20 Burst results for "Eugenia"

Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

Classical Classroom

06:33 min | 4 months ago

Alexander Pushkin in Opera, Pt. 1

"Hello everyone and welcome to the classical classroom. I'm dish plate and here with me today in the studio is Jonathan Dean. He's the he's the drama for the Seattle Opera and you may remember him from such episode of classical classroom as that one about the Steve Jobs Opera. The Seattle Opera is about to begin performances of Eugene Oregon which is based on a story by Alexander Pushkin and today John is here to talk to me about Pushkin and Russian upper John. Welcome thanks thanks for having me here. Sip before we get started. I have to ask for those listeners. Out there who don't know an me. It was a drama teacher. It's sort of a funny title. Not Every Opera Company has dramaturge but I would describe my job as being charged with making sure that everybody understands what's going on out of the CI- and actually sometimes the people on the other side of the stage to the I was hired at Seattle opera billion years ago to perform the super titles meaning to sit at the booth at every performance. Do make sure the right words over the right characters so when you go to the opera you can like actually read subtitles. But winter actually called Super Title Saban Super Titles. The same things have one is below and the other is up above Right if we did the bottom you wear the conductors head would be people like looking at those shiny bald heads words. Yes we've you know we've been doing super titles in opera in Seattle since the eighty s and pretty much everywhere in the world. That's very normal which gives opera audiences way more access to the drama than they used to have to do some cramming ahead of time and try to memorize what who everybody was going to say to. You know who and then Good Luck. Once the music started and super titles make them much much much. Easier to offer has turned his evolved since that new technology really into something much more theatrical you the listener can play along even if you don't speak Say Russian yeah and and the funny thing is I have that. I started doing that a long time ago as the musician. Getting the right line of if the right person's head by worked on my languages and took over writing the translations. Oh in the nineties. So if it's a talented French German you're usually reading and translation that I wrote. I have never actually learned Russian. We don't do too many Russian opera. So in this case for instance somebody else's has written the translation My job is just to make sure that it all happens. And and goes smoothly. Okay oh but still what a great story Eugenia again. And what a great honor Jerry working with this amazing artistic legacy of this this writer who he is he's one of Russia's greatest writers he belongs to the World Sorry Russia. You CAN'T kill this writers. Work Yeah. I was really excited. That we're going to talk about Pushkin today because back in the olden days when I was doing my Undergrad at Evergreen State College. I studied Russian literature for a while. I just fell in love with it. Because it's like I don't know it's got this really particular flavor this particular character to it that is just like you are curled up in a chair next to a fire with like a goblet of vodka on a winter's nights and having all of the emotions known to humanity all at once. I don't know I don't know how else to describe it. But but like I remember reading Pushkin and it just being this. There's something about his language just made me get what it was like to be Russian and it's very yeah involving it's the rest of the world goes away and it pulls you into so intimate. Yeah yeah so we should say like like who he was and like when he was writing which I think was like the early eighteen hundreds. Yeah remember the beginning part of the nineteenth century the operas you. I've been calling Pushkin. The wellspring of Russian opera every great Russian composer of made operas based on Pushkin Stories with him until much later took them a few more decades to get organized musically. It's funny because he became such a really just pivotal person in the Russian Arts night night even just literature but in the Russian arts but like he started out not so great like his home. Life wasn't great. He had kind of a bad time. He did a lot of Like gambling and drinking and he died young. Yeah that's right. Yeah he like. He was exiled south of Russian. Yeah yeah he kind of lived a lot of the stuff that he was talking about. One thing that I read about him was that he I think he got a lot of the fodder for his stories when So he had been had been exiled by the the Russian government for basically talking smack about them poet writing Commons writing for the stranger Seattle. Yes yes he was a Dan savage or Orlandi Western guy up your exile. So they sent him away like you. Do I guess at that time? And so he's like exile for like six years and then he finally a news. Art comes in like okay. I forgive you. We're still going to censor your work. You can come back. But right after the exile. He was like staying. His family was kind of well to do and they had the state and he went and he stayed on it after his period of exile. And there is. This nurse lived on the estate. Apparently Netanya Netanya. Jagna is the nanny. Oh yeah and so she like. It's just the two of them like everybody else's abandoned the state so he's just like on this estate with this old woman and she must have been a genius storyteller. Everything I don't understand is that he learned from her. How you tell traditional Russian story. Yeah she tells him all these folktales and then he kinda like I don't know yeah so I think she was. Maybe like the secret genius behind his. He he because he does a lot of those Russian folktales verse as these Long Narrative Poems so miserably the language in the poetry's his

Alexander Pushkin Seattle Russian Government Russian Arts Opera Company Pushkin Stories Pushkin Netanya Netanya Writer Russia Jonathan Dean Saban Eugene Oregon Evergreen State College Dan Savage Eugenia Jagna John Jerry
Identity is Complex with Eugenio Pace CEO and Co-founder of Auth0

Mission Daily

08:33 min | 6 months ago

Identity is Complex with Eugenio Pace CEO and Co-founder of Auth0

"Welcome to the show Eugenia. How're you bring your thank you for having me awesome so so I love to kind of just get right in Tell me a little bit about yourself. I know you move to America from Argentina started a couple of companies. Tell me a little bit about your backstory in how you kind of wound up where you are right now. I'm almost fifty so long time for me to describe everything that happened in my life. Auto notes version short version. So I I was born nineteen many years ago I moved to the. US In two thousand three late two thousand and three with my family was working for Microsoft to at the time Microsoft Argentina. Were there for a couple years and then in wash it took me here and they offer me to stay forward originally was going to be only three years and then three years became four and five and then mortgage and kids and houses schools. I'm I'm I feel more like a native Pacific northwest. You know than anything else but I mean he is his Hossam Awesome. Tell me a little bit about striking the balance of kind of moving to a different country having a family having you know job and making that balance where what was that it like for you in the initial years you know some people ask me this question and maybe reflect because I'm also our or family are all immigrants to my. My own family is originally from Italy and from Spain and so like Somebody made a comment to me. Go to America actually my grandfather came to the US first and then he went to Argentina so my immigration. I was very different from others. You know my family left Europe in a time of trouble. You know very poor very difficult times and my circumstances were very different very different and I feel very fortunate so these white choice was an experienced that I wanted to have the we want to have I was married in. I had two boys to beverly young boys and so we here was a was an opportunity to learn in two different to experience a different culture. We tried to adopt or yourselves to the environment that was around us and so by that. I like to think that we have experienced a much richer. You know overall environment because we haven't closed ourselves to just where we knew we open up ourselves to everything else and he's been great. I WANNA go back in time just a little bit so before you left. Argentina and before joining Microsoft. You had started your own company in Argentina right. So what was that like. Why why did you want to start your own company? Be like a founder. Get into business at all. Okay so to answer that question I I need to go a little bit back in time and so when when I was you know I still have it. I have like these notebook with old drawings and names of companies and I was pleased with like changing the letters of my name and putting other things anyway. I was like brainstorming of names were companies and A. I still have like the sketches of my campus. 'cause I what what did you have like a like a corporate campus talking about putting the horse behind the carpenter fantasy Edwin. I wanted to build a company I always wanted always wanted that. I wanted to create something from nothing I guess and so my very first adventure was you know we with a friend. We invented device. There was a device for measuring servings things and automated mation measurements and that was a fantasizing like these Massey workshop the involved manufacturing right so we thought of all this industrial age but a factory factory but it never go beyond beyond my bedroom earlier but then to your mind stone when just go a went to engineering in school and technical stuff was always you know what I was attracted to and And so when I finished college h a friend of mine and I he had idea but we were really good friends. We decided to. Hey maybe we should make these faint and so we created this solution for a company. There was like the first the first instance off the pro that we built and it was terrible when he was great and it was terrible we worked countless hours. You know he was great the really good partners but both of us were like really naive young and we were like solely will be speaking serious. We have these ideas of what building a company was about all of them wrong. Ideas play the way. The worst of all mistakes was to think that you know we could build the Bronx and then people come and it will just by because it probably was awesome. It was great it was great and he was awesome But he was to hit of. Its time and we'd have no clue of things like pricing or marketing or saves over your support like all the different components that make company and so we just we also unlucky in a way that the first customer that we got was really awesome. They paid us they treated as well they like you know they were. It was not really easy so now way it reinforced all the wrong assumptions. The second customer game and it wasn't easy toward wave and he was like really a pain and they didn't pay us and like all the wrong things will be complete and pieces of the first swamp and so that was really hard and then you know we were exhausted after a year and something you know we decided to was it and then you went and you worked for Microsoft but eventually you wanted to jump back in you wanted found another company your CEO. Now tell me about what you're doing now and why you wanted wanted to take another shot at building your own thing and and building something from nothing I did it because he was stealing me right so moncus was awesome was great the best experience I could have asked for. I was reading lucky and very grateful but he wasn't my company. I wasn't unhappy is not. I was like every day like complaining Muslim. My my style. But it wasn't. I didn't feel fulfilled. And so my wife in their infinite wisdom sadly hey maybe you should change do something else and we. We started brainstorming about what to do and she said something. That's stuck with me. which is like you know you? You never regrets your mistakes. You always always regret what you don't know what will happen. You don't know the outcome is like the is the uncertainty of what breath. I should have a nubby. I shouldn't have. And so. She said like she encouraged me to take one year. Time time boxy she put some help me put some constraints in the adventure and And so that's always thought so. Toya resigned like with Microsoft in December to two thousand twelve zero with another friend.

Argentina Microsoft United States America Eugenia Bronx Europe Toya Founder Spain Italy CEO
"eugenia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"eugenia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Side chosen was a month the main reason for that was J. he was on vacation too he decided to come home and see if he'd been smart and abandoning Amman to run an elevator on that it's not JJ I am what's the verdict Madison Avenue why is Madison Avenue dark and quiet like this who is Madison Avenue surrounded by tall trees cool by a gentle breezes filled with the fragrance of unspoiled nature know how what's Madison Avenue got that this place has well you may be right or you may be wrong that came from directly up the road he right is it a loud giggles sometimes Jake stop pulling my leg Hey what about was that the road up ahead of us I refuse to believe it but it is filled with hate Eugenia the horse out in front of a was the driver the check would would have gone up a mess of white and I'm a middle road to likely I am coming up on that way that girl if it was a girl didn't giggle she screamed I better take a look around in the hay what and in a larger than a needle nearly twenty anything else north the fifth grade I was rushing things there is something else out there what a man very pale man what he doing up there nothing just being dead a very still size stared up at the summer sky overhead bins on the the the stock the moon that shone on him and on the middle of.

Amman Jake Eugenia
"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

"Today I'd like to share with you a story a story about the dark side of astrology where in how astrology go wrong how did know when it's going wrong in our lives how to work with that consciously have worked with astrology consciously how do we work with this energy to ultimately have a very empowered and fulfilling life I am your host Eugenia crack back to share some thoughts and some inspiration with you on today's episode if you are ready to hear a story stay tuned listening dive in the first thing I would like to say is thank you how many of you have left some amazing reviews on the itunes board I really want to say thank you so much I really genuinely appreciate all the love bridge-builder fifty to eighty successful strategies just what I needed Eugenia has a great energy and so much to share I love this podcast our love fourteen said just had to say brilliant about the dance with Jupiter Pixie chick one eighteen said love this podcast bestowed Eugeniusz topics are always relevant interesting and her voice is very calming and soothing every time I listen I feel more aware and calm afterwards she.

Eugenia
"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

"Do welcome to accessible astrology i am your host psychotherapist an astrologer eugenia crowd in this podcast allows cianci to become accessible to take us cianci out of only the head in place it shockingly into our heart astrology in nature at the sunrise is doing and it is dark and cold outside we hibernate and in the middle of the night with the moon full above we how agents understood earth in that we as individuals are part of a great income just some of the outer an inner meet and greet like they want another however when we truly understand astrology we can use it in many harmful ways with this knowledge we have the power to hurt others emotionally already here we learning aspects of being in payroll astrologer we will learn how to use this information benefit and he'll from knocked the living in fear of in while astrology gives us the keys to the universe are life and ultimately are we determined a bird that need to be loved by choosing gratitude and choosing honesty i choosing no matter the challenges or other aboard for the perspective of are live at the hours alone ancient to develop astrology look the mom and guide their world in there or leave creation in this podcast guide your eyes off the chart in the heavens above.

eugenia
"eugenia" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"But realistically, I know that these things do happen always, I struck by your suggestion, the changing your mind is kind of important sign of rationality, important sign that you're actually trying to to play the game of offering reasons, listening and also offers a way of breaking out of disputes over those foundational principles. Yes, the ability to change one's mind is often seen as a weakness, especially when it's politicians and with, oh, they did something u-turn or, oh, they will just say whatever it will will get elected, which I think is is kind of funny thing thing. Because if if in a democracy, if people want something. Happen then, shouldn't we expect our politicians to respond to that? But in any case, having some kind of framework for when it's time to change your mind, I think is part of being a reasonable person in the sense that you can be reasoned with. Whereas if that's absolutely nothing that would cause you to change your mind about someone, then that's not really rational that's blind, sorta faith. And I think that loyalty is a fine human quality, but belying loyalty is very dangerous. And from there we see things like the idolization of movie stars to the point that some people will not accept the possibility that they behaved badly. And once they get to that point of invulnerability and they think that there's nothing that can possibly change people's mind about them. That's when they feel able, I think, to behavioral badly and then these things continue and something similar happens with people who don't really believe in science. They say, oh, we'll scientific theories are just theories, and sometimes they turn out to be wrong, which shows. That we don't really know about them. But in a way, the fact that science sometimes shows it self to be wrong is crucial to the framework of the scientific method. It's not showing that science is weak. It's showing science is reasonable. So who you trying to convince this book, I am trying to convince everybody because I am bishops person, but I think it's important to say that it sounds like this is a addressing many adult themes about the adult world, but young people today, I'm very impressed with how socially aware and how they think about these issues. And some of them have come to my talks already and their parents have wanted, whether there may be a bit young, even children as young as ten and eleven, and it turns out they are so excited that someone will actually talk about these things in front of them because they really care. They're aware of this. They're thinking about the future and they want to be able to contribute and suddenly now that it's become mathematics rather than politics. There are allowed to be part of the conversation. And I think that the future is in the hands of the young people. They are the next generation. They're going to be here when many of us aren't here anymore. So I hope that this will find its way into the hands of many young people as well as the many adults who need it. You're listening to the guardian books podcast. You've just heard Eugenia Chang talking to Richard Lee. Now, former guardian science editor, Tim Radford was also motivated to right after feeling desolate at the state of the world. His book the consolations of physics, why the wonders of the universe can make you happy wants to persuade us that abroad of science. Many people find Solis can offer much spiritual bomb. He makes his case in what he calls a love letter to physics, Tim joins me. Now, Tim been reading this book in bed over the weekend, and I have to say is an absolute joy, but I am not entirely decided whether it's a work of science or a work of philosophy, and obviously you're title consolations of physics refers back to use. Maybe it's a distinction that can't be made any Moore's physics is so theoretical and so beyond comprehension, is it possible that it is actually a former philosophy? It is sort. Philosophy and it is definitely constellation start. The book started writing itself. I had no control over what happened. I sort of that President Trump are sort about the political scene in Britain and in Europe, assault about what's happening in the Philippines, Russia in Ukraine, and our became suddenly immensely depress because I had a major and we who around for ninety eight thousand nine hundred ninety ninety imagined.

Tim Radford Solis Eugenia Chang Europe assault President editor Moore Britain Philippines Richard Lee Ukraine Russia
"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

"Today is Thursday, August twenty third of two thousand eighteen I'm your host Eugenia crock. And I'm back for some conversations about astrology Kazaks what I do on this podcast. Ideally, I'm doing it with another person. And if you've noticed I've had a couple of solo episodes recently, and why is that well, there's a couple of reasons for it. I as we had a lot rusher grades going on. And we've talked about them you've been thinking about them. But one of the retrograde that really kind of did my head, and this this this recently was the mercury retrograde and always say that there's so many murkier retrograde that happen in a year. But this particular one was very very difficult for myself in the podcast. I had three separate interviews with three wonderful guests and for all three of them. Their audio was intolerable. I could barely listen back to the recordings because the audio was so bad, and we had scheduled interview. I had thought taken all the right procedures to make sure we got good edit audio and there, and but alas mercury laughed in my face as I'm starting to learn more things as this podcast becomes bigger. All the time. And one of those is numero Uno. I need better audio equipment, and I've had that as a goal patriot page for all of you who support the work, I'm doing and polluted a drum roll I have a professional microphone that's right after two and a half years. And after like almost half a million listens. And, you know, people listening from all over the world and having a really good time on the podcast. I have never used a professional microphone up to this point. I've been using ear buds, which believe it or not work. Well, italy. Well, but because all of you are supporting the work, I'm doing I now have a professional microphone in for the patriots who do support the work. You can see it in the video the furthest weeks episode because it's in the camera. So this is really exciting and still thank you, Jennifer, Pamela, welcome to the tribe. But you were my last two I needed to hit my goal of forty. Patrons. And for my next school. I'm gonna try to hit fifty five patrons. So that I can buy professional audio equipment for my guests and ship it out to them before the interviews that way, I can ensure very very good interviews with good audio quality because I know as a tourist moon that the actual quality of the noise we hear is important. And with all of your supports were able to improve the show all the time. So thank you so much for all of your supports. And I just want to let all of you know, who are patrons in past clients of my or future clients of mine that I do have the new option on patriot where I'm doing the monthly horoscopes, which is a loose term. But rather than you know, checking with an astrologer every month through counseling session. Although if you will if you want to do that, you're welcome to do that. But I'm doing something now where rather than going onto the internet and seeing what's going on this month astrology, or whatever it might be doing. Very personal report for you, the audio or video, and if I've had a client before you are the candidates, I wanna make sure I've had a relationship with you before you sign up for this tier of the patron tears, and in this tier I'm going to like I said look at your chart and just say, hey, this is what's up this month in this is how it's going to be triggering elements of your chart, I'm gonna look at your progressions and everything personal to us that you can work consciously with strategy in your chart, and it's a good option for you is good option for me, and it's working out. Well, a lot of you have signed up for it so far. So I'm looking forward to doing that with a lot more of you for those of you who have not become patron members yet. That's okay. I'm sure there's a reason for it. Of course, there is a lot of you are showing me some majorly amazing support through reviews and stars on I tunes, and that's been like incredible to watch you all reviewing the pike. Cast and giving some good Lovin to me because that's another way to really help the work..

Pamela Eugenia crock italy Jennifer
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I keep talking for hours logger, but I do close every episode asking my guest, this same chew questions than I am really interested your your answers to these questions that are a bit big picture. So are you ready for that? Okay. I'll do my best. All right. So I want you to think about the future in whatever context is relevant to you right now could be a personal context. It could be global. It could be even more dick as it were, but I want you to tell me I, what is the thing that sort of keeps you up the most at night that you're most concerned about that maybe you have a bit of a pessimistic view of what is what is the thing that you're most concerned about? But on the flip side of that, what are you genuinely like? Honestly, not lip service a hopeful and optimistic and excited for? Well, I think there's no doubt that I most freaked out about antibiotic. Assistance. A huge problem. I mean, I can as a result of writing misspoke. I can imagine a future near future were a simple procedure like a a c. section could could kill women could cause women's death. I mean, more than it already does for complication reasonably. Oh, yeah. I mean, or our towns elected, you know, could all of a sudden be a matter of life and death, so so that is a, you know, I can help think, wow, you know, cuts new. My son is working with these big saws right now and he cut his thumb. What if he cut off his in in the future without antibiotics, what would happen? Gosh, it would be back to the pre antibiotic era. Like I remember sorry to interject but I tell the story lot are member. I had married McKenna on the podcast. In the first year it was really early. It was. You know recently, she wrote a book called big chicken, which is bad antibiotic resistance in farm animals. The book that we talked about then superbug was about Mersa, methicillin-resistant staff, and I asked her about this new grade of kind of resistant, gonorrhea and what what's going to happen when it's finally, you know this finally, a version of it that's completely resistant to all antibiotics on the market. And she said she asked a researcher about that and is that you know, what do you do? What do you do if you contract this infection and his answer, don't get gonorrhea. Yeah, like there is nothing you could do at that point. Exactly. It's it's on a, you know it would. It would be it potentially can usher in era of grief. Yeah. So on the other hands because of all the interesting work that's happening microbiology and the reason why everybody needs to like get behind it is there are new ways they're the researchers are considering new ways. To break up the biofilm formation to break up the very aspect of bacteria that allows them to present violence in the first place that is magnificent because that that means, you know, you would interrupt you wouldn't be killing the bacteria and whatever that would mean to the ecosystem at large, which just interrupt their ability. It's like giving them the sector, just interrupted at -bility to present VERA lens and that work is really viable. It's it's really happening. And to me, it's like a, it's the pure gracefulness of science with a combined with a world important application, so cool. Gosh, should we really like there are new vistas in front of us. This idea just like you said, preventing Vera Lynn society of universal vaccines, like all of these really neat like approaching the problem in a different way and potentially having massive global impact? Yeah, it's Hoke citing, but it only happens if he looked like by it's really by looking into the unseen world, our site can clear. That's how I see it anyway. What a perfect note and this fabulous conversation on guys. The book is microbial attorney into the unseen world around you. Check it out. It's it's just so informative. It's so well written and it's really compelling and Eugenia. Thank you so much for joining me on the show this blast. Thank you. I enjoyed it very much. I'm so glad and everyone listening. Thank you for coming back week after week. I'm really looking forward to the next time. We all get together to talk nerdy..

researcher gonorrhea McKenna attorney Vera Lynn Eugenia Hoke
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"So we're volved in this what this one wonderful plant pathologist records described as the great sterilization experiment. We sterilize baby foot week, feed her babies, sterilized baby food. We sterilize, all our food were super involved in killing germs. Yet. And yet in the process, we're were not getting a diversity microbes in. He's, he's the one who said you wanna know what? Nature's microbiome diets go into the garden poll up a carrot wife off the dirt and anyth- the carrot. So you know are the nature of our diet, our our gut microbiome, the species, the populations and the population, the population types of the population ratios are a reflection of what we eat. So that's why you know you might think that you're eating this really fantastic healthy diet, but the chances are you're microbiome species that are present that you know, like the the, the general that present are pretty much the same as the prime minister France? Yeah, because our food, even when we eat fresh vegetables, unless we're getting them at a farmer's market from our own backyard. If they're produced on an industrial scale there probably irradiated weren't they? Yeah, there's that. I mean, it's like it's all the way you know up and down the line. You know, it's kind of, you know, every step of the way our behaviors are undermining microbial diversity. I mean. Just the fact than I mean, when I was out this morning, I saw this lady with little thing of pure AL hanging from her purse. You know, we do it all the time. You know thinking, wow, your new king, all these, like commence oil bacteria on your hands. And so if you get a cut some like wicked thing again, you know, all of your allies are gone or nukes, but the, you know, a diversity of foods is. Key to getting a diversity of microbes. And I think again there it really comes down to basic literacy of of wellness of science of microbiology because I think a lot of people might go, you can't care stirred out of the ground. What if you get any cool I infection? No, no. The reason Cole I shows up and spinach because like one person on the line didn't wash their hands after going to the bathroom. Like those are two very different sources of infection. Yeah, yeah, yeah. There you'd have people this notion of good bacteria versus bad bacteria is really gets in the way. I think it's the first thing we, we need to like let go of because the way I came to what really helped me understand why good versus bad bacteria. Just a misnomer was when I was in class in a very typical. Kind of ecological story that they tell about Yellowstone park. So I'm sure you're aware of this one. The ranchers around Yellowstone get pissed off because the wolves reading all their ship sheep. So they parks department took out the wolves. The deer population went crazy, they, they increase the great numbers. They beat up the state hung around the stream beds. They they, they rooted the stream banks in they grazed on the willows. No willows meant no beaver node material for beavers to make dams which meant no pawns. So the ducks didn't come, you know, is this cascading effects the parks permit with the wolves back into Yellowstone and a Qasim recalibrated the the wolves started predating the deer deer state on the move that in just eat willows and the beaver came back and so on. Yes, just to interject for a second. Anybody who listens to. The podcast on a regular basis. If you remember episode one eighty nine with Nate Blake's -ly he wrote a book all about, oh, six was a wolf that release symbolized this movement who was killed by hunter, but he talks all about this. This very story in that it's an incredibly mean they teach it in every bio class. I mean, it's huge kind of up, you know, mind expanding thing that that you know every player in the Christmas important. However, the numbers are just as important, the Demourin bad in and of themselves deer species. They're not bad. They're bad in the wrong numbers for the ecosystem. And so this thing is true us, and that's that's why saying, okay, there's good bacteria and bad bacteria. Not really. There's only too many or too few back to your mom. For the go system, which would be very, very good point will Eugenia I have kept you for over an hour. I have been learning, so very much. Yeah. Can you believe it. I can't..

Yellowstone Nate Blake Yellowstone park prime minister hunter Eugenia I France Cole ducks Qasim
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"There's still deeply deeply apart of us, both kind of separate must, but honest and also really deeply intertwined with us. Yeah. I mean, without your mighty contry you'd be very, very a lethargic. Yeah, aka deck. We'd property. It's a really beautiful reality that they that this this notion that that we are independent, that our decisions affect only us knows just goes away when she realized that at our most deepest ends essence, we are microbial absolutely. And so so is our food. I mean, we're not just talking about eating 'Bacterial, but the fact that we plant the fact that we meet, they also have these deep relationships with bacteria. So I one more kind of trivia question which fascinated by is this argument always between grass-fed beef versus traditional beef, which of course we mostly feed our agricultural animals corn at this point how how are those different diets actually affecting? Well, you know, it's kind of interesting when you it was a revelation to me. I guess that so a a beef cattle can is evolved to eat grass. They have this, this incredible multi chambered stomach that full of organisms that break down the grass, they eat because animals can eat cellulose. It's the bacteria in them that break down cellulose. Annan fat a. produce their methods produce a lot of methane gas pooping cows. I think there was a barn in Germany last year that these farting cows, they started so much methane that they blew up their barn with them in it. Boom anyway, that's their traditional that's their food rights to eat grass, but we fake the grain to fatten up into saw in that makes the meat very creamy all that. But what the cattle are able to digest the grain. But there is a conversion that happens in their gut from a being a gut dominated by cellulose fermenters to being these grain being a bacteria that break down the great right. Right. And if you make that transition when you're feeding your couch who fast than they can get sick, there's build up of acids, all kinds of funky things that happen. The cow gets sick well, so in terms of you know, the nutritional value of what we eat. I would say that there's less problems with eating cattle that has benefited from grain than the fact that handle that have been grain fed. Have often also often been fed antibiotics and those antibiotics are showing up in people's guts and and what they're doing is all like, you know, there's not a whole lot of science out there because it's actually can be very difficult to do research on some of these big industrial food systems. There's MRs stance. I guess your answer that's happening for sure. So it's the same thing goes. For this paleo diet phenomena. So people say, okay, we didn't our guts evolve to eat grain, and that's why we have all these contemporary diseases in that actually just kind of nonsense because your gut will, if you're going to survive, you're gonna survive because you have either your own genes or you have the genes in the microbes that live in you that produce enzymes that break down whatever food is available. So we have plenty of or or we could have plenty of microbes that breakdown grants. No problem. You know, you can change your diet. A matter of, you know, in in in a matter of, I don't know generation and and be able to eat all kinds of foods. In fact, the diversity of microbes in your good is what allows. Which would allows an organism to take advantage of new food of Trinity's. So granted new food opportunity. You've got some, Mike, we've acquired microbes to break them down, get nutrition from you're gonna make you can survive day. It really is about making sure that our diet is like incredibly varied isn't. It seems like every evidence based person that I talked to who has some knowledge in this area, whether it be a nutritionist, or physician or researcher just eat a lot of different things. A lot of different colored things, things from different sources, and you're pretty much going to be okay, exactly. That's that's true. And also add to that that an appreciation of non sterilized foods, right?.

Germany researcher Trinity Mike
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"That's one study, but it just to know is a little bit of an eye-opener. For for a lot of people who heard. So many eye openers you tackle a lot of really interesting questions in your book. There's a couple of them that I would love to talk about because I love chicken of dispel myths. So one thing that you mentioned is why it is that graveyards don't make people sick like, why don't we go to a graveyard and catch dead people disease. Right. I know it's interesting, but that's that's actually such a good question because it really goes to the heart of the matter why. Why we aren't all day. Why aren't microbes just taking out? Well, you know, a disease in these pathogens if somebody dies of pathogenic disease, if that pathogen no longer has the environments the niche that it needs to survive. It won't. And if the living body is. Is that environment it's not gonna survive anymore. After the after the the, the body is is dead. Likewise, once exposed to an array of other microbes that might quite that are very easily might Friday the pathogen. So the pathogen has got like two problems. One it's niche has changed. Its environment is not the same anymore and to there are a lot of enemies. All of a sudden in that soil. A one or the other reason. Why? If there's a little pathogenic bacterium that made the individual sick, the chances of its surviving are. You know, the reason why we're not getting typhoid every time you walk into a cemetery, cemetery or beat. You're such an important point and you know, I, I had Caitlyn Dodie on the podcast a longtime ago, and she's a mortician who writes a lot about alternative death practices and dying a good death and home and things. And one of the things that she teaches people to to sort of empower them is that unless somebody dies of really infectious disease like their septic when they die, the bacteria that makes a body smell when it starts to decompose is not the same kind of bacteria that makes people sick and a lot of times, yeah, we have this idea that like just because something smells bad or just because something isn't. I don't know, we think of as quote unquote healthy like that. It's gonna make us ill, but that's not the case. No, those bacteria that are like chomping on proteins on our car in our Magus are producing the byproducts. These air Matic. That are quite stinky, but they attract they have a reason. They attract insects who real, the real disassembling corpses I see there. Yeah, that smelling that flies critters coming. I smell that. You know, it's a come hither said, you know, grosses us out, but it's get to to bury slow Beatles. It's heaven. I love that. So it really is this great interwoven kind of positive feedback loop. You got it, you got it. And that's what makes you know. That's the thing about studying biology as a English major, it just is a, you know, it's it's a month, expanding appreciation of how gloriously complex this would tap ustry nature is and how we're really woven into it very profoundly. You know, just look at might Akon mighty Kander so fascinating. Aren't they. Oh, yeah. And also chloroplast, yes. Oh, all the time. You know, talk about. When I talked to folks about how bacteria in our case are the at the bottom of the food chain right bay, the bridge, the non living in living worlds. They grab inorganic carbon and terrestrial is it make it organic and then folks? So they're the in all other organisms depend on this magnificent capture events that that bacteria archaic. Do people go? What about plants. Always thrilled when they do, then I go, well, the part of plants that actually do that are chloroplast and chloroplast are the descendants of ancient cyanobacteria. So it still bacteria that doing the job. And of course, this is why might Akon drill DNA is different than cellular DNA isn't it? I should say not cellular but nuclear DNA. Yeah, exactly. Because if in fact, if your Micon drill DNA gets loose in your Plitt stream, your immune system will attack it because it will recognize it was alien DNA. Millions of years. Yeah, it's it's totally cool to think that we've always people myself included tend to think that we involve from bacteria and Arkin, but in actuality we've been with them, we've evolved with them all along. They've never gone away..

Caitlyn Dodie typhoid Akon Plitt Arkin
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Dot com slash nerdy. All right, guys. Let's get back to the show. And you know, I think because we're very like centered, we tend to think a lot about things that terms of how they fit us. But the truth is back Tirias all over the planet all the time. Like that's what's soil is tell me a little bit about sort of the nature of of microbial around us that has nothing to do with us regarding those. Those interactions that have nothing to do with us will actually everything affects around because you know, but sitting that rather large notion aside for a minute soil is alternately living dead and dying microbes on a a matrix of minerals. For Tilleke in soil is a matter of microbial presence and all of the nutrients that they provide to plants, but all the nutrients. They also sequester in soil. So compost compost is sort of like probiotic for the planning. We, as you're adding microbes to enhance the richness of the soil and microbial rich soil is going to produce is going to provide more Trittin provides nutrition for plants, but one of the really key things understanding soil is appreciating diversity of microbial life. So fungi bacteria, Arcadia protests, and so on. But especially fungi in bacteria, bad versity in soil is really key because plants recruit microbes, they need to help them deal with a stress tolerances man, anything from tax by aphids to to drought. They recruit these microbes as like their helper, their their helpers or their mercenaries, and they recruit them by seeping out these like yummy, sweat exits, and the. Swail organisms bacteria fungi. They become after that route sweat end and deliver various services to the plant. So if you've got soil with a low diversity of microbes, 'cause they're always will be bacteria every it's just an ecological principle right? Every niche is was filled, but if it's filled with a diversity than that is what provides the most opportunity for a plant to to survive. Adversary conditions is that is that mindset also translatable to human how? Yes, yes, yes. Okay. It's like it's the same mobile, whether you're talking about soil plants or humans, which is why in microbial I tried to, let's started like Kay here soil the soil microbiome, the plant microbiomes the animal microbiome. They actually are all very similar model over and over. Again. We get our first microbes from right, we travel through the birth canal. We pick up microbes that we need when we breastfeed. We pick up bacteria that we need. And that's like the first this first successive layer, you know. So in succession, you've got like, have your pioneer species in their replaced by more or they're added onto by more mature species in the environment. Diversifies. Same thing goes with soil with plants and with us after we get our initial microbiome will from mom, which is what's plants due to they get. Initial micro-biology from mom as the comes with the seat in and so that diversify that microbiome diversifies tennis sets up the sort of engineers, the gut of the baby. And then the then the gut microbiome diversifies with the foods you eat..

Kay
"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"The highest patrons this week include rob track who is supporting at the highest level. Thank you so much, rob. We really couldn't do this without you. It means an awful lot to me and I know it means an awful lot to the to the listeners of the show. I also wanna thank Phil t bear is on drum drummer dr-. Dumber. Sorry. Sorry, zombie drummer hate to say that wrong. David J e Smith, Jeffrey Peres, Charles pay it. Jonathan, right? The honorable husband. Jay Gabrielle Philippa had a meal Gonzales, Brian Holden and Jeffrey Sewell. And if my voice sounds tired right now, it's because I'm so tired. I'm in Chicago. As I mentioned for a week of school, you know, my PHD program and clinical psych is a distributed learning model, which means that we do a lot of stuff online, and then we get together periodically throughout the year for these intensive week, long sessions, and I am finishing up a session right now. I'm recording this because the podcast never sleeps and never goes on break, but I've been in class all to every day for the past several days thinking losing voice a little bit actually. But yeah, in case you were wondering that's going on guys. This week is a really great episode and speaking of going to school, we're going to talk about that quite a bit in this episode. Owed. Let me tell you about it. I sit down with or sit down remotely, actually. She's not in studio, but I sit down with you Genia bone and she is nature and food writer and author. So you know, she is a member of the national association of science writers. She's written quite a lot of science and nature, but it's really interesting because she's also written a lot of food and kind of judged a lot of food and wine competitions. So she has this great intersection like she's written for the New York Times the Wall Street Journal, but also food and wine and gourmet, and she has a new book. It's just fascinating called microbial a journey into the unseen world around you. So yeah, she, she wrote a previous book about mushrooms that was a bestseller called Mike affiliate. And while she was researching that book, she really became interested in microbes and went back to school for a little while to learn. Learn a little bit more about the microbiome which is as I can attest to not an easy task. So I hope you like the interviews much as I did. I had an awful lot of fun with it. Yeah, without any further ado, let's dive right in here. She is Eugenia bone, Jamie. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you care. I'm glad to be here. I am really excited to talk about your new book. I wanna make sure I'm pronouncing it right. It's microbial right. That's how you would say that word. Okay. Kirby a-. Journey into the unseen world around you. And of course, what that's really referring to is all the little things that we can't see. But that are definitely there in large, large number. That's truth. I mean, so large, it's it's the true definition of the word. Awesome. Used properly in terms of microbes. Yeah. And microbes are literally everywhere, aren't they like everywhere like everywhere in every type of environment from seven miles deep in the ocean floor to forty miles into the atmosphere there. So many of them that you can't even come up with a word to describe the number..

Gonzales Eugenia bone rob Phil t Jay Gabrielle Philippa Chicago Jonathan Jeffrey Peres David J e Smith national association of scienc Jeffrey Sewell Kirby writer New York Times Jamie Wall Street Journal Mike Charles Brian Holden
"eugenia" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To you read take gracie to be your doggy wife this was for red to to gracie to love and cherish this you must swear to always support her choice of headwear to promised always be her fella to treat a like cinderella to always protect her a beer homey if you do not do this you will answer to odi to keep us safe as she is so slight that be biocide in the spotlight will you love and comfort her and share your choose and if you do you read police bach i do so they were the they were the vials the reference to oda is grace's brother which i thought was quite funny and it was just a really under the nice touch to the event itself and gosh all the other going to be any more royal weddings because i'm getting i'm getting really good at this is my second one i think they're done i think there's no more no more that are worthy of tv coverage yeah yeah don't see anything for a while i mean the princess eugenia think he's getting married but he may not be this big hoopla there you go there's a bow vows that i promised i would read outs everybody from our fundraiser a couple of weeks ago well let's go let's go into pool of topics today actually let's go into the behavioral effects of olfactory stimulation on dogs at rescue in rescues and then shelters yeah so because this is going to lead into another topic when we're going to talk about this year many domestic dogs are kept in rescue and rehoming shelters which are frequently stressful and under stimulating environments doug welfare is often compromised within these environments and there is a need to determine new practical and effective methods of improving the welfare of these kennel dogs old factor olfactory stimulation has been demonstrated to a positive behavioral effects in a range of contexts however this field remains relatively under studied in the domestic dog this study aimed to investigate the effects of olfactory stimulation via vanilla coconut ginger and the larry in from the from the.

gracie grace eugenia oda
"eugenia" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Science Friday

"One of our mathematician guests stuck eugenia chang will also be playing a few pieces on the piano forests and for her first performance she's gonna tell us about the connection between math and music let's invite her up to the stage duct chenggong scientists in residence at the school of the art institute of chicago come on up hello it's so wonderful to be here on this amazing stage where i've seen so many great concerts in the post and i'm going to talk to you about one of my favorite things which is the connection between math and nfl really that's my favorite thing and music is another of my favorite thing so of course the connection between math and music is one of my favorite things there are so many things i could talk about i just had to pick one little one and it's going to be about things that amazing in ways we maybe don't notice until we think about a bit harder and that's one of the things i love about thinking hotter we see how amazing things i'm sometimes we jinx say the square root of two that's just a number but it's a really amazing number and it took mathematicians thousands of years to figure out what the square root of two is it's just a number such that when you multiply it by itself it too but you might know it's an irrational number so that means it's a decimal number that goes on forever and ever without repeating itself what has that got to do with music well i'm going to play one of my favorite pieces fall from the forty eight pearly fuchs that baulk road bought have tons of math in his music and one of the things that happened was he got so excited about being able to write in every key that he wrote a piece in every key so there are twelve notes on the piano keyboard and so he wrote twelve keys then there's major mind that makes twenty four and then he got really excited and did it all again so that makes full eight but why was he so excited it's because before his time it wasn't possible to write music in every key because when you choose a keyboard instruments it wasn't pno's in those days but when you tuned to a keyboard instrument some keys would sound great and the other keys would sound terrible and why is that when it's because they haven't figured out some math yet the reason is that when if you go up to what you've done is you've multiplied the frequency by two so in order to get intervals into you along to you have to divide that octave into twelve but you don't just divide the interval by twelve in numbers because when you multiply frequency that's when you get an interval so you multiply it by two to get the octave which means you need some multiply by number such that if you multiply twelve times you get to that means we're looking for the twelfth root of to a number such that when you multiply it by itself twelve times you get to that's really difficult problem on a mathematician spent thousands of years and it's an irrational number they spend ages they couldn't do it so they had to try and fudge it with fractions and things which meant typically see the gene with sound nice and then maybe would sound noise so you get lots of pieces that just use those courts maybe we'll say this one but ultimately that's a bit limited limiting then in box time they figured out a way of doing it no point with the square of the twelve to but so that it was more or less okay to writing every key and i feel like i can sense bucks excitement as he goes through the keys in these pieces but it's amazing he's never been able to write in this key before and so i'm going to play president f sharp exactly halfway between c and see that means it's actually the square root of two away so the ratio is the square of two which is why it's related to the square to this is needs to consonant into the most disciplined it used to be called the devil and music it is the one that sounds the hormone x interfere with each other the most and i feel like i'm just sensing box wonder that he can actually write a piece.

eugenia chang
Guatemala's Volcano of Fire wipes out entire villages as ash, rocks rain down

KNX Evening News with Diane Thompson

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Guatemala's Volcano of Fire wipes out entire villages as ash, rocks rain down

"In seventy seven countries he will leave the company at the end of the month the outspoken businessman has been named one of the world's most influential people by time magazine as well as business person of the year by fortune his departure has sparked speculation about his plans to run for president in twenty twenty shields credited starbucks with balancing profitability and social conscience compassion and rigor and love and responsibility the volcano of fire has erupted in guatemala orange superheated gas and rocks shot into the sky and poured down the mountain reportedly wiping out entire villages cbs news correspondent dan dealer don daler tells us more than sixty two people have been killed but that toll is expected to go much higher rapidly rising mudflow destroyed a highway bridge and a once pristine nearby golf course was covered in dark gray ash and mud manuel khobar is there i can see very people care and this equation is very so eugenia garcia mata and lost all but two of her family members those eagles i only managed to find two children last night she says but my two female daughters my grandson and my son or missing together with my entire family sunday's sixteen hour long eruption was the most violent in more than a century he says it sent ashes far as forty miles away lava from hawaii's kill away of volcano now is destroyed one hundred seventeen homes it had been eightyseven on friday ficials are not estimating how many more are endanger thousands in the poona district had to evacuate after lava fisher started opening in neighborhoods about a month ago it's ten fifty state utilities one help covering all their liability lisa parental checks your money stay lawmakers are looking at a way to help utilities.

Time Magazine President Trump Starbucks Don Daler Manuel Khobar Eugenia Garcia Mata Hawaii Twenty Twenty Guatemala Dan Dealer Poona Lisa Sixteen Hour
"eugenia" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on KCBS All News

"I can see very people care and this is very subtle eugenia garcia mata and lost all but two of our family members those eagles i only managed to find two children last night she says but my two female daughters my grandson and my son are missing together with my entire family sunday sixteen hour long eruption was the most violent in more than a century more than three thousand people have been evacuated from the area officials expect the death toll to rise as rescuers reach more villages jeff pyroclastic flows from the soviets in italy are what buried the city of pompeii killing an estimated sixteen thousand people in the year seventy nine here's there might be more terrible news to come here don thanks there is big news tonight about an experimental treatment for breast cancer that has saved the woman's life dr jon lapook calls it a game changer they say into each life a little rain must fall rains common beg rain worth fifty two year old judy perkins it's been a monsoon i had a mastectomy i had all my lymph nodes out ten years later twenty thirteen i felt another lump on the same side and this time it ended up being stage for so i entered the world of cancer patient serious cancer patient despite hormonal and chemotherapy by two thousand fifteen the cancer had spread to her chest and liver i came to realize that i was going to die and that's where my mind was you know i felt bad for my family but i was.

eugenia garcia mata italy dr jon lapook judy perkins fifty two year sixteen hour ten years
"eugenia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Yeah i said i said i don't i don't know about them i said so but good you to learn more about eugenia also because you genius she lives in the same apartments is them you got the cousins fifty seven fifty five we got our granny panties on and we will be right back stay with us mytalk one zero seven one everything entertainment dear friends it is jason live for triple a movers i absolutely love that aaa movers is a minnesota company i also love that it's not some big conglomerate with a with a board aboard of directors you know the aaa movers has a family behind it a minnesota family the guys their their father started it and now they run it and it's a family affair i just love knowing that that there's a family behind the logo so if you're listening to this and you're getting ready to move there's only one company that call and that's aaa movers they've truly been minnesota's moving professionals for decades now i personally have used them four times that is not a joke four times and i wouldn't use anybody else they have a great declutter program they have a moving boxes there for your convenience it's easy to get those six one two five eight eight move or go to aaa movers dot com trust aaa movers you don't move every day but they do and julia here with david from first equity mortgage david what's your advice for people who are maybe looking at a ton of debt right now one of the things that has happened over the last few years has home values have risen so we've had some people who use credit cards to pay.

eugenia jason minnesota david julia
"eugenia" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Wanted to say that i do you listen to your show and i love christians laugh we them he had based in has a great left united than it make me feel happy whenever i hear it crystal can make lengthy your hot unfortunately i haven't discovered that i actually you know well with these headphones misery makes happier i prefer misery even on the radio but anyway i kenny what do you think uh what's your question well my question is is that i am the executor who my mother's escape he is still alive but i'm wondering um i do have a really nasty sister of that everyone does i'm kind of worried that and i don't want to say anything amongst i don't want her to get worried about anything but i am worried that when something does happen mom that i'm going to have to deal with this crazy sister and i wanna know what why rights says executor too much center okay i knew after you okay so you're so your the dicheva will or a trust whoa chest both and you are probably named as executor and the successor trusty right yucca and it does your mother have capacity now using does she have capacity issue dealing with our own financial affairs right now argued eugenia here okay so then you're worried about what's going to happen when she she can't deal with our financial affairs.

eugenia
"eugenia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eugenia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"A fast and then someone else but i mean at the net is now today when i was younger you would go to the notion insecure pg out the library which research something now you go to the next to research something and if it takes more time to someone who's less allows the less advantaged by ground at university for example and then someone who's has rich parents that's not that's not fair but there's another story here which is which you've picked out which is almost resume into this the ftc writeup of the big media deal the media deal of the twentyfirst century you could say with disney agreeing to buy most of the murdoch empires at media assets and against this is set in a kind of a context of of bound with as well because this transaction at many the analysts as saying was necessary because television is no longer a really a broadcast medium it's an internet medium now and you've got the netflixing is and the who lose of this world consuming so much bandwidth because we're no longer watching via satellite will watching five broadband yes will basically it's just that the reshaping of the of the industry as we know it then again and basically it's di entered an entertainment business has been of of of of folks that been uh bought by by disney and it means that for the six weeks eugenia must you used business interests at the moment they will uh there will be just five and at the big question would be question i mean d a d a d question underlying is that disney and folks don't do the same thing at all i mean morris multimediaoriented the other is more damning somehow in in what they do so how is it gonna how is it going to play out somehow is disney going at the diversified sofa and it's going to think this is that that that's that's the interesting interesting debate but yes you're right yes today murdoch says modest is are we would.

murdoch disney eugenia morris six weeks