17 Burst results for "Eurasia Center"

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:24 min | Last month

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With Denise Pellegrini in the Bloomberg 11 three O newsroom Hi Denise. Hey there Katie, and as we've been talking about Ukrainian leader, Vladimir zelensky at The White House is our making that surprise visit visiting with President Biden this hour we're tracking all the developments here, including his address to Congress tonight and Melinda herring is deputy director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center and she tells us it is a holiday season visit bud. Zelensky is hoping to get gifts, not give them. In order to get as many weapons as possible, you have to appeal to Congress. So yes, he's going to meet with President Biden. He's going to thank him that President Biden and the national security adviser are unwilling to send some of the heavy weapons systems that Ukraine has begged for for months. But Congress feels differently. So I think Congress has really his audience. And herrig speaking their unbalance of power with David Westin and we will have live special coverage and a special edition of balanced power tonight with live team coverage 7 30 eastern as zelensky addresses Congress in that historic moment. I mean, I'm a big omnibus spending bill also making its way through Congress. There is funding for Ukraine in that it also includes some important provisions for mental health and COVID here in the United States. More on that part of the story from Bloomberg say me Mars in Washington. The package focuses on suicide prevention addiction treatment mental health and the COVID pandemic in all nearly $210 billion is included in the fiscal 2023 labor HHS education appropriations bill. That's a 7.1% increase over the 2022 level. Medical providers were also appreciative that the proposed spending bill includes a two year extension of emergency Medicare telehealth provisions put in place during the COVID public health emergency. In Washington, I'm Amy Morris, Bloomberg radio. All right, thank you. Amy, U.S. attorney holding a press conference on FTX cofounder Sam bankman freed this afternoon that's Manhattan southern D a Damien Williams and some good news if you've been trying to get your hands on Tamiflu for influenza, especially for kids. You know, some pharmacies guys in Manhattan have been totally out over the weekend leaving parents scrambling, but now the U.S. announcing it is releasing its reserves of Tamiflu because of the shortages and the tough flu season. Global news, 24 hours a day, I'm Denise Pellegrini. This is Bloomberg. Mike and Katie back over to you guys. All right, thank you so much, Denise Pellegrini. Bloomberg businessweek is brought

President Biden Congress COVID Denise Pellegrini Vladimir zelensky Melinda herring Eurasia center herrig David Westin zelensky Atlantic council Ukraine Denise Katie White House Amy Morris Bloomberg radio FTX
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:27 min | 2 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Be the last question. Should I do that? Vladimir Putin. We hear the answer. You will be talking to president Putin any time soon. What is your approach? We have been listening to the news conference occurring at The White House as we speak between president Macron and France and President Biden. This is coming off after their meeting today to go over a series of issues. We heard from President Biden and the possibility of reconciling some changes rising out of the inflation reduction act and president Macron saying that there is a shared objective that just needs to re synchronize. We also had President Biden asked about the deal that would resolve a possible rail strike saying that he negotiated a better deal than they could have had otherwise and he would like paid leave for everyone, not just for rail workers. To give us a perspective from the European side of these meetings and what we're hearing out of these two presidents welcome now, Melinda herring. She is deputy director of the Eurasia center at the Atlantic council. So thank you so much, Melinda for being so patient as we've waded through this. Give us your take on what we are learning about the relationship between France and the United States and for that matter, you are more broadly. Hey David, great to be with you. So I think the biggest takeaway for me was what Macron just said. He said very, very clearly that we the French and the European Union will not push Ukraine to the negotiating table before they're ready to go there. I think that was really powerful. And he said, we must look to Ukraine to determine the circumstances. It was very, very good that he made that language so plain and clear. He said that we will never urge Ukraine to accept a compromise that they would find unacceptable. And we want a sustainable peace and there's no way to get a sustainable peace if Ukraine has to negotiate before it's ready. So that's the most important headline from the discussions with Biden and Macron today from a Ukraine Russia perspective. So Melinda, to parse the language and I take your point, it's a very resounding statement for president Macron. He said that they would never urge Ukraine to do something that Ukraine was not willing to do. But the question was, in your discussions, the President Biden did you recommend that perhaps there should be recommending to the Europeans then negotiate, he didn't say they had not raised that as a possibility and there was some speculation that yes behind the scenes he's at least raising the question maybe even urging recognize that he wouldn't impose anything in the gradient. David, you are a good listener. He danced around the question. I'm glad he said what he did, but you're absolutely right. I don't have any special information, but what I do know is that Macron continues to emphasize the importance of negotiations. I'm sure it came up, but this is where there's a big difference between macaron and Biden. Biden has said we need Ukrainian victory. The United States has been very, very clear about that. And the United States has said that we will not we will not force the Ukrainians to negotiate before they're ready. There's been some weird rumblings though. General mealy raised the possibility of negotiations. You know, it's especially as winter gets harder in the conditions than Ukraine get more difficult. Perhaps it's time to start thinking about negotiations. But other parts of the U.S. government have said, heck, no. So I think that that mealy trial balloon has been squashed in the United States for now. I'm sure it's part of the private discussion. The United States is not going to go there. So Melinda, because you do know so much about your more broadly. That's president Macron. What about the rest of Europe? Because this is a pretty broad alliance at this point. Are they united in saying that maybe there should be accessions? Are they united saying there should not be discussions? I noticed, for example, that mister Michelle, the president of the European council was over visiting president Xi, and it seemed to suggest that perhaps a president Xi play a role here. Yeah, I think that's one of the big questions right now. So there's a difference within Europe. Eastern Europe is going to be very firm in saying Ukraine gets to decide when it's ready to negotiate. And the opinion in Eastern Europe is Ukraine has momentum in its sales initiative continue to push on the battlefield as long and as hard as it possibly can in order to get the

President Biden president Macron Ukraine Macron Vladimir Putin Biden Melinda herring Eurasia center Melinda France United States Atlantic council White House David General mealy European Union macaron Russia mister Michelle U.S. government
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:58 min | 2 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Some of the very difficult decisions that are coming, Melinda herring of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center on Ukraine is here next. This is Bloomberg. Wake up and text text and eat. Text and catch the bus. Text and miss your stop. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Text and be late to work. Sorry, Blake. Text and work. Text and pretend to work. Text and act surprised when someone calls you out for not working. Who me? Text and meet up with a friend you haven't seen in forever. Hi. Oh hey. Text and complain that they're on their phone the whole time. Text and listen to them complain that you're on your phone the whole time. Oh. Text in whatever. But when you get behind the wheel, give your phone to a passenger. Put it in the glove box. Just don't text and drive. Visit stop texts, stop Rex dot org. A public service announcement brought to you by the national highway traffic safety administration and the ad council. What is dedication? The thing that drives me every day is a day is very un we call them day to day for short. Every day he's hungry for something, whether it's attention, affection, knowledge And there's this huge responsibility and making sure that when he's no longer under my wing, that he's a good person. I think the advice I would give is you don't need to know all the answers. The craziest thing was believing that your dad knew everything. So as a dad, you felt like you had to know everything. You had to get everything right. It's okay to make mistakes. As long as it's coming from love, then, you know, it kind of starts to work itself out. I want him to be able to sit back one day and go. We work together. We did a good job. That's dedication. Find out more at fatherhood dot gov. Brought to you by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the ad council. This is the Bloomberg green report data compiled by the global alliance for buildings and construction show carbon dioxide emissions from building construction and operations hit an all time high in 2021, energy related emissions from the operation of buildings last year were 5% higher than in 2020 and 2% higher than the pre-pandemic peak in 2019, energy demand for the operation of heating, cooling, lighting, and equipment was up about 4% from 2020 levels, buildings accounted for more than a third of global CO2 emissions in 2021 that includes emissions resulting from the production of concrete, steel, glass, and other building materials reducing the sector's emissions has therefore become vital to the larger goal of decarbonizing the global economy

"eurasia center" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:06 min | 3 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Marketplace. Jim Taylor, yes. Dianne Feinstein took a few moments today to reflect on being the longest serving woman ever in the U.S. Senate. She will surpass former senator Barbara mikulski for that historic distinction on Saturday. The center issued a statement saying it's an incredible honor and that she is forever grateful to the people of California who sent her to the nation's capital to represent them. Feinstein's political career began with her election to the San Francisco board of supervisors in 1969. And she first gained national prominence in the dark hours following the 1978 city hall assassinations of San Francisco mayor George moscone and supervisor Harvey Milk. She succeeded moscone as interim mayor and then became the first woman elected to serve in that position. White House says North Korea is covertly shipping a significant number of artillery shells to Russia and support of its invasion of Ukraine. CBS Margie schaefer reports one expert believes it indicates Russia as having difficulty replacing its ammunition. The U.S. accuses North Korea of trying to hide shipments of ammunition to Russia. Covertly supplying Russia with rockets and artillery ammunition to use in Ukraine. That's non resident fellow at the Eurasia center at the Atlantic council Doug clane, who says North Korea is making it appear the ammo is being sent to countries in the Middle East or North Africa. Russia has been burning through its ammo at a very fast pace. It's been shelling Ukrainian military forces in firing rockets and kamikaze drones at Ukrainian civilians in major cities. It's doing much of this at a rate that just is not very sustainable. And Ukrainian forces have been intentionally targeting Russian ammunition depots, claim expects a dark winter in Ukraine as Russia is very intentionally targeting Ukraine's energy infrastructure to try to take out Ukraine's power plants so that in this brutal winter people will be literally freezing in their homes. He calls it a dangerous new dimension to this conflict. Margie schaeffer Casey BS. Two minutes away from more case CBS traffic. Don't lose access to your favorite news in sports

senator Barbara mikulski Russia George moscone North Korea Jim Taylor Dianne Feinstein Margie schaefer San Francisco board of supervi U.S. Senate Feinstein Eurasia center Harvey Milk Doug clane moscone city hall Atlantic council CBS San Francisco White House California
"eurasia center" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on KCBS All News

"You're eligible and talk to your doctor about screening. Save by the scan dot org is brought to you by the American lung association's lung force initiative and the ad council. Case CBS News time 1243, The White House says North Korea is covertly shipping a significant number of artillery shells to Russia in support of its invasion of Ukraine. For reports one experts believes this indicates Russia is having difficulty replacing its ammunition. The U.S. accuses North Korea of trying to hide shipments of ammunition to Russia. Covertly supplying Russia with rockets and artillery ammunition to use in Ukraine. That's non resident fellow at the Eurasia center at the Atlantic council Doug klain, who says North Korea is making it appear the ammo is being sent to countries in the Middle East or North Africa. Russia has been burning through its ammo at a very fast pace. It's been shelling Ukrainian military forces in firing rockets and kamikaze drones at Ukrainian civilians in major cities. It's doing much of this at a rate that just is not very sustainable. And Ukrainian forces have been intentionally targeting Russian ammunition depots, claim expects a dark winter in Ukraine as Russia is very intentionally targeting Ukraine's energy infrastructure to try to take out Ukraine's power plants so that in this brutal winter people will be literally freezing in their homes. He calls it a dangerous new dimension to this conflict, Margie schaeffer Casey BS. News time 1244, the sports line in a minute. If a natural disaster comes knocking, how prepared is your family? You can't just close the door on earthquakes, floods, or hurricanes

Russia North Korea Eurasia center Doug klain American lung association CBS News Atlantic council White House North Africa Middle East U.S. Margie schaeffer Casey
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And I'm Karen Moscow and U.S. stock index futures are lower this morning we're coming up to 5 O one on Wall Street and we check the markets every 15 minutes throughout the trading day on Bloomberg S&P futures down 34 points. Now futures down 248 and NASDAQ futures down in 98, ten year treasury down 1530 seconds yo 3.94% and the yield on the two year 4.32% and I'm excrete oil is down 2.7% Nathan. Karen today's drop in futures follows four straight losing sessions on Wall Street. This morning yields on two year treasuries are trading at the highest level since 2007 and ten year yields are flirting with 4%, 30 years search to their highest since 2014. Jordan Kahn is chief investment officer at ACM funds. A lot of these areas of the market and the fixed income market are really getting oversold here that have come down quite a bit yields are much higher than we've seen in years. And so I think as soon as the market gets a sense that inflation is peaking and tenure, you will start to stabilize more. I think there could be a lot of good buying opportunities, but for us, we're not going to put the cart before the horse. Jordan Conan ACM fund says the mood remains fragile. I had a Thursday's inflation data. Well, as for equities, Nathan, perhaps the hardest sector hit in the recent sell off has been chip stocks. In fact, more than $240 billion in market value has been wiped out since The White House imposed curbs on China's access to semiconductor technology. We get more from Bloomberg's Charlie pellet. The industry sold off globally after fresh U.S. curbs on China's access to American technology, added to a disappointing start to the earnings season, stoking concern that the industry's downturn is far from over. The Philadelphia stock exchange semiconductor index fell three and a half percent, closing at its lowest level since November of 2020. The index has dropped nearly 10% over the past three trading days and is now down more than 40% so far this year. In New York, Charlie pellet Bloomberg debris. All right, Charlie, thank you. And the chips sell off continued overnight, leading stocks lower in Asia. Let's get more on that from Bloomberg's Juliet Sally in Singapore good morning, Juliet. Good morning, Nathan and Karen, some of the biggest losses were in chip related equities in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, where traders returned from holidays to join the global sell off in semiconductor shares. Taiwan's Tai X traded at November 2020 lows, while TSMC shares fell as much as 8 and a half percent, the most on record to July 2020 lows, the yen traded within sight of the original level that spurred Japanese authorities to defend the currency in September, and the one slid as wary mounts at Beijing will uphold its COVID zero policy well after the Chinese Communist Party Congress this month. In Singapore, Juliet sali, Bloomberg daybreak. Juliet, thank you, Ellen. You're up this morning the Bank of England has been forced to expand its emergency measures as in response to chaos in the bond market and let's go live to London and get the latest from Bloomberg's UN pause. Good morning Ewan. Good morning, Karen, Nathan. It's the second time this week the UK's Central Bank has moved to calm the bond market. This morning, the Bank of England expanded the scope of its guilt purchases to include inflation linked debt in an effort to avert what it called a fire sale. The intervention comes after a severe sell off on Monday that saw UK inflation in yields surging by the most on record in London, a Muhammad Bloomberg daybreak. Are you and thanks. The risk of a global recession is now rising thanks to higher rates that's according to the head of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank president David malpass. The risk in the real danger of a world recession next year. The advanced economies are slowing in Europe, the debt levels for the developing countries are getting more and more burdensome. The rise in interest rates puts added weight on it. And inflation is still a major problem for everyone, but especially for the poor. Those comments from World Bank president David malpass are being echoed by JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. He says, serious headwinds are likely to push the U.S. and global economies into recession by the middle of next year. Meantime, Nathan the fed keeps banging the drum for higher rates still vice chair Lyle brainard lays out a case for caution as the Central Bank works to curb inflation. In light of elevated global, economic and financial uncertainty moving forward deliberately and in a data dependent manner will enable us to learn how economic activity, employment, and inflation are adjusting to the cumulative tightening in order to inform our assessment of the path of the policy rate. Brainard made the comments yesterday at a meeting at the national association for business economics in Chicago. When despite some caution, Karen, it's too early for a fed policy pivot. That's according to strategist at Goldman Sachs, who say the economic outlook is not bad enough yet and rates markets remain too volatile. Economists predict the fed is on track to deliver its fourth straight, 75 basis point hike at next month's meeting. Now let's get the latest on the war in Ukraine, Nathan, Russia, has launched even more strikes in the country just a day after the most intense barrages since the early days of the invasion. President Biden will speak with a group of 7 leaders this morning, he's pledging to impose more costs on the Kremlin and to keep providing support to Kyiv. John herps is a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine and now senior director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center. Ukraine's east. His objective today is to take political control of Ukraine. As objective tomorrow, once he has Ukraine in his pocket, is to go after other states, including our NATO allies. So he is coming for our NATO allies, and we are bound to defend with American troops. Former ambassador to Ukraine John herps spoke with our Washington correspondent Joe Matthew on Bloomberg sound on, catch the program weekdays

Nathan Bloomberg Karen Moscow Jordan Kahn ACM funds Karen Jordan Conan Charlie pellet David malpass Charlie pellet Bloomberg Juliet Sally U.S.
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:50 min | 3 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A day after Vladimir Putin blamed Ukraine. For an explosion that damaged a key bridge connecting Crimea to Russia and Putin is threatening more now after targeting civilian infrastructure, civilian neighborhoods in this latest barrage. The images are horrifying, vitali Klitschko is the mayor of key. Angry and want to depend our houses depends our families, our children. President zelensky back on the phone today with President Biden to discuss the need for more air defenses, something we discussed earlier today on Bloomberg with Mark Esper, the former Secretary of Defense. I think at this point, we need to rush anti aircraft systems long-range anti aircraft anti missile systems into Ukraine and provide Ukraine of veneer of defense because at this point, this seems to be like one of the last cards that Vladimir Putin has, and that's the long-range bombardment of civilian cities. It's quite a thought. Let's bring in John herb's former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine now senior director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center. Ambassador welcome back. We appreciate your being here. A French president Emmanuel Macron says the attacks that we saw by Russia on infrastructure in Ukraine represent a deep change in the war. Is he right? I would say represents more maybe it perhaps a lot more of the same. This is not the first time Putin has gone after infrastructure that he's been going after civilian targets since the start of the big invasion. And the end of February. Yeah. Ukraine was able to shoot down only half the missiles fired by Russia as they read on the terminal here. We recall president zelensky's cry for help ambassador to close the skies with the words that he chose when he spoke with. Spoke to a joint session of Congress. Is this simply a matter of providing more long-range missile defense systems like Mark Esper said and if that's the case, how come we haven't already? Esther is right. Look, our policy as Moscow is conducted this war of aggression in Ukraine has been adequate, but not as good as it could and should be. Administration has sent lots of weapons to Ukraine and they deserve credit for that. But the weapons they've said have always been, you might say, the second rank. Second order. And I usually say no before they say yes before sending weapons of more sophisticated kind. So like the high Mars with range of 85 kilometers, we finally sent at the end of June, Ukraine should have had in March. But we said no until finally we said yes. And that's over a fear of escalation, right? Correct. David, they've been intimidated in my judgment by Putin's nuclear threats. Many times, we said we can't do this because we're afraid Moscow might escalate. That is a posture of weakness, which is not suitable to our interest. Finally, finally, we seem to have gotten that point right when Biden's still very strongly against the threats of nuclear strikes by Putin a couple of weeks ago at the UN and on 60 minutes. But before that, we kept saying we can't do X because again, Russia might have speculated basically. We are much stronger than Russia. We have a long history of deterring Soviet power, which is greater than Putin's power should demonstrate that now. Well, I feel like I'm asking this every day at this point and I'm sure I've asked you ambassador, do we need to not go back to the initial request for MiGs from Poland or other NATO friends that are flying these jets that would be easy for Ukraine to start flying now? Or is the concern that this spills over Ukraine's borders? Is that why the jets are off limits? Again, it comes from a certain timidity on the part of the administration, which is unfortunate, which is not served our interest. Again, look, the support we provided to Ukraine has been decent. It's been adequate, but it could be stronger and it could be if we did the right thing earlier. And if we do the right thing now, this will come to a satisfactory and faster. And we'll at the current pace. Just makes you feel like what else is behind that door there that we haven't sent already. The reluctance has really been laid bare by conversations like these. They're asking for tacos, which are missiles, which have a range of up to 300 kilometers. They're asking for more high Mars and high Mars with longer ranges, not the 85 kilometers that we're sending, but a 150 kilometers or more. They're asking for tanks to asking for armored personnel carriers. And they're asking for as former defense secretary Esper said, high range of anti aircraft defense. All these things we should be Sunday. We should be sending. Putin's army is on the ropes in Ukraine. We want to help you create recapture all of its territory sooner rather than later. Ambassador how real is the possibility of this war spilling over into neighboring countries crossing the border. Well, it would be improved to the possibility of Putin escalating. By escalating, I mean going beyond Ukraine or dropping a tactical nuclear weapon or two on Ukraine. The point is this. Putin's objective is not to take a bit of territory in Ukraine's east. It's his objective today is to take political control of Ukraine. As objective tomorrow, once he has Ukraine in his pocket, is to go after other states, including our NATO allies. So he is coming for our NATO allies, and we are bound to defend with American troops. So American interests, smart American policies to give Ukraine everything it needs to defeat Putin for us. So all we are providing is our weapons and money, not soldiers and American lives. And therefore. And deter Putin from doing the same to Estonia or another former piece of the Soviet Union. That's correct. We appease Putin in Georgia. We appease Putin when he sees Crimea in 2014. Let's stop appeasing and let's help you clean beat him. So again, we don't have to worry about our Baltic allies

Ukraine Putin Mark Esper Russia Vladimir Putin President zelensky President Biden John herb Eurasia center Emmanuel Macron president zelensky vitali Klitschko Crimea Atlantic council Moscow Esther NATO
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You every 15 minutes during the training day to fight here on Bloomberg radio. I'm John Tucker, and that is your Bloomberg business flash. Matt and Paul. All right, John Tucker, thank you so much. We appreciate that. Time to go geopolitics right here. We're gonna round table this series of stories. Doctor Ariel Cohen, senior fellow at the Atlantic council Eurasia center joins us as well as ros mathison. She covers Bloomberg news executive editor for international government joins us here to talk about a whole host of geopolitical issues and let's start with Ukraine because it seems to have ratcheted up over the weekend and doctor Cohn I like to start there. Just give us your thoughts on kind of how you see the situation in Ukraine. Maybe the events over the weekend and maybe what's next to come. Okay, so on the 8th of October 1 day after Putin 17th earth day. There was an explosion on the kitchen bridge that's a bridge that connected Crimean Peninsula with the mainland. And it disrupted the traffic on the bridge, most of the traffic is repaired now. It's multi media bridge. It has cars, railroad, electricity and whatnot. So it's a strategic supply line for the Russian military in the Crimea and in the south of Ukraine in the concerned region. After that, the Russians started bombarding Kyiv, the capital of Ukraine, the kharkiv, the second largest

John Tucker Bloomberg radio Ariel Cohen Bloomberg Atlantic council Eurasia cente ros mathison Ukraine international government Matt Cohn Paul Crimean Peninsula Putin Crimea Kyiv kharkiv
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:09 min | 4 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It's Bloomberg sound on. I'm Joe Matthew in Washington with news. From Moscow declaring landslide victories, which is exactly what everyone expected in the hastily organized referendums if we can call them that referenda that had held in territories currently occupied. By Russian forces on their heels, of course, following, as I mentioned, a string of military setbacks, the UN is condemning the voting as illegal, people sometimes forced to vote at gunpoint, apparently. Reaction from The White House, they see it in a similar way. They were already calling it a sham vote before it happened. This is press secretary Korean Jean Pierre. These so called referenda have been an exercise in coercion and disinformation, executed by puppet authority authorities following orders from Russia. Based on our information, every aspect of this referendum process was pre stage and orchestrated by the Kremlin. U.S. ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas Greenfield spoke today at a UN Security Council meeting specifically on Ukraine. Here's how she put it. The United States will never recognize any territory Russia attempts to seize or allegedly annex as anything other than part of Ukraine. But does it matter what the U.S. recognizes if Russia considers something an attack on its sovereign territory? This war could get a lot more complicated. Melinda herring is with us. I'm glad to say, deputy director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center on Ukraine and back as part of the conversation here on Bloomberg radio Melinda, thank you for sharing some time with us here. How concerned are you about this development? Hey Joe, very concerned is the answer. So you're right that it doesn't matter a whole lot that the U.S. is not recognizing it. No one's going to recognize these reference of their chance, right? This is not Russian democracy. But the point is that these four provinces, it's about 18% of Ukraine are going to be brought under Moscow's nuclear umbrella. And Ukraine is not covered by the west's nuclear umbrella. That's why the situation is getting very serious. Moscow is huffing and puffing and they have a history of hopping in public about using nuclear weapons and they've never used them. So a lot of experts in town think that this is just the same old thing. But it's different this time. Vladimir Putin is in a corner. He's getting his butt kicked in Ukraine and he doesn't have that many options. And we don't think he has a face saving option. So this could be the prelude to the use of a nuclear weapon is what you're saying. So I've been asking all the experts in town who have been doing this a lot longer than I have. And no one thinks he's going to use nuclear weapons. It's quite complicated for him to do it. It evolves a lot of decision makers. There's no evidence that the Russians are putting the pieces in place that would need to be done in order to use nuclear weapons. As far as we can tell, as a community, there's about a 5% chance that he would use weapons. Okay. But there's still a chance, right? That's why this is and he has other levers as well. He's threatening to use a nuclear weapon, but he could also not renew the grain deal. So he cut off all the grain from Ukraine and that would really hurt food prices and it could starve a lot of people in October. He could also cut off Russian oil in November. And that would also cause prices to really spike here in the U.S. right during election season. So he still has leverage. He is in fact threatening to cut off the last gas pipeline to European allies here. This is a pretty desperate situation as well. This winter, my goodness, you talk about his ability to weaponize almost anything here, weaponizing energy is clearly one way to do it, but also it doesn't have to be nuclear. And I think you made this point last time we spoke Melinda he can do an enormous amount of damage against civilian populations with conventional weapons. That's right. That's right. So he doesn't have to use nuclear weapons. He could use a tactical nuke, and that's a lot easier to do. He could also continue to do his civilian targets in Ukraine. And really turn up the pressure so that there's another refugee flow into Europe this winter. And that will put more pressure. Look, Joe, I expect him to turn up all the levers of pressure on Europe to try to break the solidarity that we've seen. He could also cut cable to Europe. He could cut cable to Ukraine. Ukrainian, the state really relies on Internet. So he's got a lot of ways to monkey about. Nord stream, the pipeline is leaking gas in the Baltic Sea right now. There are early reports that this is sabotage. I know it's being investigated. The White House really didn't want to weigh in one way or the other on that today, although the State Department did acknowledge that as a possibility, but it's created this massive methane gas leak, it is a potential climate disaster here, and it's something that we've talked about today with John Kerry, of course, the former Secretary of State now, climate adviser to President Biden. He spoke to David Weston earlier. Here's what he said. Well, any time you have a major leak, leaks are the problem with methane all around the world. But this is a massive leak bubbling up under the water. Much larger than the normal leak Methane is 20 to 80 times more damaging than CO2. David. So it has a profound impact in adding the amount of methane in the air. Makes us a think Melinda that Vladimir Putin can also weaponize climate, candy. That's exactly right. And this was no accident. It's way too coincidental, but these two pipes had leaks around the same time. It's not a coincidence. Russia has been weaponizing energy for years. And Vladimir Putin is flexing his muscles and showing the west and saying, look what I can do. And I can do more. That's what he was doing. With these gas leaks. Do these developments change the U.S. posture? Are we doing everything we can? Knowing that the rules are continuing to change as we go? So the U.S. just announced another package to Ukraine good, let's do more. I think 18 more high Mars, these are the long-range weapon rocket launchers. But The White House is still refusing to send those long-range rockets that we talked about last time. There's still afraid of escalation. And this is the one thing that the Ukrainians are really begging for right now that they need to finish this war. But we also need to continue to send budgetary to support to Ukraine. And the European Union needs to do its part. It's committed 9 billion. And it's only sent one of the 9 billion. And Ukraine is really bad. So my favorite idiom is all hat no cattle. And that's really what the Europeans are guilty of. So they talk a big game, but they actually haven't spent the money. And the state in Ukraine really needs it. We learned something every time we

Ukraine U.S. Joe Matthew Moscow Russia Linda Thomas Greenfield Melinda herring Eurasia center Bloomberg radio Melinda UN Jean Pierre Vladimir Putin Atlantic council White House UN Security Council Bloomberg Joe Europe
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:58 min | 4 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We appreciate that. Well, you know when Russia invaded Ukraine, I think I was probably like a lot of people just shocked at the development there just seems so ill conceived poorly executed and boy, it seems things seem to have gotten from bad to worse for the Russians here in Ukraine as a Ukraine puts up a very stout defense. It's time to get the latest on what's going on there and more importantly what could happen going forward. We check in with doctor Ariel Cohen. He's a senior fellow at the Atlanta council Eurasia center. Tremendous amount of experience across geopolitical issues international security and we're very fortunate to have him. Ariel, it's really interesting here. Again, it seems to have gone bad to worse for mister Putin and his strategy, how did we get here? Do you think, how did he so misread the situation? Look, you can see how poorly the Russian military is performing and the military is always almost always the reflection of the condition of the society. Okay. So if you see the American military performing very well on a tactical level, but failing again and again, like we saw in Afghanistan in Iraq and elsewhere on the strategic level that makes you think that maybe our top leaders are not up to snuff, but our soldiers are definitely very good probably the best in the world. Ditto with Russia, not just the military, but also the intelligence community failed tremendously to assess what will happen in terms of the Ukrainian resistance. They brought to Putin their reports that he wanted to hear. And now, to cover their behind, to paper over their failures, the military came to Putin and said, we need more resources. Military often says that we saw it in Vietnam if you remember the escalation after escalation in Vietnam that eventually it ended very badly for the U.S.. So they said, we need more resources. They are going to mobilize 300,000 people. The secret paragraph in Putin's order is talking about possibly up to a million people to be drafted and we see that they're drafting everybody, not just people as they said that have prior military experience and served in the ranks, but people as old as 60 three or 65 and people with no experience whatsoever. Now Russia is notorious for not having a good sergeant core, not having a good core of training officers only one military facility for training, therefore there will send untrained soldiers with no military background to the front lines and as the Ukrainians say good luck to them. So that's, I guess, very concerning for Russians and as a result for Russian men age 18 to 65 as a result we see them leaving as quickly as possible in large quantities. What about the threat of the nuclear threat? How seriously should we take that doctor Cohen? I probably will be unpopular with many of my colleagues. But mark my words, I was traveling to Moscow several times before COVID and heard from our Russian colleagues that they are thinking about having something like the Cuban missile crisis. Having staring eyeball to eyeball face to face with the United States for us to understand that Russia is some kind of our equal because they have nuclear weapons. So I will not necessarily say that they will use the nukes, but they will escalate and threaten to use the nukes so that we will blink, we will be afraid and the motif the topic of U.S. and the west being weak, being feet, not remembering who we are, not being masculine enough, having too many gays and too many, I don't know. People who can not figure out their gender, being extremely condescending to the west and to our values, drives their desire to escalate to nuclear. And this is very, very dangerous. And I say, this is very serious. We need to be prepared. We need to have an overwhelming superiority if we can. To have four a potential answer to a Russian threat. Number one, number two, we need to expedite we need to speed up our missile defense efforts that are dragging on for 40 or more years since the famous president Reagan's speech on a Star Wars and missile defense. And be able to knock down Russian warheads while they're flying. It's very difficult technically. It's expensive. But with this kind of leadership in Moscow, I think we have no choice. All right, that's some very difficult choices, and that'll be the next issue for the world to digest here. Doctor Ariel Cohen, he's a senior fellow with the Atlantic council for the Eurasia center. And this is what I like Matt from his CV, speaks English, Hebrew, Russian

Ariel Cohen Putin Russia Atlanta council Eurasia center mister Putin Vietnam Ariel U.S. Afghanistan Iraq Moscow Cohen Reagan Atlantic council for the Euras Matt
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:35 min | 4 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Second biggest losers with 48% drawdowns, breaking market news and inside from Bloomberg experts. The fact is that we now have positive real yields according to market yields. We really see consumers trade up or trade down. I think we're breaking away from this idea that rates need to be at zero. This is Bloomberg markets. With all Sweeney and Matt Miller. On Bloomberg radio. All right, coming up in this half hour. We're going to check in with Katie greifeld cross asset reporter at Bloomberg news. We're talking ETFs, I think she and Matt have an ETF show today at 1 o'clock Wall Street. I'm going to get a little preview there. Plus, doctor Ariel Cohen, senior fellow at the Atlantic council Eurasia center, couldn't get the latest there on the Ukraine war, mister Putin and the risk ahead for Ukraine in the world coming out of that very dangerous part of the world. But first, let's check in with John Tucker Getty Bloomberg business flash jump. Yeah, as we look at the major averages right now, the S&P 500 edging higher the NASDAQ 100 off the best levels of the session of such technology shares leading kind of a cautious rebound in U.S. stocks at least for the moment. And then there's fed speak, the Federal Reserve bank of Boston presences and Collins in her first public speech since taking office says additional tightening is needed to rein in stubbornly high inflation, as she's also cautioned the process is going to require some job losses. Meantime, economists forecasted weakness in August data on factory orders for durable goods, one of this week's key economic indicators, let's get more from Bloomberg's Vinny del Judas. Economics is the record setting equipment spending recovery has lost steam. Putting America's manufacturing outlook in doubt. Business investment figures gleaned from regional Federal Reserve surveys point to moderation. We get the national durable goods data Tuesday. Also, this week, economists anticipate lackluster data on housing and consumer spending while jobless claims portend low unemployment for now. If any doubt should ice Bloomberg radio. As we wait for the possibility of some sort of intervention for the Bank of England, British pound Sterling right now, down about 7 tenths of a percent, we are at a dollar 7 88. S&P 500 three points higher, the NASDAQ 180 points higher. That's up 7 tenths of a percent right now. Yeah, the Dow Jones Industrial Average 49 points lower that is down about a tenth of a percent. And the two year yield right now up two basis points four 22 of the ten year of 8 basis points. That's a three 76. We check the markets for you every 15 minutes during the trading day right here on Bloomberg

Bloomberg Katie greifeld Ariel Cohen Atlantic council Eurasia cente mister Putin Getty Bloomberg Ukraine Matt Miller John Tucker Sweeney Vinny del Judas Federal Reserve bank of Boston regional Federal Reserve Matt America Bloomberg radio Collins Bank of England S
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thanks Tim Regional governors in Ukraine and reporting civilian deaths in the eastern Luhansk and Donetsk regions and the northern city of kharkiv They have also been explosions in neighboring Moldova Aerial Cohen with the Atlantic council's Eurasia center says this seems straight out of the Russian playbook When they are in crisis their strategy of the Russian strategy is to expand the perimeter of the crisis not to shrink it not to negotiate but they are convinced in their own superiority I would add that convinced erroneously Doctor Ariel Cohen tells Bloomberg Russia could expand into Baltic states even Finland or Sweden though he says that would be suicide if those nations do join NATO The former Minneapolis police officer who was convicted of murdering George Floyd is seeking a new trial An attorney for Derek Chauvin has filed an 82 page appeal arguing Chauvin did not receive a fair trial in Minneapolis where the incident took place He argues jurors felt pressured to convict in order to prevent potential riots if Chauvin was acquitted Harvard is joining other universities in dealing with its past ties to slavery The university is committing a $100 million to study and redress its ties to slavery and to create an endowed legacy of slavery fund Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake Howard by more than 2700 journalists.

Tim Regional Luhansk Eurasia center Chauvin Ariel Cohen Donetsk kharkiv Atlantic council Moldova George Floyd Ukraine Derek Chauvin Cohen Minneapolis Bloomberg Baltic Finland Sweden NATO Russia
"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:32 min | 9 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Whole of emerging markets I think 15 out of the 17 major emerging markets they've all seen reserves relative to money supply decline in the better part of the last three to 6 months I mean that's a real risk And I think that's something that a lot of investors are going to pay a lot more closer attention to as we move from inflation into growth concerns which is something that we expect to happen Which is happening now effectively So much going on in China we didn't even get to Russia which means we're just going to have to have you back I mean that's really the end of it Damien sassa or Bloomberg intelligence and a wealth of information as always Thank you so much We really appreciate it Let's go to our 99 one studios in Washington D.C. get world of national headlines with Nathan Hager Pretty Gupta is the war intensifies in Ukraine UN secretary general Antonio Guterres is pushing diplomacy He is meeting in Moscow today with Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov and president Vladimir Putin proposing a ceasefire and a humanitarian contact group to help evacuate civilians Guterres will be in Kyiv tomorrow to meet with president Vladimir zelensky Anytime regional governors in Ukraine are reporting more civilian deaths including the eastern Luhansk and Donetsk regions as well as the northern city of har kiv There have also been explosions in the separatist Transnistria region in neighboring Moldova Ariel Cohen with the Atlantic council's Eurasia center says this may be straight out of Russia's playbook When they are in crisis their strategy of the Russian strategy is to expand the perimeter of the crisis not to shrink it not to negotiate but they are convinced in their own superiority I would add that convinced erroneously Doctor Ariel Cohen spoke with us moments ago on Bloomberg markets defense secretary Lloyd Austin has just wrapped up a summit with more than 40 of his counterparts on offering more military support to Ukraine sources tell Bloomberg news German Chancellor Olaf scholz has signed off on sending 50 anti aircraft tanks Novak Djokovic will be allowed to defend his title at Wimbledon the number one in the world missed that chance at the Australian open because he isn't vaccinated The all England club says shots are not required to enter the UK and while vaccination is encouraged it will not be a condition of entry to compete Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries this is Bloomberg With the cost of living going up across the country you deserve a solution that offers some change BJ's Wholesale Club members can save an extra 50 cents per gallon at BJ's gas when they spend $100 in club or.

Ariel Cohen Damien sassa Washington D.C. Nathan Hager Antonio Guterres Sergei Lavrov president Vladimir Putin Ukraine Bloomberg Vladimir zelensky Luhansk har kiv Transnistria Eurasia center Russia Gupta Lloyd Austin Kyiv Donetsk Atlantic council
"eurasia center" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Skimm This

"This week, we've seen a lot of headlines that said the war in Ukraine has entered a new phase. And it's hard to imagine what a new phase of a war that's already caused so much death and destruction could look like. But we asked Shelby McGee, the associate director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center to help us break it down. She told us, that phrase actually came from Russia's foreign minister, who isn't exactly the most trustworthy source. I would take anything that the Russian foreign minister or any Russian leader say with not even a grain of salt just with the full salt shaker. It's really they're covering themselves because the war has not gone how they would like. They seem to have truly thought that they could blow into the capitol in a couple days. Take Kyiv overthrow the government and that has not worked out. So they've had to retreat and regroup and now they're re concentrating their forces in the east and south. Russia is shifting its strategy in large part because there's an important deadline coming up. May 9th is victory day in Russia. And while Putin and his government can spin anything they want, it is a little hard to spend a major victory right now. So they're really giving themselves this narrative to say, this is what we intended all along. We haven't had a failure. This was the plan. Focusing on eastern Ukraine could give Russia a bit of an advantage for a few reasons. One is that the east is just geographically closer to Russia, so Russia can get supplies easier. Two is that Russia and Ukraine have already been fighting a war in the east for 8 years. In an area called the Donbass region. So Russia is already really familiar with that territory and how to fight there. And three, attacking the east hurts Ukraine economically. Because it's where the country's steel and coal plants are. This looming new military offensive in the east will only exacerbate an already dire humanitarian situation. As more than 5 million people have fled Ukraine and 7 million have been internally displaced. And McGee told us, Ukraine will have to make difficult choices about how to defend itself going forward. Because Russia isn't playing by any rules. Something that I've discussed with experts is that going forward, it's not just a simple calculation of military strategy and military might. The Ukrainians also have to think about how to save their civilians. We've seen what happens when the Russians take over control of Ukrainian territory. Moscow in the Kremlin and the Russian forces have superior supplies and equipment. So president zelensky would face a difficult choice of risking having his army surrounded, potentially losing the army, which would risk protecting other parts of the country or giving up civilians to Russian control, so there's serious concerns that they have to balance out all of these risks. This week, Russia started making small attacks in the east, while it continued its advance on the key port city of Mario. A city that would provide Russia with a strategic land bridge between Russian controlled Crimea and the Donbass region in the east. Russia also launched an intercontinental ballistic missile test that had said could carry multiple nuclear warheads. That test was basically a warning to the U.S. and Europe to think twice about threatening Russia. In response, U.S. officials said today, they're sending another $800 million security package to Ukraine, following the separate $800 million package, The White House announced last week. And across the pond, European countries have drafted a proposal to stop importing Russian oil. McGee told us, it's essential that Western Allies continue to think about what support they can give Ukraine in the coming weeks. Really what's needed right now, what's needed yesterday, what's needed last year last month is more weapons. The Western Allies are doing a good job. We see packages continuing to roll out of heavy duty weapons, but it's not enough. Conversations like this, I think are critical because the world has a very short attention span. So I'm happy that we're still paying attention to Ukraine. Of course, for bad reason, but this is not going to end in the next two weeks. May 9th is not going to be the end date. And there needs to be conversations like this about heavy weapons, but also tons of money..

Russia Ukraine Shelby McGee Eurasia center Donbass Atlantic council Kyiv president zelensky Putin McGee Kremlin U.S. Moscow Crimea Mario army White House Europe
"eurasia center" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"So diplomatic efforts continue to try to resolve this crisis in Europe. But here in the U.S., the Biden administration, The Pentagon, they continue to sell the alarm about a potential Russian invasion of Ukraine. For weeks now, the Biden administration has been revealing details of Russian troop movements, exposing what it says was Moscow's plan to create a fake video of an attack that would be a pretext for war, Russia has accused the U.S. of conducting so called megaphone diplomacy. John herbs is a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, now the senior director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center, and he joins us this morning ambassador, welcome. Good morning. We just heard from and pierce Joanna cassis, that German Chancellor Olaf Schultz is in Kyiv today, Moscow later in the week. She nodded to some of the tension that could exist in a meeting with president zelensky. What do you make of that meeting?.

Biden administration U.S. Ukraine John herbs Pentagon Eurasia center Moscow Europe Atlantic council pierce Joanna cassis German Chancellor Olaf Schultz Russia Kyiv president zelensky
"eurasia center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Dot com slash NPR If you happen to be stocking up on face masks well caveat emptor yo It's not really clear about what are really high performing masks which masks don't meet the standard and which ones are just straight up fakes All the face mask market frauds and fakes Next time on marketplace This evening at 6 30 on 90.1 From NPR in WBUR I'm Tanya Mosley in Los Angeles And I'm Scott Tong in Washington D.C. It's here and now Secretary of State Antony Blinken is in Berlin today addressing Russian threats against Ukraine Last night in a press conference President Biden appeared to anticipate an invasion My guess is he will move in He has to do something And he suggested the U.S. and NATO might tolerate a minor incursion into Ukraine It depends on what it does It's one thing if it's a minor incursion and then we end up having to fight about what to do and not do et cetera But if they actually do what they're capable of doing with the force of mass on the border it is going to be a disaster for Russia Now Biden tried to walk back that statement today saying any troops crossing the border would constitute an invasion But when talks are this delicate every word counts Let's talk now to Melinda herring She is deputy director of the Atlantic council's Eurasia center Melinda welcome Hey Scott thanks for having me Yes thanks for joining us Now President Biden said he thinks Putin will move in Perhaps inadvertently using his outside voice you've been saying this for months Do you still expect an invasion Yes Yesterday was a disaster I don't know why Joe Biden decided to take off his presidential hat and put on his think tank hat but look he acknowledged that it was Putin's decision He seated the initiative to him He differentiated between an incursion and an all out invasion and said that the response would be different And he said that there's differences among allies He ultimately said that Putin will go in because he doesn't see an off ramp It's really shocking that he said this you got it right The White House tried to walk it back and they've said a lot of good things But now really is the moment for Biden to step up on the deterrence piece The White House hasn't done that They need to be sending more material to Ukraine and they also NATO needs to be stepping up its posture in Eastern Europe But yes it looks more likely war looks more likely as a result of the failure of last week's talks as well Yeah and just for the rest of us can you step back and help us understand why you think it's in Putin's interest for his legacy for his messaging for his worldview to indeed have Russian troops invade Ukraine Sure So there's at least 5 reasons why I think it's go time for Putin One is that he's an aging autocrat and he's thinking about his legacy Scott So if you want to be a great Russian leader you take big swaths of land And when Vladimir Putin talks about who he admires he admires Ivan the great installing That's consistent in his statements The second reason is he can He looks at the world and he sees weakness everywhere There's no real leader in Europe Merkel's gone The U.S. looks really weak and obsessed with climate with China with COVID and after Afghanistan and Joe Biden's polling numbers are declining He sees weakness all over the map He also had a really good year last year energy prices are up He got the meetings with the United States So really there's never been a better time for him to go in Fiona hill my colleague at brookings has said that and she's absolutely right Number three I would say is he can afford it They have a huge amount of international reserves right now It's about 38% of its GDP They can afford a large scale military incursion if they want to And then .4 and 5 So Putin spent a lot of time last year and it is cronies did talking about Ukraine They wrote this long 5000 word essay and they said Ukraine is not a real country It's leaders are not legitimate Russia's historic lands sit on Ukraine And those statements there's many of them But they now look like a justification for war like Putin is trying to convince the Russian people that this is the way to go And then the 5th reason Putin is sick and tired of Vladimir zelensky Volodymyr zelensky is the president of Ukraine He was elected two years ago and he'd never held office before and Putin was super excited He said God I'm gonna be able to fool this guy and he wasn't able to get a deal with zelensky And zelensky has embraced NATO membership with the zeal of a convert He won't stop talking about it and Putin also sees support for Ukraine growing I'm sorry Putin sees support for NATO growing In Ukraine it's at 58% So all these reasons lead me to believe that Putin is serious about going in Getting behind a very very quickly Antony Lincoln speaking in Berlin tonight you've mentioned the importance from the U.S. perspective of sanctions or stepping those up what in your view is or should be on the list that the U.S. and NATO should consider So The White House has said that we're going to do three things if Putin goes in again We're going to throw the meanest nastiest package of sanctions you've ever seen Vladimir Putin we're going to put more and more defensive material in Ukraine and we're going to increase the force posture of NATO troops in Eastern Europe We need to be doing that now We need to be putting more troops in Eastern Europe now That's how you get Vladimir.

Putin Ukraine Biden Tanya Mosley Scott Tong Washington D.C. Secretary of State Antony Blin President Biden NPR NATO Melinda herring Eurasia center Joe Biden U.S. Atlantic council White House Scott COVID Berlin Russia
"eurasia center" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"eurasia center" Discussed on Skimm This

"Poland, where they're stopped. Putin's denied encouraging this, but some see Putin's fingerprints all over this manufactured crisis. That's because if the migrants do get into the EU, it could deepen already intense political divisions over refugees. And if they're turned away, the EU, which has sanctioned Belarus a lot in recent years, might look like the bad guy responsible for denying entry to desperate migrants. Putin's second bit of bad behavior lately has to do with Ukraine, which, remember, Russia basically invaded in 2014. Now, leaders from Ukraine and NATO were a Russia might be back for more. Amid reports that tens of thousands of Russian troops are assembling near Ukraine's borders. Putin said over the weekend, hey, don't be alarmist about this story. But that's not much of a reassurance. And third and finally, Putin got so worked up this week, he literally needed to blow something up. This morning, outrage from U.S. officials have to rush a carried out a missile test. On Monday, Russia's military reportedly tested out some flashy new tech, by using a missile to blow up a satellite in space. An impressive site, but also created a giant and potentially deadly risk for astronauts, including Russians at the International Space Station. They'll now have to worry about thousands of pieces of exploded satellite debris that are now zipping around in orbit and won't go away anytime soon. Remember the film gravity? Well, we have a full on chain reaction. It's been confirmed that it's the unintentional side effect of the Russians, striking one of their own satellite. So what's the endgame of all this bad behavior? To get one expert's take, we called up John E Hurst. He's the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, and currently, the senior director of the Eurasia center at the Atlantic council, a foreign policy think tank. So we just recapped three headlines, all of which look like they have Putin's fingerprints on it. Do you agree with that? And if so, what's in this for Putin? Well, I agree that all of these steps would require his okay. And maybe it was even his idea in each or most of these cases. And I think there's definitely a connection between the crises on the Polish buildings border and the Russian military build up along Ukraine's border. In two ways, one each as an example of the Kremlin testing the western response to provocations. Two, while they have separate origins, the two crises. They both relate to an aggressive Russian foreign policy. I would not lump the shooting down of the satellite in this same basket, although it was a provocative action, but for very different purposes. I think a they wanted to test their capacity and B, they were confident that the test would be successful. And that would demonstrate to the world and especially the United States that they have this capacity. And what is kind of the logic of having multiple kind of chaotic situations unfolding all at once? Do you think that part of this could be him trying to distract countries or an overwhelm them as they choose what's most important to respond to? I think that there's a real logic to your question. I think for Putin the piece watching how the west can manage both issues. Ukraine, jealous, to see if somehow this could strike in his hand Vis-à-vis Ukraine. Because he's got a 7 year problem in Ukraine. The worries when conducting Dunbar is not gone well for him. And instead he's got sanctions, which cost his economy, real money. And he's trying to figure out a way to end the stalemate in Ukraine, which is a stalemate to his disadvantage. They're testing the rest of ability to respond to provocations. So that gives them information which they might find useful in the future as they consider additional provocative action. And it's easy for Moscow to step back in both cases. There's little cost for these provocations. I mean, we've seen a build up along the border with Ukraine, but they can always build down. And I'm curious just from your perspective, you know, how would you explain the significance of Putin testing these waters right now to like an everyday American who might not be thinking about foreign policy in their day to today? Well, average Americans right now is suffering from major inflation from supply problems from rising gas prices. And I can tell you this if Moscow would succeed with an escalation in Ukraine, that would make the chances of real war of expanded warrior that much higher. So it's in the great interest of your average American that the United States to the extent that it can confront successfully aggression overseas, and restores order. Because American prosperity is directly related to the absence of war, major war.

Putin Ukraine Russia EU John E Hurst Eurasia center United States Belarus Atlantic council Poland International Space Station NATO Dunbar Moscow