4 Burst results for "Eugene Dong"

"eugene dong" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

15:02 min | 3 months ago

"eugene dong" Discussed on LensWork

"Off Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing but eventually landscape was fully accepted by the painting world and their came on the scene painters who really excelled at landscape painting and it sort of became normal until eventually people said well. Wait a minute Move over landscape. We're interested in this bit of Flotsam Jetson and we want abstracts in you know with enough passage of time. We've suddenly got Jackson pollock dripping paint on canvases that are neither landscapes nor are they portraits and so we value that some people value Jackson pollock's work because it's so innovative and so different. I think the exact same thing can be said of photography in the early days of photography mostly what people were interested in photographing was portraits pictures of people. It was so innovative and people wanted to have pictures of themselves and so a huge branch. Photography took off in that direction and then eventually landscape came about in an abstract. It's the same kind of pattern. Well here we are today here. You are today as an artist trying to make artwork. That is personally expressive. Which do you value more in terms of what you create? Are you most interested in pursuing traditional execution at the highest levels so that someone might look at one of your landscapes and ansel Adams landscape and say I can't tell the difference because they're both executed so well that might be the high water mark for you or you might really Value Jackson. Pollock and John Cage in the prepared piano and say I'm interested in innovation. Therefore you're going to do all kinds of innovative imaginative work. That other people might look at and say well. That's not very you know it's not what I call a picture. It's not anything I can recognize. It's even an abstract or it's you know. Joel Peter Witkin something like that and say that's not a photograph. I can't help but conclude that there there really isn't a right answer to this question but it is as worker to me this morning. A dance between innovation an execution and both have their virtues both have their fans both probably have their non-fans but I think that's not quite the end of the story because maybe from a strategic point of view it's worth asking. Which are we most likely to succeed in when it comes to getting our work recognized in the marketplace in the art world if fame and exhibition publication is your objective. Which is likely to be the path that's going to get you. Those objectives more readily. Is it going to be clean execution of an aesthetic? That's very traditional or is it going to be innovation and that's where I think we get into the rub because I think when it comes to the gallery world and to the publishing world to a large degree innovation is the king. It seems like galleries and publishers are not very interested anymore. In publishing traditional work that somehow the.

John Cage Jackson pollock Youtube Avant Garde Rachmaninoff baseball Lens Work Publishing editor Joel Peter Witkin Jerry Brooks Jensen ansel Adams landscape Nari Soul Steve McCurry Juwan John Paul Capela Negro Eugene Dong John Sexton Pena
Innovation and the Clich

LensWork

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Innovation and the Clich

"Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing

John Cage Rachmaninoff Avant Garde Youtube Baseball Eugene Dong Lens Work Publishing Editor Jerry Nari Soul Brooks Jensen John Paul Capela Negro Juwan Steve Mccurry John Sexton Pena Dominic Rouse Bruce Marne Mcgraw
"eugene dong" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"eugene dong" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Here city wherever you live. If they're all making sure you follow those are being careful with anything outdoors that can call the spark the main areas of concern include Amarillo Lubbock Midland Odessa in fort Stockton, kenley we's, NewsRadio to nitty KRLD Detroit area middle school now telling students to stay home if they're not vaccinated against measles. There is one confirmed case of the measles at derby middle school. In Detroit's upscale neighborhood of Birmingham. So school officials say for the safety and wellbeing of their students. Those who haven't been vaccinated against the highly contagious disease. We'll have to stay at home. The students are being excluded from class for three weeks from the date of exposure officials say they can't release how many students are being affected. Do federal privacy rules, Sandra McNeill for CBS news, Detroit. This portion of the news for worth brothers. Roughing the lawyer for a woman arrested at President Trump's mar-a-lago resort deny. She was spying for China. CBS paul. It has the update Eugene Dong entered the US on a tourist visa flying from Shanghai to Newark, New Jersey on March twenty eighth two days later, she was at mar-a-lago John apparently bluffed her way through two checkpoints and passed several secret service agents before a receptionist realized John didn't have a valid reason to be at the members only club when she was arrested John was carrying two Chinese passports one listing her age is thirty three she also had four cell phones and thumb drive full of malware, which investigators say immediately corrupted their test computer, John was staying at the colony hotel about two miles more mar-a-lago their investigators found a device to detect hidden cameras nine more USB drives five sim cards and more than eight thousand dollars cash most of it in hundred dollar bills. John wearing a blue prison jumpsuit and shackles said little during her. Her detention hearing last week, she told the judge she's an investment consultant in the US on business yesterday. Her public defender said John win tomorrow law go to attend a charity event, featuring the president sister, Elizabeth even produced a receipt for twenty thousand dollars. He says John wired to a middleman who promised her access on Monday. A judge will decide whether to release on bond, even if that happens freedom will likely be short-lived immigration officials have revoked for visa and would likely take her into custody immediately. News. Correspondent Paula Reid..

John wired Detroit consultant Amarillo Lubbock Midland Odess Trump derby middle school US President CBS middle school fort Stockton Sandra McNeill Paula Reid Birmingham Eugene Dong New Jersey Shanghai China Newark
"eugene dong" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

94WIP Sports Radio

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"eugene dong" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

"Anywhere by downloading the radio. John ritchie. The calls in Jerusalem. Best best calls make the show one forty five. John, would you agree? Thumbs up thumbs down when you are hungry. And have limited options. And all you have is the vending machine that the Snickers is the most filling of all candy bars. I don't know. Yeah. So here's the there are other things that are more filling their like chips. Well, you get the cracker cracker. No, get the meat and cheese sticks. Big cheeses guy. These days. So you get cheeses. Naggus neck, I go with like, the whatever the jerky and in cheese. Yeah. My thing is much. No, Bryce Harper. Could by the holy could bias all good. Yeah. And you know, like a Bryce just by the city of Philadelphia everybody by everybody candy bar. Nice gesture on the way Johnson got everyone a beer, I ain't gonna really want a candy bar. Eugene Dong, I think that maybe the advertising for the Snickers like the satisfies. Maybe well, which came first were you satisfied type thing where were you told? You were said I have always believed this I don't know when that campaign started. But I think I have long believed that this sure you love the Batman commercial for Snickers as well. I haven't seen that. I don't think so great. Let's go to the phones Bryce Harper willy B. Phil looks like it will say nothing officially yet. Obviously, very exciting. Rare for Philadelphia sports to get the guy. Let's talk to Conwell northeast Philly. What's up Conwell? Hey, guys. How you doing? Great show is always thank you guys, and your producer is really fantastic. He should have his own show. So really doesn't doesn't the weekends? And and I'm sure more to come in the in the coming years. I agree. I hear you can be introducing this. But I've been telling spike to get rid of Ritchie for. I don't know. God six months now. I think I get rid of you. Dodges kidding around. You guys got a great show. My my brother-in-law works for the Baltimore Orioles. He's in the organization itself. Just he had some interesting things prospects, you say he's he he agrees with the Phillies are definitely getting Bryce Harper. It's just a matter of what they happened what they has a physical. And and what they Boris wants to announce it. It's just a matter of counting the hours before it happens. But he also, and he doesn't know this for gospel truth, but he also says he knows mainly Machado personal. He he almost guarantees that even before Bryce Harper announced that that Machado's come. So he has that he has that, you know, China wants to come to the Phillies. He of course, he wanted to 'cause it Yankees because that's where the money is. That's what. Yeah. Ties in is and stuff like that. But he does wanna come to the Phillies. Also. Well, what's that? What's preventing it? According to your brother-in-law is it preventing it is Christ tag. And they post want their ten years thirty million dollars. And it's whether it's whether you want to give up on Mike trout in two years. Yeah. Do you want to spend all your money? Now, put all your eggs in the basket on having these two guys. And then it puts the pressure on Middleton. He said it be has to has to go out and get Kimball. He cannot let kimbrel go by. If he picks up them too. Big people. We have to one hundred percent go after and why do you say that to complete the team that would need a closer? Well, last quizzes, you're closer. Well, no, they know they got they got to do it. It's been a successful closer for awhile. Now, I'm blanking on his name. But the the old Yankee player, I know, I know you're talking, but it it's not Kimball. Kimberly. Listen, you know, if they get him hidden or career career career their their their bullpen would be fantastic. Kimberly have this quiz and Padilla in the book. No, no. You're you're getting your names confused, you're talking about. Yes. Yes, sir. Oh my God. I we'll give me. Wasn't cracking up because I was literally having conversation about today about three days ago. People that how how mad Bo used to everyone? Bo would go to the moun- were to visit him help. Oh, he would get so mad at today was so funny. All right. Gimme great love story. Yeah. What story itself? Mike, seventy two LA McGraw. I love story. I don't know that one. Do we know this one John Lester famous movie gone? Yeah. You say so love store. That boa Ryan Ryan O'Neal, right? Love story. All right. Let's talk to Mike is Mike you're on wwl. Mike. Hey, buddy. Hi, mike. How are you guys? Great. I'm calling from Jupiter beach, inlet, Florida. Oh, yeah. I usually do my my office here get it out of the way and bet a week ago. I tuned in you guys, I say guys go free to show. Thanks. I'd like to say great first off. I'd like to say you guys are talking about land. How do they know all the states are measured yesterday? Yeah. What's the deal with some of the well did you ever figure out like, George, Washington and Thomas Jefferson were surveyors? Yeah. I know Washington was your. Yeah. You're talking about people with a lot of money come on. That's the first thing they do is measured or land. No, I know. Yeah. But I got and put a friendship. No, I understand that. But it's easy to to do that with personal property. I'm talking about when you say, you know, here, here's where you know, Pennsylvania, you know, stops. And here's where you know, such and such begins. I mean, here's where New York begins. It's kind of bizarre. But it is surveying. Because when you're surveying you're taking a couple of points and connecting them who 0. So that's that's where your land begins in that. All right. All right. Yeah. It wasn't. Yeah. They had a pretty good just a lot of money was tied up. That's number one number two. Nick foles. You sure we want him to go to the giants. Well, I don't want him to go to the giants. I absolutely don't want to go to the right. And you know, you know, I just wanna say something about I read Nick foles book. I'm the one he wrote last year and he's wired a little differently. I think he really enjoys the clubhouse. He sure enjoys being playing football every day. What he saw that in Los Angeles. I don't know if he wants to go to a place, particularly Jacksonville. Well, we'll we'll finally listen we're gonna find out about a month and a half. I think your instincts will be proven wrong because I think you might be a starting quarterback somewhere. But we'll find out if he wants to be a backup here for eight million dollars. He can do I doubt he will be well, it might be a bigger year next year because there's no quarterbacks out there after a year of college quarterback, right? I like it might give me give me. Great love story. Yeah. Great love story nineteen eighties. Same time next year. Okay. Yeah. I haven't seen. I haven't I need to. What is it sometime next year? Yeah. Okay. I I was very confused. But we we appreciate the call. Oh, speaking of football. I was having this. I just I this thought this morning with the Super Bowl, which I didn't even put together to this morning. It's the patriots. And Rams again, you know, obviously they played at Prieto on Super Bowl back. Then when this whole patriots, then got going. So what do you do if you are a Saint Louis Rams fan? Will you root against the Rams? I think right. They leave aren't you out? I mean, it's gotta be weird spot. I mean, it was there team three years ago. Sure mean Aaron Donald played for the St Louis Rams. That's tough spot for them. I don't know what they do. I mean, that's a personal choice for them. I mean, I I can't imagine. I mean, we almost lost the eagles in the mid eighties. I just I would be I don't even know fans. I mean most mo- unless they harbor a grudge. Do I'm sure. Well, no, I was in a town that, you know, the team left and went to LA, and then came back, and there were a lot most people were on board when the raiders were in L A, and they were on board when they came back still big choice some who have decided that they would look elsewhere. But most the majority of fans that's your team. You know, that's your uniform, and that's your coaching staff to some degree. I get it. I I don't know. It's hard to say from the outside looking in the outside looking in. And you say, you know, they left I'm done. But yeah, I guess that's easier. Outside than to be a Rams fan your life, and then to have to change that if they move south just the worst for those people, James and voorhees what's up, James? Hi, James doing well. Just a quick point. Baseball fan in a different time. But. The super stars. When I was I was never been under two fifty. You know, going pocket grassy Chipper Jones. So I mean, I I don't know maybe it's different now. Well, it was a was a steroid air that you're describing not all those guys. We don't think, but it was certainly steroid era. Which could have contributed to it. You know, I I've I've thought about that too. I know that era the sluggers that would hit the the forty homers, maybe not Maguire. But man, a lot of them bad at three hundred. I mean, Albert Belle Frank Thomas. I mean, a lot of those guys batted three hundred and in many ways, I think Harper's more like an old school player because you used to have the big slugger. They would hit like to sixty and Harper's a career to seventy nine at. I think Schmidt. He was a career to sixty five hitter. I believe, you know, which isn't great. But of course, when you have five hundred and forty eight home runs than than there in all the walks. There you go. So I think in many ways Harper's kind of like an old school player in that regard. Good most stories and name calling from here. It's always go sports are involved to write for love of the game. Kevin costner. Good one. It's john. I touched on this before I think it's a really good first half of the movie, and I think the second half kind of bizarro for the love of the game. Well, the problem is that the love story is the worst part of the movie. Yeah. The baseball stuff is great if they just cut Kelly press. Now, the movie it probably would have been good in the beginning. He helps Shirley change a tire or something like that, you know. And then, but but then that's what I look for. He's kind of insurance love love seeing a good change and change a tyre any other nothing more romantic. They get that Jack out of the Toronto. Wait a second. China your lug nuts. God, you're rude guy. But I mean, it's it's the idea of stopping to help the woman and she's a damsel in distress. She's also very attractive. She happens to be a quite attractive female. I will I will agree with that. So so you think Kevin Costner was only inclined. Oh, he had ulterior motive unchanging that tire. Okay. That's out works. Probably right about that. There. Let's talk to Gary in Whitehall, yo, Gary. Hey, good afternoon, guys. Great, gary. Hey, thanks for taking my call. Great show is always. I'm not getting to over four was a Harper. But at least we got some kind of talk going on..

Bryce Harper Mike trout Snickers St Louis Rams Phillies Philadelphia John ritchie Kevin costner Kimball Baseball China Los Angeles Jerusalem Nick foles John giants Ryan Ryan O'Neal Eugene Dong Gary