever is helping people get from ada be hope. Hopefully bigger pictures adapt to more like mindful living lifestyle. But you gotta you gotta meet people where they're at and sometimes just sometimes it's music sometimes. It's just help with the night's sleep shirt debt. I'm really excited by that. And just personally. I realized now i absolutely love working on consumer products. Like i really like having working on something that. I can talk absolutely love working on something that i can talk to you about. You know what. I'm talking about interesting..

"eureka" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

02:25 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

"Of like cute. Little art stores. Bob purchases house in trinidad in june nineteen ninety-five from diane bouche. Who lived next to the three story. Property bouche a well liked and well known local owned an rv park and several properties in the trinidad area bouche and durst became close. They would go to the movies or local events together. They were occasional running buddies. Diane told a local news outlet the durst spent fifty or sixty percent of his time in trinidad and that she anti were in infrequent contact via phone email and fax again. This is journalist. Michelle dean i think durst was attracted to remote areas of the country places where he could hide eureka which is another place. He spent some time in up there although his house was internet. Dad eureka's like right next to got it's often referred to the lost coast there. I think he liked places where he could live among people who were injured demographic meaning people who were cultured and had a certain amount of wealth. But you weren't necessarily you know society people or or living out. In public i after durst arrest for the murder and dismemberment of morris black diane bouche struggle to reconcile that someone she considered a friend could possibly have done what bob was accused of doing. I thought he was totally a victim of the ruthless press. Diane told the local north coast journal. She even invited him to seek shelter. In one of the remote she operated if he needed to escape the media after durst fled texas upon his arrest. For the murder of morris. Black diane bouches campground manager bradley bass asserted to the north coast journal that durst had stayed there during the nationwide manhunt bass said he saw dir sleeping in a pup tent amidst group of off duty police highway patrol officers who were at the camp ground for salmon season bush's faith in her friend eventually evaporated prior to her death in two thousand and two bush believe had been lying to her all along telling a local news outlet that durst was a notorious liar and extremely dangerous. When bob sold the trinidad house in two thousand he told boo she was leaving to focus on development projects in big lagoon seven miles to the north this to maybe a complete fabrication as the big lagoon. Project is non-existent in the public record. I even told bush that he had a daughter with whom he shopped when he was in new york. Another.

diane bouche trinidad durst north coast journal Michelle dean eureka Diane rv park morris Black diane bouches bradley bass Bob duty police highway patrol bob bush texas new york
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

03:26 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Tends to come <Speech_Music_Female> towards <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the beginning of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the day <Silence> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Female> you know i <Speech_Female> think. I <Speech_Female> think you just have to find <Speech_Female> that time. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> That <Silence> that really <Speech_Music_Male> where. <Speech_Female> You're <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you wanna commit <Speech_Female> right in insulin <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> thinking in that <Speech_Female> direction and again <Speech_Female> i think my brain <Speech_Female> is so used to <Speech_Female> being on <Speech_Female> that pattern <Speech_Female> now that it just <Speech_Male> comes very <SpeakerChange> naturally <Speech_Male> to me. <Speech_Male> So is this that <Speech_Male> when you're at the end of the <Speech_Male> day this is grab <Speech_Music_Male> your notebook and <Speech_Music_Male> just kind of <Speech_Male> unload <Speech_Male> what's on your mind <Speech_Male> or if or <Speech_Male> if you're coming to the <Speech_Male> end of the day that <Speech_Male> particular day there's <Speech_Male> been an idea floating <Speech_Male> around that you're kind of <Speech_Male> you're putting <Speech_Male> down paper <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> just living through. <Speech_Female> Yeah i <Speech_Female> think it <Speech_Female> ends up. Being an <Speech_Female> asian <Speech_Female> of you know <Speech_Music_Female> what else could <Speech_Music_Female> be and <Speech_Female> oftentimes. <Silence> It'll be <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> maybe. I'm giving <Speech_Female> hints throughout the day <Speech_Female> and sort of my conversation <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and okay. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yes so <Speech_Female> that's kind <Speech_Male> of how it <SpeakerChange> comes <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> mazing <Speech_Male> will last <Speech_Male> question <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> You know you've <Speech_Male> there are so <Speech_Male> many awesome lessons <Speech_Male> in the book and <Speech_Male> you've just had such <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> wonderful <Speech_Male> career <Speech_Male> and continued avid <Speech_Male> wonderful career. I <Speech_Male> imagine you've picked up a ton <Speech_Male> of different lessons across <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> your <SpeakerChange> work in <Speech_Male> your experience. <Speech_Male> Is there anything <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> you know. Just is top <Speech_Male> of mind that you'd <Speech_Music_Male> like to leave with us <Speech_Music_Male> as the <Speech_Music_Male> listeners. Something <Speech_Male> to think about <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> prioritize <Speech_Male> or whatever there's <Speech_Male> no <SpeakerChange> there are no rules <Speech_Male> with this. <Speech_Female> Yeah i <Speech_Female> think that the most important <Speech_Female> thing <Speech_Male> to think <Speech_Female> about is <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> you don't have to figure <Speech_Female> it all out <Speech_Female> right. And <Speech_Female> i think that so <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> you know were were <Speech_Female> on this race <Speech_Female> or we think that <Speech_Female> you know we <Speech_Female> have to go and do <Speech_Female> something you <Speech_Female> know in six months from now <Speech_Female> next <SpeakerChange> week <Speech_Female> whatever instead <Speech_Female> <Silence> i think that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you know giving yourself <Speech_Female> a break and <Speech_Female> actually aiding <Speech_Female> and starting to <Speech_Female> think about things <Speech_Female> and making progress <Speech_Female> towards the goal <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is the most <Speech_Female> important thing and <Speech_Female> when you you <Speech_Female> know freak yourself <Speech_Male> out too much about <Speech_Male> These <Speech_Female> ideas <Speech_Female> these goals whatever <Speech_Female> than off <Speech_Female> tax. You just don't do <Speech_Female> them. And i think <Speech_Female> that the idea of actually <Speech_Female> getting <Speech_Female> making steps <Speech_Female> and making more progress <Speech_Female> towards something <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> find that you're almost <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> and then <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> then you can actually <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> throw the gas on <Speech_Female> but i think that <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> fear gets in the <Speech_Music_Female> way of <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Male> potential <Speech_Female> failure potential. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> could never do it. <Speech_Music_Male> And <SpeakerChange> i think <Speech_Music_Female> that we need to <Speech_Male> <Silence> stop ourselves <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> from going in that direction <Speech_Male> before <SpeakerChange> we even <Speech_Male> start <Speech_Male> such such <Speech_Male> a great message. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well that <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> wrap everyone for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> today's <Speech_Male> thinker. Talk <Speech_Music_Male> care work in <Speech_Music_Male> listeners. <SpeakerChange> Find <Speech_Male> connect with you <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> keira golden <Speech_Female> with an eye all <Speech_Female> over a <Speech_Female> social media <Speech_Female> platforms everywhere. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> hopefully you'll get a chance <Speech_Music_Male> to pick up my book. <Speech_Music_Female> Undaunted overcoming <Speech_Music_Female> doubts in doubters. <Speech_Female> And i <Speech_Music_Female> really appreciate <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> this mark. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you thank <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you and thanks. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Everyone for listening <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> links are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> available in the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nelson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> carriages mentioned <Speech_Music_Male> in their member <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to eureka. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you dig what. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We're up to you <Speech_Music_Male> until <SpeakerChange> next <Music> time.

eureka
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

01:52 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"It's just you know. That's that's how it all came about. But i think it really. Did you know spur. Very similar to Why launched a product launched hint. Water was just to help people and Yeah i love it. I love it so much. I mean i'm sure people listening can feel the energy and the passion behind both those stories. And when you link link that passion and that desire to help i mean there's there's no surprise that there's the results in success link with that right so it's really nice story last thing i want to dive into for goes wide Love to know what your journaling practices. If you're still journaling or like just kind of what what you're doing on a day to day basis In terms of stain mentally fit than productive and all the inefficient all that like what are some of your tools. Enacts in whatnot. Yeah well i think i'm. I'm constantly idea dating innovating however you want to think about it and so i'm i'm sketching out a couple of ideas every day very naturally i find that once you start getting in the habit and getting in the practice of it It really does become very natural for you to be doing it on. You know every couple days. I i can't say that i actually some people practice it like every morning. You know they get up and they they like meditation. They really get into that practice. I don't really do that. I i find that For me it tends to come towards the end of the day as compared to An exercise and That.

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

06:56 min | 10 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"And then Started actually had really given up. And then i looked down at my drink. My diet coke. That i was drinking atanov and i thought what are all these ingredients and i mean i think i paid more attention to what i was putting in my car and i did my own body right not really thinking. I was doing anything wrong because it was labeled diet. And for me. Diamond equated to health and so that's when i did a little swap and put the diet soda to diet coke in particular to the side and i started drinking water and i. I started to see dramatic changes. My energy came back. I started losing weight and my skin cleared up. And i thought there's only one problem. Water is just so darn boring or sewed onboard Boring so this cannot be dislike temporary measure. I need to get on the program. And i just couldn't do it so i had a. I think a lie and a pomegranate on my counter. And i thought i wonder if i slice it and just throw it in the water. What would happen and this was like seventeen years ago and hard did it and it made water tastes better but then the funny thing is kids. Were coming into our house and they were asking me for like strawberry water and installing me saying what kind of like strawberry water you giving my kids and i'm like it. Strawberries and water. I mean you know it was just. I thought this is just so interesting. How something so simple and so obvious was not available on the market. Everything had either sugar or diet sweeter senate. And i just couldn't believe it. In fact i when i went out looking for my product that i had made in my kitchen like to consume to buy it to consume it not to actually figure out you know. Should i go to a product. I wasn't there yet. I just assumed that san francisco kinda sucked and they didn't have like good stores. That would have this product and even whole foods had just opened. And i thought this is the store that would have a product like this and they didn't have it and i thought i there. There were carbonated versions of the drink. That i wanted to eventually create but most of bomb had way too much sodium in them and so that changed over over time. But i thought if i want a drink you know eight plus glasses of water a day to actually drink carbonation it. It's really hard to drink that much water and it's a little bit different than drinking like you know a diet coke over the course of time. So it's just when you're drinking water with bubbles in it. I don't know it just slake there's nothing else in it and so it's doesn't it. You feel really bloated and like you're going to blow up and so i thought it's gotta be stillwater. If i want to stay on the path of drinking eight glasses of water so long winded story of you know really chairing that. I was just kind of floating in some ways of trying to figure out kind of some problems that i wanted to solve And then one day just sort of thought. Well no one's doing this. I actually think i could not only help. Change my own health. Which i had figured out but i thought i could probably help a lot of other people too and i think that that specific point for me of being able to help a lot of people was incredibly powerful so and i i think that is it. It really instilled the stay. I mean that really. I didn't sit there and think. Oh i'm gonna go take on the beverage companies. i mean for me. I thought i'm gonna provide a product that actually helps people enjoy water and that and that was it was that so it sounds like that was kind of the eureka moment for you to from. Oh you've you figure something out personally for yourself to hey. There might be something here to help others but were like where did that. Where did that come from. Was that just something in your life or in in shifting out of tech or were you were the benefits you saw for yourself. Because i think you lost a ton of weight in like something ridiculous like two weeks just chef won't over twenty pounds in two and a half weeks but it wasn't just the weight i mean it really was like you know the skin stuff i mean i went to different dermatologists thinking and tried everything over the counter trying to figure it out and i never had this acne that i had developed over time and you know the more i know about how the body works. Is you know you're processing everything that you're putting into your system everything that you're putting on your skin and you're coming in contact with you know your your body eventually is reacting to it. I think for for me it was on overload. And so you know your skin is your largest organ and so here. I was putting these diet sweeteners. And my body just couldn't do it anymore. I mean i was producing insulin Which is actually very common for diet. Sweeteners today. Yet a lot of people don't realize that. And i think that my organs were shutting down. I mean i am not dot is ultimately you know that is a an explanation for people who are who are dealing with adult acne. I mean what is going on inside that you can't see i is such a key thing and so as i started to to fix myself. That's when i thought there's a lot of confusion out there and obviously you know people are joining diet programs. And they're buying diet drinks and low fat. There's a lot of healthy perception out there versus healthy reality and i think look right and i think for me. It just seemed it might. Curiosity just sat there every single day and wouldn't go away. I kept thinking about how many people i could help just by. You know getting a product on the shelf. And and i think that look. I have many friends.

coke stillwater senate san francisco acne confusion
How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

The Science Show

02:02 min | 11 months ago

How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

"Meat cure macneice who's from melbourne originally but usually resides in cambridge working for the famous press the publishers care wise open publishing so important now cambridge university press exists as an organization to try to advance knowledge research and learning and part of that mission is what we do in publishing research we publish about four hundred journals plus fifty books and as well as just publishing research we care about making sure that best practices are followed in research and the research we publish is robust and reliable and so we work with communities of authors and researchers and without journal editors to try and ensure that we can support upcoming best practices and research and what is open publishing much it made of well so are there a few aspects often people will talk about open access publishing and this means access to the published papers once they put out there on the internet or in print form and a lot of these in the past have been subscription access only and there's solid movement around the world which we fully support for more open access to the results of research so these papers can be read by anyone and learned from anyone around the world but also looking at open research across the whole research life cycle there are practices being developed around sharing information long before we get to the publication stage and also sharing the data and other materials that underpin what's published in that final stage all to support greater transparency. Indeed you probably know that this motion at the university of sydney and chemist in fact still is doing work on. Malaria is one of the pioneers in this country of that sort of approach and she actually won the eureka prize for the promotion of science last year. So you probably know about her. Yes i think that work is fantastic. I think i must have just missed her. When i was in england. I think she started at cambridge just after i left in her phd. That i think the whether they're doing is great. Supporting fully author notebooks in library such and the like

Macneice Cambridge University Press Cambridge Melbourne University Of Sydney Malaria England
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Ford. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm just <Speech_Music_Male> getting to <Speech_Music_Male> start from <Speech_Male> the bottom of <Speech_Male> the ladder <Speech_Male> for something <SpeakerChange> is <Speech_Music_Male> very exciting to <Speech_Music_Female> me. <Speech_Music_Female> Like <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> for al house. <Speech_Female> I was very <Speech_Female> green writer starting <Silence> out and <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> once i got <Speech_Music_Female> into season two <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> scott writing <Speech_Female> the so hard. <Speech_Female> I was trying so <Speech_Female> hard. Didn't feel like. <Speech_Female> I was making any improvements <Speech_Music_Female> until season <Speech_Music_Male> two. <Speech_Music_Male> There was a <Speech_Music_Female> scripts <Speech_Female> that i wrote. And <Speech_Female> i hit. I did it <Speech_Female> really fast. He ended <Speech_Music_Female> announcers. Like oh god <Speech_Female> i really am not meant <Speech_Music_Female> for those i should <Speech_Music_Female> give. <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> Everyone came back like <Speech_Music_Female> this is great. <Speech_Music_Female> This is great. <SpeakerChange> We could give <Silence> to the arts <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> when you're when you're drying <Speech_Female> in when you're learning <Speech_Female> how to do very visual <Speech_Female> things <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> there's a. <Speech_Male> There's very obvious. <Speech_Female> Improvement from <Speech_Female> one sketchbook to another <Speech_Female> from a <Speech_Female> painting. You did last year <Speech_Female> to a painting <SpeakerChange> you did today <Speech_Male> that you can <Silence> see improve <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> writing it so <Speech_Female> much. It's <Speech_Female> it's harder because you <Speech_Male> have to read <Speech_Female> the whole damn script <Speech_Male> that takes a <Speech_Music_Male> it can't just glance <Speech_Music_Male> at it <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> so tight literally a <Speech_Music_Female> word could <Speech_Female> be literally a word <Speech_Female> it could be. It could be <Speech_Female> the placement of <Speech_Music_Female> that word <Speech_Male> and just <Speech_Male> knowing that there <Speech_Male> was improvement there <Speech_Male> existed <Speech_Female> for happy. And <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Music_Male> i live for <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> cut <Speech_Male> virtual high fis <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> they're <Speech_Male> eddie any <Speech_Male> advice that you <Silence> give to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> writers right now or <Speech_Male> even people that are <Speech_Male> drying in <SpeakerChange> that are just <Speech_Male> starting out or <Silence> they're <Speech_Male> you know <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> have ambitions <Speech_Male> to take <Silence> their career to <Speech_Male> wherever <Speech_Male> that would go. Obviously <Speech_Male> whatever their <Speech_Male> goals are but any <Speech_Male> advice <SpeakerChange> for people starting <Speech_Male> out. <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah i would say <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> you know. Don't <Speech_Female> be if whether <Speech_Male> you're an artist or <Speech_Male> writer. Don't <SpeakerChange> be afraid <Silence> to <Speech_Male> copy <Speech_Female> those <Speech_Female> people that you <Speech_Female> admire. <Speech_Female> And i don't mean it in a <Speech_Male> way where don't <Speech_Male> plagiarize work <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Music_Female> better maids. <Speech_Music_Female> Don't do that <Speech_Female> but in your own time <Speech_Female> in your own practice. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> what studying <Speech_Female> is just seeing what <Speech_Male> people did in the past <Speech_Male> learning how <Speech_Male> they did it and then <Speech_Male> you know maybe <Speech_Male> putting your <SpeakerChange> twist <Speech_Male> on it when you <Silence> have to try. <Silence> Yeah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i mean it's totally what you <Speech_Male> that example you <Speech_Male> gave in the evenings <Speech_Male> right of like figuring <Speech_Male> out the <Speech_Male> yet low <SpeakerChange> of a show <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> exactly <Speech_Male> study <Speech_Male> other people <Speech_Male> do stuff <Speech_Male> on your own. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I didn't have <Speech_Music_Male> any formal writing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> training <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it <Silence> all just came from <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> learning <Speech_Female> and asking <Speech_Music_Female> a lot of questions to <Speech_Music_Male> my buddies <SpeakerChange> who are <Speech_Music_Male> writers. Yeah <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> i love it <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> was super <Speech_Male> fun data. <Speech_Male> I hope we <Speech_Male> are paths crossed <Speech_Male> again in the future. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> i thank <Speech_Male> you for taking time to <Speech_Male> come on the show. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> is a wrap. So <Speech_Male> i'd love to let <Speech_Music_Male> listeners know where <Speech_Music_Male> they can connect <Speech_Music_Male> with you or follow <Speech_Music_Male> along <SpeakerChange> your work. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I have <Speech_Music_Female> a. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I got my <Speech_Female> instagram <Speech_Music_Female> twitter. Tumbler handles <Speech_Music_Male> all under dana <Speech_Music_Female> terrace. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Sometimes i'll take <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> breaks <Speech_Music_Male> and deactivate <Speech_Music_Male> those accounts <Speech_Music_Male> for sure <Speech_Music_Male> for you <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> in the show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for listening. Everyone <Speech_Music_Male> has mentioned <Speech_Music_Male> links are available <Speech_Music_Male> in our show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> Remember to subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> to eureka. <Speech_Music_Male> What we're up <Speech_Music_Male> to <SpeakerChange> next <Music> time.

al house ford twitter
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Still haven't really recovered from it or Or have been able to take a break or it. Okay so how you met because this is super important if you if you're willing to go there like how what's what's been helping. What's in helping making a concerted effort to reach out to friends. I'm if i need to vent. Or if i just need to be around. Other people course. Corentin was a huge part of this yup but also delegating more. The work than i normally would allowing myself to do that so that i could have my weekends back. Yeah totally usually. I work six days a week. Sunday is my prep day for monday. But for for like four or five months straight. It was seven days a week nonstop work into the night. I wasn't getting any break in washing the dishes. And i my hands were shaking. Like that's new. That has never before so to anyone. Listening take breaks drink water. You know carriers off. Yeah usually when something comes up physically right. It's it's it's a good sign that things internally have gone far beyond our max right. I shouldn't have let it get to that point But i'm glad i caught it before. I went absolutely ballistic. Yeah no but i wouldn't even say you should have let it get to that point. I mean your human. Like the rest of us i feel like many of us myself included can resonate with with something like that. We might experience it in different ways but like let's be honest. Society is kind of set up the pushes to that place so for not actively doing something in in doing something to see against have the awareness to see that. That's coming up and putting stuff into our routine than at minutes. Inevitable's just going to happen for not wired to handle this much pressure. Yeah and i am someone who like. I am very aware that. I have a a workhorse. I've obsessed with it. Brings me more joy than everything and.

Corentin
PhD Candidates on the Front Lines of COVID

Sounds of Science

01:51 min | 11 months ago

PhD Candidates on the Front Lines of COVID

"Welcome daisy. Thank you so much for having me. Mary on To the eureka sounds of science. Podcast for having me. I'm excited to be here today. We're really excited to have you. Thank you so much for coming. So can you tell me first. About what drew you to a career in science obviously before the pandemic yeah absolutely on it actually started in high school. I went to a vocational school in new jersey called biotechnology high school on and so it kind of it's like public vocational school. And it kind of set me on The stem track and i ended up on going to the university of vermont on an studying microbiology on. And they're realize quickly that. I wanted to be involved in like actual lab science so i started doing a work study position in eventually on doing research for credit on in dr yvonne johnson. Hainan juice lab on where we studied allergic asthma models on in mice on specifically reprogramming of metabolism in the context of asthma models on and so i was really interested in doing a wet lab research but after i graduated. I actually really need to convince myself that. I wanted to to stay in science on because i knew it takes like a lot to to be able to spend like at least a decade of your life at the bench While you're getting. Yeah all of these degrees so i actually took a year and i did americorps vista on which is basically. I volunteered on at a stem mentorship nonprofit on in the bay area of california

Biotechnology High School Dr Yvonne Johnson Allergic Asthma University Of Vermont Mary Drew New Jersey Hainan Asthma Bay Area California
"eureka" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

02:43 min | 11 months ago

"eureka" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"So you've talked before. About how before drag race you lived as a trans woman for five years and then you decided that that's or you realize that's not actually who you are. Can you just talk about your early experience gender and what led you to think that you might be a trans woman. Oh yeah of. Course why i to reiterate into the versus me figuring out that i'm not. I think it was more of like discovering that. I'm like all of these things you know what i'm saying. Expansion the weirdly. Like i think the trans person that i was is a huge part of who i am now. It's just like a more elevated self perception and then also like some description as far as like gender goes that's where gender neutrality i think comes in right. I just remember growing up. Well i i grew up with all women. So four women I remember being younger. And like the little gameboy and we always like wanted to be a girl. Because it'd be easier. I think we'll have those thoughts a little bit at some point in our life like oh like dealing with the persecution of it or likes negatively or like the self inflicted ideas that we put on ourselves because of other people's opinions we automatically assume that it's a bad thing and how much easier beats like. Just be a girl so then you could wear pretty and for things and you could like boys and you know all these things that you want. Do play with barbies etc. So that was kind of a star. I think and then i met a guy when i was like eighteen. Who was really interested in eureka and i clicked with him really well so then like i was already doing drag and i was living with a trans woman at the time so it just seems like so many factors of my mind mike. My thought process was adding up to this like okay. You're not leaving your authentic self. Maybe this is something you should discover and then the boy comes in. Because and i call him a boy because he turned out not to be a man. Okay reading like in allegra boswell sands so the boy was also there for like that. Validation i guess my having someone to support me through it because he was more interested in eureka. So that's why. I kind of brought that up because the thought process was more from like growing up and then living with the transvaal man and just having those ideas kind of for a long time anyway dating him he he really isn't do eureka. Your drag character and so it's like you're getting all the validation about the feminine side of noon that an interesting. It was interesting but it was like. I really liked him. You know and he was like the first time i ever had like had a guy that could consider like a real interested in mike relationship type situation and saddam was just like you know fell head over heels really quickly so i would have done just about anything but i was already thinking these things. I can't really say like. Oh well i did it. Because i met this guy no i had the quote unquote balls. Elevate or the lack thereof to push myself to do it. Because i had like this validation from the opposite sex or however you want to describe the gender of that situation. I don't know how would talk about that.

wilder eureka jeffrey hara Paul
Eureka O'Hara: The Drag Race All Stars Season 6 Winner

LGBTQ&A

02:43 min | 11 months ago

Eureka O'Hara: The Drag Race All Stars Season 6 Winner

"So you've talked before. About how before drag race you lived as a trans woman for five years and then you decided that that's or you realize that's not actually who you are. Can you just talk about your early experience gender and what led you to think that you might be a trans woman. Oh yeah of. Course why i to reiterate into the versus me figuring out that i'm not. I think it was more of like discovering that. I'm like all of these things you know what i'm saying. Expansion the weirdly. Like i think the trans person that i was is a huge part of who i am now. It's just like a more elevated self perception and then also like some description as far as like gender goes that's where gender neutrality i think comes in right. I just remember growing up. Well i i grew up with all women. So four women I remember being younger. And like the little gameboy and we always like wanted to be a girl. Because it'd be easier. I think we'll have those thoughts a little bit at some point in our life like oh like dealing with the persecution of it or likes negatively or like the self inflicted ideas that we put on ourselves because of other people's opinions we automatically assume that it's a bad thing and how much easier beats like. Just be a girl so then you could wear pretty and for things and you could like boys and you know all these things that you want. Do play with barbies etc. So that was kind of a star. I think and then i met a guy when i was like eighteen. Who was really interested in eureka and i clicked with him really well so then like i was already doing drag and i was living with a trans woman at the time so it just seems like so many factors of my mind mike. My thought process was adding up to this like okay. You're not leaving your authentic self. Maybe this is something you should discover and then the boy comes in. Because and i call him a boy because he turned out not to be a man. Okay reading like in allegra boswell sands so the boy was also there for like that. Validation i guess my having someone to support me through it because he was more interested in eureka. So that's why. I kind of brought that up because the thought process was more from like growing up and then living with the transvaal man and just having those ideas kind of for a long time anyway dating him he he really isn't do eureka. Your drag character and so it's like you're getting all the validation about the feminine side of noon that an interesting. It was interesting but it was like. I really liked him. You know and he was like the first time i ever had like had a guy that could consider like a real interested in mike relationship type situation and saddam was just like you know fell head over heels really quickly so i would have done just about anything but i was already thinking these things. I can't really say like. Oh well i did it. Because i met this guy no i had the quote unquote balls. Elevate or the lack thereof to push myself to do it. Because i had like this validation from the opposite sex or however you want to describe the gender of that situation. I don't know how would talk about that.

Eureka Allegra Boswell Mike Saddam
Did You Know Females Have a Prostate? Sex Educator Deborah Sundahl Explains

Sex With Emily

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Did You Know Females Have a Prostate? Sex Educator Deborah Sundahl Explains

"Let's talk about the clitoral orgasm versus the g spot orgasm. How would you describe them. We'll first of all g-spot is the female prostate that female prostate surrounds. The re throw canal. It starts at the outside opening of the body. And it's thirty two ducks. Glands are sprinkled along the eureka three canal about two inches so therefore because you're re throw canal and the vaginal canal share the same wall that means you can easily access prostate through the roof of the vagina. You can easily feel it. It literally hangs down through the roof of the vagina. it's a prostate. It's not the clitoris. The clitoris is primarily erectile tissue. We have the little knob on the outside of the body. Full of nerves. But as feminists healthcare a nurse's rebecca shocker and susan gauge and nineteen eighty to redefine the clitoris. They said hey. It's not just the little knob on the outside of the body. That feels so good. It's actually erectile tissue that extends four to five inches inside the body. They thought these women were not strict. Fifteen years will now. They've seen this structure in the

Rebecca Shocker Susan Gauge
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Just like don't have them on my phone. Because i've realized that i'm gonna lose the battle ten nine times at a ten and it's not worth one time at a time that i get it and i'm really hopeful that over the next decade we are going to build a healthier relationship with our phones. Because i think we've gone way too far to the extreme in the last few years and yeah yeah what. I think that that mentality is something that will serve us for all technology that is to comrades so like a again. It's you know you're right. There's the the most talented engineers working to keep us addicted to these things but at the same time to there's the onus is on us to to to develop that healthy relationships right like so we can if we can take that responsibility than i mean. We'll we'll win as other things. Continue to evolve in whatnot rights sub. Yeah for sure and like listen. They're also built like you said they're they're built into phones out to like screen. Time is great. Like i generally just like turn do. Do not disturb from like ten pm until seven thirty or eight. Am in the morning. So that when. I tried to open my phone. I am immediately reminded to just put it back down and i think again i think as we as customers demand a healthier relationship tools are going to get built to serve us because at the end of the day like we need to. Yeah i think everything. Everything's really demand driven in that way. Yeah oh man well this. This was super fun. I mean i'm really really digging the whole idea of like the long-form Ide- shen practice. I'm gonna. I'm gonna bring that to our team as well and see what we can do that. I think it's a mirror. That's an amazing thing. And and it takes. It takes a lot of time to do one well. And so i think that's the brilliant piece of it is like you wanna have lots of good ideas like i have will. I have lots of ideas all the time. Rarely do i have a good one. When i have a little a little barrier in front of me that says okay like if ideas really good you need to go through the time and energy to get it on paper and iron ironed out and find the data to back it up. You're just creating a funnel that ensures that only the good ideas really come out of it and so it's a great. It's a great mechanism to screen out all the bad ideas that we have and yet try to try to spend our time and energy doubling down an investing in the good ones will analyze. There's a lot of You know independent creatives freelancers and whatnot. That listen to this show like the thing. I like about the practice. Is we've been talking from a standpoint of the team in presenting new ideas like that. But i mean this up really works in in all situations right like again. Like if you're creating a list of all these ideas in your. I don't know a freelance photographer. And you're thinking of this new project or something. It's probably worth that time. Sure and map it out and take two three pages as the standard exactly. Yeah all every time now. When i'm brainstorming ideas with france. I always say like this is how we're going to do it if we think it's good enough. Let's let's throw down on paper. So yeah yeah that's cool around what's one thing you you know you've been thinking about lately or that's been on your mind or something that you think we should be thinking about You know it doesn't have to be at athene related to what we talked about but just like leave us with a thought or a an idea that floating around in your mind. Get the juices flowing. Yeah so the quote that i heard. Recently i think it's confucius anyways says that. Yes it is computers. So it's it's her we have two lives and the second begins when we realize we only have one nice and so i just love that quote because i think i'm at least moving onto the next stage of my life and thinking about kids and and all of those things and i just wanna to make sure that you always have in the back of your mind that like hey like you got one life like low live at the way you want to and yeah and so. I think it's a hard thing to do because of for me. It's it's the timeline piece of it is like when you compromise a little bit of the short term to sort of achieve longer term goals vs when you're always just like achieving eric. Doing exactly what you wanna do when you wanna do it and just finding that balance is a really tough one. But i just love that quote and it resonates. That's beautiful beautiful way to add to wrap this up that that is wrapped. So thank you so much for joining us. Ben were kin listeners. Connect with you yeah. That's a good question. I would say like emails. A good one ben hopper dot com pretty easy and you can find me on linked in. I'm not great at responding to messages but can find me at lincoln. Ben walters.

one time ten pm ten eight seven thirty one two three pages two lives Ben hopper dot com next decade nine times one thing last few years second ben lincoln - shen one life france
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"Like mastery is being able to take a really complex subject and simplify it into terms that everyone that resonate with everyone and i think the narrative long-form doc is really good at that is like the the bungle jungle like long words and like. You just can't hide behind that when you really are laying out a again like a thousand words about about why we should be focused on something new. Yeah that's cool so just jumping to you a little bit more individually. You went through this process. Obviously as you just mentioned in pitch one of the ideas that you're working your team's working on like for you personally like what's how do you tackle a new project or thinking of this stuff like what. What are some of the things that you're doing to keep your mind Or bring your your mind clear place so that you can release these ideas essentially and see how you want it to to map out. Yeah there's there's so many so many different ways to answer that question from a couple of different angles but let's try to piece at a or unpack a little bit. So i like you were talking about. Creativity comes from space. You need space and clarity. It's the reason people like always have great thoughts in the shower. Because you're sort of just like not you can't think about anything. You can't distract yourself. It's just like a water hitting your head and and so most of my good ideas come from non work time trying to force the creative thoughts and the good ideas. That's a really really hard thing to do. And so that just means that you naturally need to give yourself space working fourteen hours a day. It's really hard to come up with novel out of the box ideas and so finding a way to have that balance and give yourself space. I think everyone has different ways of doing that. I now love going for long walks. I actually notoriously. You said not like walking which is crazy but now it's just one of my favorite things to do an close to high park here in toronto. And there's no better place to get some yes. Let's stick with the walk. Because i've been doing them to as i've been experimenting with different things historically i would i'd like cramming a podcast or something or than like You know what. I won't do podcasts. I'll just do music then. Now it's like nothing in. I'm just trying to literally be present with the footsteps like here. In smell like the Worse as well and and what not but Yes i'm fascinated. See like how other people are doing this as well. Yeah i went through the exact same transition issue is like it used to be okay. Podcasts or audiobooks and it's like oh you know what like let's do music music seems a little bit more balanced but even that can sort of just take your mind away. It depends what kind of music i to do nothing. I prefer nothing. And i do. Love going for walks with my wife to she's also like we're on the similar wavelength where we know how to poke and prod each other and all the right ways to get those creative juices flowing but when i go to walk by myself it is always just with nothing in my ear I also i also love doing like walking meetings. Which right now in. Toronto is a little bit tricky but As often as possible. When i can step away from my desk and not do a zoom meeting but actually like plug in the airpods or whatever and go for a walk and take a meeting. I find my mind just worked so much. Better when yeah. I don't know what it is that there has to be some cool research around that. Because like i am one hundred percent sure that my mind works any different more creative way when i just like. Have the blood flowing. Yeah yeah yeah. I think so. I mean i i would say it's you know what's like you like any type of exercise like you're just you're you're firing up your biology at the same time right in and i'd imagine Just a change in environment and scenery and stuff like that is is also helpful pressure and frankly we spent so much time sitting or in one place especially now with everything being remote as well like even the smallest things right where you'd like. I don't go to I think you guys were co working space right in toronto. Like you know you go to the common area to grab a coffee or something like you actually move around where the app not that much going on when you're at home like it's it's tough and and honestly i think that creativity is probably dropped off a little bit too. I don't think it's a great thing for for anyone Yeah it will be. Yeah i don't know. I can't wait to get back to an office but like now i see it differently in like three days. A week probably makes sense for me. I don't know yeah. And so just back to the question of like other ways like i love paper and pen like to me like writing on idea like i. I'm not gonna write a full long form narrative on on and like like no way. My hand hurts after like just writing one card. I know you're a fan of the products of barren fig. You don't have to go that. But i do start. I do like to start with paper and pen a bunch of like random circles and maybe some cowboy math numbers in that sort of stuff. The other guys. You need to have a safe space and listen. I one of those people that really hate meetings. And i cut as many meetings as possible. But when you're in the sort of creative part of the process It's important to have like agendaless meetings with people who come from different perspectives and engineering perspective of product perspective data perspective and create a safe space where everyone can just throw ideas out there. There's no hierarchy of ideas based on like what people's backgrounds or seniority is and so those sort of like again. It's hard to create that it's hard to be like. Hey every month we're all gonna get together and think about good ideas. I think that's a hard way to innovate. But there is something there. And i don't actually have the recipe for it. The last thing. And i think this is the most important one for me and this is what i love. And we're all my energy from is is the really fun dance of customer discovery and selling.

toronto one card three days Toronto one fourteen hours a day one hundred percent one place thousand words A week one of ideas
"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

Eureka by Baron Fig

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"eureka" Discussed on Eureka by Baron Fig

"For this culture as i am and it's something i let them now share with them that are standing like. Hey this is phenomenal. like the culture isn't just my responsibility. Aries it's yours and yours worsen. isn't that amazing. That's what i'll say to them. Isn't that amazing. What you can do with that kind of the autonomy. Yeah so have you have you seen. I imagine the answer is yes. But i'd love to if you haven't examples you can share but have you seen the results of that when it comes to the team's work and how they think 'cause know this shows widely about or covering thinkers essentially right and in helping people view ideas and challenges in whatnot in different ways in how people have different thought processes. And this is. This is a completely different way of. I think approaching Creative work and Will work in general right in. It's it's something. I'd love to hear from your perspective on how that plays out so first and foremost. I'm just gonna talk about my team. Sure the way we go about what normally is called a jar. I am putting that into brent. Disease is very different. Based on the dna that gary nigh both have based on the fact that first off. I changed the name to people inexperience. Because that's what we're doing now. That's not any wild creation but when you sit inside of a department with that title rather than a jarek than their you know okay. I'm taking care people in their experience. Okay that's a.

both first
Meet the HIBT Fellows: Dinesh Tadepalli and Jennifer Zeitler

How I Built This

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Meet the HIBT Fellows: Dinesh Tadepalli and Jennifer Zeitler

"Young son and daughter to get an ice cream. I had an ice cream than the last six when obviously and throat. And i saw so many of the plastic spoons and unlike in the in the in the ben and i was like. I'm a person who was an air of the plastic pollution and what issues. It causes us. And still i did not act on what i know that it's harming the environment and it's going to have my kids and my future so that's that seat of thought. I need to make something that makes people think twice before they take the next plastic spoon or spoke the ham. So this idea kind of came to you in a eureka moment or did it come to you over time. I always wanted to be an entrepreneur to prank obviously had to secure myself from my finances any comfortable masters here and then a job so the general immigrant journey then as an angel investor in mr and a couple of stops by one of them feel and that gave me a realization. If i'm going to raise some money on it let me this myself. And let me do the entrepreneurship because i already had h and learn it. Even even if it's going to lose some money left me experience and learn it around the same time this even happened. I ended ice cream shop and had this realization and advantage depression. I was like. Why did i use so many classic in my life. I knowing that. I'm going to drop you memories Plastic pollution and like latest uses that even babies pleasant does have micro-plastics in them. So all this knowing all of this. I was still using. That led me to this company. So tell me what were you doing at

Depression
Bill Gates & How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

Squawk Pod

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Bill Gates & How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

"It's great to have you on the program again. This extraordinary book. And i want to start here. I want to start in two thousand six because you talk in the book about having an almost eureka moment in terms of realization and. I think that there's still some people in this country that haven't had that realization. I wanted to understand what brought you to this place in two thousand funded. The gates foundation and started traveling to africa in seen only the lack of electricity but how the weather is getting tougher for the farmers there and that led me to learn about climate. I haven't spent time on it. But i was kind of horrified to learn that over time. It's just going to get worse. And worse. and the sources of the missions are are very very broad and so that in a brought me in to think about actually do a ted talk in two thousand ten five years before. I did the pandemic talk in the book. You warn that. The economic damage caused by climate change will likely be as bad as having a covert sized pandemic every decade. What do you think the role of business should be in solving this business you know. Businesses are paid to think ahead and They consumers will be looking at the carbon footprint of the companies. They buy from They will be looking for business to be part of the dialogue about shifting these systems around and so climate climate is big the younger generation. I think their energy already very high. But i see that going up Even in a bipartisan way and so measuring Footprint being open about that and being willing to devote resources to getting those numbers down over time i think no matter what business you're in that that will deserve a lot of attention but can the problem be solved if big businesses and microsoft and apple and google and others have have announced very ambitious plans. But they are all idiosyncratic mean. They're doing it on their own. Can it work. Everybody's doing it on their own or does it effectively require regulation and laws over time. You'll you'll have regulations that will drive the market for green products

Gates Foundation Africa TED Microsoft Apple Google
Ron Jaworski: Making the Internet More Audible with Trinity Audio

Future Ear Radio

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Ron Jaworski: Making the Internet More Audible with Trinity Audio

"Us about how this whole thing came to be in what the big vision is here. 'cause i think we're on the same wavelength with a potential of converting text to speech so a festival. Yes yes to everything shed supervision is is is i have is so dip Basically came going down down the elevator. I was reading an article on my mobile phone. Go into my car and myself. Why can't listen to an article. I just started reading. This is the moment that they said was. If he doesn't it was two thousand seventeen in a homeless doesn't make sense that i don't have like an easy solution Just press play. This is it. i'm listening to and in. This was the eureka moment i said. Okay i need to set forth in and do that and day. I have a history common from from the industry from from a video products in a dealing with media companies in dealing with the users consume plugged in dealing with advertisers in because we also offer a monetization on top of our solution in i. I understood that there is a there is a product. The festival makes sense makes sense for the user because yesterday there might sets that they wanna listen instead of instead of reading instead of watching. I wanna listen. I understand that there is a two thousand seventeen. If for those of us the likes in odors there we started feeling like okay. This is our tom he's coming. It's coming soon. So i didn't understand it. There is in these markets education to be made but definitely media companies publisher called. It will start understanding coming using portents of and they're always looking content. Creators media companies are always looking for a generate in a new engagement with the users in you in user experience in of course if they can add a monetization air in generates Some revenue out of a thumbs up and in the last thing is advertised. Were when i was sure that you know the same that happens from tv. And then youtube started. And then you know in a lot of the budget went from a advertisement to video was shared. The disdain is going to happen. We'd we'd audio from radio two on audio in in different forms due to the fact of all the a additional data and information and targeted that you can use the digital landscape. So by this recent trinity. Because it's the only triangle between the user publisher in the advertiser and of course. I always tell these jobs. It's also funny to have the holy trinity form a couple of juicing in israel a but but but but this is. This is the moment that understood. I actually remember it clearly sitting in my car and saying okay. There is something here i am actually was both i understand. I understood that it make sense for me to make sense to a lot of other people in fact that it serves older check Peelers off the internet. And i remember the first a media conference win i had. It's funny i had like a web page. I think i even of usa today. We'd we'd some sold of an embedded there. This was the first a decided in a wrench for different five. I talked to people from usa today in from wall street journal. And show that okay. This is what i wanna to do and everybody looked at nagasaki. You did the crazy guy in drew. Okay we just wanted to or these but you know cheap phoenix later. -tunities is fact and more and more Media companies called the graders joining on on a daily basis. And and and as i said in the beginning our vision. Basically two or defy the internet's we.

Youtube Israel Usa Today USA Wall Street Journal Nagasaki Drew Phoenix
"eureka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"eureka" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"Program ever spoke to monaco's new york correspondent henry sheridan to share the story of maude. Before i started mod. I spent about ten plus years in brand strategy working for startups and in marketing. And before that i had a few years as a legislative aide in healthcare which actually those two things together have been very formative in thinking about how to build maude and how i think about the future of this industry. When did you first have the deif mold. The first time i had the idea for maude was actually in a conversation with some designers who i was working with on a project. Cole tinker watches and they started to talk about. Why has a sexual wellness. industry never been modernized. And i thought that's the idea that i wanna pursue. This is what i've been waiting my whole career to do and it makes sense. It's that really the convergence of healthcare and building brands and that was in twenty fifteen. That's kind of relevant. Because i wanted to ask you how you knew. The time was right to start the company. Like i was going to say it might have been something much more difficult to launch even five years ago but it sounds like you had the idea that long ago. What was the context like back then in terms of the market and people's receptivity to your idea. How has that changed over time. It's a very interesting thing to think about the timing of the idea because this is an industry that has been dominated by big players legacy companies for over one hundred years and so in many ways even five years ago. The idea was quite late. This idea of making more modern industry. But i think the few years that it took to get off the ground where actually years spent well and really teed up the right timing for this category. Because it's now getting to the point where i would say. The broader conversation is sexual. Wellness is just like any other part of your wellness. And it should be treated that way. And so people have been very receptive. Tomorrow's take on the category. And i very much chalk that up to timing so it's quite interesting to think about the evolution of the five years. Spent speaking a little bit more detail. About what the sexual wellness landscape looked like back in twenty fifteen the sexual wellness industry in two thousand fifteen looked pretty similar to what. It's looked like for the past few decades. Which is that. You might buy your basics which are condoms and lubricants in a drugstore. And it's still a very stigmatized purchase. I think most people feel uncomfortable being on that. I'll sometimes the aisle is called family planning. So you can tell how did it was and still is and then you find maybe devices or toys as they're called in suck shops and so it makes this industry quite fragmented and it makes the customer experience very again like stigmatized and uncomfortable and it's a subject that so every day and so human that i just thought there has to be a better way you point out that previously these two categories were kind of sold separately. There wasn't much kind of integrated marketing as to how you could like employ them with the other. How the brought those together. I think that the idea in two thousand fifteen and it is very much the same as it was then. When i first started thinking about it was how can you make these products feel like everyday basics. How can you make them feel like essential items together and what that means. You should be able to buy them in the same place by introducing these products together. It created an intimacy brand and now our tagline is modern intimacy and we have sense extended into other product categories but those were really the foundational things to say we stand for your intimate life and we believe that all people should be able to have access to these things in a very comfortable way. Take me through how you attracted funding for mode and the kind of conversations that you had around that when you're looking for funding well when you're thinking about taking any type of vc money. I think that the first thing you have to consider what we considered was it. Is it a much larger market. Is it a big category and understanding that this very monopolized category but it's completely sort of a global issue that there are no modern brands. I knew walking into meetings with investors that this was something that really had a huge potential to be very big market size and something to change an industry so i walked in with that kind of confidence knowing that but they're also is the element of its sex and so talking about that can create some level of discomfort. But i walked in. I treated it like an everyday conversation and started to get a lot of traction so we raised around to funding and that really started with making a lot of connections and knocking on doors in two thousand seventeen and since then we have raised three rounds of funding and a lot of that came from the initial excitement around the brand both with the customer and with the press and that has since grown. And i think that it really speaks to the need so it was a journey. And how do you view the company give you view it as an e commerce company at tech company. You just mentioned the phrase like an intimacy brand how you think about the company and how did you pitch it to potential investors are. Is there a gap between the two. I pitched the company as a mission based company. Because i believe that there are actually only two types of product companies. You either focus on product and you almost commodities something or you speak to innovation or you speak to mission and this is absolutely a category. That has so much emotional. Impact in physical impact in obviously sex education especially in the united states is quite disparate and fragmented and so such a big category. That was really mission. And that's how. I pitched the company. What if you invested in something that changes culture forever and the interesting thing was that many investors took the idea home to their spouses or their college age children and said what do you think of this idea. And all of them came back and said everybody at the table. Knew that this was a good idea. And so it's spoke across generations and across genders and. i believe that's really what the mission is. All about is changing the future of sexual wellness. Describe the kind of range of products that you offer so we can get an idea of the diversity of what you're putting out there are product assortment has evolved since we started. We launched a massage candle at the end of two thousand eighteen and it took off. The customer was super excited about this. This idea of setting the mood and part of our mission has always been to offer content and so it was very easy to tell the story around setting the mood and sort of art design culture all of those things as they relate to intimacy by having this next product extension and from there we have sent launched bath and body products. That always have a bit of a cheeky twist. So they're meant to be used alone or with a partner and we have a wash. That's a page balanced body wash but it was also formulated to make a lot of bubbles. So it's great for bubble bath but this idea was to just really think about intimacy in a way that felt like almost an extension of other parts of your personal care or beauty routines and that's what we've become sort of the one. You know the one stop goto place to think.

five years five years ago henry sheridan two new york two things three rounds about ten plus years maude Tomorrow both united states two categories first first time two thousand two types two thousand seventeen two thousand fifteen first thing
Man of the People

Reply All

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Man of the People

"And the story. You're about to hear it takes place in nineteen seventeen but almost everything that happens in. It feels like it could have happened this week. Basically it starts with this young doctor john. Brinkley he's just married the love of his life many and they decided to go find a place where they can just settle down. He's going to be a town doctor and then they set out for kansas because they see an advertisement that says milford kansas population. Three thousand when you doctor. And they're like okay. We'll go west. So they travel west get milford and three thousand was a typo in fact it was population. Three hundred which say it's like the middle of nowhere. There's nobody there. This is penny lane. She's a filmmaker. She made a documentary about john brinkley. Brinkley moved to milford and they set up shop. This elderly farmer named bills. It's worth comes into the office and you know after much hemming hiring kind of manages to spit out his problem. Which is that. He's a flat tire Get it get it you know and finally the brinkley's like oh. You're impotent okay. Gotcha i'm so sorry. We have nothing for that. Like modern medical science has not solved. That problem. I'm very sorry according to brinkley. What happens next is that he and the former get into small talk and they start talking about goats talking about. How goats never seem to be impotent. They're always zero. And the farmer says something to brinkley. That will change his life. he says. Gosh it's too bad. I don't have billy goat nuts and then brinkley laughs. And then after hours of brinkley's saying no i didn't learn that in medical school. That's not how we do. Things that might now work could be dangerous. The farmer infuses to leave until brinkley agrees to try to fix impotence by giving him go testicles. There's the strangest eureka moment so then of course he tries it and it works. It works according to brinkley. Brinkley tells the world that he has created the goat gland cure. Meaning he will take goat testicles. Insert them into your scrotum and you'll be healed and not just of impotence either. He says it'll cure flatulence emphysema stomach cancer. He's got a version for women which he says will cure female infertility. I talked to this redder. Pope brock who wrote a book about brinkley charlton. He said that when patients came to bring you get the surgery it was set up so that the patients would know that they were getting exactly what they paid for right so the patient was it was local anesthetic so that he could be assured that was actually getting the goat and then Many brinkley usually brinkley's wife would do the snipping on the goat. They would bring the goat balls over opened a guy up toss them in so him up and send him out so just to be clear. This surgery is bogus utterly bogus and privately. Brinkley knows this but he's extremely good. Commencing the public that he believes in what he's selling that goat gland surgery really works. It helps that he looks extremely professional. He's got a three piece suit. He's got round glasses. This neat blonde goatee. He's everybody's idea of what a smart doctor looks like. And so they start showing up at the clinic. These nervous guys ready for the surgery their own goats in tau like you bring the you want this just clutched in your arms and your pounding on the door About pretty soon he He got his own heard out back. Because it was you know was a volume business. By that point the patient would come out browse the herd and pick one the the the goat with which he felt the most connection you know whatever. He felt simpatico. That's the good he. He chose lobster at a restaurant exactly exactly exactly so. Business is booming. Brinkley has found a great scheme. Because what happens is there are men who are impotent. Who get the surgery. And because there are evidences psychological diplo cbo effect saves them and they thanked dr brinkley and for the men that it doesn't work on their generally too ashamed to say anything about it so no matter what he wins

Brinkley John Brinkley Kansas Hemming Pope Brock Brinkley Charlton Milford Stomach Cancer Emphysema John Billy Infertility Dr Brinkley CBO
The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:51 min | 1 year ago

The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

"In December nineteen, ninety-eight, Sylvana, Polo left her home city of Cordova Argentina banned for the United States. The, sixteen year old had inherited her mother's spirit for travel and had signed up to bay a Foreign Exchange Juden. For the next three months, Silvana would be living with the six member to family in the northern Californian port city, of Eureka. The pelos Os and sons were longtime friends through mother's Ricco and Cairo. The two women met in the seventies when Carol traveled to Argentina has an exchange student herself. Carol Ray visited the country used laid off with her two year old daughter Juliana better known as Julie. But this stage the Palacios had two daughters with Sylvana the younger of the Pan. Into Julie Juliane to a similar in age but opposite in personality. Sylvana was an introvert unlock Julie more outgoing. Despite that differences, the girls formed a lifelong friendship of their own. Silvino was Jud to return home from the US in light. March nineteen ninety nine. As she was very interested in American culture, the sons had endeavoured to give her a memorable experience of their homeland. They had taken Sylvana old across the state to visit landmarks such as Disneyland Tint Fisherman's wharf. The Grand Canyon in Arizona was next on the list as was Yosemite. National Park. It took Cairo son a month to meticulously planned the perfect to road trip to Yosemite. Carol schedule was typically fool with family work and other commitments. So she made the most of every minute of her vacations. They Yosemite troop revolved around one of Julie's leading competitions and would be taking place over four days that encompassed the long weekend. Only carroo Julie, and Sylvana would be going. It was set to bay a you naked fanshawe as winter had brought snow to the region. The trip began on Friday February twelve. Carol Julie and Seven A- flew to San Francisco. From there they ha- Attica, and of two hours northeast to Stockton. City was home to the University of the Pacific where Julie's cheerleading competition took place on Saturday February. Thirteen. Julie was impressed by the campus and considered enrolling their after graduating high school. She had ambitions to become either a chef for an architect while maintaining her. For Violin and piano. Julie Caroline Sylvana, organized to return to the university for a proper tool in three days time. From Stockton the trio drove to the small farming town of Moore said known as the gateway to Yosemite. They spent the nod at the Ramada Rin before continuing on to Yosemite National. Park on the Sunday. Selena was particularly excited to see Yosemite granite cliffs waterfalls, lakes, meadows, and mountains. Shay was inactive person by nature who enjoyed our skating skiing and roller skating. She'll say loved the outdoors and hoped to study in the environmental field in the future. Carol. Julie and Venus spent death first day at Yosemite exploring pod of the pox seven hundred and fifty thousand acres of. Rugged. Wilderness. Before and they drove through the dense and far raging forests along highway one forty to the nearby town of. El Porto. There they checked in at the Saito Lodge. An affordable hotel on the banks of the mess said reveal. On the evening of Monday February fifteen, yen sund received a phone call from his wife Carol. Shea. Happily spoke of her time away with the Julie and Silvy Narine Yosemite. They had spent the previous two days exploring the park and was settling in for their phone or gnawed at the hotel.

Sylvana Julie Carol Ray Juliana Better Julie Juliane Argentina Silvino Carol Cairo Disneyland Tint Fisherman's Wh Silvana Carroo Julie Yosemite Cordova Palacios Carol Julie JUD Eureka
'The Writing On The Wall' Finds Poetry Behind Bars, Projects It Onto Buildings

All Things Considered

04:26 min | 1 year ago

'The Writing On The Wall' Finds Poetry Behind Bars, Projects It Onto Buildings

"The wall takes the words of incarcerated people beyond prison and jail walls. The project began small but gained new visibility through projections of the writer's words on the sides of buildings in the U. S and Mexico. John Kayla's reports that it is a collaboration between a conceptual artist, a college professor and those whose words they want to share. Devon Simmons served 15 years in New York prisons lens hanging off the tree limbs. Skeletons of these two range in strange fruits with strong braided brownstone. Intrigued by envy, he reads from a poem by Carl Burn hard that is part of the writing on the Wall Project. Simmons graduated from the prison to college Pipeline program, which included a seminar with artist Hank Willis Thomas, one of the co founders of the writing on the Wall. Speaking via Skype, Thomas says working with his incarcerated students sparked the idea of sharing their creative output with those on the outside is a eureka moment. Look at all the wisdom look at all the heart that is imprisoned in our society. There was a huge hypocrisy or irony that I thought we could and should be focusing on There was so much poetry and there just so much beauty drawings, thoughts so much reflection of humanity. That's Bozz Dries ing, the other co founder of the writing on the wall. She also founded the Incarceration Nations Network, a coalition of prison reformers, and she teaches English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Technically, I was teaching English classes. But really, I was teaching criminal justice through the lens of humanities. And that to me is what the writing on the wall is. The idea for the project came winds rising. There show Thomas some of the writing she's been given by incarcerated people. Two enlisted architects to design mobile installation move that resembled a prison cell with the words of the incarcerated on the walls, floor and ceiling. The idea was to take the booth two cities around the U. S and Canada. But after it's New York debut, the tour was cancelled by the pandemic in prison by covert Bye, Mr Roland Davis. We were taken over by a virus, more cities in any terrorist attack. As the days and weeks turn into months, Americans locked themselves into their homes and fear of what was to come. We? We had to lock inside our cages because it was the safest place for us to be. With the tour cancelled. The organizer's got the idea of projecting those words on public buildings, often ones that are part of the criminal justice system. They enlisted a company called Chemistry Creative to come up with a projection system. The last installation was at Brooklyn Public Library Standing outside chemistry. Creative producer Sidney McDonald describes the first projection. Nobody was out on the streets. There was still very strict fans on everything being closed, and nobody actually really sawed in really life besides the people who were there, but the projections on but since then the writing on the wall has been Seen in Detroit, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Washington, DC Columbus, Ohio, in Mexico City again or just Hank Willis Thomas. There is nothing that Eisen artists or anyone could really do or say that was more extraordinary. Them things that these artists were doing as you say. I talk about those artists, and some of them had not thought about themselves artists, but it was clear that they were. One of those artists is divine Simmons, who is now working as a paid curator and tour guide for the project. If you take the time to actually read some of the material is in the installation. You recognize that people

Wall Project Hank Willis Thomas Devon Simmons New York John Jay College Of Criminal J John Kayla Chemistry Creative Incarceration Nations Network Brooklyn Public Library Mexico Professor Writer Carl Burn Canada Co Founder Mr Roland Davis U. S Eisen Mexico City Sidney Mcdonald
What it's like inside a prisoner transport van

WNYC Programming

08:30 min | 1 year ago

What it's like inside a prisoner transport van

"Know, with like two seats on either side. It's like a Greyhound bus. And I mean, instead of a cushy ceased at the Greyhound bus is happy. They had these little part plastic siya and you have to deal with these CEOs and every guy we talked to about this had something to say about how the CEO's act when they're on those transport buses. And you Talk. I'll pull this bus over and kick you. And if you get up without asking to go to the restroom, you will get DP. So what is dp me? Disciplined, physically physically disciplined, And if they do hear some talking, they're going to stop the bus Pull you off the bus. Give you a little bit of what they call it. They used to call it. What was it wrote there? That's what they do. Religiousness, just a gang a threat to us and what's the longest right that you've been on? It was three days going from prison, a prison of prison prison prison collect and everybody that was going to the shu in other places, and we went all the way up north to Crescent City, which is like Eureka. Oh, you're almost in Oregon and I actually went through organ to get to Pelican Bank Indian stopped at one of the prisons and you'll stay there overnight. And sometimes they put you to say you've been a hallway just sitting on a bench all night waiting on them to come get me, But I say it is nice. Uh, I've had some hippie, right? I believe you, but not like Mambo Alley. My name's Elita Bora. I served 12 little over 12 years in the California Department of Corrections been home about four years now. Back and wanted to say was around 2008. I got transfer away from San Quentin because they needed the cells for hire custody, incarcerated people so They shipped me off to California Men's colony. Okay. But the thing that is really difficult for Ali is that he had been taking college classes at San Quentin, right, And they don't have a program like that at CMC. So when he got transferred All of that stopped. And so I Li started doing everything he could to get back to San Quentin. The executive director of college programs like Live Just Hang tight. We're going to try to get you back so you can finish your college degree. I was like, OK, cool. Pretty soon Ali got called to a classifications here, which is an administrative thing you have to do before your transfer. So they called me two classifications like Yeah, she did it. She's get me back to San Quentin. So I go up in the classifications hearing and they're like, Yeah, we'll put you up for transfer and I'm just sitting there. Got my arms folded a little bit, You know, thinking, Yeah, they did this. This is yeah. You go into an out of state facility. Out of state facility. Yeah, they used to do that do that. It was common when the federal courts told California tto Lord overcrowded and as was like you've got to be kidding me. I'm supposed to be going back to San Quit in the classification hearings. They don't even let you talk man. I tried to talk. They just like well about to bring that up with your counselor and went back to the dorm. I was devastated. So Ali, facing another long ride on the great ghouls. This time he's headed out of state and a world away from San Quentin in the college classes, and it's like when you move anywhere. It's like you're starting a new life on ly In this situation. You have no control over it. You have no idea what that life is going to be. You're taking away from everything that's familiar. And your life is totally in somebody else's hands.

San Quentin ALI California California Department Of Corre CEO Elita Bora San Quit Mambo Alley Pelican Bank Indian Oregon Crescent City Religiousness Executive Director LI CMC
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Ghost of Tsushima: Creative Director Interview (with Spoilers)

Beyond!

55:06 min | 1 year ago

Ghost of Tsushima: Creative Director Interview (with Spoilers)

"Have a very special guests with us this week that we're both very excited to talk with Jason. Connell from sucker punch. Thank you so much for joining US A. Awesome ear. Very happy to have you of course to go super in depth on Kgo Suma, so for those who are watching end jumping in. Be warned there will be some spoiler fil talking here if you haven't played through the game if you haven't. Checked out everything you want to in the game beforehand. Please do that first and then come back. There's a lot to dive into. We're going to be jumping into as much as we can. Of course if you want spoiler free impressions. We did record episode that a little earlier. Even can go check that out, but. There's so much that we can jump into this game I off. Jason I. Just want to say congratulations for recording this on the day. The game is starting to roll out on launch. Worldwide is already available in some territories as where speaking so congratulations to you on the team on that It's very exciting for to finally be out there as a fan of it and I'm sure it must be exciting for the team. Yes, it's a super exciting to have it out. There cited everybody host their photo mode favorites sin. Just enjoy the Games. I feel like an Brian I think this is true for both you and me. We could probably spend the next forty minutes talking exclusively about photo mode. Yeah, no I. Just get into that very quickly. What you've created, my favorite voted in video game history, but also. You might notice you. Create one of the most not-so-subtle advertising tools. That is perfect for this game. Because every time I seen pictures of it I WANNA? Play it again, and I think for a lot of people who were just sort of like on the outside, looking in a video games in general like people who aren't just totally head down on stuff all the time. They're like wait what that's! That's a video game. Where do I play I play it? They're going to get that so Yeah, that's a very very smart. If you guys it's absolutely stunning game. A cool. Photo of his crazy because we were one of the first, you know infamous second son was one of the first. At least I know of modern games that have put like a like a photo mode in in that game. It was just like this cool idea to show off all the cool particles and lighting. That game was a while known for. But it was wasn't crafted as a personality around. It was the cool photo mode, and then over time over the last few years. You have these games that out and Spiderman my favorite of version of this where they like adds the flavor of their game to its photos like tied to the personality of that gain. On, the building tops, doing like little cell fees and Doing it with a phone. That was awesome made it. You need to spiderman so when we were like. Hey, what are we gonNA do for voter mood? To? Whatever the ghost photo mode. One, it's gotta be way better than our first one because. Our, follow up one and two. It's gotta be semantically. You know connected to the game, so we're like. Well motion in Wind I. Haven't we like? Make it less about a static image. You can do that, too, but have be about moving frame that I think is so beautiful about our game kind of spun out from there. I didn't think it was odd that you give the main character, a Selfie, stick and the iphone. His drone that goes along with. Little you know little out of place, but I thought butyl. Oh God you know it's been incredible thing to play around with, and you can do what Brian said. Every time I see more of it. It's one of those things where I've been playing every night. Still in, it's like Oh, no, I need to go jump back in the middle of the day. Because like Oh. That's a great spot I never thought. I could take a photo of I've been a particularly obsessed with going to bamboo strike locations and trying to get all the great photos. I cannot have those spot often. You know like perfectly placed at an edge or something. I sort of wondering. Because obviously this was built more with like the photo mode in mind as you development went on, because it's become so much bigger, what was world creation influenced at all by the photo mode, or were there any aspects of designing this game that were influenced by it because it is more like prevately used feature these days I guess than back when second came out. You know. A little secret you know we. We always knew we'd have a photo modem. We knew that this ambitious version of like I. said a second ago better and more dramatically connected. Owning, really work on it until pretty late, so you know we were so. Dedicated to the stories in crafting the world, so when it came to the beauty of the world. That add add everything that's in the game. I would have to imagine that that had the most iterating over anything, because it's one of the first things you do before you have the whole story articulated and put into the game. Certainly don't have cut scenes. You know it's like you're laying out terrain and at that like how does the island look and then it gets into the direction the feeling Cutting, trees down growing trees, making procedural tools like the world is the by far the most iterative on thing now. There was a point where we're like. This is how we make our game. Look good clearings. Big giant swath of like in forests, you know that you can see for miles. Off using color as like landmarks again, the Golden Forest, or read flower fields, and then, and then a you know, certainly that sort of made its way into some of our features of a photo, but the the world designed stuff. took the lead on on end photo mode. Okay, now that we've created this amazing awesome place. How do we utilize the photo mode in like critical photo that will. Take advantage of how great our team at did at creating a beautiful world. I think one of my favorite things about this game is the sort of balanced that it's constantly striking Between being sort of completely serene, and then the music swells up and swords or out, and they're slashing against each other. How hard was it to sort of get that that tone down because I could see. You know I think in in lesser hands I could be a very kind of dangerous. Push and pull, but I feel like you totally nailed that and I think that that's like some people when they look at an open world game want like nonstop jam-packed activities in in your team made the decision to pull back and let things breath every now and then How did all that come together? Well you know for me. It's the first game that I was certainly a visual director on, and so I I would I you learn something about yourself with everything you create, and for me I personally learned that I don't have a natural tendency to like create incredible. Violence, I just wasn't that was uneven. Favor Games, bloodborne like as absolutely my favorite game. Guide. You're on this show. This is gonNA be worthwhile and. About it anytime. But no, seriously like. That's my favorite game, but. When we were crafting the world would I navigated towards with Joanna. Who's environment our leader? This did this amazing a blog post recently on playstation bar. was the beauty of it was taking taking a moment to breathe in, and then I realized that some of my favorite games that are not. Show the classes certainly embraced the idea of atmosphere in a sense of this and you know I donate Fox's is is resonates. Conversations resonated with him as well so then then the conversation shifted into. Okay well. We definitely have it. We have a summer game. So you know without saying anything else as you say Amer game, you know you're going to be hitting things with a four-foot razor blade so. You know violence is GonNa come so we certainly work on that stuff. allied and we wanted to be great and gritty, and the you know like you really WanNa feel like you have contact when you have contact but the other stuff doesn't come as natural, and you have to actually work on that stuff to balance it out, you really do, and so that means like the idea is about creating Haiku, which was actually named idea You know really. Or believe it was taking a moment to. Allow the beauty to take hold, and not what I think is cool about the ICU that I hope people enjoy about it is is that they're not tied till like progression like you're not. You're not like intrinsically forced to go, do it? You know there's a sense of you have to have the wonder and curiosity desire to do it. It's not like game telling you go do this to reach next level certainly, a lot of that is tied to corporation auto out to have to consider that, but it is. It is a work philosophy to try to get that balance of that contrast It takes years to get right for sure. I really enjoyed the Haiku sections actually He was like you said. It's sort of provided like this. This relaxing breeder and I did like the you were able to select different things who essentially collate them into one kind of fresh Haiku each time. Yeah I I mean I did every single side quests in every single objective in this game, but I I really enjoyed those wow awesome. The accuser, some of my favorite ones to the cinematography. You know it was at the moment to like. You know certainly we call them breathing. Moments definitely say that studio, but it was kind of a moment. Regis Art Geek out a little bit like the people who do the cameras. Mottaki, they can place it in to get the right motion and you know, and then the writers have an opportunity to like. Give you give you a couple of cool options. Just the beauty kinda comes through which is which in the end has been a very positive thing for the experience. Yeah, the balance that Brian was. Speaking to how you were sort of describing how that all came together? I could imagine. It's a very fine line between making sure it's peaceful and calm in certain areas, but. It's still engaging for the player because you could always run the risk of it. Being something that the player doesn't want to engage with, but as Brian. Saying like finding those high coups feels like this wonderful moment of solace after I have assassinated an entire Cam Mongols. And need to reflect on Jin's life, but also just the world I, it's this really great balanced that a I think as Brian was sort of saying you always get in games, but it feels so refreshing to hear. And it's a huge part of our philosophy. How we treat. Treat the game. Whether it's a Haiku great example, he could probably keep talking about, but you know the music style music how the music comes on not having things like combat while you're doing, shrine climbs or anywhere near them so that we can let those be their own experience, and so are these, are we? Everything wanted these features that are not mainline missions. Our conversation is like about how much combat how much non-combat and what is the purpose and what are the? What's the feeling for its existence like what what is the emotional goal for for these features and these are conversations? We have a lot and sometimes triple times over we try. We don't like it. We try something else. Well and for me, what's really interesting is sort of the place that all of these features and the things you go on, have sort of in the context of sucker punches past work, because it is I've been such a huge fan of both cooper franchise and infamous. Stir a year and. You know you get increasingly larger, but often more urban. City expenses that you're exploring a lot. In both of those franchises to certain extent here you're out in the wild. There are of course settlements and encampments and things like that, but there is a there's a lot of stretches where it can just be the world around you that you're exploring and I was sort of wondering on a world design level. How do you? How do you balance? Making all of these locations unique to explore as well and interesting. Even though you know a lot of can just be more, the environment's like what are the challenges that come with that? Yeah, so one of our. Our Contractors Jeff He. He talks a lot about content density, and what is the correct density and I really am really thankful that he brought that conversation up to light so much because It's such a you know Thinking about if you're currently doing something, you're going across the world and run into something. How much further would you have to ride your horse before you might find the next thing, or can you see the next thing from where you currently are? How how dense is it and I really enjoyed that conversation? Because it let us think about what's the right philosophy for for our game and it it certainly it allows us to you know if we want to in one place, you just completed something, and you should be able to generally speaking, look around and find one more thing on horizon or see the shrine trying on top of the mountain. It influence our world design alive, because when we first had the game built for the I you know I'd say maybe two years. It was a lot of forest. It was a ton of trees and it was cool, but you always were felt like you were in this like. Tunnel beautiful, but really deforestation. which does a couple things one is? It is very cool, but. It makes it really hard to know where you are without a compass or many map. Something telling you kind of giving you that extra information that your brain is just really needing. So what we did is we started opening up fields and I definitely some shadow, the classes photos out and was like fields as as reference vm. Because it just feels so epic when you're going through field, but but you know the criticism it could be that it's boring or something like that, and and really have to embrace a philosophy that it won't be boring because there's beautiful music. There's five things now that you can see what you want to do next because you're in a field, there's more clearings and it created a Great beauty in the game, but also more opportunity to engage with that density and I I. Really I think that that was one of the conversations that was ongoing throughout the project, but we landed in a really. I think unique spot for. When when when you? When your team was the helping this game, you obviously weren't anticipating a significant portion of the world's population to be stuck indoors for months on end, but At one I mean there were obviously there. Are you know a lot of sort of like entertainment? Things that have come out during quarantined. That didn't really. Fair as well due to their. SORT, of like the way they were delivered or their subject material something that, but this is a game that I really more than ever appreciated as a guy who's in a two bedroom apartment really appreciated huge open fields and. Mountains in like sprawling rivers and seas and stuff like that but I think one of my favorite things about the big open fields is that there's always something? Or there is like a lone tree. And you're just sort of naturally drawn towards it, and I found that like that sort of like beautiful use of negative space to be like so powerful. In terms of like never felt to me like there's nothing ahead of you. This is boring. It always felt to me like this. Is this is this is like a sort of triumphant use of minimalism and and charging towards something. To reveal that there's like one loan item in the distance was so much more engaging tomato like at a mini map that had a hundred time trials, but Hamas other stuff like I. Found Myself uncovering the dog on the entire map which. I was I was like basically riding around in spirals like in that movie alto like I was trying to. Five is in half the time I was on foot to. It was really wonderful game to explore so I. WanNa ask you about that the. The the sort of the way exploration on unfolds in this game is something I. Really Really Love and I think a lot of open world games are going to take note of following the wind and talking to people and following Fox's two locations rather than just you know overtly stating the player. This is where you're GonNa go, or you go to. The map in this big thing opens up. All that come together. What was the push and pull on that to sort of find the right way to keep players in the no, but without making like overwhelming them with information. Yeah I'll talk about kind of our studio kind of struggles, but I also kind of throw in my own, maybe personal philosophy, too. So I. I judge Games my favorite game, especially them really harshly by. How does it feel if you're? You're actually not doing anything on the sticks. I would if you're just sitting there. Just sitting in the world, you're standing in the world. You're on your horse in the world like is there. Is there a what's the feeling and some of my favorite games by just sitting there? There's like things that go through your mind. Like why do we? What are you anticipating? That are stuck on the story or like. Where's that next objective like you're just what's going through your mind? because. That's when you're not doing anything. That's what you're thinking of next like. You're just taking in the beauty looking around our game I hope that translates into that sense of exploration and sense of curiosity like if you do stop for a second yearly, you're not already on kind of a train of thought it is more. One of curiosity is one of like. Hey, what? What do I want to do next? Oh, there's something over there. There's something of their. Oh, I wonder band before, so they're having gone to could check it out and I. think that the more information you were to have on your screen compasses many maps. It kinda answers those questions before you even have time to ask the question. It's just like the dots right there. Let's go do the DOT. It doesn't matter what the DOT is. It's just there's thing let's go do it, and so that that to me is is a really important part of what I think. The Games, Tries to do in the world, and and certainly we did not have the wind when we started on this project at all. In fact, what the wind was which is has got this cool story I'll say quick is. on the first direction slides on the you know we did. A presentation is like one of the first presentation out the way look and feel and everything moves was was one of them like a wind. We're going to double triple quadruple down on win, and you know there's a lot of attack that has to go into that. He got Capes moving I gala hair moving. You gotta get trees and Bushes, and especially for procedurally generated now artistically procedurally generated world. That's really tough. Two years later. Something like that. That became true and you've standing I'm standing in this world and we had other elements we were helped. Augmenting are kind of navigation and get around the world and I'm just like holy crap. The wind is amazing. It actually works at that time. It always like went from East West or West. East or something I can't remember always just directional and it's just. It's really good. And then we started having conversations like how going to get more stuff off the screen to stay in the is like beautiful world more and more because it's just. It's really stunning even years ago. And a one point I had this idea like. The Wind. It sounds kind of crazy and Adrian is like our longtime worked on has been sucker punch. Long Time. They tried a little quick prototype with me. We had like fifteen people play at were removed all the you I just to hey. Can you just just try to follow it and just and it sounds crazy, but follow in if you can get to that hot spring or that on. And it worked like the first prototype fourteen out of the fifteen people were able to easily get there so cool. Yeah and I. I was like Oh. Yeah, we have to do this. Question. Like. This is something that is going to be unique to the game and then an analyzing. Say on them about the wind because I can do it all day, but is it had like the matic ties to the island in historical kind of. Poetic, Tian's to you know. The Mongols came in as typhoon sweeps them all out to see and. You know we name the sword the sky storm after that you know him being a storm, a metaphorical storm on the island for for the island, rooting for the island, and then it was like about nature, and then the animals came along, and I, you know it just felt like a bunch of like one of these critical pieces you don't know exists, and then you find it, and you're like that fifth straight there and does and then nearly. Oh, I, think we have a good. I can see the puzzle now so. Cool, it was cool journey. Having having that comes away. It all it feels so true to the world that the team has created in those moments. Because you know, I'm I'm a completion is player like if you give me a list of a thousand things to go collect if you give me, you know like an infamous. Charge to go collect I. Collect all of them, but there's something that I think does speak so much to this world and end you wanting to be invested in that. It is really by pulling everything. Out of the screen that you're looking at and just letting you look at the world you get more familiar with it, and you start to learn more about Oh. Yeah, I've taken that pass before. That leads to that pillar of honor or there's that cemetery over there as you start to. Trek across the land. It really gets you invest in the world in a way that I think just having a list or a neon sign to tell you where to go would. Deliver it in the same way. Yeah, that's great. That's so. That's the goal so I'm glad you had that experience. And I it's one of those things you know that the open world I think speaks so well to what the team really accomplish with this game, but one of the things I was curious about wasn't and I know. We talked about this a little bit, but released, but since we can. Talk to the island as whole, but what was the? I? Guess the poll the. The back and forth poll of wanting to make sure you stay true to the spirit of this real world location, and honor the history and the people that are but also create a world that at the end of the day would be fun to run around or write a horse around in as a game. Yeah and it's a great topic, and it's kind of been the the struggle for and I would say struggle in a creative sense. It's the creative. From from from once, we actually knew we were making Susha and we started doing all this research, and and you learn so much about the island. Like the fact that at that time it was likely to be like ninety five percent covered in dense forest. Which again I told you we tried. We tried very dense forest in. It's just hard to ride a fun horse through tree. Trees it's. Pretty tough. Also, it's incredibly hilly. We went there just like it's just hill after hill after mountain after Mount After Mountain, also challenging to create a interesting layouts in combat spaces in so. So, we worked with our team in Japan. We're like hey, this is how we were planning on You know being inspired by the shape of the islands. It looks very similar to the actual shape, but here's some kind of Ford as we'd like to take or game reasons you know, make the game more fun to to roam around. The landscapes in have layouts that have. Have Cool puzzle climbing challenges, or what have you were interesting missions, and and they were totally for it you know. And they gave us feedback of maybe when we went too far and then they also they know is in a fun way. They gave us feedback of win. Hey, you could go further with us, and so that was. It was a lot of ultimately. We're super inspired by history, and what happened and then the general beauty of greater. The greater nature of Japan as a whole, it's definitely hugely inspiring to us but we also make in a game and a PR and original story and a lot of things that. Have to Challenge it, but work in tandem with it, so it's it's definitely been a challenge I'm in a good way and we learn so much. And I will say the last thing I'll say on that. Is that within Joyon on the environment? Our team myself in the constitution. We talk a lot about like realism. And You know like A. Maybe painted realism, or maybe, how can we do it like a slightly stylized version of that? And and and you know this is not even if you've ever been to Seattle only did infamous. It wasn't really a stone by stone. Kind of recreation. Roads aren't lined up exactly. It's sort of like if you blur your eyes, you're like Oh. Yeah, that's definitely definitely Seattle like it rains. A lot of people drink coffee. PUNK ROCK and grunge music. It's You know the things that are there the spacing? Like the things you would expect, but it's not the like. Let's put a magnifying glass over, and let's get it like perfectly accurate and we take that same philosophy here. We want to feel like that. This is plausibly. Dass what it could feel like. That's what if we could do smell through it. That would we would try to. Feeling into music, we're going for a as a is a is a main heart. Smell will actually be unlocked on the playstation six. Thirty I. Have Rumor, we have an today since three. Hey listeners. We know you love gaming and have excellent taste, so we want to tell you about the official. The last of podcast in the show writer podcasters stand up comedian and huge fan of the. Host Christian Spicer we'll revisit the first game and talk with the people who created that critically acclaimed work hit. Also give you what you've all been waiting for. A behind the scenes look into the last of US part to Christian wanted to crawl into the minds of these visionaries and talents who created this highly anticipated game the podcast. We'll recap the news story. Story and episodes five through eight while also diving deep into the making of the game in the first episode. Christian will talking with Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson also known as Joel and Ellie may land combat designer, Anthony Newman, and the writer and creative director of the last of US Neil Druckman. The whole series is crammed with conversations with developers invoice actors. The official, the last of podcast episode one arrived on June ninth, and they'll be releasing new episodes of this limited series every Tuesday for the following eight weeks available now on Itunes spotify, and all your favorite audio sources, stream, or download the official, the last of his podcast from June ninth. The the combat in this game is awesome, and that's coming from somebody who to be completely transparent. Wasn't crazy about it. At first 'cause my immediate reaction was. There's no lock on. Think what do you mean? There's no lock on like you can't. You can't have a certified again without lock on and as as I grew to. Appreciate. The sort of dynamic happenstance of a dashing between those four stances and. Fighting different types of enemies. In synchronicity while switching and switching back and forth using my sub moves and everything I was like. This is one of my favorite combat systems interview ever But what what? How did how did that decision? Come to not have have lock on? was that was at a debate internally in the studio? Because that's to me, that's one of those things that people just expect from a video game and I found myself not even thinking about it after a few hours in. I. It's definitely debate right like it's A. It was heavily debated and talked about how you know. From all corners of the CEO there was not some like. I mean because it's a it's a standard. There is a standard anytime. You go against the standard. You need to prove it out and. I'm glad we tried something different than you know. As person bloodborne like my favorite game, I like games that allow you to really kind of hone in and focus, and and control that since a control comes, comes with locking, but and you know, and certainly as a samurais sense of control is a huge fantasy so Yeah, man. We talked about it a ton Maybe when it comes to combat, I would say it's in the top three conversations that we had over the entire course of the project while. But I have to give massive. Shout out to you know. One of the studio heads. You know I've found Sucker Punch Christopher. Men he's he's behind the core design, a lot of the combat and he he works out of the code for it, and there's another Guy Ted. Who is awesome designer? And he liked those two brains man. They worked together, and they figured out a way to create something that is first of all feels like you're hitting the person when you do hit them like it's a tandem as animation, so it's not like a hit box based. It's like these. This animation links up to this one. Is I very newbie? Animation Brain. And it's not just like the slash through thing right, and so they feel like you're hitting the person it feels. A goal is a gritty feeling, but it's also incredibly fast paced at times. You know as you get like five or six people around you you can be, you could be like. Changes. In planning, and when you're going to do the smoke bomb, go around the building and do another. Jump down from the top, you know. It's just like a it. Almost like a the style of it is is better with how the walk on. That's kind of the thing that we found over time especially when she became pro at it. And locking on actually with slow down, maybe in some ways and a sense of control will be got out of it instead was things like standoffs in duels, obviously assassinating somebody having that jump on, somebody gives you that, too, but we decided to really push that those moments or mythic abilities I think are. Usually will help take out people pretty quickly. The mythic abilities are interesting because I I think i. I I'm really glad that this game never really went like supernatural despite having the Word Ghost, in the title. There's. There's other there's an alternate version of this game. Were you guys just want preserved and people are summoning dragons and stuff like that. I appreciate that a lot of the crazy stuff that you got away with felt grounded even like the fire sort is ridiculous, but there's like. Oh there's there's sort of like a scientific explanation. Yeah. And then when you start doing some really intense stuff that feels deliberately over the top like dude, get terrified and they starts crawling away like. Is Watching people just straight up running around. Disappear and stuff like that. It's crazy like this is a i. mean even when we pitches his game. This was another heavily debated. Topic is going to be fantasy based or not, and obviously nate and I felt really strongly as well as many other people that we should not make it fantasy base in like high fantasy base because. It really those first of all there's. Several of those games out there already, and they do a wonderful job and I love neo I love sector, Oh, these games are awesome and they lean on that a little bit more as their unique. You know and so. Good. It's smart of us not to do that, but the reason why we didn't do the reason we did was because we were definitely were focusing a little bit more on the Human Story certainly one of the world to feel plausibly real. And you know if you like, I'll take the example. You just threw out there like having people fall in there, but get scared. Scoot away, man if you could just like, pull out a fucking dragon every five minutes. Scares them like I feel like a real challenge to overcome like and so you have to be constrained. So that when we do pull out something that's really incredible or scary or something like that that it actually has wait to it, you know and. I one of the things I do love about our game in might be some of my favorite content, actually mythic missions because. They. A build up the idea that people were legends like they talk about people in their connection to the island. The lightning one is a great example where you know, they burn the black sand, the sands black, which always like wire, the sands black back answer black, and it just bill out as they build up this legend of people that may have come before you, which is Kinda cool because? because. You're kind of building your own legend. To maybe one day, people talk about mythic stories of the ghost You know that humans can do maybe slightly crazy incredible in your living, example of that and people tell tall tales. I think that's cool. I love win. Jin would go around to the stories and people would be like. There's ghosts in the woods and he's like. No, there's not. Watching watching the people run away after a battle, though my favorite things in the game because it's it teeters on like on on like. Comedy, you would find in like vintage Kung Fu movies where somebody would come and kick. A bunch of Bass and one guy would be like away. Runaway ended every single time was I would let him run like maybe like hundreds of feet pull out my arrow. Cruel Man I know you you put it there. You know you gotta sit there, don't. If you give Brian the high ground. He will let them run as far as he wants to. I what I do love going back to the mythic tells them. You know maybe people one day telling the story of the Ghost I. I'm always sort of a sucker for. Stories that are about storytelling to a certain extent, because I do think you get so much of the human nature that we all deal with on a day to day basis of why we tell stories and everything and I I love that that permeates so much of this game, and not just in the quest, but on the on the ques- structure as a whole in this game I think is really unique, but it works really well. Because as Brian was saying earlier, you can go to a house in. Someone's saying Oh. There are nearby. Please help me or someone one of my favorite stories early on one of the side missions I found was. A woman send you to get food from the bandit that stole it from her. And then you bring the food back and she's like. Oh, thanks! I finally have food down. You're like. Wait a second. That wasn't yours to begin with. I just killed all those guys because you can't, there's. There's this. Stark sadness to a lot of the stories that I think really works in this game and I was just curious on like a total storytelling. Horrible 'cause there are moments of levity. You know like everything with Kennedy I think is so great, but how do you you know balance? I think this is a land and a group of people who are under siege. They're under attack by the suppressive force. At the same time. They are living their lives. There's this humanity going on the island. Hugs, what are some of the struggles that come up and try to tell those stories? Yeah, well first of all. When you started telling me, which story were, I was like racking my brain like which? It was so many. I I know it's crazy and I'm gonNA. Play through a bunch probably that I've played through in a long time, I play retail, but. You know It's balanced because you don't want it to be this like we did not want our game to be this like heavy thing that was constantly hitting you over the head with a that was just not what we wanted for this particular game. Think anybody really goes from bad particularly. I think they're always in goal, but but in it's hard, though because invasion and you wanna see desperation, and you WanNa see like these people have struggles. And frankly you know we want to. You know it's not always like dude. Go kill things, and so you WanNa hear you know people having. Their kids, or this or that like our parents like I. Don't know you just want to hear something that sounds like these people are struggling a little bit. But you know the when it comes to the writing and those stories, most of the stories do most of them do exist to try and reflect at the world has been in invaded, invaded place and. For people that are like these allies, and you engage with those those will get a little bit more in depth than traveling of their story, and for these little small one off encounters. Just say look even even the hasn't class is affected greatly by this and hopefully feel a sense of remorse for them or sadness for them, maybe a sense of duty that why you're doing this stuff, but as for the tone of it. I genuinely like a somber tone in general, I think Sambre is is not dark. Sombre is not grotesque. Sambas is just like a like A. Light sadness to things and I felt like that light sadness in a world that is so incredibly. Beautiful is kind of a nice. Balance and I think we look at it now that way and to some extent. That's a really good way putting now that now that you say that. It makes perfect sense because. You have all these incredible like you know. There's Fox's in this you know. Like. Rainstorms the beautiful trees and yellow leaves, but then you go, do these side quests on. You're like Oh. Wow, that was. Your family died and you can save them and you're like damn. That hit me hard that one. Particularly, there was one side quest for like now I know, too. Hard that one's talents so hard and You know there that one people on on the team who? Created that one, and then like you know as we get through the Polish face like Alan, somebody went through and added a bunch of extra work to that one for animation, and like kneeling down, and you know I you know in from liking that mission to really like connecting with more, and this is a small thing right like this is not a. Two hour long you know big big mission. It's very straightforward and simple cement to just reflects the tone of the world, a little bit and Alan Dow was one of the ones that, even though it's a small moment in your entire through I think improved a lot of the last course of the project I'm glad it exists. That's awesome. Yeah, I I, don't even know if I necessarily have a question about it, but I'm just curious to hear more about the the construction of the the site quests when it comes to the side tails when it comes to those the supporting cast that you get because I do I do think one of my favorite things. Throughout sucker punches, history has been that there is of course he usually a pretty great main character, but also this really great supporting cast as well, and you know going back to sign infamous now with ghost. I loved finding out more about Yuna and lady Moscow and just everyone at the pace that you want to in the world. And that balance I guess my question is because I. do think that's some of my favorite story. Telling him the Games in the game comes from those lines. How do you balance having this stuff? Be Optional I guess if you if a player just wants to go through the main story, but also encouraged people to want to keep going back and revisit these stories in these characters. Yeah Yeah! It's a question you know we From I is long as I can remember. I think I, think earliest pitches of the game we talked about. How we really wanted to create sort of this. Anthology of short stories. know these little little side branches off the main trunk. You know that you could. You'RE GONNA. You'RE GONNA get invited to them on the main truck main story. You'RE GONNA. Get invited them and maybe even once or twice in an engaged with them, but it's up to you hopefully, engaging enough for that story relates to you. It's up to you to kind of go. Finish out the rest of that branch, and we do a lot of stuff like we try to reward you for doing these things but I find that those things are They're good and I'm super glad. Glad reward you in different ways for playing these, but I find that the beauty of those those allies missions. If you will Masako. Norio characters is that they're just they're. They're far more developed in terms of like there are like what they need out of the world in their stories are interesting, and and they all have a different perspective on you and life, and you know in an what I what I think is kind of cool about creating a world like this is that you have to be okay with having content that exists. You're not forced to play. And you have to embrace that you have to because that. That is what makes it joyful when you go on your own ambition to go through it. It's not that you were told to go. Do it was in the Golden Path? And there were versions of the game earlier that a lot of these characters stories were more interconnected to Go Path. Through play, testing and feedback in her own kind of iteration process. We ended up where they are. Which I think is the right spot. which is you introduce them and then? Over your curiosity, we can push them push. You can go enjoy them your own Yossi, and there. Some of them are five or six missions long. And I think that's the right model, but it takes some iteration to get to that that that's spot for us. Even having late in the game the I think it's two missions for Eureka that pop up after you've revisited home. Just was such a such a Gut Punch. In the midst of as Jin, story is starting to come, full circle meant to have this exploration both more into him, but also into her life It's it was like as you were saying I, it felt so much more rewarding because I, saw it out that story within the. Yeah I think that that's A. It's not an easy philosophy to hold you now. as a director or as a contributor designer artist, because it means that somebody is going to get a bunch of people, not GonNa, play your mission bench people are not going to see your artwork, and and it's really hard to like talk about that because I want everyone to who worked on this game at Sakkara Punch to just like the super proud of it and love every moment that they cred tributed, too, but that's one where it's like. Yeah, but your thing is optional, and I can really bad, but it. In these cases it is for the for a greater feeling that. The people that will engage with it will probably tear out will probably love or be maybe even their favor mission of the game, even not the golden path I gave might be their favorite moment in the game nest. Because you, you let them engage it at their own will in. That's A. that's a hard philosophy to to. kind of stomach, but I think it's I. think it's a really healthy one for the type of game that ghost is. It absolutely plays into who I I think. My favorite thing about the game. Is that Me In the act of playing the game, so has to the game halfway in a presents all of these options, but I have to go exploring too, and I feel encouraged and want to explore and of my favorite times playing have just been putting a dot on the map letting the wind guy. A thousand kilometers, and if I if something stops me, stop if it doesn't I just keep going until something else. Interest me awesome. It's a calming experience which I don't often say I think about games at the moment. That's exactly how I played, too I would just put a marker somewhere completely random very far from me and just go there and see what I ran into along the what along the way with stories popped up which new characters I would meet, that would show me points of interest and stuff like that. and I think that that loop was really smart in terms of having sort of random gangs of bad guys. Patrolling the land and you'd run into them, and they'd have somebody kidnapped, and you'd rescue that person and that person would tell you another place to go. It felt like you're constantly pulling on these little threads. and I loved that so much was did that did that all take awhile to come together? Like outside of the wind is sort of the way the. The optional stuff and the sort of like randomize character you know excursions and stuff all interconnect. How how was it bringing all that stuff together to create the flow that you guys ended up with? The I I you both sound like you've played it exactly the way that I would recommend somebody to play, which is like hey, you know every now and then just throw down and go that direction and see what you find, and and if you don't find some great than go to your Golden, Pastora that's awesome, but try it, and because it's. In this is true for even when we're doing play testing that we did find that that was some of the ways that people would enjoy the game the most which is awesome. will you're talking about that? Like the ecosystem imbalance of people who tell you where stuff is in? How many patrols are there that stuff I'll tell you? We tweak that probably. Maybe until weeks before gold I think. Exactly the number on no top ahead, but is very late. We tweak those numbers because. because the sense of owning the curiosity, and like not having everything told you. was so important to the global feeling of enjoying just like exploring throughout the world, and as soon as you're told, were too much. Stuff is or too many things around your map. It becomes a different problem like you're kind of you either you either go into. Let's just go through the checklist which. Is Fine I think if you found them on your own but can be exhausting for some people because they're like Oh God. There's a ton of stuff to do, or it's kind of a turn off because you already know what it is, and you don't think of anything else over there, but they're actually might be if you if you actually went look, so we actually ramped down the people that the amount of people that would tell you where things were quite a bit. It used to be far more. part of the emergent processes I've almost everybody who talked to tell you. Something is, and it would put a thing on your map and We found that to be Super Smart System, and I'm so glad that we have it, but we put it in a very specific way in a very specific amount of things on the map total. Total that it would ever tell you about so that you still had your cool moment of like i. don't see anything over here on this. I'm going to head that way and finds things along the way now balance. It's really it's really tricky. Because again it goes up to that thing. I was talking about early. Enough loss of being okay with things being skipped and. That if you don't want to be so much that you don't have any information, that would be bad too right so it it is takes time to to work out, but the team did that. No, no a healthy fund way but I think even when you like clear. Mongol, Camp and Clears up a little bit. You still get a question mark. It's not even like yours, a hotel or something like that. And it's sort of it to me. It fell It felt like A. SORT, of natural to the universe that you guys were setting your game in this is this is like a long time ago. There is those no yelp. There's no google. So it seemed natural that you'd find a random person on the street and be like Oh. Thank you so much. There's this awesome restaurants. You should go check it out. Right I really doug. That I played a ton of the game in Kerr. Asala Mode Oh cool and that was. It was really it was really difficult for me. 'cause you made such beautiful game central? And I think it's I think it's. Beautiful in a different way in Curacao mode. But there was just something so special about about like heading into conflict or a story be or coming into a new environment. or it's all black and white, and there's that film green crackling, and a I read that you guys even did some stuff with the music to make it feel almost like it was coming through old speakers or something like that. Yeah, how how how how did how did you develop that? I I know. That's like obviously. It's something that you're studios. Really proud of especially since you've got endorsement from the family. It was a that was A. That was a I. I probably will put that in my top list of my entire career as like being apart process because. I mean it's just. It's just why just kind of a wild thing that you don't go into making video games because you expect to go through that process one day, yeah. which is probably why it's cool is that it's different. You know, but. The. We knew that we WANNA. Do Black and white mode I mean I think i. I don't remember when we first talked about it, but it was definitely really early Redo black and white vote, but again it got kind of pushed towards the end of the project, and then once things started to. You know you can sit in the world and you could be like. Oh, my goddess stunning! It's really a beautiful I feel I. Do feel like I'm. There's moments of this I feel like movie. It's coming. It's coming together. And, then we're like okay well. We definitely have that mode. Let's are planning for it. And an I got version of it in that was a very early version of it with a sliding team and Like what do we call this thing? and You Owe Samurai cinema or classic. Why can Wyatt our traditional La just things? You know cool cool names. And member WHO's I may was Brian Studio head. I don't remember somebody was like. When we see if we can call it, Chris Allen Mode. And I thought that was brilliant and I was like. Yes, can we? What was that process so I reached out to. One of the people that I think he deserves a special shout at his name as a relay Katami. He's on our Japanese producer. He's a helped us since the very almost since the very beginning, and he helps coordinate all of our feedback through Japan, and said Hey, you hey, who's now a dear friend of mine. I was like. Is this possible. Could you look this up? And he and the Japanese team reached out to their to their state across our state and worked out You know. They wanted to see video so I. Put together a video, and then I redid it like three times because enough. People on time video, but I was like Austin. Even Brian Our leauge rendering Guy Jasmine. He was not good. No. Though I kinda Redid it a couple of times and then eventually Is this. Is it I? I looked at so many movies measured the black and white. You know in our game. You know as you both played it. Daytime Times. There's indoor's whether there's rain. There's fog and so like you have to look at movies that have all of these things you can't just be like. Here's a movie. Here's a sample. It's the black. Man Like you gotTa. Look at all these because they exist in our game and it's a filter that'd be going over all of these and so I finally got to the point where I was, I had good black levels. White levels has cool noise. We sent them a video and and It took a little bit of time back and forth, but eventually we're like asses cooling reach an agreement. They were cool with it so. Yeah it was a it was a coup processing showed up. Is Mode teams all shit? It's called. Is it was pretty cool goal process. It has a dream come true. It's so awesome on a historical level. Because obviously you're seeing the game through its you know from the reveal trailer to now there's clearly a love and Joe Majd to the cinema and the storytelling that come in the John Mara, before it, and so to have that encapsulated as a mood that you can jump into starting to such a great I. Think like touchtone full circle thing as a fan of genres well. Also I mean the. The audio! From from like A. A gigantic Blue Tang Fan. It's it sounded like like RISI's sampling. VHS, tapes of sword slashes, and like there were moments. Paint that game and I was like I expect like method man rapid right now because. If anyone was intended, but that sort of got me on a very very like neural level I was like Oh my God like this is. This is quietly the best. Wu Tang game ever made since. The fighting gave. The quote somewhere I feel. That's. But. Our audio director Brad he that's all him he was like. I have an idea that guy's a wizard, so that usually meant something cool and he. It was like we have this special thing that we developed internally at Sony that replicates old processes from like you know fifty sixty s something like that radios and TV's and and And and he he kind of took that filtered it and figured out the right 'cause he was like. If you do too much over, you know, we wanted people to play lengthy amount of times and if they wanted to the Chrysanthemum. View too much, and it becomes incredibly fatiguing. Like, not watching move hours possibly thirty hours. You know so. You got a nice balance between that and something that you can you know Listen to over and over again? I- legitimated Curacao Mode for Poly Twenty five thirty hours and I think that I like maybe fifty sixty into the game. So how yeah! That's incredible. Yeah, along along with that and to me. It was surreal to play an open world game almost entirely in black and white. That was just I've never done anything like that before and. It was such a cool. It was such a cool experience. One of the challenges with eggs I would add is like since it's black and white. There's there's missions that use color as guiding, and so there are. There are a few missions of. It really struggles with, but for the most part we redesigned icons on the map so that it would work with answer, so you're not just looking at two icons ones. This color ones that color and we just changed the icon Lopate, but but yeah it, it's it's generally speaking. You can play through most of the game with it, which is just crazy. Yeah I think there was one mission where they're like find. The purple flowers was like Oh! I was to right back on, so that was good. Leads to so many great visual moments, and as you were saying I know we're running short on time I. don't want believe the too much, but I, genuinely really loved, and as pointing to earlier the the soundtrack and the way both game uses it. It comes in from quiet to loud, but also how the score changes both from the combat setting to the open world setting you know. Moments I would say not settings, but. That Jackson position as well as even on the side, the remixes that were coming out sort of in the lead up to the Games launch. There's so much great musicality and artistry. Bear that I think really. Elevate, so much of what's going on there on visual rebel to a works so well in tandem. You know there is no single discipline that contributes more to the game. The music like a known this case we have to composers, a team of people that obviously help implemented like their artistry is like. White just level things up so much like a scene without music in a scene with music. There's a world of difference in generally speaking I know it's not one contributor. There's quite a few people that make it happen. Processing and implementation, but it's insane. What music can do in for this game? It's it's. It's one of the best parts of the Game I. Think is the the the artistry behind the music in the soulful fullness in is is really I listened to it a lot. I love and then we tokens the glitch mob. Which is just? RIDICULOUSLY COOL! Yeah, it's an awesome combination i. do think as you were saying. It elevates so many great moments, but really. A drills home like the emotional undercurrent of everything that's going on in the game. Unfortunately. We're pretty much out of time. I think Brandon I could keep talking there so much. We love and really enjoyed about the experience and are continuing to enjoy. Time in this world, so Jason Thank you so much for taking time. We really appreciate it. SUPERFUND and thank thank you to your studio for. bookending this entire console generation with my favorite games. I I don't know if that was ever the plan, but the way that

Brian FOX JIN Director Japan United States Jason I. Kgo Suma Seattle Connell Official Hamas Playstation Bar. Jeff He Golden Forest Cam Mongols Joanna Core Design Mottaki
11 Trivia Questions on USA Crossword

Trivia With Budds

06:53 min | 2 years ago

11 Trivia Questions on USA Crossword

"Guys. Today's episode is all about a USA crossword. Why give you letters and you try and come up with the answers? Just like you're doing crossword puzzle and before we do that. We have some questions for you from trivial pursuit. Here's a question from a movie in beetlejuice. What BOOK TURNS UP ON? Gina Davis Alex Alec Baldwin's coffee table after their untimely demise. What is named the book from Beetlejuice? That is called the handbook for the recently deceased. Handbook for the recently deceased love. That movie love that book. It's a very cool prop. You buy at places like hot topic and box lunch. They have purses and wallets and things of that cover. Your next question is about Michael. Keaton and David Letterman. Who's nineteen seventy eight variety? Show had a troop that included Michael Keaton and David Letterman. Who's nine hundred? Seventy eight variety show was that and that was Mary. Tyler Moore way back in the day. Mary Tyler Moore David Letterman Michael. Keaton working together. That's kind of fun and here is your last question. It's about music. What was the name of the male member of the carpenters? What was the first name of that member of the carpenters? That was Richard Richard Carpenter. I imagine there you go. Thank you guys for listening to this intro and get ready because we got eleven more. Usa themed questions common at you right about now here we go all right here. We go with the USA Crossword. We'll give you the amount of letters and the clue and you tell me or looking for all American and USA related things number one ten letters a famous building that blows up in Independence Day number one ten letters famous building that blows up in independence. Day that's number one number one number. Two six letters thirty third. Us President number two six letters the thirty third US president and number three on your list nine letters the capital of Iowa number three nine letters the capital of Iowa number four eight letters the most American desert Americans in quotes number four eight letters the most American desert question number five nine letters home state of springsteen number five nine letters home state of springsteen number six seven letters memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech number six seven letters the memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech and number seven six letters in Eureka California. You can see this. World's biggest tool in Eureka California. You can see this world's biggest tool questionable eight ten letters. America Ferrera. Is this Sitcom after five seasons. What is it after five seasons? What do you think an number nine four letters? The Police Department for Dangle Clementine and Garcia Police Department for Dangle Clinton and Garcia question number ten we have six letters and that's the MLB World Series Champs in two thousand fifteen number ten MLB world series champs in two thousand fifteen six letters and the bonus four two points twelve letters. I'm looking for the name of Hogan's entrance song name when he wrestles Hogan's entrance song name twelve letters those all your questions for USA Crossword. We'll be right back in just a second to see how you did. We are back with the answers to USA Crossword U. S. A. Let's see how you did number one. Ten letters famous building blows up Independence Day is of course the White House to five letter words for the ten letters in White House number. Two six letters the third. Us President Harry S. Truman Truman. Where the six letters we are looking for. Tru Number. Two number three nine letters capital of Iowa is de Moines Das Mo es es Des Moines number. Three number four. We had eight letters the most American desert looking for Apple Pie eight letters. Long Apple Pie number five nine letters home state of springsteen that's Bruce Springsteen and New Jersey nine letters New Jersey number six seven letters memorial setting for mlk juniors. I have a dream speech. That was the Lincoln Memorial Lincoln number seven six letters in Eureka California. You can see this world's biggest tool it is a hammer. The world's biggest hammer is in Eureka. California number eight ten letters. America Ferrera is leaving this Sitcom after five seasons. It's called superstore. You can drive by the storefront that they use for the exterior shots of the building on Barham Boulevard in Burbank. California right near where my first apartment was number nine four letters police department. Four Dangle Clementine Garcia. They brought back this show on. Qube. It's Reno for Reno nine one one. Those are characters on Reno nine one one number ten six letters. Mlb World Series Champs in two thousand fifteen. The royals Kansas city royals and the bone is twelve letters. Hogan's entrance song name is real American Hogan I am a real American in there. You guys all your questions for the USA themed Crossword Hope. He had fun playing along with today's quiz. We have one more question for you. It's called the question of the day. And it is what sea creature is associated with. Ross and Rachel's relationship on friends. Tweet me your answer at Ryan. Buds or email Ryan buds gmail.com to be eligible for a prize. Yesterday is questioned. The day was about the sparkling water brand from Coca Cola that was released in two thousand twenty and the answer is Ha- A. H. A. It's called a high and it's pretty damn good. I like the citrus citrus. Green tea one. It's green and yellow box. Looks like lemon lime? Go Try that. If you have not had the citrus Green tea and your Trivia team name of the day is come and get your gloves. Come and get your gloves. Thank you so much for playing trivia with me. Thanks for telling a friend about the show and we'll see you next time for more trivia with buds jeers

USA Michael Keaton Eureka California Mary Tyler Moore David Letterm Bruce Springsteen Hogan Clementine Garcia Iowa America Ferrera MLB President Trump California Beetlejuice David Letterman Tyler Moore Gina Davis Richard Richard Carpenter Eureka Alex Alec Baldwin
Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

The Cryptoverse

07:30 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

"When did it stop for you? When did you get the The bug as it were twenty fifteen? It was twenty eight. Fifteen five years five years ago. Yeah why don't you think about it like that? But yet I've been in the game is so what happened. I mean because you know was it. Was it like a Eureka moment because for many people they still don't understand what this whole thing was games about. Tell us a little bit in one of the things about Chris. Leads is really good at explaining simply finding so how would you simply explain this whole cryptocurrency space for people so I use Russian? Dole's right big rich Dole. The smaller one inside small on his side. Right so I have this little one two three that I put these together I say. Bitcoin cryptocurrencies and blockchain right. Those are the three big words thrown around. But the reason. I mentioned the Russian dolls and explaining to the SEC. He's like Bitcoin. The low one fits inside big Agricole cryptocurrency which fits inside a bigger calgary cold blockchain technology right so. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and cryptocurrencies puzzle because of blockchain technology right so that's the overview of how it all fit together so SA- bitcoin was the first the first example. A something that was digital that could not be copied. That's basically the revolutionary break-through. So if you think you know when all the file sharing networks came along the music labels lost their mind because you know. Cd's were great but then yet these CD copiers in your home pc see could copy albums but it was still you had to buy the disks and no one knew how to do it but when went digital it was an MP three file. You could just emailed you friends. That's the beauty of digital. Is that he just send a song across web. That's why streaming services so popular now is because it's convenient for the listener. Both the labels get to maintain control of the files right because before it was just a free for all wherever was sharing files everywhere. No one was paying for them. And that's because if something's digital you just copy a million times which means the song lost. Its value count. You can't sell it anymore. 'cause won't buys it. She has friends which is why you couldn't have digital money because if you got coin there's a digital file on your computer. You can make a million Kobe. Kobe scored and then it has no value. Because you can make an infinite number of gold right goes out. It's called in the ground therefore retains its value because of that. So that's that's the big takeaway is. Bitcoin was the first ever thing that was digital. That could not be copied. And that's how come it can be named digital money. It can be digital and it holds its value because he can't just copy and paste the Bitcoin so that was where it will began with that and everything exploded from that by well okay so it used to be really cheap like it used to be ridiculously cheap. We've said that every it was great in two thousand nine and add no value. Was you know didn't have a didn't have a price wasn't traded against anything so? Bitcoin is just to Bitcoin with just the bitcoin being passed around amongst in the inventors view like And it was just won't Bitcoin was being sent here there and everywhere until someone was willing to say you give the the Bitcoin. Now give you some. Us dollars at that point is it gets a price which is a an exchange rate and the famous story is the the first of actual transaction. Was someone on a discussion for said someone by me to Pepperoni pizzas and have them delivered to my house. And I'll send you ten thousand bitcoin so that was kind of like the pizza place. Took the dollars so would pay for the UK the twenty dollars for the pizzas delivered to my house when they go to live without. Send you the ten thousand bitcoin. Summer fest of Patches with Bitcoin. Ten Thousand Bitcoins petits and if that person still has those ten thousand bitcoins ads. Are you like less like how much they pay pieces? Cause Bitcoin might nights trading it nine thousand while human bitcoin and nine thousand dollars ten thousand bitcoin ninety I don't to night. How many million ninety million dollars now granted? You had to wait ten years because I was in two thousand nine so if if that pass and if obeyed ten dollars bitcoin sound them till twenty twenty. That twenty dollars would be ninety million and not have to pieces. God now that brings me onto the point because rolling with you. I mean you've you've enabled me to to to learn and what I've come to realize. Is that most people stay broke. We came just going to say it a case that most people stay broke because they just don't have vision in the sense that like you just talked about the pizza guy. I mean I've seen Things that you show me where you know. Bitcoin is concerned and there were forces at work that that trying to shake your hand to make if you're holding bitcoin. That will give you full snow and ideas about what's really happening. Trump took about the vision. Because unless you're very clear about and have an understanding of what this cryptocurrency weld is about. You'll give you you'll sell your. Bitcoin says the price goes down right so without takes. My mind is the rural of fads in the business world. Psycho Tony's Tony's doing Amazon FDA or Tony's doing shopper fire to property always doing internet modeling almost like almost like the passing fads. The they come and you make a bit of money from him and then they go. So or Tony's doing four x four x take instagram so disposable right and that that's fine but some people. I had a lot of people especially when it exploded in two thousand seventeen. We're talking about it like that. The language was on now. Now Tony's doing bitcoin like as if it's just the next thing like the next fad to play with until it comes and goes and that's that's how people have tried it because it was like it was hard because the price was absolute mental. And then when pretend to know melody be Blah. Last that fad passed in the pocket. And maybe for the reason you said which is unless you really understand what is about in a broader context. You will just pick it up like a fat and put it down and if the thing that got your attention was the price going from three thousand to twenty thousand. Well then you missing the whole game

Bitcoin Tony Calgary Chris Dole SEC Kobe United States Instagram CD UK Donald Trump Amazon
"eureka" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"eureka" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Up a little bit of? Because you're in that timeline. Now so is that there's got it. There might be some picking up of memories that Fargo but the fighting this Fargo who you are really or is there be knocking. I think I will not so far. We haven't gone there yet. I mean there is an episode where we do all go crazy and we start seeing things but it's not necessarily number do it now. Does it have to do with the time you now? We definitely don't go about point just yet. But I mean we've got twenty episodes to tell a story so see further new story you're telling is the addition capped the lovely James Calicivirus say. Yes so what was it. Like bringing him on board character brings the show. And you know it's very hard to not think that James Cows character has some mesas up. This is GONNA get deceptive. Just has that and just going from Baltimore like he always looked like he was up to something when he was on Bridget Jones diary. Stir and he's British. Got that accent. It might be shifty or he might be late. No I think the thing that really great about his is. He's a new set of eyes so people can jump in in season four and sort of see it through his eyes and get in sort of discovered the town. You don't have to go with our like forty five episodes wherever was when previous Lauren consorted gives you a little bit life. Step sort of coalesce any ads. A nice little foil for Carter again. Any you know he has that sorta sweater. James Callous has which is It's Ns addition to the show. You mentioned when we talk that you're producing movies but we didn't get a chance to talk about what maybe you can tell us a little bit. Not that it's basically it was called the millionaire's Club. No MILLIONAIRES ARE IN I. It's it's basically about a group of people sort of based on the writer slash director. He grew up where near where I live right now. And there's a small there and at any time of the day that you walk into this mall. There will be the same people sitting at table and they're all ages. I'M GONNA SAY. Twenty six to forty seven image. Make a very bizarre. And no one can figure out what they do and how they have the time. Sit there and nothing all day and it sounds terribly like rats. But it's more like mallrats. Were a bunch of Mathematics. Damn people like that. I don't know what it's going to be like. We're in the process of editing shots so much that we have like a three hour movie that we have to condense Fatemi we've got Gave Him through owned a wedding shop? We've got some hilarious. Attempted auditions or terrible actor in it. there's a lot of assisted like there's scooters in wheelchairs It's just basically It's a dark comedy. It's kind of hard. It's more about the little pieces of it. Rather than big over our thought which is to save them all. That's GonNa be bulldozed even though it's a horrible horrible all these people have no power to that anyway. Funny tried to do some. It's basically a careful with the tagline for the movie that I've used to to rent so quick to go back to the new farther. What's the part of being a new Fargo as opposed to hold Fargo? I just like the challenge of having to figure out how to talk to in and who I can teach you who I can and then having basically trying to find my head just trying to find that balance between not being like a cloudy version of the old Fargo sort of being in going to serious about it. It's just been like a fun thing for me to do world. Thanks so much all right seeing a movie capacity my hands on it somehow when it comes together own grey to relive that Eureka was a very special show. It really was something that really lived up to SCIFIS NAME. Imagine greater a very clever idea and it was utilized and like any successful show besides the writing you have actors that Gel together as cast and bring their characters to life now. That's sounds so easy but that is so hard to do in. Television is usually one of those things just don't fit right to get all the pieces to fit is probably one of the hardest things to do in TV. That's why a lot of shows contract. Come and go well. I'll Miss Eureka. That's sure but I do. Have IT available on Netflix? And I'll go back and relive those episodes on my kindle fire my name Gareth Edwards. I am the director of a new film called monsters. And you're listening to Sifi Talk..

Fargo Eureka James Calicivirus director Carter James Callous James Cows Gareth Edwards Netflix Bridget Jones Lauren consorted Sifi Baltimore Fatemi writer
"eureka" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"eureka" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"From there. So that's why I think where it came from. Was the idea that we were saying. Oh you know then we could change something we didn't like in the show and then Jamie said we could change anything and then all of a sudden you. Have you know what I consider you a show that can go on forever? It's just fascinating it was there. Are Those moments? I mean I have to say there are Eureka. Eureka moments like that and that one in the in. The writer's room was Like lightning in a bottle because it's sort of felt like that was it. We knew what we were going to do this season and we were so excited by it. Now we figured man if no one else likes it that we're just totally crazy. And so hopefully they get on board and and it's the one time I think that you know we were running the network in the studio executives through the arc of what we wanted to do this season I we started telling him changes and they started their laughing jumping up and we got to and then the last bit of it was an Fargo. As the head of global dynamics mark. Stern actually did happy dance in his chair. I love it and mark doesn't dance. I've been to every Sifi party. These never danced so that was the one time I've actually gotten to seen it in Got Into See. I know we have one more but talk about the Crossover Warehouse Thirteen I. I'm excited well. Paulie. You wrote that episode. She's one of our New Writers this year and it it seemed like such a good match especially when we decided crossovers are done in a lot of different. Tv shows but the way we decided to do is send one of our characters over there and have one of those come to our world and not get it. Make it too complicated and and Alison Scalia Odi Odi It was perfect in our world. She spot on hit the tone of our show and it was great and they love having me over and but I think the biggest thing was Jack Kennedy who's The show runner of Eureka? We sat down the show runner of warehouse thirteen. We sat down beforehand and we just talked before we got into stories before we got into. What are we GONNA do? We just kind of had a nice conversation. About what would you? What kind of person would you like in your world? What kind of person you'd like in our world and how it will work out and from there just like we said before from character last season after we did our panels and I ran into Jack any and saw rubenesque in the restaurant in our hotel and warning. That was great fun. I walked and I saw two of them. And it's all Carl Carlson wash on our show in a very big part of our mythology and I saw this is great. We should have him do our show. We have our guys over there. We joked about we should send our characters to each other's shows sort of close quality there and then we joked for a while afterwards saying well if I send them to you. It's your headache and we should do that. And there's no no they should really be on your show. No no please let the and it ends up being a production hitting. It's a real challenge and you're trying to borrow actors and schedules and all those things but I think Kamara conversation. I think the network may must have been having their own conversations about this that we all sort of Gum. Same Page and say well. We really should work very headache at all considering their shot in states citizens six hours. Yeah that doesn't make it. Any easier by close to crossover was brought up during previous discussions about the crossover. Are we going to see future ones? And does that mean that the universe effectively between these can be shared? It's funny we had Originally In our shows mythology the idea of the vaults that was going to be in section five and we actually exported a little bit. In what about Bob and season two it was you know the place where it technologies. That didn't work out just went to go away. Because they were not world was not ready for them yet and so. I think that there's an element to warehouse that sort of similar in that. It's it's there's a slightly more mystical I won't I won't say magical because I know that they're that's not part of the way that they they view the show. But it's Things that have not been able to be explained yet and So it it kind of felt like we could live within At least the framework of no we know each other if not necessarily being absolutely sort of mashed mythologies asked him. Thank you very much. Thank you gentlemen. Thanks resellers fine. Thank you very much more from the Eureka roundtables with Neil Grayson who is Fargo. Got Quite a promotion. Well Fargo. We've been talking crossovers crossover. Yes so tell us about going over onto this different dynamic difference that it was for me. I mean I already knew the cast warehouse already from like Allison last year and Eddie and then Joanna actually. We have mutual friends and Saul had been on an episode Greek. It was like okay. This is already a good fit. Like I already know all you guys and Allison and I are actually really good friends in real life too. And then the director Chris Fisher. Done an episode of Steve Surging the second unit director and the Supervisor Directing episode of You. So it was like going over to my uncle and aunt house for dinner and you know like getting paid to do it and getting paid to hang out with like people ever like kissing. Yeah I really liked it. I can go back. So when you're reading the script founder's Day and you come to the page with the foggin eater on it. What's sort of your reaction when you come across A moment that was one of those initial like five years ago I would have been so worried about it and says she going to the gym every day and then I probably wouldn't anyway like I'd be like I'm tired and then I'd get there on the day really nervous but I've already done the sort of like I kind of get it. It's like any make do so and then I'm such a huge fan of terminator two to be able to recreate that sorta like. Oh yeah I I mean. I think I disturbed more people at the amount of times I was like no one. Oh yeah by the way border on them. What it's going to be Christmas grandma. Your character is one of the most interesting timeline or not. Just that your head of global dynamics now but also that apparently bitten. And I think you've mentioned panel. How this kind of US get the terminology right for this guy? The version of you in this time seems like he's kind of maybe rules my little bit of fear. He's a humongous Kirk. Are we going to get to see play bat version of the character or any of him? Or is it all going to be the sort of what we hear you'll see basically you'll see? Fargo meal far columns Imitation of what he thinks. That Jerk Fargo is like but I mean unless we eventually at some point this is kind of something to think about. There's maybe recorded footage video of previous by yourself. Fat Fun to play a flashback. Retailing that security footage or some sort of like a speech. He's given Christmas or something like that. You have Christmas episode. I don't know where that jumping new Christmas like three times already to anyway the season yes July July but I mean that would be a really fun thing to play the most. We have so far as his motivation. Roasters that you can see on the walls and everything where basically sort of a stylized almost Soviet Union has my poster but Yeah hope to see the real mean fire of we do get to see why jerk follow history and how he got. The job is the next part of the art. Any emily when you do something like that where you guys get back and the president is not present you knew but your character who you are lived there with relief previously. You're just not not care anymore because they're going to be anything. Where like your memories are picking.

Fargo Jack Kennedy director Jerk Fargo Jamie Soviet Union writer Allison Alison Scalia Bob Paulie Saul Eureka Stern US Carl Carlson Kamara Neil Grayson Chris Fisher
Dead or Alive, Viruses are Everywhere, and Here to Stay

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Dead or Alive, Viruses are Everywhere, and Here to Stay

"Viruses are found just about everywhere there in glaciers crystal caves volcanoes the ocean when we try to count the number of viruses that are around. It's actually a hard thing to do. This is Neil Shubin an evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago but we can get estimates for how many viruses say Lion Ocean. It's a number that is just genus. It's actually a number that's larger than the number of stars in the known universe. That is how many viruses around us. Despite their abundance Shubin says viruses have been surprisingly challenging to study. You know in terms of the number jeans they have and the number of proteins and so forth. It's just a handful of things really and that's what makes them so. Pernicious Shubin says over Millennia of these viruses have actually ended up making our lives better. His new book touches on the role viruses have played in our evolution and it appears that they've had a vital part in shaping our Gino but what's remarkable their number and their sure diversity but how evolve -able they are our. Dna contains protein. Coding genes they send instructions to the cells that help us to develop survive and reproduce but our genome are complete set of DNA. Keep surprising researchers turns out that eight percent of our genome werft from ancient viruses that invaded our genome got incorporated inside our genome and no longer affect us and the number may even be higher than that instead of infecting us. Shubin says ancient viral genetic material. Now helps us to perform essential functions and discoveries about these weird molecular partnerships are ongoing Shubin. Says one of the first happened a couple of years ago in Jason Shepherds lab? My Name's Jason Shepherd. I'm an associate professor at the University of Utah. In the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy Sheppard's team was studying memory genes in mice to find out how cells in the brain store information. They were focusing on the archie. That is connected to long term memory creation in mammals take gene out of mice late. Look Normal Brain. Looks normal for the most part. They just can't remembering things so they con- store any information. Basically MICE WITHOUT THEIR ARCH. Gene have trouble learning. And there's evidence that humans who have mutations in genes have cognitive deficits so he thinks this one gene is very key for memory consolidation making long term memories especially and so we've been trying to figure out what the protein is doing in the brain while you lynn. How does it convert short-term memories into Long Term Memories? Shepherd isolated the proteins? That the chain makes what you do. If you're studying this stuff and one day shepherd's lab tech pop the ARC proteins under a powerful electron microscope they call it the em scope and they couldn't believe what they saw. He came to me and he was like I. I'm seeing these weird objects under the scope and I don't know what to make of them take a look and so they should meet them. I was like what the hell are these. These are this is crazy. The brain proteins they were looking at. We're much larger than they should have been. Shepherd says they looked like little capsule. It's like similar to the shell. Virus makes called a capsule when we took pictures we saw these lodge sackable structures that were mobile sociable structures. Well they looked like soccer balls. Shepherd pulled out his firm textbook to compare photos. Yup still looked like a virus. And then that's when I took it to my colleagues and said you know. What do you think of Bizarre? And they like well. That's virus that take J. V. Let's looks like HIV. What happened? What happens to your protein verification. That you've got viruses. Shepherd was like what the heck is a brain protein doing looking like a virus. His colleagues thought that the slides were somehow contaminated with HIV. But no it was a brain protein. It's not often that one finds something in the brain that looks like a virus. That's not a virus in fact it's like never like never before it's almost like the classic stereotype view of a scientist that they're making this discovery. They shout out. Eureka way the ARC looked like a virus made shepherd sink. Maybe it would behave like one.

Jason Shepherd Neil Shubin Gene Lion Ocean University Of Chicago Gino Soccer ARC Associate Professor Department Of Neurobiology Anatomy Sheppard Scientist University Of Utah J.