13 Burst results for "Euler Hermes North America"

With the COVID Relief Bill Signed Yellen Turns Focus on Unemployment

All Things Considered

02:45 min | 11 months ago

With the COVID Relief Bill Signed Yellen Turns Focus on Unemployment

"The big relief bill is signed now begins the sales pitch. The president and vice president and various and sundry Cabinet members are traveling or otherwise making the rounds, making their case among them. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, which is where we come in. Yellen said on ABC over the weekend that she is hopeful will be back near full employment next year. Back near is the operative phrase there because it had been widely assumed we were at full employment. Before everything fell apart. 3.5%, if you remember was the unemployment rate in February of 2020. So with everything in the past year in this economy What you suppose full employment's gonna look like now and more to the point water policy makers at the Fed and Treasury going to do about it if and when we get there, Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman starts us off. Full employment is a perfect sweet spot for the economy. Thea unemployment rate is as low as it can get, without employers having to bid up wages through the roof to get the workers they need. Everyone who wants a job can get one and inflation doesn't soar out of control, Dean Baker at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, says. In the past, policymakers have often put the brakes on before we got to full employment. But, he says in this recovery from massive pandemic job loss, they seem to be following a more ambitious unemployment script. They really do want to press the economy to see how low we could go. That likely means getting headline unemployment down to 3.5% again. But economist Mark Paul at New College of Florida says policymakers will also try to get other measures of worker to stress and financial hardship. Down. This means looking at unemployment rates for certain groups that have traditionally been stigmatized in the labor market. Such a black workers who tend to experience unemployment rates twice that of white workers. Black unemployment is up 4% in the pandemic. For White Americans. It's up just 2.5% and many more women with kids at home have dropped out of the labor force than men. Now, job creation is accelerating, and it's likely to continue with new government stimulus. Covad cases down and vaccination up Economist Damn north at credit insurer Euler Hermes North America says the economy has a lot of ground to make up. He estimates at least 30% of small businesses have folded. New businesses are going to start up, but it will take a wild probably T O late, 2022 early 2023 to get all the jobs back. And to get back to a full employment economy. I'm Mitchell Hartman for

Treasury Secretary Janet Yelle Yellen Mitchell Hartman Mark Paul New College Of Florida Center For Economic And Policy Dean Baker Cabinet Thea ABC Treasury FED Euler Hermes North America Covad
What full employment means in a pandemic-ravaged economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:43 min | 11 months ago

What full employment means in a pandemic-ravaged economy

"The bigger relief bill is signed now begins the sales pitch the president and vice president in various and sundry cabinet members are travelling or otherwise making the rounds making their case among them treasury secretary. Janet yellen which is where we come in yellen said on. Abc over the weekend that she is hopeful will be back near full employment. Next year back here is the operative phrase there because it had been widely assumed we were at full employment before everything fell apart three and a half percent. If you're a member of the unemployment rate in february of twenty twenty so with everything in the past year in this economy what are you suppose. Full employment is gonna look like now and more to the point water policy makers at the fed and treasury gonna do about it. If and when we get there marketplace's mitchell hartman starts us off. Full employment is a perfect sweet spot for the economy. The unemployment rate is as low as it can get without employers having to bid up wages through the roof to get the workers. They need everyone who wants a job can get one and inflation doesn't sore out of control dean baker at the center for economic and policy research says in the past policy makers of often put the brakes on before we got two full employment but he says in this recovery from massive pandemic job loss. They seem to be following a more ambitious on employment script. They really do want impress the economy to see how low we could go. That likely means getting headline unemployment. Down to three and a half percent again but economists mark paul at new college of florida. Says policymakers will also try to get other measures of worker to stress and financial hardship down. This means looking at unemployment rates for certain groups that have traditionally been stigmatized in the labor market. Such as black workers who tend to experience isn't rates whites that of white workers. Black unemployment is up four percent in the pandemic for white americans. It's up just two and a half percent and many more women with kids at home have dropped out of the labor force than men now. Job creation is accelerating and it's likely to continue with new stimulus covid cases down and vaccination up economists dam north at credit insurer euler hermes north america says the economy has a lot of ground to make up. He estimates at least thirty percent of small businesses have folded. New businesses are going to start up but it will take wild probably too late. Twenty twenty two early twenty twenty three to get all the jobs back and to get back to a full employment

Janet Yellen Yellen Mitchell Hartman Treasury Mark Paul New College Of Florida Center For Economic And Policy Cabinet Dean Baker ABC FED North America
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People at the Department of Labor this morning came the latest indicator of the health of this economy. After four straight months of increases, Consumer prices inflation, right It held steady in October on the face of it not so bad in an economy beaten up by this pandemic. But as often happened with seemingly not so bad news, there is more to it. Those steady prices even falling prices in some sectors are telling the story of a recovery losing steam and his marketplaces, Mitchell Hartman, reports. It all comes down to supply and demand. We've seen this supply and demand push. Pull on. Price is right through the pandemic. Remember back in the summer when Cove it shut down food processing plants, and they were meat shortages. Supply fell and meat prices went up. Now, consumer demand in the economy is weakening and holding prices down with Covitz urging consumers don't want to go out and spend money and they may not be able to, says economist Dan North at credit insurer Euler Hermes North America restrictions and they're already coming In some states. It's going to shut down significant parts of the economy like it did before, and it'll make consumption very difficult. Fear of mortgage job and income losses is also keeping demand down, says Sam Stovall at CFR a research. A lot of people are still very worried about overspending. If they do have a job. They're worried about being furloughed with the additional spike in Cove. It We're running into the end of the year. We've gotten income Cliff coming up for a bunch of people. That's Brad McMillan at Commonwealth Financial Network and the Income Cliff He's referring to is the expiration of federal pandemic unemployment benefits at the end of the year. That adds up to billions of weak in payments to more than 13 million Americans, and that's not all that's set to run out. It's not just a matter of income, it's the prohibition of the evictions, Foreclosures. In other words, there's a lot of financial damage that isn't showing up on the radar right now, but will start to show up very shortly unless McMillan says Congress extends those payments and protections before they expire in December. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. You just heard from Mitchell about the income cliff coming up at the end of the year. Right? Still, though, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said again today there is not going to be another big coronavirus relief bill out of Congress if it happens at all. Gonna be closer. What he was talking about before the election, something you're $500 billion a skinny package if you will. But with unemployment still high and the virus on the rise will that skinny bill help the people who need it? Most? No. They won't beggar agile or is a senior economist at the Center for American Progress. He writes about this kind of thing. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me as you just heard, Senator McConnell said Once again day, hey, does not see the need for a large relief package for this economy. Um, what do you think? It is very surprising to hear that given where we are in terms of the pandemic, but also given what happened earlier this year if you think about what happened in March and April, and the cares act and how that helped out the economy. We shouldn't want Maura that given the numbers You have said repeatedly said it on Twitter the other day, and you've said in a piece online within the past week or so. Our economic policies are basically geared toward white men. If white men are doing fine, then we get the economic policy that white men need. That is correct. Because if you look at the numbers, you look at what happened in April, when we had the peak of unemployment. General employment was at 14.7% White men had unemployment rate of 12.4%. That's when we saw the cares act. That's what we saw all the other things and P p p. And a lot of spending toe. How about this economy? Since then, the unemployment rate for white man has dropped down now to 5.8%. And so you could look at these policymakers say, Oh, well, things are looking good. But if you look at it for other groups, so, for example, black men are 11.5%. So black men have a similar unemployment rate that white men had in April and then you also even look at what's happening with women Women Last month, 865,000 dropped out of the labor force that they're not even counted it unemployment and the only got half that back. But if you look only at white men with 5.8% unemployment rate, then you could say all we only need a skinny bill. White men are not the economy, everybody's economy and we have to focus on that. Let me ask you one more thing and On, I guess it. It makes sense, given the state of play right now, But you wrote the other day. Um as this pandemic has hit home, lawmakers cannot be counted on to respond to the magnitude off this crisis or any future economic crisis. That is fairly bleak that we can't count on Washington T O fix this economy when it so desperately needs it. That's the truth. We lost a lot of jobs, unemployment, Pete that almost 15% and we put in $34 trillion into the economy, And the thing is it worked. And instead of putting more money back in continuing these things like direct checks or expanded you why which help people look, you said eight million people out of poverty. Policymakers sat on their hands and let it expire and all the way through the election. It didn't happen. Shocking Pretty much, everybody so Of course, you know we can't. We can't expect policy makes you do that, because it's a position where they would have done it. When he should have done it. We didn't see it so we can't trust him anymore. Well, how worried are you then about what is likely to happen in January, Assuming Republicans hold the Senate, right, and I get that I'm making some assumptions there, but President Biden will come in with a larger stimulus bill. It will pass the house and then it will again be subject to Republicans in the Senate. Who will say no, We don't need it. And more importantly, we have to start thinking about austerity because we're spending too much money. Then what happens in this recovery? What I think is gonna happen is that we are going to end up with something close to a skinny bill. And then policymakers are gonna wipe their hands and then say, OK, well,.

Mitchell Hartman Senate Senator McConnell Brad McMillan Department of Labor Congress Cliff senior economist Sam Stovall Commonwealth Financial Network Euler Hermes North America Covitz Center for American Progress Twitter Maura Dan North President Biden
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the health of this economy. After four straight months of increases, Consumer prices inflation, right It held steady in October on the face of it not so bad in an economy beaten up by this pandemic. But as often happened with seemingly not so bad news, there is more to it. Those steady prices even falling prices in some sectors are telling the story of a recovery losing steam and his marketplaces, Mitchell Hartman, reports. It all comes down to supply and demand. We've seen this supply and demand push. Pull on price is right through the pandemic. Remember back in the summer when Cove it shut down food processing plants, and they were meat shortages. Supply fell and meat prices went up. Now, consumer demand in the economy is weakening and holding prices down. With Covad. Surging consumers don't want to go out and spend money and they may not be able to, says economist Dan North at credit insurer Euler Hermes North America restrictions and they're already coming In some states. It's going to shut down significant parts of the economy like it did before, and it'll make consumption very difficult. Fear of more job and income losses is also keeping demand down, says Sam Stovall at CFR a research. A lot of people are still very worried about overspending. If they do have a job. They're worried about being furloughed with the additional spike in Cove. It We're running into the end of the year. We've gotten income Cliff coming up for a bunch of people. That's Brad McMillan at Commonwealth Financial Network and the Income Cliff He's referring to is the expiration of federal pandemic unemployment benefits at the end of the year. That adds up to billions of weak in payments to more than 13 million Americans, and that's not all that's set to run out. It's not just a matter of income, it's the prohibition of evictions, Foreclosures. In other words, there's a lot of financial damage that isn't showing up on the radar right now, but will start to show up very shortly unless McMillan says Congress extends those payments and protections before they expire in December. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. You just heard from Mitchell about the income cliff coming up at the end of the year. Right? Still, though, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said again today there is not gonna be another big coronavirus relief bill out of Congress if it happens at all. Gonna be closer What he was talking about before the election, something near $500 billion a skinny package if you will. But with unemployment still high and the virus on the rise will that skinny bill help the people who need it? Most know they won't bang agile or is a senior economist at the Center for American Progress. He writes about this kind of thing. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me as you just heard, Senator McConnell said once again day, hey, does not see the need for a large relief package for this economy. Um, what do you think? It is very surprising to hear that given where we are in terms of the pandemic, but also given what happened earlier this year if you think about what happened in March and April, and the cares act and how that helped out the economy. We shouldn't want Maura that given the numbers You have said repeatedly said it on Twitter the other day, and and you've said it in a piece online within the past week or so. Our economic policies are basically geared toward white men. White men are doing fine, Then we get the economic policy that white men need. That is correct. Because if you look at the numbers, you look at what happened in April, when we had the peak of unemployment. General employment was at 14.7% White Man had unemployment rate of 12.4%. That's when we saw the cares act. That's what we saw all the other things and P P p. And a lot of spending to help out this economy. Since then, the unemployment rate for white man has dropped down now to 5.8%. And so you could look at these policymakers say, Oh, well. These are looking good. But if you look at it for other groups, So, for example, black men are 11.5% so black men have a similar unemployment rate that white men had in April. Then you also even look at what's happening with women Women Last month, 865,000 dropped out of the labor force that they're not even counted it. Unemployment and the only got half that back. But if you look only at white men with 5.8% unemployment rate, then you could say all we only need a skinny bill. White men are not the economy, everybody the economy and we have to focus on that. Let me ask you one more thing and On, I guess it. It makes sense, given the state of play right now, But you wrote the other day. Um as this pandemic has hit home, lawmakers cannot be counted on to respond to the magnitude off this crisis or any future economic crisis that is fairly bleak that we can't count on Washington T O fix this economy when it's so desperately needed. That's the truth. We lost a lot of jobs, unemployment, Pete that almost 15% and we put in $34 trillion into the economy, And the thing is it worked. And instead of putting more money back in continuing these things like direct checks or expanded UI, which help people left, you said eight million people out of poverty. Policymakers sat on their hands and let it expire and all the way through the Election. It didn't happen. Shocking pretty much, everybody. So of course, you know, we we can't expect policy makes you do that. Because in a position where they would have done it when they should have done it, we didn't see it so we can't trust him anymore..

Mitchell Hartman Senator McConnell Congress Brad McMillan Covad Cliff senior economist Sam Stovall Commonwealth Financial Network Euler Hermes North America Senate Dan North Center for American Progress Twitter Pete Maura
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KCRW

"Is Thursday. Today, the 12th of November. Good is always to have you along, everybody. From the good people at the Department of Labor this morning came the latest indicator of the health of this economy. After four straight months of increases, Consumer prices inflation, right It held steady in October on the face of it not so bad in an economy beaten up by this pandemic. But as often happened with seemingly not so bad news, there is more to it. Those steady prices even falling prices in some sectors are telling the story of a recovery losing steam and his marketplaces, Mitchell Hartman, reports. It all comes down to supply and demand. We've seen this supply and demand push. Pull on price is right through the pandemic. Remember back in the summer when Cove it shut down food processing plants, and they were meat shortages. Supply fell and meat prices went up. Now, Consumer demand in the economy is weakening and holding prices down with Covitz urging consumers don't want to go out and spend money and they may not be able to, says economist Dan North at credit insurer Euler Hermes North America restrictions and they're already coming in some stage. It's going to shut down significant parts of the economy like it did before, and it'll make consumption very difficult. Fear of more job and income losses is also keeping demand down, says Sam Stovall at CFR, a research A lot of people are still very worried about overspending. If they do have a job, they're worried about being furloughed with the additional spike in Cove it we're running into the end of the year. We've gotten income Cliff coming up for a bunch of people. That's Brad McMillan at Commonwealth Financial Network and the Income Cliff. He's referring to Is the expiration of federal pandemic unemployment benefits at the end of the year. That adds up to billions of weak in payments to more than 13 million Americans, and that's not all that's set to run out. It's not just a matter of income, it's the prohibition of infections, foreclosures. In other words, there's a lot of financial damage that isn't showing up when the radar right now, but will start to show up very shortly unless McMillan says Congress extends those payments and protections before they expire in December. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. You just heard from Mitchell about the income cliff coming up at the end of the year. Right? Still, though, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said again today there is not gonna be another big coronavirus relief bill out of Congress if it happens at all. Gonna be closer What he was talking about before the election, something near $500 billion a skinny package if you will. But with unemployment still high and the virus on the rise will that skinny bill help the people who need it? Most know they won't bang agile or is a senior economist at the Center for American Progress, he writes about this kind of thing. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me as you just heard, Senator McConnell said Once again day, hey, does not see the need for a large relief package for this economy. Um Do you think it is very surprising to hear that given where we are in terms of the pandemic, but also given what happened earlier this year, if you think about what happened in March and April, and the cares act and how that helped out the economy, we shouldn't want Maura that given the numbers You have said repeatedly said it on Twitter the other day, and and you've said it in a piece online within the past week or so. Our economic policies are basically geared toward white men. White men are doing fine. Then we got the economic policy that white men need. That is correct. Because if you look at the numbers, you look at what happened in April, when we had the peak of unemployment. General employment was at 14.7% White Man had unemployment rate of 12.4%. That's when we saw the cares act. That's what we saw all the other things and P P p. And a lot of spending to help out this economy. Since then, the unemployment rate for white man has dropped down now to 5.8%. And so you could look at these policymakers say, Oh, well. These are looking good. But if you look at it for other groups, So, for example, black men are 11.5% so black men have a similar unemployment rate that white men had in April. And then you also even look at what's happening with women Women Last month, 865,000 dropped out of the labor force that they're not even counted it unemployment and the only got half that back. But if you look only at white men with 5.8% on a puddle rate, then you could say all we only need a skinny bill, but white men are not the economy, everybody's economy and we have to focus on that. Let me ask you one more thing and On, I guess it. It makes sense, given the state of play right now, But you wrote the other day. Um as this pandemic has hit home, lawmakers cannot be counted on to respond to the magnitude off this crisis or any future economic crisis that is fairly bleak that we can't count on Washington T O fix this economy when it so desperately needs it. That's the truth. We lost a lot of jobs, unemployment, Pete that almost 15% and we put in $34 trillion into the economy, And the thing is it worked. And instead of putting more money back in continuing these things like direct checks or expanded UI, which help people left, you said eight million people out of poverty. Policymakers sat on their hands and let it expire and all the way through the egg. Election. It didn't happen. Shocking pretty much, everybody. So of course, you know, we we can't expect policy makes you do that. Because in a position where they would have done it when they should have done it, we didn't see it so we can't trust him anymore..

Mitchell Hartman Senator McConnell Brad McMillan Congress Department of Labor Cliff senior economist Sam Stovall Commonwealth Financial Network Euler Hermes North America Senate Covitz Center for American Progress Twitter Maura Dan North
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"As always to have you along, everybody. We are not goingto hazard a guess here. About what is going to happen with negotiations on an economic relief bill the negotiations that the president shut down yesterday afternoon and then tried to restart piecemeal last night. What we are going to do is deal with the facts as we have them now, which is that there are no negotiations and that as far as anybody knows, there is no help coming for this economy. Till after the election, and maybe longer, so that being the case two stories today on that topic and then a political insight marketplaces Mitchell Harmon gets is going with store number one. The economic big picture. Back in March, Washington sent $3 trillion coursing through the economy's veins. One of the biggest infusions was $600 a week in extra unemployment payments to more than 20 million jobless Americans. That expired in mid summer, and George Washington University economist J. Shamba says the amount of cash going out to laid off workers cratered. It fell from 110 in July 2 $34 billion in September. So there's this massive drop off to the economy and also to the most vulnerable households. Those $1200 relief checks from the spring have been spent with most of the federal pandemic relief now gone. Sena's throwing of retail sales and personal spending, Joseph Brusuelas said. Ressam Consulting says a quarter of small businesses have closed, he predicts without more federal support, including lending to small businesses more will fail. And state and local governments won't be able to keep teachers and other essential workers on the payroll, says Michael Gratz at Columbia Law School. The loss of civil service jobs will disproportionately affect minorities because they've been hired into those jobs. Bottom line, says Dan North at Credit Insurer Euler Hermes, North America. Okay, let's say we don't have a stimulus package. The economy gets pretty severely damaged in the short term, probably for five years to get back to full employment. The burden is falling to families that are running out of time and money, says Colombia's Michael Gratz. People are facing evictions, difficulty paying for food and lodging. This is a desperate situation, one that the chaos in Washington isn't making any better. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace, So there is a cost to the economy of all this Politiken, as Mitchell was telling us, there are also really big personal costs. Marketplaces. Jasmine Garza has store number two Chester Englander is an orchestra percussionists living in Ohio. He was unemployed for much of this year. So was his musician wife. They have two small Children, and he was getting 600 a week in federal unemployment benefits. From April to July. I added $6000 credit card debt in my one card, and it was clear like You know things were deteriorating incredibly fast. He's used a credit card to pay for food mortgage utilities. His parents in their seventies recently had to pitch in For a lot of Americans. The economic crisis means drawing unemployment and wiping out savings. Like Chris Dancy in Texas. I mean, our savings was eviscerated, even with mortgage deferments and lots of plans. You still you can't stop your spending past. Nancy is a health consultant who has been unemployed since the pandemic began. His husband is a schoolteacher who is still working, but with only one income dancing is nervous about the future. So is crystal Ball. Morris, who has had to defer his dream of buying a house. He works in the New York film industry and was without income for much of the year. Morris is now employed again. But as the city sees a new rise in covert cases, Morris says, My biggest here right now is if we have another shutdown in the next month, and there is no additional government assistance, then we definitely will have to go start tapping into our savings again. He says he's always tried to set money aside for a rainy day, but he's worried about how many more rainy days he and his family will have to weather. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Okay, now the political insight into all of this, namely how we wound up empty handed after force, something months of negotiations. It comes to us from Politico's Jake Sherman on MSNBC this morning. Markets are Woefully uneducated about Washington. Those markets as you know, I've been on a roll since the end of March, in part because of the cares act and in part because of the hopes for another relief bill, which has eased some of the pressure. A lot of the pressure on lawmakers to deal This is idiocy. These people on Wall Street should should spend a day in Washington and talking to people because they're just they are just completely out of their minds. Or in other words, there was never gonna be a deal or hopes were faint at best, and Wall Street should unknown it. These people in any other business Wall Street analysts who have been putting 90% on a stimulus deal, any other business would be put away for fraud. I mean, it's just complete nonsense. Anybody with the brain understood this. And then today what happens, negotiations are torpedoed by the White House and Wall Street says, Hey, no. Yeah, it's all good. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Consider the modern American grocery store aisles and aisles of almost every product you can think.

Morris Washington Jasmine Garza Michael Gratz Mitchell Harmon George Washington University Mitchell Hartmann president Euler Hermes North America Politico Ressam Consulting Colombia fraud Columbia Law School Mitchell
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of October. Good as always to have you along, everybody. We are not goingto hazard a guess here. About what is going to happen with negotiations on an economic relief bill the negotiations that the president shut down yesterday afternoon and then tried to restart peace meal last night. What we are going to do is deal with the facts as we have them now, which is that there are no negotiations and that as far as anybody knows, there is no help coming for this economy. Till after the election, and maybe longer, so that being the case two stories today on that topic and then a political insight marketplaces Mitchell Harmon gets is going with store number one. The economic big picture. Back in March, Washington sent $3 trillion coursing through the economy's veins. One of the biggest infusions was $600 a week in extra unemployment payments to more than 20 million jobless Americans. That expired in mid summer, and George Washington University economist J. Shamba says the amount of cash going out to laid off workers cratered it felt from 110 in July 2 $34 billion in September. So there's this massive drop off to the economy and also to the most vulnerable households. Those $1200 relief checks from the spring have been spent with most of the federal pandemic relief now gone. Seen a slowing of retail sales and personal spending, Joseph Brusuelas said. Ressam Consulting says a quarter of small businesses have closed, he predicts without more federal support, including lending to small businesses more will fail. And state and local governments won't be able to keep teachers and other essential workers on the payroll, says Michael Gratz at Columbia Law School. The loss of civil service jobs will disproportionately affect minorities because they've been hired into those jobs. Bottom line, says Dan North at Credit Insurer Euler Hermes, North America. Okay, let's say we don't have a stimulus package. The economy gets pretty severely damaged in the short term, probably for five years to get back to full employment. The burden is falling to families that are running out of time and money, says Colombia's Michael Grants. People are facing evictions, difficulty paying for food and lodging. This is a desperate situation, one that the chaos in Washington isn't making any better. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace, So there is a cost to the economy of all this Politiken, as Mitchell was telling us, there are also really big personal costs. MARKETPLACE Jasmine Garza has store number two Chester Englander is an orchestra percussionists living in Ohio. He was unemployed for much of this year. So was his musician wife. They have two small Children, and he was getting 600 a week in federal unemployment benefits. From April to July. I added $6000 credit card debt in my one card, and it was clear like You know things were deteriorating incredibly fast. He's used a credit card to pay for food mortgage utilities. His parents in their seventies recently had to pitch in For a lot of Americans. The economic crisis means drawing unemployment and wiping out savings. Like Chris Dancy in Texas. I mean, our savings was eviscerated, even with mortgage deferments in lots of plans. You still you can't stop your spending past. Nancy is a health consultant who has been unemployed since the pandemic began. His husband is a schoolteacher who is still working, but with only one income dancing is nervous about the future. So is Crystal Morris, who has had to defer his dream of buying a house. He works in the New York film industry and was without income for much of the year. Morris is now employed again. But as the city sees a new rise in covert cases, Morris says, My biggest here right now is if we have another shutdown in the next month, and There is no additional government assistance, then we definitely have to go start tapping into our savings again. He says. He's always tried to set money aside for a rainy day, but he's worried about how many more rainy days he and his family will have to weather. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Okay, now the political insight into all of this, namely how we wound up empty handed after four something months of negotiations, it comes to us from Politico's Jake Sherman on MSNBC this morning. Markets are Woefully uneducated about Washington. Those markets as you know, I've been on a roll since the end of March, in part because of the cares act and in part because of the hopes for another relief bill, which has eased some of the pressure. A lot of the pressure on lawmakers to deal. This is idiocy. These people on Wall Street should should spend a day in Washington and talking to people because they're just they are just completely out of their minds or in other words, there was never going to be a deal or hopes were faint at best, and Wall Street should unknown it. These people in any other business Wall Street analysts who have been putting 90% on a stimulus deal, any other business would be put away for fraud. I mean, it's just complete nonsense. Anybody with the brain understood this. And then today what happens, negotiations are torpedoed by the White House and Wall Street says, Hey, no. Yeah, it's all good. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Consider the modern American grocery store aisles and aisles of almost every product you can think of really kind.

Crystal Morris Washington Jasmine Garza Mitchell Harmon George Washington University Mitchell Hartmann president Euler Hermes Michael Gratz North America Politico Ressam Consulting Colombia fraud Columbia Law School Mitchell
Delaying COVID-19 relief could do lasting damage

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Delaying COVID-19 relief could do lasting damage

"We are not going to hazard a guess here about what is going to happen with negotiations on an economic relief bill the negotiations that the president shutdown yesterday afternoon, and then tried to restart piecemeal. Last night what we are going to do is deal the facts as we have them now, which is that there are no negotiations and as far as anybody knows, there is no help coming for this economy till after the election and maybe longer. So that being case two stories today on that topic, and then a political insight marketplace's Mitchell Hartman gets going with story number one the. Big Picture. Back, in March Washington sent three trillion dollars coursing through the economy's veins. One of the biggest infusions was six hundred dollars a week in extra unemployment payments to more than twenty million jobless Americans that expired midsummer and George Washington University economist J Shamba says the amount of cash going out to laid off workers cratered it fell from one hundred, ten, July two, thirty, four, million dollars in September. So there's this massive drop off to the economy and also to the most vulnerable households those twelve hundred dollar relief checks from the spring have been spent with most of the federal pandemic relief now gone. Slowing retail sales and personal spending Joseph Bruce. RSM Consulting says. A quarter of small businesses have closed. He predicts without more federal support including lending to small businesses more will fail and state and local governments won't be able to keep teachers and other essential workers on the payroll says Michael. `grats. At Columbia Law School. The loss of civil service jobs will disproportionately affect minority because they've been hired into those jobs. Bottom Line says Dan North at credit insurer, Euler Hermes, North America. Okay. Let's say we don't have a stimulus package. The economy gets pretty severely damaged in the short term probably for five years to get back on. The burden falling to families that are running out of time and money says Columbia's Michael `grats people are facing eviction. Difficulty paying for food and lodging. This is a desperate situation. One that the chaos in Washington isn't making any

Washington Joseph Bruce Michael Mitchell Hartman George Washington University President Trump Columbia Law School Euler Hermes Rsm Consulting North America Columbia Dan North J Shamba
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KCRW

"Week in extra unemployment payments to more than 20 million jobless Americans. That expired in mid summer, and George Washington University economist J. Shamba says the amount of cash going out to laid off workers cratered. It fell from 110 in July 2 $34 billion in September. So there's this massive drop off to the economy and also to the most vulnerable households. Those $1200 relief checks from the spring have been spent with most of the federal pandemic relief now gone. You've seen a slowing of retail sales and personal spending, Joseph Brusuelas said. Ressam Consulting says a quarter of small businesses have closed, he predicts without more federal support, including lending to small businesses more will fail. And state and local governments won't be able to keep teachers and other essential workers on the payroll, says Michael Gratz at Columbia Law School. The loss of civil service jobs will disproportionately affect minorities because they've been hired into those jobs. Bottom line, says Dan North at Credit Insurer Euler Hermes, North America. Okay, let's say we don't have a stimulus package. The economy gets pretty severely damaged in the short term, probably for five years to get back to full employment. The burden is falling to families that are running out of time and money, says Colombia's Michael Gratz. People are facing evictions, difficulty paying for food and lodging. This is a desperate situation, one that the chaos in Washington isn't making any better. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace, So there is a cost to the economy of all this Politiken, as Mitchell was telling us, there are also really big personal costs. Marketplaces. Jasmine Garza has store number two Chester Englander is an orchestra percussionists living in Ohio. He was unemployed for much of this year. So was his musician wife. They have two small Children, and he was getting 600 a week in federal unemployment benefits. From April to July. I added $6000 credit card debt in my one card, and it was clear like You know things were deteriorating incredibly fast. He's used a credit card to pay for food mortgage utilities. His parents in their seventies recently had to pitch in For a lot of Americans. The economic crisis means drawing unemployment and wiping out savings. Like Chris Dancy in Texas. I mean, our savings was eviscerated, even with mortgage deferments and lots of plans. You still you can't stop your spending past. Nancy is a health consultant who has been unemployed since the pandemic began. His husband is a schoolteacher who is still working, but with only one income dancing is nervous about the future. So is Crystal Ball Morris, who have had to defer his dream of buying a house. He works in the New York film industry and was without income for much of the year. Morris is now employed again. But as the city sees a new rise in covert cases, Morris says, My biggest here right now is if we have another shutdown in the next month, and there is no additional government assistance, then we definitely have to go start tapping into our savings again. He says he's always tried to set money aside for a rainy day, but he's worried about how many more rainy days he and his family will have to weather. I'm Jasmine Garza for marketplace. Okay, now the political insight into all of this, namely how we wound up empty handed after force, something months of negotiations. It comes to us from Politico's Jake Sherman on MSNBC this morning. Markets are Woefully uneducated about Washington. Those markets as you know, I've been on a roll since the end of March, in part because of the cares act and in part because of the hopes for another relief bill, which has eased some of the pressure. A lot of the pressure on lawmakers to deal this is idiocy. These people on Wall Street should should spend a day in Washington and talking to people because they're just they are just completely out of their minds. Or in other words, there was never gonna be a deal or hopes were faint at best, and Wall Street should unknown it. These people in any other business Wall Street analysts who have been putting 90% on a stimulus deal, any other business would be put away for fraud. I mean, it's just complete nonsense. Anybody with the brain understood this. And then today what happens, negotiations are torpedoed by the White House and Wall Street says, Hey, no. Yeah, it's all good. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Consider the modern American grocery store aisles and aisles of almost every product you can think of really kind of a miracle of logistics and of productivity and of consumer choice. And now in this virus economy, it has to be said, not without hazard for those consumers.

Crystal Ball Morris Chester Englander Jasmine Garza Michael Gratz Washington George Washington University Mitchell Hartmann Joseph Brusuelas Euler Hermes J. Shamba North America Politico Colombia Columbia Law School Ressam Consulting Chris Dancy Dan North
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Los Angeles on Congress Know Wednesday today, the 12th day of August. It is always have you along everybody. Some related. But cognitively dissonant economic fact as we get going today won there is still no movement toward an economic support package on Capitol Hill. Two of the three major stock indexes have. As of today, he raised almost all of their pandemic related losses. And three bankruptcies are up 27% in this economy so far this year over the same period in 2019 to a level we have not seen since the great recession. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman gets is going with a reading of the bankruptcy code tea leaves when the pandemic hit in March. Bankruptcies kept ambling along pretty much like in 2019 slow and steady, says Chris Hodgins, who crunches the numbers at S and P global market intelligence and even into April, and they were still pretty much what you would expect. During the normal course of a year. Companies were still managing to pay the bills in the midst of stay at home orders. But then, in June and July, we'd call it large. Bankruptcies, which is about 30% increase. They were concentrated in retail and energy. Now this analysis covers pretty big companies with millions in assets and liabilities. Small to medium sized businesses appear to be doing worse, says economist Dan North, That Euler, Hermes, North America, We think for the whole year business bankruptcies there going to be up around 47%. Euler Hermes is in the business of ensuring companies for payments they're expecting, say from the customers. They ship products, too. When those customers are late or in default. Dan North says it's often because they're heading for bankruptcy. If your Wal Mart a large company, you've got a buffer. The average small business has a 27 day catch. Buffer business gets shut down 27 days to survive As the economy continues to struggle, A lot of small businesses might just throw in the towel. They won't show up his bankruptcies. They'll just turn into zombie companies, no employees or sales, not contributing to the economy anymore. Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace We are now 12 days into the month of August. In this fifth month of this pandemic, and early data suggests the number of people who can't pay their rent is climbing. In the first week of August apartment list found that about 1/3 of Americans had yet to make their full payment. And the numbers are even worse in apartments, the serve low and middle income renters, and that hurts both renters and landlords. Yes, His marketplaces Amy Scott reports, the economic fallout from the pandemic could do lasting damage to the actual supply of affordable housing. Christopher Wallace is still collecting this month's rent for the hundreds of apartments his firm manages in Washington, D. C and he is an optimistic Thistle started in March. It's being progressively getting a little worse. Wallace with Fred A. Smith management says late or skipped payments aren't the on ly problem. I think a lot of people if they're unable to pay what they're doing is moving out moving. Go back home or moving without people. Most of Wallace's buildings are known as Class C properties. They're older, have fewer amenities and tend to serve lower income tenants. Rochelle Bayliss is with the insurance company Lease Lock, which found that by mid July, owners of class C buildings had collected only 37% of rent. Down from 54% in mid June. Those groups of people who are most affected by unemployment and layoffs, It's the same population who are also residents of classy apartments. And when they can't pay their landlords may have to sell or face foreclosure. Jenny shirts with the Brookings Institution says that could permanently reduce the stock of affordable housing. Investors could swoop in, renovate and raise the rent or but the landlord isn't collecting rent. They can't do things like fix the plumbing and fix the roof. Some of these buildings just may become uninhabitable. The need for affordable housing was already dire before this crisis, and once it's gone, shut, says it's hard to replace. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace on Wall Street today, it's almost like the pandemic isn't even happening. You know we'll have the details when we do the numbers. We've spoken a good deal about what this pandemic has done. The clothing sales clothing retailers, one bankruptcy after another Brooks Brothers, Neiman Marcus, J. Crew, and the parent companies of Men's Warehouse, and Ann Taylor. But it's not just those big companies that are struggling, were dying. In fact, there is a downstream effect all through the supply chain is marketplaces. Mariel Segarra reports. There are so many parts that go into one item of clothing. Kathleen are. Jiro is a fashion designer in New York, who makes evening dresses. Each one is like a little house. You know, you have, like the main fabric, and then you might have a so if it's like a strapless dress and inside course, that so you need boning and lining and you need a zipper and you need thread and you need suppliers to sell you all those things. The problem for our Jiro and her many suppliers we make evening where people aren't running around evening dresses. Right now, Demand is down, which means clothing makers won't need to buy many zippers or fabric pieces anytime in the foreseeable future. David German runs the zipper and Thread supplier, a GH trim source in New York City he sells to our Jiro. Everybody's been massively affected. Our biggest season would be full on holiday. And we missed out on both. And the pain just trickles down because a th s suppliers to like the Japanese manufacturing company Y k K, which you probably know from those letters on all of your zipper's seriously look closely. White cake stands for Yoshida Kogel cover Keisha, but you can't fit that on a zipper. So Jim Reed is president of a Corporation of America, he says businesses down between 30 and 60% from before the pandemic and suppliers like his air, often the last to bounce back. It's like a train, you know where the engine starts. Did you hear the clanging down the line of all the touring cars? There's a train car behind. Why KK to the companies that sell it raw materials like plastic and metal Mariel SARAH Marketplace Inflation.

Jiro Christopher Wallace Amy Scott New York City Dan North Euler Hermes Congress Wal Mart Los Angeles North America Mitchell Hartman Mariel SARAH Mitchell Hartmann Mariel Segarra Chris Hodgins Brookings Institution Rochelle Bayliss Brooks Brothers
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Some related But cognitively dissonant economic fact as we get going today won there is still no movement toward an economic support package on Capitol Hill. Two of the three major stock indexes have as of today erased almost all of their pandemic related losses. And three bankruptcies are up 27% in this economy so far this year over the same period in 2019 to a level we have not seen since the great recession. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman gets us going with a reading of the bankruptcy code tea leaves when the pandemic hit in March. Bankruptcies kept ambling along pretty much like in 2019 slow and steady, says Chris Hudgens, who crunches the numbers at S and P global market intelligence and even into April and they were still pretty much what you would expect during the normal course of a year. Companies were still managing to pay the bills in the midst of stay at home orders, but then and union July we call it a large spike and bankruptcies, which is about 30% increase. They were concentrated in retail and energy. Now this analysis covers pretty big companies with millions and assets and liabilities. Small to medium size businesses appear to be doing worse, says economist Dan North. That Euler, Hermes, North America, we think for the whole year Business bankruptcies there going to be up around 47%. Euler Hermes is in the business of ensuring companies for payments they're expecting, say from the customers. They ship products, too. When those customers are late or in default. Dan North says it's often because they're heading for bankruptcy. If your Wal Mart a large company, you've got a buffer. The average small business has a 27 day cash buffer business gets shut down 27 days to survive. As the economy continues to struggle. A lot of small businesses might just throw in the towel. They won't show up his bankruptcies. They'll just turn into zombie companies, no employees or sales, not contributing to the economy anymore. Hi Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. We are now 12 days into the month of August. In this fifth month of this pandemic, and early data suggests the number of people who can't pay their rent is climbing in the first week of August apartment list found that about 1/3 of Americans had yet to make their full payment, and the numbers are even worse in apartments, the serve low and middle income renters. And that hurts both renters and landlords. Yes, but his marketplaces Amy Scott reports the economic fallout from a pandemic could do lasting damage to the actual supply of affordable housing. Christopher Wallace is still collecting this month's rent for the hundreds of apartments his firm manages in Washington, D. C. And he is an optimistic since this all started in March is being progressively getting a little worse. Wallace with Fred A. Smith management says late or skipped payments aren't the only problem. I think a lot of people But they're unable to pay. What they're doing is moving out, moving back home or moving without people. Most of Wallace's buildings are known as Class C properties. They're older, have fewer amenities and tend to serve lower income tenants. Rochelle Bayliss is with the insurance company Lease Lock, which found that by mid July, owners of classy buildings had collected only 37% of rent, down from 54% in mid June. Those groups of people who are most affected by unemployment and layoffs. It's the same population who are also residents of classy apartments. And when they can't pay their landlords may have to sell or face foreclosure. Jenny shirts with the Brookings Institution says that could permanently reduce the stock of affordable housing. Investors could swoop in, renovate and raise the rent or with the landlord isn't collecting rent. They can't do things like fix the plumbing and fix the roof. Some of these buildings just may become uninhabitable. The need for affordable housing was already dire before this crisis, and once it's gone, shut, says it's hard to replace. I'm Amy Scott for a marketplace. On Wall Street today. It's almost like the pandemic isn't even happening. You know we'll have the details when we do the numbers. We've spoken a good deal about what this pandemic has done to clothing sales clothing retailers, one bankruptcy after another Brooks Brothers, Neiman Marcus J. Crew and the parent company's a Men's warehouse, and Ann Taylor But it's not just those big companies that are struggling or dying. In fact, there is a downstream effect all through the supply chain is marketplaces, Mariel Segarra reports. There are so many parts that go into one item of clothing. Kathleen or Jiro is a fashion designer in New York, who makes evening dresses. Each one is like a little house. You know, you have, like the main fabric, and then you might have a so if it's like a strapless dress and inside course, that so you need boning and lining and you need a zipper and you need thread. And you need suppliers to sell you all those things. The problem for our Jiro and her many suppliers we make evening where people aren't running around evening dresses right now. Demand is down. Which means clothing makers won't need to buy many zippers or fabric pieces anytime in the foreseeable future. David German runs the zipper and Thread supplier, a GH trim source in New York City he sells to our Jiro. Everybody's been massively affected. Our biggest season would be full on holiday. And we missed out on both. And the pain just trickles down because a GH has suppliers to like the Japanese manufacturing company Y k K, which you probably know from those letters on all of your zipper's seriously look closely. Like a K stands for Yoshida Kogel Kabashi, Keisha. But you can't fit that on a zipper. So Jim Reed is president of a Corporation of America, he says businesses down between 30 and 60% from before the pandemic and suppliers like whose air often the last to bounce back. It's like a train. You know where the engine starts. Did you hear the clanging down the line of all the touring cars? There's a train car behind Why K. K to the companies that sell it raw materials like plastic and metal, Um Mariel Segarra marketplace..

Christopher Wallace Jiro Dan North Amy Scott New York City Euler Hermes Um Mariel Segarra Mitchell Hartman Wal Mart Chris Hudgens North America Mitchell Hartmann Mariel Segarra Euler Brookings Institution Yoshida Kogel Kabashi Rochelle Bayliss
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Los Angeles on Bristol, Wednesday. Today, the 12th day of August is always have you along everybody. Some related But cognitively dissonant economic fact as we get going today won there is still no movement toward an economic support package on Capitol Hill. Two of the three major stock indexes have. As of today he raced almost all of their pandemic related losses. And three bankruptcies are up 27% in this economy so far this year over the same period in 2019 to a level we have not seen since the great recession. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartman gets us going with a reading of the bankruptcy code tea leaves when the pandemic hit in March. Bankruptcies kept ambling along pretty much like in 2019 slow and steady, says Chris Hudgens, who crunches the numbers at S and P global market intelligence and even into April and they were still pretty much what you would expect during the normal course of a year. Companies were still managing to pay the bills in the midst of stay at home orders. But then in June July, we call it a large spike and bankruptcy, which is about 30% increase. They were concentrated in retail and energy. Now this analysis covers pretty big companies with millions and assets and liabilities. Small to medium sized businesses appear to be doing worse, says economist Dan North. That Euler, Hermes, North America, we think for the whole year Business bankruptcies there going to be up around 47%. Euler Hermes is in the business of ensuring companies for payments they're.

Euler Hermes Euler Mitchell Hartman Los Angeles Dan North North America Chris Hudgens Bristol
"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"euler hermes north america" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wednesday. Today, the 12th day of August has always have you along everybody, some related but cognitively dissonant economic fact as we get going today won there is still no movement toward an economic support package on Capitol Hill. Two of the three major stock indexes have. As of today he raced almost all of their pandemic related losses. And three bankruptcies are up 27% in this economy so far this year over the same period in 2019 to a level we have not seen since the great recession. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartman gets is going with a reading of the bankruptcy code tea leaves when the pandemic hit in March. Bankruptcies kept ambling along pretty much like in 2019 slow and steady, says Chris Hudgens, who crunches the numbers at S and P global market intelligence and even into April and they were still pretty much what you would expect. During the normal course of a year. Companies were still managing to pay the bills in the midst of stay at home orders. But then in June and July, we call it a large spike and bankruptcy, which is about 30% increase. They were concentrated in retail and energy. Now this analysis covers pretty big companies with millions and assets and liabilities. Small to medium sized businesses appear to be doing worse, says economist Dan North. That Euler, Hermes, North America, we think for the whole year Business bankruptcies there going to be up around 47%. Euler Hermes is in the business of ensuring companies for payments they're expecting, say from the customers. They ship products, too. When those customers are late or in default. Dan North says it's often because they're heading for bankruptcy. If your Wal Mart a large company, you've got a buffer. The average small business has a 27 day cash buffer business gets shut down 27 days to survive. As the economy continues to struggle. A lot of small businesses might just throw in the towel. They won't show up his bankruptcies. They'll just turn into zombie companies, no employees or sales, not contributing to the economy anymore. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace. We are now 12 days into the month of August. In this fifth month of this pandemic, and early data suggests the number of people who can't pay their rent is climbing in the first week of August apartment list found that about 1/3 of Americans had yet to make their full payment, and the numbers are even worse in apartments, the serve low and middle income renters. And that hurts both renters and landlords. Yes, but his marketplaces Amy Scott reports the economic fallout from a pandemic could do lasting damage to the actual supply of affordable housing. Christopher Wallace is still collecting this month's rent for the hundreds of apartments his firm manages in Washington, D. C and he is an optimistic started in March being progressively getting a little worse. Wallace with Fred A. Smith management says late or skipped payments aren't the on ly problem. I think a lot of people if they're unable to pay what they're doing is moving out moving. You go back home or moving without people. Most of Wallace's buildings are known as Class C properties. They're older, have fewer amenities and tend to serve lower income tenants. Rochelle Bayliss is with the insurance company leased Lock, which found that by mid July, owners of Class C buildings had collected only 37% of rent, down from 54% in mid June. Those groups of people who are most affected by unemployment and layoffs. It's the same population who are also residents of classy apartments, and when they can't pay their landlords may have to sell or face foreclosure. Jenny shirts with the Brookings Institution says that could permanently reduce the stock of affordable housing. Investors could swoop in renovate and raised the rent or with the landlord isn't collecting rent. They can't do things like fix the plumbing and fix the roof. Some of these buildings just may become uninhabitable. The need for affordable housing was already dire before this crisis, and once it's gone, shut, says it's hard to replace. I'm Amy Scott for a marketplace. On Wall Street today. It's almost like the pandemic isn't even happening. You know we'll have the details when we do the numbers. We've spoken a good deal about what this pandemic has done to clothing sales clothing retailers, one bankruptcy after another Brooks Brothers, Neiman Marcus, J. Crew and the parent companies of Men's Warehouse and Ann Taylor But it's not just those big companies that are struggling or dying. In fact, there is a downstream effect all through the supply chain is marketplaces, Mariel Segarra reports. There are so many parts that go into one item of clothing. Kathleen or Jiro is a fashion designer in New York, who makes evening dresses. Each one is like a little house. You know, you have, like the main fabric, and then you might have a so if it's like a strapless dress and inside course, that so you need boning and lining and you need a zipper and you need thread. And you need suppliers to sell you all those things. The problem for our Jiro and her many suppliers we make evening where people aren't running around and evening dresses Right now, Demand is down, which means clothing makers won't need to buy many zippers or fabric pieces anytime in the foreseeable future. David German runs the zipper and Thread supplier, a GH trim source in New York City he sells to our Jiro. Everybody's been massively affected. Our biggest season would be full on holiday. And we lift out on both. And the pain just trickles down because a GH has suppliers to like the Japanese manufacturing company Y k K, which you probably know from those letters on all of your zipper's seriously look closely. Like a K stands for Yoshida Kogel cover shiki, Keisha. But you can't fit that on a zipper. So Jim Reed is president of a Corporation of America, he says businesses down between 30 and 60% from before the pandemic and suppliers like whose air often the last to bounce back. It's like a train. You know where the engine starts. Did you hear the clanging down the line of all the touring cars? There's a train car behind Why K k to the companies that sell it raw materials like plastic and metal Mariel Segarra marketplace Inflation in this economy is a.

Christopher Wallace Jiro Dan North Amy Scott New York City Euler Hermes Mitchell Hartman Wal Mart Chris Hudgens North America Mitchell Hartmann Yoshida Kogel Mariel Segarra Euler Brookings Institution Rochelle Bayliss Brooks Brothers