7 Burst results for "Eum archipelago"

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:17 min | 11 months ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so is never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural conversations. It's really interesting to approach these issues from the framework of such a technical profession. What is different? What has changed interest in the field of conservation since you were in school? I I was in Grad school two decades ago. So it's you know. I guess I would break it down into technical practices desist which I think most conservatives would would think of themselves as doing sort of things with their hands changing a surface in some way and then more social practices this or how do you how do you be in this world. In terms of technical practices. I mean some of the things that we do on a regular basis or certainly did to me raise a lot of questions about how do even come up with this. So you know one of the things that I was trained on and I think a lot of conservatives still do is something like spit cleaning leaning for a long time it was known that something like human saliva has really amazing cleaning properties. And you know it's the reason why your mom might have like littered Dom uh-huh and rubbed off your face but but it works really well and it's you know there have been attempts to make this much more scientific Tillich. What are the enzymes designs for example in saliva that work? But you know now thinking about it. My Gosh you to spit on someone else's things it's really really strange concept and yet it was something that was really suggested as a very efficacious way of doing a treatments for me. This is meant that I really have to be extremely aware of the choices. I'm making an at least be aware of the discomfort that they raise in me when I started thinking about what I'm actually doing. And then there's how how does one work with anybody else certainly in academia and I would say also in in museums are very hierarchical spaces where you know in the museum. The end the sort of curator often has had the privilege of storytelling and often when people are not within. The museum are consulted their consulted assaulted. Either after most of the work has been done or that that information is extracted from them and presented as part of this larger narrative rather than allowing doing people to simply say what they they believe. These objects are how you know. The story needs to be presented for those in an established field like museum professionals or conservators. It's easy to go with the language and practice that exists before you arrive. Projects Untold Stories challenge those assumptions and help help create a new model for me. It's really about kind of activating cultural heritage. In in very kind of living ways underlying all of this work with untold stories was to really think about what is possible in terms of preserving cultural heritage if you think of cultural heritage as being something that's preserved by people in in conservation labs only to that's really limiting and it also is untrue because we have millennia of people caring in for their things and their stories and passing this knowledge on through oral traditions and other kinds of traditions so to somehow claim that we are the only ones capable of doing this kind of preservation. Work is fundamentally untrue and so to me kind of bringing up this resilience but also just this joy of doing miss incredible connected. Human work was something that I wanted to be around the next untold..

American Institute for Conserv Collaborative Conservation American Institute for Conserv Bala Chandran Cheetah Bala Chandran John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Cinci Bala Alexander Bala Archaeological Theological Mus Elsner Mohegan Sun Europe Johns Hopkins University blake Ed Wanda Shipton Grad school
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to Museum Archipelago I'm Elsner appease Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each So he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. The American Alliance of museums often says that museums are the most trustworthy institute has rates trust in other institutions plummet the government the news media excetera museum still enjoy a privileged position in our collective consciousness it's something I've no this over the past few years even non museum spaces try to adopt museum like presentations to apply the veneer of trustworthiness but it's also uneasy set of statistics is it possible that the reason museums are so trustworthy because they have an excellent at towing the status quo the party line and who's public con justness our museums enjoying a privileged position side of anyway that's why I was thrilled to come across the book exhibitions for Social Justice by Elena Gonzales during a recent museum binge the book presents the current state of museum practice as it relates to the work of social justice but it's also a guide map for anyone Interested in the way forward I think if a lot of people fully understood how museum work is done they might actually not trust us so much because they would understand the subject activity but I think the more that we are transparent about museums content who creates it what the goals of an exhibition are etc.. The MORE PEOPLE CAN Trust US authentically and rightfully I'm joined today by Elena Gonzales Hello My name is Elena Gonzales and I'm the author of exhibitions for Social Justice which is newly out for museum meanings at Rutledge I am an independent curator and scholar in the Chicago area and I'm also co chair of the Exhibitions Committee at the Evanston Art Center we curate twenty to thirty exhibitions a year in exhibitions for Social Justice Gonzales lays out some of the ways that in itution can use the overwhelming uneasy trust capital built up over centuries museums have a centuries long history of supporting and white supremacist colonialist racist ideologies and helping them flourish and providing the evidence for them and under girding them and it is museums ethical and moral obligation now to not only dismantle that through declawing practices but also to make themselves into pro social inclusive institutions that are actively working for social justice kansallis believes that museums have the power to help our societies become more hospitable equitable and sustainable and the book presents a survey of specific museums and exhibitions that have read their goals clear people asked me what counts as an exhibition for Social Justice and I think people you know they immediately snap to museums and exhibitions that deal with mass violence that deal with redress of major wrongs like genocides your Holocaust museums your memorial Ziems that type of thing and when they ask this question I say what I think is the the most readily accessible definition for social does which is that social justice is the equitable distribution of risks and rewards in society and then I say that there are so many different areas that this touches in terms of content beyond memorial museums beyond holcombes museums and that's not to minimize the work of those institutions those are critical institute nations and holding those memories is very very important and sites of conscience are very important to my work in general but there are many topics anywhere rain aging from equity in education equity in health care environmental justice gender equity any kind of moment where a culturally specific group is gaining access to historical voice or contemporary voice in the public sphere there just many different entry points to this topic one of the main ideas of the book is that the work of social justice must be institution wide not just the work of one curator Gonzales writes about the experience of her first curatorial effort at the National Museum of Mexican art and M. A. in Chicago and MMA is a culturally specific for voice museum dedicated serving its local Mexican community it was a really big project for us it's called the African presence in Mahyco and the main exhibition was called the African presence in Mahyco from Yanga to the present I curated a second exhibition which was about the relationships between African Americans and Mexicans in the United States and relationships between African Americans and the country of Mexico and that was called who are we now roots resistance in recognition all staff meeting shortly before the opening of the project act the president of the museum reiterated the goal of solidarity to the entire staff of the museum if the museum did everything right.

excetera museum American Alliance of museums Museum Archipelago Elena Gonzales Eum archipelago fifteen minutes
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:29 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started in the middle of Bulgaria not far from the crumbling boozers monument why as the town of gap reveal situated in the Valley of the Balkan mountains the city prides itself on its unique brand of humor. Many local jokes are self deprecating about the gap ravine obsession with frugality and entrepreneurship and center around the comical links. The townspeople go to save money. The Mascot of the city is a black cat without a tail. It said the bruins prefer cats without tails because then they can shut the door faster when they let their cats out saving on their heating bills. This used to be the kind of humor that exist in data in the region around gobble not owning governable but then abrazos abuse were smart enough to brand it as there's best the entrepreneur does entrepreneurial course this is Margarita Sheriff's. Go hello my name. AMY'S MARGARITA DOT COM. I'm curator by profession and I'm director of the Museum of Humor and sat are based in Gobble Bulgaria. The museum was founded founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy two before the wall fell. This location was known as the Communist capital of humor extending its reach across eastern bloc countries and and also into certain circles in the West. I visited gap radio because I wanted to find out how this political humor and Satire Museum could have started here during Communist Times yes and how the museum is tackling. The global memed driven culture of the world today. There are a couple of precursors that we have to go through to understand how the Museum of two things one is the governor of jokes so someone announced a competition in the newspaper that the municipalities paying certain amount for each job that gets druid into a collection of the jokes so they collected a lot of a lot of these jokes made a book and this book was this absolute bestseller. It was immediately translating of course in the Russian those who in different languages like French English German and it started selling L. Inc very very well and the other thing that happened was car narrowed the Ghabra Carnival which was restarted in the sixties this and it is typical for being a carnival a with a lot of political humor and satire the people running the Carnival and later the museum were experts at walking up to the line without crossing it when we speak of political satire do not imagine that the general secretary of the of the part to being saturated it was very clear to what level of satire can reach so satire was an instrument in the hands of good communists to fight. Dole's who abused power but to certain level so talk to maybe your local exactly exactly 'cause very clear you're aware to set our can reach as to the governor will joke. They're not political they deal with the economy with them and tolliday of the of the local people combining the two or maybe more realistically using the Gabar Vo Jokes as a Trojan horse to present more political satire was what led some entrepreneurial Gab ravines to open the museum typical will style day didn't Butte a new building Aberdeen refurbished old leather factory so the building we are in name is a former ladder factory for secrets cheaper second it could go slightly notice because you don't need the same kind of permissions nations to build and to refurbish and if you wanted your out of the mainstream project to succeed in Communist Bulgaria asking for permission was not the way to go. The museum started to put on. BNL's festivals held every two years which featured invited Western guests. The first was in nineteen seventy three. They immediately started with the bi-annual. The first edition was dedicated to Kerr tools and small satirical sculpture. It was international and they brought in the jury amazing amazing names like amazing petunias international out so how could how could that exist well. If you ooh think of that time most Tunis in the Western World would be critical. They'll be leftist so they'll be very welcome in Bulgaria and that indeed the gathering place for people from East and West but there was a problem with that first biannial the jury selected for first prize a cartoonist from Turkey Berkey a country on the other side of the Iron Curtain Director. Oh well what we did and they started asking themselves between never asked for permission mission to make that make an international together. All these people are going to be a huge problem. What are we going to do and then he thought okay don't think I can do is go straight to the monster. So the museum's director went straight to the daughter of the general secretary very with Mela Sheesh Cova who would later become Bulgaria's minister of culture. She was she was good enough to listen. She was smart to pursue seve good ideas and support them. So it worked she came she opened the be annual. Antidote went to on well and they never gave award award having more to a cartoonist coming from a country. That's the initial. The museum and the bienial kept growing until communism collapsed in one thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine hundred nine. They had more than eighty four in guests artists jewelry coming in for a new and that was massive after eighty nine was the collapse indeed at that time there were more than one hundred people working king house of Humour Mark. Because if you think of all the different departments cinema literature folklore it was big enterprise. We need a lot of events tweets amazing executions when I look at photos from exhibitions from the seventies and eighties. I'm absolutely astonished by exhibition designed. You see it's it's amazing. It's so well done. I don't think anywhere in Belgrade Bulgaria exhibitions were so good. After the collapse the museum staff shrink to a skeleton crew as you can imagine until one thousand nine hundred ninety nine my colleagues would insist that humor is juniper very so that whole human being laugh and humor is omnipresent than Union for so and so on the first fight I short of had to have with the team when I came was to say I'm sorry but humor is not universal. Humor is so culture based. It's totally coacher base. Of course it's safe for into say humor is universal and not go into political humor. It's safer but you don't do your job. Our mission needs to be very very timely to very actual to show things that are happening today from their museum can do that. Who else would be able to do that while it has improved over the past decade in Bulgaria. Media Freedom is declining most of the press has been purchased by the guards and corruption and collusion between in media and politicians is widespread. You know there are issues with freedom of expression in Bulgaria Freedom Media media media ownership and so on so at least a museum should be some sort of outlet the museum addresses the Civic Space in Bulgaria with a new temporary Rachel exhibit called Garden Town. The charming subtitle is where mischief has a happy end motive of town where the different neighborhoods address different issues such as you know graffiti. You're invited to draw or voting over. Dare the place where you go by a yourself and it's accidentally a toilet but also voting rule then we have some guerrilla gardening making bumps of seeds leads and then finally is the park where kids because they usually come in groups. They are invited to sit down and have a discussion and reach a decision to give them some advice about how to have a discussion and also explain how they could reach decision like tossing a coin or consensus. ASSOC- or voting or you know different offices including anarchy. It's really something to see how far the museum has come from starting within the Communist system to reinventing itself to remain relevant in ways that are crucially important to a modern Bulgarian audience. The roofs good mitts that the next stage of reinventing interpreting interpreting humor on the Internet to an audience that lives mostly online hasn't happened just yet the first big challenge. I could think of when I I when I learnt that. The museum is looking for director aching to retire looked at it. I was really impressed and then I told okay. How can you change this place. What can you do about it. And how can you make it really fun when all the funny near is on your phone you know you can just scroll. Oh for hours and you wouldn't stop laughing. So what can museum do about that. Are we supposed to show the same things. No I mean you don't go to museums due to look at something that you see on your phone. Internet certainly has changed humor a lot and this is an exhibition that we've been planning for ages and we're trying to to find the right research team to prepare that means different. Thank fully games. It's really interesting to see how Internet has been changing humor and where are we at now. The way that jokes jokes developed in Gabarevo where people told slightly different versions to each other and in the process carefully distilled the most sharable essence of the joke mirrors. Here's the way that memes are forged in online communities constantly morphing to get more attention. Maybe the best chance we have of interpreting communities. He's on line and off comes from a humor museum. The Gabar Vo Museum of Humor and satire which has already morphed through twenty years of communism and thirty years of democracy accuracy is a good place to start. Just close the door quickly when you let the cat out this has been museum archipelago the you'll find full transcript of this episode along with shouts at Museum Archipelago Dot Com Club archipelago members get access to the bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary into the main show fund extras like stickers support the show and join club archipelago today today the two dollars Patriot dot com slash museum competitive. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

Bulgaria director Gabar Vo Museum of Humor Museum of Humor Satire Museum Museum Archipelago Dot Com Clu museum archipelago Museum of two Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelag general secretary Gobble Bulgaria Margarita Sheriff Bulgaria Freedom Media bruins BNL Communist Times Tunis Belgrade Union
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:30 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. There are many sites on earth that play a role in human spaceflight the mission control building in houston texas where flight engineers communicated with the apollo astronauts on the moon or even the grassy field in south eastern russia where eureka garin landed to end his his mission as the first person in space but hutchinson kansas isn't one of these sites. No spacecraft engineering happened here like in huntsville alabama. Emma no rocket engine testing happened here like in pearling taken mississippi. There's not even a historic exploration related radio telescope here like in parks australia despite this hutchinson a town a forty thousand people is home to the cosmos fear a massive space museum. The cosmos here boasts enormous collection the spacecraft including the largest collection of soviet space hardware anywhere outside russia. How did all of these space are the facts and up in the middle of kansas to find out. I visited hutchinson to talk to causes here curator shannon wetzel. I think some of our brochure say why not us right. The story of the cosmos fear is more or less the right place at the right time. What's all says that the museum museum has had many decades to be in the right place at the right time. Hello my name is shannon wetzel and i am the curators here at the concentrate the cosmos fears. I was a star projector in folding chairs so up at the kansas state fairgrounds in nineteen sixty two by woman named patty carey she was inspired spire by the launch of sputnik and ultimately wanted to set up a space science center in the mid west the volunteers. We have who knew her personally. I did not know her. Personally have pretty not much call her very nice arm-twister. You didn't say no to patty kerry and that planetarium grew to what you say now by the late nineteen seventies his potty carey was making plans to transform the planetarium into the kansas causes fear and discovery center the collection as we know it started in in the late nineteen seventies nasa is looking to a hedge singers unload but looking to get some hardware out there for the public to see and the cosmos fear was beginning its first expansion so we had the space and the connections. That's how we wound up. Collecting eighteen space harbor the cosmos fear was in the right place a big building in the mid west and the right time the late nineteen seventy s the era was a strange time for space exploration. It was after the apollo program but before the space shuttle the smithsonian errands space museum opened in washington dc in nineteen seventy six and and i get the sense of the whole bunch of space artifacts that didn't make the cut for that museum ended up in hutchinson this massoni and nass. I mean they want to get ed stuff stuff artifacts priceless our tracks out for the public to see everywhere and maybe also that's a sign of their success status and they have gotten into the mid west and it's been a priority and we are so grateful to the smithsonian. I don't know if you noticed on our labels. How many of our items on display are from from them and we're just grateful to be. I believe we are the only smithsonian affiliated kansas looking carefully at the collection. You also see another pattern hardware from missions that didn't go exactly as planned. It is heavily damaged mercury boilerplate capsule from the mercury atlas one mission. There's liberty bell seven another mercury capsule. That was the u._s.'s second human spaceflight mission in nineteen sixty one the astronaut survived but the capsule sink into the ocean and wasn't recovered until nineteen ninety nine and then there's the apollo thirteen command module odyssey which was restored and added to the museum in nineteen ninety five live at the end of the apollo thirteen mission. The astronauts were home safe. It was fantastic and then it was viewed more as a failure than success. Apollo thirteen was displayed in france. It wasn't viewed as something that should be around here necessarily and and so yes it was on display in france for awhile and then our guys restored it. I can't imagine any museum turning away the apollo thirteen command module today but but it is the cosmos fears ethos to say yes to an unwanted unrestored artifact even if that artifact is sitting under the water or somewhere in france they see the investment in the recovery and the restoration as well worth the effort to add it to their collection but there's also a bigger point that the museum is making thing with the collection as a whole space exploration is as much about the failures as it is about the successes. I believe that apollo thirteen had come up with contingency plan before it wasn't on the fly and in a way it was testing their contingency plan and it went wonderful. They got home safely. We discuss a lot. I know about how it seems in our culture. There's a fear of failure. We are afraid to fail or if something doesn't work the first time that means that idea should be discarded and i think that that's not what got us to the moon. That's not what made our space program successful so without meaning to. That's kind of become one of our catchphrases around here. Don't want our campers our students to be afraid to fail but the collection it wasn't just made up of american space hardware. The cosmic sphere also boasts the largest collection of soviet space artifacts anywhere outside of russia and this fills in the sizable reasonable gaps of how most other space museum's present the space race the cozma sphere team which included patty carey served obtaining soviet space hardware in in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s again right place at the right time. The soviet union was cobbling. They were looking to get rid of some of their artifacts artifacts. We worked through a broker and we were able to obtain them so they are part of our collection. They are not loaned pieces by the decision to try and collect them. Why why didn't other museums try to in the same way that you did. I think that our early leaders were very visionary in what we could become and recognize that in a sense we were only telling half the story half of the space race coury is colored red and filled with soviet space objects and text about the soviet human spaceflight program and the other half is blue telling the american story. Our gallery is is setup particularly well in the sense that you get a comparison. We split the gallery in a sense where you can see. This is kind of what was going going on the soviet union at the time. This is what the americans were doing. I think that our gallery does a really good job of comparing the two in a linear way so you can say okay during the mercury program and here's the vostok program the effect is striking the causes fear is not a design museum but by putting the artifacts from two different superpowers superpower's close to one another you get an appreciation for the subtle and not so subtle differences in the industrial design compare the design language of the soviet looking at the moon rover on display at the museum with the american mars rovers that americans might be more familiar with and you can see the different ways each program approach the problems of surviving in space even without the color coordination wessels favourite soviet are the fact is the luna sphere a copy of a soccer soccer ball shaped device carried by luna to whose only purpose was to cover its crash landing site on the moon with little pendants embossed with images of the hammer encircle. The soviet sent the luna sphere and it's just a small ball that upon landing it has a small explosive in it and all of these little art gallery calls them cosmic calling cards all of these cosmic calling cards go all over the surface of the moon. What a nice little just such a <hes> a metaphor for the cold war a little stick in the eye wetzel said that it's becoming increasingly difficult to teach younger generations about the political context context of the space race after all. It's been thirty years since the berlin wall fell very difficult to explain. I would even say the cold war is kind of difficult to explain because first of all they didn't live through it. I don't know if you did but i mean i was on the tail end of it. It wasn't isn't black and white there was so much great and i think that's the difficult part especially you've seen. Our gallery is pretty big. A forty five minute tour down there you just barely make it to the shuttle and that's if you're rushing so it's difficult to portray those ideas in a short amount of time to a younger audience no matter what you do do it gets wrapped up nice eight as we change here on earth so too does the way we teach the story of spaceflight what's will give me me an example of the list of items. Humans have left on the moon. A list that includes everything from the propagandistic lewis fear pendants to actual trash left there by the apollo astronauts. I didn't with our campus yesterday. We do a collection sure and i was telling they were appalled. I was like wow the generational it were hauled. What we we trashed.

shannon wetzel patty carey soviet union russia smithsonian errands space muse kansas hutchinson france museum museum soccer houston alabama smithsonian huntsville texas
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started for many indigenous people native people we're looking for ways who engage a culture at all places at all times and for me and for many other native people it happens to be in the realm of museums and donna spears focuses on engaging with her culture within the realm of museums precisely because museums violently separate her culture from living context yup to a a donald spears initiate hush con- you believe people buses team. Hello i'm donna spear yucca like a fruit shanghai and online crane. I'm born for the way people my maternal grandfather from the tangled plan and my paternal grandfather is from the chuck todd chickasaw people well. I'm the director of programming and outreach for the adamant educational initiatives spirits co-founded the educational initiative in twenty eighteen with chris newell and dr jason ma'am sheeny the initiative was born out of their experiences in museum and classroom education across present day new england. They saw the need to supply regional educators with the tools to implement competent education on native history and native contemporary issues. They created the initiative to build those tools. The word adamant is a pass inequality word. It is the pessimist plenty word for the snowshoe path. One of our co founders chris newell is a quasi and he recommended this term as a defining part of our our initiative because snowshoe pass at the beginning of the winter season is hard to find. It's hard to walk on but the more people pass along this past and carve out this path through the snow. During the season the easier it becomes for everyone to walk together and we see that as of of our our mission and part of the work that we're trying to do part of the guiding principles for our work that we are looking to add to that educational taste experience for people we living with an amongst here in what is present day new england because we're all going on the same direction and the more information and the more culturally accurate and respectful and historically accurate information. We're working within the easier. It is for our children far grandchildren and when i say our a need that i also mean native people the initiative focuses on what's called sites of knowledge these include k. through twelfth schools universities and museums but a spirits describes the notion of silence sites of knowledge is a western idea poorly suited to the work work they do instead the agony educational initiative seeks to employ knowledge at all places and at all times something that museums as they exist today fail to do in our traditional communities native communities there is no place that you would go to learn and to gain the authority on one one particular place and then leave that place and and not employ that knowledge someplace else or not see the connection between one place and another so there's no to a the museum and this is the authority and this is where you learn about this and then you exit the museum and that knowledge is no longer useful to you as you go the daily life that concept of silencing knowledge and silently our understanding of the world is a foreign one to this continent spears share share the striking example of this at untold stories twenty nineteen which was called indigenous futures and collaborative conservation. The session was the closing session of the american institute for conservation annual conference there. She showed an image of a hard no schone cradle board as presented in detroit art institute. It is completely they divorced from context and certainly doesn't feel lifting in typical museum conservation fashion. She compares this with an image of the cradle board that held her as a child tiled and has securely held all four for children. The ties on the cradle board are ceremonially retied for each child representing continuity in the material real world that is nowhere to be found in the museum. If you came into my house right now you would see all of the cradle boards from when i was a baby that were made for for me which i have a few and then the credit of words that we had made for for our children and my husband and i children they are placed up on the wall the difference difference between that and he is that we keep pieces of that babies experience within the cradle awards so we keep we keep a blanket in certain certain pieces of material culture so we keep those on the cradle boorda wing put them up on the wall to remind us of of that time that special time with our our son or daughter her and so these are instances where the critics award is referring to a specific specific place in a specific emotional life our family spears uses the difference between her cradle boards in her own home and how they would be treated in the museum collection to illustrate the difference between living collections and ethnographic objects. I think we look at within using collections. All of that is ripped away. All of that is stripped stripped and that stripping of those experiences and the spiritual and emotional life of that piece is a violent nine one and it's a very apt representation of what colonialism is that we're going to take this and we're going to repeat away from its relationship relationship with you and make it only relevant in his relationship to us the colonizers and that's the story like it's honored. That's the story that's more important and that is a violent story and it's one of domination and so when we go into museums and we see items is that have a lived relationship with us within our communities within our homes we see them on display as <hes> ethnographic jack objects that is a reminder that our understanding of our own <noise> material culture is not the one that is important to prevent the continued need violent ripping of the emotional life that object collections represent the initiative offers a range of educational support services in educational programming across present day new new england and part of that is making sure that certain words remain problem is d- using the term present day because we don't like to use the term new england even on probably ties like it's this is not problematic. Everyone calls in new england. This is okay. We sanction this term. We don't want onto us anytime that place american western understandings of our of our places and our culture in our communities in reference to into reference to europe in this case england some of.

england donna spears chris newell american institute for conserv shanghai director europe detroit art institute dr jason fifteen minutes
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started museums on the Australian island of Tasmania are a microcosm of museums all around the world. They struggle with properly interpreting their colonial past the exclusion of first peoples from telling their own stories in major museums, and having a large privately owned art museum reshape small town, this month on museum archipelago. We're taking you to Tasmania over the course of three episodes were conducting a survey of museums on the island and exploring how each of them relates to the wider landscape of museums today, we visit the museum of old, and new art in Hobart Tasmania, Australia. It's known as Muna and it's by far the largest museum in Tasmania now the only by square footage. It's in fact, the largest privately owned art museum in the southern hemisphere, but also by its influence on your often on ABC radio Hobart and across Tasmania, we'll hosting an international podcast about. Museums. Would you spend your precious travel dollas to record? That's Helen shield, host of terrestrial broadcast radio program in Tasmania is one obvious enters. She's a Hobart local and she interviewed me about this series. Listen to how she describes the way that Mona shapes the island eight it wouldn't be a trip to Tasmania these days without stopping on one particular museum, which is single handedly changed tourism. And prominent international reputation of his island stopping at Marna Mona often called the museum of Saxon death opened in buried Dale a suburb of Hobart in twenty eleven the building on the Norris. Bunker out on the peninsula. Overlooking a river, sneaks up on you, as you approach once you're inside through a rather small, entrance that whisks you on the ground. The architecture is designed to make you feel lost. There are no signs or directions. So you have to choose your own route the maze, like paths split in two with no indication of which way you should take. Other than which one might seem more attractive to you, tunnels and stairs. Which won't always move you up or down by one story are another an escape from the disorienting experience. Instead, they might lead you to a tight claustrophobic chamber a lovely cafe. Overlooking the water or another massive previously undiscovered subterranean open space. I don't think people expected it to have such an impact. It's kind of a lair their villainous. This is being co Blackhall a Hobart based musician, whose watched Mona reshape the creative community and the art landscape of the island. My name is Shanghai black. Oh, I live in Tasmania. I'm twenty seven and I'm a musician among other things. The museum is the product of Tasmanian millionaire and art. Collector David Walsh Walsh made his fortune by gambling. And Blackhall says that he is a much talked about figure in Hobart. He he'd be an interesting guests. Jintai boo. Who's quite unusual in his manner, and he'd fight. He's money through gambling, and who's good with numbers in his introduction to one of Mona's past exhibits Walsh, recalled spending, a lot of time in Hobart, smu's Zia, GMs as a teenager. And apparently he's to get dropped off by his parents in town at the museums and Easter just walk around the day as a kid, and then become up again at the not on come home. 'cause navy was annoying them or whatever at home as a kid with a name like the museum of old, and new art Mona could pretty much include any type of art, but looking at the collection, it's clear that David Walsh has a fascination with sex, and death and bets that the rest of us do too, and it turns out, he's right. Social animals like us love thinking about fucking and dying and excretion and wrought Walsh, himself calls. Mona a subversive adult Disneyland. There's the holy virgin. Mary, a painting created and part with elevate. Int- deng. There's on the road to heaven, the highway to hell in which the remains of a suicide bomber cast in dark chocolate, there dead horses, and rotting festering wounds with swarming bugs encased in acrylic, there's audio animatronic skeletons fucking, there's a digestive machine that turns food into feces and stinks up an entire gallery, the art tries to punch you in the gut, and mostly succeeds in part because there aren't any descriptive. Plaques telling you what's important about the art or how to feel about it. I say I'd never seen anything like it really something. And these from someone who worked scene, and spent his free time exploring mediums, so often we are in neom. World were very stressed out by the labeling. We spend hours and hours thinking about what the labels and placard look like next to a piece of armour. And so it was really refreshing Winston understanding, no labels at all. He normally. Clinical music copulating and they're enjoying it. Always removing feeling from the equation like go objectively this is this. But moving on your only guide to the museum is it's inhouse app called the oh, the oh, will provide some interpretation of the art, but that interpretation is hidden away in a little tab, called art wink, which has the icon of a penis. It's delightful to see art off the pedestal. But Blackhall says that that levity might also make it easier for the artists. I think it's a very uncomfortable thing to be asked to explain please explain know as pulling Hansen says, and it's like, oh. How do I say this stuff without being twit gets almost like they've made the unconventional the everyday, you know? And sometimes you wonder around there and they'll be people in smokes getting about. And you might y you know, these these odd smokes. I'm not sure you know what's happening. But it so it's like now it's a pot of your every day, do you think for Tasmanians that there's a certain amount of pride that it's here? Definitely, I think people have welcomed with open arms almost, and the way people talk about you here. You know, wherever you are the art minor. Yup up. Very good. You know, lacking kind of very gruff way. But like all. Yep. Very good going to go down to the bone fire with the kids, you know. And it's good. Mona has also been well received by art critics and by tourists visiting from outside Tasmania as a new destination on the global art tourism circuit. There's no doubt that the museum has changed Hobart a city of a quarter of a million people. I feel like it. Partly began with minor this. You know, Sarah NHS is tourism like feel like where in the I you know, that it's, it's watching us the world is going that Lyon there and it really in the last year. Oh, two, you can feel the new foot traffic you can really feel it and it's a little bit at I don't know if actually quite got the infrastructure for the amount that we of tourists that we now have luckily, moaner, I think, took responsibility for itself. But yeah, you can definitely feel the on the, you know, we have cruise ships, not coming in and out sometimes their cruise ship traffic jams, whether I have to white and the by for the other one to leave before they come in, and yet, it's changed rapidly in a very short space of time, quite shocking, even with the crowds of people visiting it's hard. Not to feel alone in the space as if you're the only one experiencing the art, the museum also hosts solstice festivals, which I'm told transformed the town with musical performances and large public art. Installations, eight slang having access to the blow like it feels that you've you've got an, you have an insight into this world that you would have never been apart of had you lived somewhere else. My lasting impression is that Mona is a monument to a kind of joyful secularism in the world where monuments don't feel particularly secular or joyful, the feeling of visiting is a little like launching confetti Popper in the serious place of worship and getting away with it. It is in short life, affirming. A very special thanks to the newest members of club archipelago, Sean Blinn, Blair Chisholm, Victoria, capacity. And Alex, join them to support the show and get access to special bonus features like longer versions of some of my interviews. My take on the museum industry, an inside a tours of museums all around the world all with the same humor and quality you've come to expect from us. Eum archipelago. Join today for two dollars a month on patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and get museum archipelago logo stickers mailed straight to your door. That's patriot dot com slash museum archipelago to join club archipelago. You can find more about being co Blackhall by searching for being a black hole music on Facebook and Instagram. This has been museum archipelago. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with show notes at museum, archipelago dot com. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend in ELS nine Boston. Find museum archipelago move you get your podcast. I've listened.

Tasmania Hobart Mona museum of old art museum David Walsh Walsh Hobart Tasmania Eum archipelago Blackhall museum of Saxon Marna Mona Ian Elsner Muna ABC Australia Facebook Boston Helen shield
"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"eum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Only open for prearranged tours consisting most. The of school kids and the occasional podcast or even the ownership of the museum has been contentious up until recently, the Devonport city council rescinded the lease from the six rivers, aboriginal corporation in two thousand fourteen and did not hand back the keys until twenty fifteen Sammy Howard, fellow board member of the six rivers, aboriginal corporation, explains that the museum has been hampered by red tape every step of the way to our which fees drawn those Nonni a the only museum caving, pice in stri, figurative stike funded on today's of what she added governments set us up to file. You don't give didn't give us the training and the things that way knighted on starting to sink it would become a collection of who jumps because every time we get through one hope there's another one put in front of us. The white governments have got to be silliness with phone. Welcome a money issue don't working when you're trying. To deal with these things people want what they told could talk about. Matings of may was return on investment. And it's a difficult spice when you when you talking about sharing culture and having applies to your community bay is plice means a lot to families in this area. But both Howard and golf are optimists about the future of tiara the corporation hopes to bring some, high tech exhibits like touchscreens into the museum and build the resources to maintain opening hours with staff and guides from the community all will centering their own story, a number of factors contribute to their optimism. The museum can now apply for specific funding sources from other Tasmanians there's an increased interest in understanding the land in its people, and the greater understanding of British colonization of the island, we sort of feeling that this is a year where we'll get the spice opened again over just bring school gross right now with this business plan, what we're doing is to get out to spend some, some of this money and upgrade some of the interpreted here and put ourselves and ask stories into this spice. This is really important. It could be an option of having a self God into with they walking around, and as they come to different sections, getting told the stores wanted to tell, but everything costs money, and it's not just upgrading the museum all over Australia and indeed all over the world, the practices of welcome to country and acknowledgement of country are slowly becoming more common as a way to open the vents school, assemblies, and conferences is a difference as an acknowledgment to country and I can be done by anyone is to acknowledge the land and the traditional papal land. And that can be anyone in it should be done by people to site where you do a speech form. Former function is firstly decided after knowledge, the traditional this land. If United nine of is to mention the nine of them into college the land, we made on his is they land in Besser, thinks a welcome to country be done by someone who's from that country. It's basically welcoming balloon to. Up land and for people to understand why affiliates repulsive and opaque guitar stand to beat about who we are what land, they're on. And, and Linda hitt about the traditional papal custodianship, rather than undershoot, Gough, describes visiting native American nations in the US state of Zona and realizing that the challenges that members of first nations face all around the world, including developing museums, that simultaneously served their own people and the wider public are similar, and so are some of the solutions, dude. Wave they're doing that war on, I consider my friends and Harrison. Mc knowledge minutes coming up around universities with I see it at seven, that's, that's a great feat when we're doing things here. I'm getting things in support from my friends will have been gone through similar things conversation on their loss weight, which was around knowledge moments that people not what? We do is always, I would comment on that. And then pay backwards and forwards. There is some support in. Which is really, really positive. Hi, it's in again since you've listened to all the way to the end. I'm going to go out on a limb and say you're a fan of museum archipelago join other fans by subscribing to club archipelago. It's not so secret club that gives you access to special bonus features like longer versions of some of my interviews. My take on the museum industry, an inside a tours of museums all around the world all with the same humor and quality you've come to expect from us. Eum archipelago. Join today for two dollars a month on patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and get museum archipelago logo stickers mailed straight to your door. That's patriot dot com slash museum archipelago to join club. Archipelago. This is. Compelling. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with shown up that museum archipelago dot if this is your first show. Don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next. Bring a friend.

Sammy Howard Eum archipelago Devonport city council golf Besser US Linda hitt Australia Harrison Zona undershoot Gough two dollars