20 Burst results for "Euphrates River"

The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 2 months ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
"euphrates river" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:22 min | 3 months ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The Jesus Christ Show tomorrow morning at six on K of I am 6 40 or stimulating talk. If I am 6 40. It is the dark secret place. Brian sits in here until 11 here our number three for the 26th of December 2023 Way conversation with someone interested in such things. They asked me if I had Patrol reports from 2004 to them Fire the 18 months I was in Iraq, the fire support officer and infantry infantry officer, And so I cracked into my my old word documents that I used to have to submit at the end of every patrol. Mm. And as a read through them, I was struck by him. How many of them I'd for gotten, And so I brought in three is sort of a representative sample in the last break out. Whenever the format of how this was to be reported my information the unit who I am what routes we took. When did we leave and we come back? On this date on the 25th of July to them for this patrol report. My first mission was to go to one of her outlying Platoon forward operating bases Now my base was in the green zone of the Far West end. Called Bob Highlander and our area of Operation Responsibility was far to the south in the Big Southern peninsula of the Euphrates River. A deep, deep Sunni Arab bath assed. Um, stronghold. There were Al Qaeda guys from Chechnya, Al Qaeda guys from Yemen and then, of course, former regime elements fr Reza's. We called them and so it is really common for guys to get mortared. Sometimes they were pretty good. Sometimes they were bad. This was concerning because these guys fired three rounds pretty close. You are little fob called fob yellow cake because their mission was to guard. The Tuwaitha nuclear facility, the one that the Israelis bond in 81 destroying the French reactor. Saddam re constructed everything with the Russian reactor and Italian rancher. You never hear that story. Anyway. Um s o I in my report under enemy activity that block I said patrol arrived yellowcake, approximately 0 900. Received briefing from staff sergeant asked about a mortar attack the day before 24th of July 3 round attack lasted approximately 45 to 60 seconds, points of impact poise. We're approximately north south in a line 100 M, east of Yellow cakes, Eastern perimeter. When I give the location of where the three mortars hit, Then I have a picture of the based tale the fins of little mortars. I determined where most likely it came from, and I said fragments of tailfin assembly confirms and 82 millimeter Iraqi manufacturer based on letter lettering on the primer. It's like a shotgun shell or mortar very much like a shotgun shell has as a primer of brass primer on the bottom. That was pretty routine. I was our first mission. Usually every morning was checking on On, uh, points of impact and then determining where it came from, and then doing our best to go find scars on the pavement where mortar base plate would scratch up And in doing so you could you could determine patterns. You could figure out who's a good more German and who's half asked. So who's a priority? On all that. So also in the course of my duties, I in our whole a lar, which was about half the size of l a county. I'm not kidding. South of Baghdad. I would engage with local merchants, old guys smoking local government officials that we'd appointed or young guys shooting the crap. On guy had translators that I could trust to not tell me what I want to hear. But just tell me the truth. Block number two local national activity and encounters and at this time in July of 2004 We were in frequent nightly firefights with the Sauder militia, the Shia militia that were led by the cleric Moqtada Sauder, who had fled to Iran. And I said quote, spoke with eight local men at a roadside market vicinity and I give a grid west side of road subjects included combat action of 9 July 2004 men claimed that you have we had a nasty firefight in the middle of the city on the night of the night in July. Men claimed that U. S forces quote fired in every direction, close quote. I pointed out that I surveyed damage after the fight, and only one resident claimed damage they had no comment. We argued about what is best for Iraq's future. They said that the violence is due to us presents a yellow cake. I asked if Iraqi authorities would be attacked at yellow cake. They said No. Pointed out. The Children are in danger of being injured because the mortars are inaccurate. They brought up the action of the ninth of July again. I posed a rhetorical question. What if we had used all of our available power that night? They conceded that we actually held back or available firepower and that we had more disciplined than our Attackers. Why do you think we do that? I asked. One of them had the correct answer that we sought to minimize collateral damage. We spoke briefly about locals versus outsiders, and none of the men wanted to name tribes and clans. Several agreed that many quote new faces close quote. We're in the area. End of block the third block any other information of value. Nothing significant to report that is probably the most routine. Besides, being frequently engaged, attacked on the way into our air or the way out, which never made it in the report. There wasn't significant. That's a very typical routine patrol. That we would get a list of places to investigate. And along the way on DSA we we were given wide leeway to take whatever route we wanted. And so we went off track very, very frequently, and in doing so sometimes surprised, complacent insurgents either Shia or Sunni Al Qaeda guys. It wasn't uncommon, and we would literally turn a corner and catch guys embedding an I e. D. Just simply Because we went off the standard tracks, we would come up behind them. Aziz. They tended to look at the road up and down to see the Americans coming. They never turned around and looked behind them. That was a very frequent experience that we had. Let's say a typical A typical day in my life that year and a half, But you understand they're also untypical day, so I'll read you two more reports to sour of untypical days that became frankly, too typical. It is the dark secret place over number three war aholic. I'm reading you. Patrol reports that I've never read on the air before on dive. Got two more to go to two long days in my life. Back in a second. It is Ko Phi inflict 40 life everywhere on the eye. Her radio AP credits to find him with the news. Health inspectors and authorities beefed up enforcement at restaurants and shopping malls over the weekend following Christmas in an attempt Eo Get coronavirus Case numbers under control. L. A County shopping malls were facing.

Iraq and infantry infantry officer Brian representative Baghdad Ko Phi Moqtada Sauder Chechnya Saddam Bob Highlander Yemen Iran Euphrates River Reza Eo U. S
The rejected children of Yazidi women raped by their I-S captors

Correspondents Report

06:10 min | 1 year ago

The rejected children of Yazidi women raped by their I-S captors

"The ordeal of some women enslaved by the Islamic State Group didn't end with their freedom U._C._d.. Women raped by their captors have been told they can't bring their children home so they've had to leave them behind. A Middle East correspondent Adam Harvey visited an orphanage in northern Syria. That's trying to care for the youngest victims of I S. I'm sitting cross legged on flow cushions in the goals section of a Kurdish orphanage across the room sits a little. I'll go with curly black hair and Brown eyes. She's on the lap of the orphanages house mother the little go let's call her. Alya looks on as we talk. It gives me a shy smile when away at this place seems so normal caring adults curious kids a room full of bunk bunkbeds pile of tiny shoes by the door plastic tricycles whiting outside. It seems such contrast to the lives that these children did not so long ago go and the layers of misery the broad aaliyah here. Her mother was an isis slave who was captured along with thousands of other Yazidi. Women goals not far from he the Z._d.. Oils of war they were sold and raped and sold over and over again even as isis caliphate dwindled to a handful of villages along the Euphrates River <hes> the loss pace of ice territory was captured in March and the surviving. Z._D.'s and their children were freed but in April Yazidi elders Liz ruled the children of I._S. would not be allowed to leave in his eighty villages so the mothers of children like Alya born in the Calicut had an awful choice. I go home will surrender your children. Now's Muhammad is a psychologist working here as these eighty kids ride up to four years old the reason why the he is that these eighty community is not accepting them. It is very painful for the mothers to leave the children here after enroll their their mothers they come here. They put them down and then I go of course it is very painful but we always hope that one day they may come back to do they kids of there are four children of US eighty mothers in the goal section. The boys area has across a small playground. He there is sixteen sixteen children some born easy mothers and a couple of older orphans whose parents were both I._S.. Members all of them have been raised in a war zone. The speaker of the House article is took Bush. Sometimes they have problem sleeping sometimes when they see a black color they get skid. Now's Muhammed says some of the boys Have Emotional problems. Dana said has sometimes I try to beat their friends. They used to the violence. They were living in that environment now. We're doing this missed change their mentality. It's a real problem. That's why we try to deal with. The kids are cooperating with us. They see that we're trying to help them trying to help them deal with the the things they've passed through. If we say a twelve year old boy is not changing and making problems for other kids we will send him to a different center. We'll condescend to envision kind of like an Advanced Center for twelve year olds these cases who are not going to change Keyarena again. I'm laid out of the boys would assume we're going back to the goals to say goodbye but we moved to another building. We cross the road and opened the door and I'm I'm struck by a shop smell of urine and detergent. There are two rooms full of cots there twenty-one babies here ranging in age from about two to six months although it's hard to tell their exact Daij as some of the children seem small and hollow-cheeked now says they're unrecognizable now to the children who first arrived that was so malnourished when they lift I._S.. GNOME was sure if they'd In the middle of the day and all the children are in net costs is nice on of a playroom. It must be overwhelming for so few women to look after so many babies. Now's says it's difficult to find staff because of the shift work. Someone's going to stay with the children all night. A little boy cries put my hand on his chest. I and he quietens he stays back at me for a minute and then we leave more back to the Gulf section. US knows how she explains to the older two children what's happened to them. They must ask about their mother's Day Mahendran Muhammad. We tell them different stories. We say mothers who come to see them one day. We don't want to kill the hope to do something that will impact their psychology and ended innovation is actually it's a little vague with the children are actually up for adoption. Now says it's not up to her so far. None of these eighty children have gone out to Kurdish families. This is after all one of the poorest parts of the Middle East and the complications of bringing apart is eighty child into a Christian or Muslim. Family must be immense. We sit down again on the cushions. A couple of the older goals hand us. T- glasses of water and then there's a performance the little girl we met earlier. Alya sits with the bigger goals as I sing Kurdish Kurdish aid aw tough future for those kids Adam Harvey reporting from northeastern Syria.

Muhammad Alya United States Adam Harvey Syria Kurdish Kurdish Aid Middle East Euphrates River Islamic State Group Aaliyah Brown Yazidi Calicut Dana Z._D. LIZ Bush Twelve Year One Day
Trump flip-flops: US will keep troops in Syria after all

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Trump flip-flops: US will keep troops in Syria after all

"The State Department has confirmed troops will remain in Syria to maintain a military presence Clemens reports that was the confirmation from Robert palladino deputy spokesperson at the US State Department force of the United States military school. Remain in northeast Syria is part of a multinational force to prevent ISIS. Researchers into support support stability and security in northeast Syria. The battle continues against ISIS has many terrorists remain in a small area of land in the middle. Euphrates river valley in Syria.

Syria State Department Euphrates River Valley Robert Palladino Clemens United States
"euphrates river" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Here on c span radio coming up just a few minutes fox news sunday chris wallace's guests include un ambassador nikki haley and south carolina republican congressman trey out of come up just a few minutes here on c span radio until then here's more from this morning's washington journal with former us ambassador to syria more connelly our guest is invest your connolly she is joining us from new york we're talking about syria what is next for the united states and our allies france and great britain also reaction from the united nations and other allies across europe and the middle east stephen is joining us from windham connecticut hey good morning thanks for taking my call this was a great moral victory after reading the horrors of world war one i really think we needed to respond i was afraid of analysis paralysis but the facts here point you know in the future we own the us special forces on our side of the euphrates river we should split syria along that river bay it's this is our time this is our chance to create a new country for the peoples of that area for the sudanese for the kurds we need another country there that's can have free and fair elections this is our chance to do it and i think the west should really consider with our allies you've the uk france deriding that nation stephen thank you for the call we'll get a response industry connolly i understand the temptation that underlies that that idea but i i would be very wary of the wester the us unilaterally carving up countries we saw during the colonial period that having arbitrary lines drawn to suit external interest didn't necessarily result in very stable countries i think we really need to work with syria as it is president presently constituted and tried to come up with some and state in syria where the country is able to govern itself and live at peace with its neighbors i when i lived in syria i found it remarkable.

connecticut uk euphrates river windham europe south carolina un president sudanese river bay chris wallace united nations britain france united states syria new york washington journal congressman trey
"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"A has made a lot of them do you think that position reposition themselves and the after the turkish uh onslaught on i fleeing and its countryside the vast majority of the kurdish population in that area have actually the found no alternative but to ask for the protection of the syrian army i believe that after the progovernment forces completely enter our shreen white pg will probably deploy somewhere else probably east of the authorities down kabalan the last syrian ambassador to turkey speaking to us from just outside damascus while as ebastine osher mentioned to the east of refereeing on the other side of the euphrates river of fighters from the same kurdish fourth the white pg who are in close alliance with us troops they been deployed on a mission to help clear the area of jihadists so what does robert a former us ambassador to syria make of the latest developments in offering certainly uh the syrian kurdish why bg militia fighters were disappointed that the united states declined to offer any assistance the afford the defensive african which then forced the syrian kurds to go to plan b which was to ask for the syrian government's help so there the american stroke of credibility it for sure among a searing girds i don't think however it means that the relationship between the united states and the syrian kurdish wide pg fighters is ending by in fact the united states is ramping up a program five to arm and train fighters including fighters in uh syrian kurdish regions northeastern syria i think the americans have been very careful not to get involved in the fighting in offering the former us embassy.

damascus osher euphrates river us syrian government syria ebastine robert
"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"A has made a lot of them do you think that position reposition themselves and the after the turkish uh onslaught on i fleeing and its countryside the vast majority of the kurdish population in that area have actually the found no alternative but to ask for the protection of the syrian army i believe that after the progovernment forces completely enter our shreen white pg will probably deploy somewhere else probably east of the authorities down kabalan the last syrian ambassador to turkey speaking to us from just outside damascus while as ebastine osher mentioned to the east of refereeing on the other side of the euphrates river of fighters from the same kurdish fourth the white pg who are in close alliance with us troops they been deployed on a mission to help clear the area of jihadists so what does robert a former us ambassador to syria make of the latest developments in offering certainly uh the syrian kurdish why bg militia fighters were disappointed that the united states declined to offer any assistance the afford the defensive african which then forced the syrian kurds to go to plan b which was to ask for the syrian government's help so there the american stroke of credibility it for sure among a searing girds i don't think however it means that the relationship between the united states and the syrian kurdish wide pg fighters is ending by in fact the united states is ramping up a program five to arm and train fighters including fighters in uh syrian kurdish regions northeastern syria i think the americans have been very careful not to get involved in the fighting in offering the former us embassy.

damascus osher euphrates river us syrian government syria ebastine robert
"euphrates river" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Of the tanks that did that he jack lease happened to yes up the plan was as you had mentioned earlier ambush alley is the road that goes was a nickname given to the road that went through nozzle area between the saddam canal bridge and the and the northern uh and the euphrates river bridge it's the road that the 500 seventh was ambushed on up and the marines had to go oh through that area to secure the saddam canal bridge in the north well they're plan from the beginning from planning on the way over on the ship's was we're not gonna go through ambush alley we are going to cross the euphrates river we're going to leave a company at the euphrates river to protect at bridge and then our main effort is gonna sidestep to the east of the city and then we're going to drive along the eastern side of the city of voiding ambush alley and then attacked the northern said saddam canal bridge which was four kilometers south of the euphrates river as the vehicles the amphibious tractors and tanks moved to the outskirts of the city they found open terrain that they thought was solid ground and as i mentioned earlier there was a two or three inch crust and three feet of mud beneath and when these tracked vehicles went out on this train they crack the crust and sunk to their chassis and so it completely stopped the advance of the first battalion second marines there's so much detail in your book ended descriptions of the fighting in the city or so vivid uh can't possibly get it all of them uh but uh a desserts up a couple of subject i do want to touch on the uh in the heat of battle when this fierce confrontation is taking place with literally hand to hand in some places of cetera we have a real problem that his idol's agathon governed much tension back here and that was.

saddam canal bridge euphrates river four kilometers three feet three inch
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Here & Now

"A just north of doris war which is sort of the front line against isis now um the ussupported syrian democratic force is pushing south along the euphrates river down to the iraqi border sorta clean out the last vestiges of the islamic state caliphate so we were just north east of there and then we went up to raka which was taken back uh you know months ago he harm us from isis right that was course they're they're uh headquarters of their caliphate and then we went north of their two men bitch which was taken back from isis sixty months ago so it's really a bustling city now in its also where the us is facing turkish backed forces in their taking pot at both the kurdish fighters and the us several times a week will you spoke with the lieutenant general pol funk who is in charge of the anti isis fight in syria and iraq let's listen to what he told you anytime mock soldiers threaten at words but they're pretty good of what they do and they will defend themselves who is a serious threat they'll shoot back yes they well how challenging is the conflict right now for the american troops who were still deployed in syria i don't think it's that much of a challenge there's a concern the general funk a just mentioned that uh these american troops a moving along these checkpoints run by the kurdish fighters and concerned that these have pro turkish forces are shooting at them most this is no see harassing fire and a president alberto one of turkey said they may move on mandach and clearly that's where you know scores of us troops are so that's a huge concern for general funk and others but again you have to remember that the the us is assisting and training in aiding the syrian democratic forces did not really doing the fighting themselves and they call an air strikes and so forth so it's not really like american troops are on the front lines except for this area that we just mentioned and mandach so um they are doing again the clean up of they estimate will take two to six months to clear out the final parts of the.

raka us pol funk syria president euphrates river iraq alberto one sixty months six months
"euphrates river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now the regime and the rebels out only miles apart separated just by the finn blue line of euphrates river the syrian government has opposed the rebels move into deir isil seeing it as a land grab a valuable terrain derozan is remote but important it's home to vast oilfields and a border crossing into iraq that is part of an important trade reed whoever controls this area we'll have a great to say in the future of syria the us has long said it only wants to be in syria to fight isis connell ryan dillon a spokesman for the u s led anti isis coalition weren't cool this a race but he said that the situation in deir ezzor is uncharted territory i think the first time we are seeing eight convergence so both the democratic forces in into the regime is cheered years or local residents warned both sides will find the province hottest rule than they think it's very very sensitive situation very dangerous situation that ms them a saloon fled his town and derozan province when isis took control and now runs a facebook page posting information on the area he explains that the largely sunni arab population doesn't want to welcome either the shia militias used by the regime all the largely kurdish forces backed by the united states he says i the side taking the area could mean more war yes and five see is we will have another conflict and this another conflict will become another type of civil war nicolas harris amid least fellow at the center for new american security think tank in washington says the a us could have to back forces in deir isil for years to come the question that comes will how long does the us military need to keep a residual force inside of the areas of syria that a conquered for now it looks like the us batch forces and the syrianbacked forces will come could different territory that may well have to keep fight ting reached sherlock mp unease bay rate and now we remember grant heart he was the drummer songwriter and cofounder of the influential punk band who scre do heart died last night at the age of fifty six after being diagnosed with terminal liver cancer i'll never a big commercial success whose.

blue line syrian government deir isil iraq syria ryan dillon deir ezzor derozan united states washington euphrates river facebook sunni arab civil war nicolas harris
"euphrates river" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on KOMO

"From abc news i'm todd ant the center of hurricane urban out eighty miles southsoutheast of key west florida as the storm now starting to track north away from cuba florida highway patrol tells us some drivers is still trying to evacuate the as gas supplies one low abc's alex stone in tampa it is tough to find gas right now for anybody trying to evacuate many people are searching around the gas stations are closed some numbers from gas body in the miami area only thirteen percent of gas stations have any fuel right now here in the tampa bay area only twenty one percent and many of them aren't open any longer they've evacuated the workers there so you can't get any gas there the national hurricane center warning that aroma could strengthen again before making landfall but south florida already taking a beating from the outer bands acting director ed rappaport said rising sea levels remain the top concern addition to the winner the storm surge we're also very concerned about the rainfall which could be on the order of eight to fifteen inches locally 20th inches over the floor the peninsula 25 inches over the florida keys over two hundred ninety thousand homes and businesses in florida have laws power and many of the outages are in the miami dade area the categorythree storm still packing winds of a hundred and twenty miles an hour hurricane warnings in effect for eighteen million and there's a tornado watch until noon sunday in effect for nearly all of south florida a major offensive underway against isis in syria us backed forces in syria had launched a military operation against isis in deir is a war province the attack the aim to push the militants out of areas along the euphrates river near the iraqi border a syrian military is also converging on the oil oilrich region raising concerns about a direct conflict abc's jennifer eccleston the foreign desk emergency crews and mexico have recovered the body of a police officer buried in rubble raising to sixty five the death toll from this week's eight point one.

officer jennifer eccleston ed rappaport acting director tampa bay miami florida cuba abc west florida mexico euphrates river syria south florida gas stations tampa alex stone twenty one percent thirteen percent fifteen inches 25 inches
"euphrates river" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"For storms high eighty eight monday eighty six the high temperature of course we do a monday night football broncos in chargers over a mile high kickoff temperature monday night 75 degrees meteorologist ashton altieri currently eighty chew in denver miami dade county shutting down as hurricane armas wins begin lashing the state this afternoon mayor carlos jimenez urging people to stay off streets and warning that police will not respond when conditions become unsafe conditions outside deteriorate we still have a potential for a category one or two uh hurricane in in terms of a hurricane force winds here beginning late tonight through sunday evening evening tens of thousands of people in florida already without electricity are they located the car in an officer parked his cruiser behind dead car carter hamid in that it but the vehicle in reverse and drove over are they located the car in an officer parked his cruiser behind dead to hamid in that it but the vehicle in reverse and drove over there did hit him in the jaw putnam says kemira mahil was taken to the haass but only and is now at the denver county jail major offensive underway against isis either did hit him in the jaw putnam says kemira mahil was taken to the hospital and is now at the denver county jail major offensive underway against isis in syria us backed forces in syria have launched a military operation shen against isis in deir is war province the attacks aimed to push the militants out of areas along the euphrates river near the iraqi border the syrian military is also converging on the oilrich region raising concerns about a direct conflict abc's jennifer eccleston reporting from the four desk college football today the buffs hammering texas state thirty seven to seven see issue beat abilene christian thirty eight to ten and it's wyoming over gardner web twenty seven to nothing rockies and dodgers of course from la tonight our first pitch 710 next up there's nine delivers of colorado task force one are now deployed to help with hurricane a rescue efforts most of the task force members are staged in albany georgia a few in saint augustine florida the task force members which include firefighters paramedics and several other disciplines will hold a place until armagh passes over and that'd be sent over there needed in the region and officerinvolved shooting in.

abilene armagh albany colorado wyoming texas denver county carlos jimenez armas dade county denver saint augustine florida georgia la chargers football jennifer eccleston euphrates river deir syria kemira mahil putnam carter hamid officer florida miami ashton altieri 75 degrees
"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Australia has said it will suspend all military air operations in syria until further notice this comes a day after winning by russia that it would target coalition planes following the shooting down of a syrian plane by the us the australian defence ministry said the move was a precautionary measure sir how much of an impact will this australian decision have on coalition operations in syria at a fence and diplomatic correspondent his jonathan marcus in short term not a huge amount to the overwhelming bulk of australia's airstrikes have taken place in iraq although it has a hit targets in syria as well it's rose rosary small contribution probably six strike aircraft tanker aircraft under an airborne early warning aircraft were involved in the a coalition air campaign uh you know it's a capable contingent even though it small uh it's that ribian illustration i think of the unease in many quarters when faced by this new russian threats the words were very specific uh you know that coalition aircraft and drones would be targetted as the russians poses a if they were operating west of euphrates river in areas where russian aircraft themselves were actively engaged do you think the russians will be able to constrain the coalition efforts in syria i think everybody's wondering whether what the russians saying his rhetoric or whether they genuinely intend to deny a part of syrian airspace to the uslead coalition it has to be said that many of the airstrikes that conducted by the coalition in syria off to the east of the freighters.

Australia syria russia us australian defence ministry euphrates river iraq
"euphrates river" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"euphrates river" Discussed on WLAC

"The euphrates river russia has said they will shut they will shoot down any of our planes they have also because this is a tight zone i mean it is really easy you're on one side of the river boom you're on the other side of the river that fast majan you're going 500 miles an hour you cross the river in lightning speed so you're we've always had a communications center her set up between ourselves because there are too many jets and there are too many chances for mistakes to be made and so we have a communications center russia has one we have one and it's like a hotline and if one of the jets crosses a border crosses some zone they pick up the phone are we pick up the phone and say hey we're about to shoot down what is your what are your intense and then immediately the answer is given don't shoot it down or yeah that's yeah we're doing the various things or whatever it is take this we know when there is a mistake and we've turned back jets over and over and over again because of the firing on the syrian jet today russia has taken that away and now said we will shoot down anything that crosses the afraid east river so this is the war i talked about this last week this is the war that is coming and the war that is coming his on the southern border of syria northern border of iraq sorry north western southwestern border of iraq just before the euphrates so if you would look at a map it's a crescent shape and that's what iran is after they're going for a crescent control of that whole region from iran through iraq to syria up to turkey they wanna control that well turkey wants to control turkey syria into iraq so they're both coming down exactly the same way and where army people that the kurds in syria that also want their own nation in syria and turkey so we're arming the people who are against not only syria iran isis but also against turkey.

russia jets east river iran iraq syria turkey euphrates river