16 Burst results for "Ethan Diamond"

"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:52 min | 3 weeks ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"I know that last year was a Huge year for you, but by the way, what kind of growth did you see in 2020? In terms of? Yeah. Just overall growth. It was enormous. I mean, it was everything more or less doubled in 2020. You know, artists sign ups fan sign up sales through the side. Digital physical music. Yeah. And I know that last year you started something called Bank Camp Fridays where I think you started pretty pretty soon after the like the shutdown in San Francisco, which was March 17th. I think that Friday you you, basically, um Had this band camp Friday, which which was a day where all of the proceeds except for the processing fees go to the artist. So you guys wave your commission? And it was huge. Like you sold like $4.5 million worth of music in like 24 hours. Yeah, it was crazy. I mean, we and it happened very, very quickly. You know, the pandemic hits the shutdown happened. We realized okay artists or losing a huge part of their many artists are losing a huge part of their income. What can you know? This is our community. What can we do to help? We've had successful fundraisers in the past. Like when the the former president had the Muslim travel ban. We had a really successful fundraiser for Hulu. The former president had transgender military band and we held a very successful fundraiser for the transgender Law Center. We've done others, and it just felt like okay, well, what's What are we going to do? What's the organization that we should? Support this time. Should it be something and, um, helping support the venues that are shut down, helping maybe support artists, Healthcare And ultimately, what we settled on was something very simple, which is yes, waving our revenue share and we scrambled to do that. We had our first one on March 20th of last year, and you know it was It was huge. It was, uh It was about 15. Times are normal Friday sales, which for the systems team for support for developers ever, it was a really big effort to keep the site running and how to keep up with all of that, But, you know, obviously, the benefit to artist was enormous. And just on those days, fans of paid artists $50 million. See this house? I mean, it is amazing and incredible and obviously aligned with your mission. But you're also running a company that has to how many employees do you have? About 100 now, so you have to pay 100 people and obviously help sustain their lives. So you have to be profitable and I imagine doing that. Having those band Camp Fridays where you guys are getting no money, But you're still processing the fees and you still have to work right to to make that happen that that's that can't be easy financially for the company to absorb. You know, we were concerned at the beginning it was, you know, it was the first one we did. We didn't know how it was going to go at all. And we didn't know that we were going to do another one. And we didn't call it band camp Friday. That's something that just happened. You know, on social media, people started pulling it down, and we're like, Yeah, that sounds great. Let's say embrace that and and use that for all of the future ones as well. But you know what we saw after that first one Is that it resulted in a lot of artists driving awareness to their fans that hey, here's a way to directly support me. And that extends past that day of the month. Right? You know, on Ben Camp Friday, 93% of what a fan spends gets to the artist. On the other days a year, right? It's 82% on average. That's all days are good days, right to support an artist and and so the effect of these days has been A big positive. I think for artists overall and then because of this alignment of our business model with the interests of the artists, it actually is a huge benefit to band camp as well the company so whilst we wave our revenue share on those days, but I feel like the numbers prove out that it's been a net benefit for the company Overall. What what advice would you give to an entrepreneur who wants to run an ethical Business mission focused business like yours, but has the opportunity to grow it very quickly into scale it if only They would shift their business model or their values ever so slightly. What would you say to them? Well, I guess it just completely depends on what that slight shift Looks like. I think you know my my advice and what has served us really, really well has been aligning the business model with the community that we're here to serve. And if the shift still allows you to do that, then the only risk really, I think is that, um, you know, the priorities of a major investor aren't necessarily going to be exact Same priorities. You may have to find yourself in a situation where your push to sell the company or push to, um, to grow quickly in a way that risks your mission, right? But, yeah, I think that at the core, the problem that I've seen in previous companies that I've worked at is when there's that misalignment, and you know what your apparently I here to do versus how you actually make money so that and that's typically a problem where we're like an advertising based business is where you know, the sales team on the advertising side wants to encroach on the interface as much as possible and get people to see as many ads as possible. And you're, you know, maybe trying to make a mail program, for example, you know where you're just trying to Make the best possible product that people say subscribe to or something like that. So when, when that misalignment occurs, I feel like that's when when anybody, uh, gets into trouble, But that's I think the majority also of businesses, right? That's an excerpt from my live conversation with Ethan Diamond, the CEO and co founder of Band Camp. This episode was produced by Liz Mets, curb with help.

Liz Mets Ethan Diamond 2020 San Francisco 82% $4.5 million March 17th 93% Hulu $50 million last year 24 hours Friday Band Camp 100 people About 100 first one Ben Camp Bank Camp Fridays March 20th of
"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:49 min | 3 weeks ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBUR

"But by the way, what kind of growth did you see in 2020? In terms of? Yeah. Just overall growth. It was enormous. I mean, it was everything more or less doubled in 2020. You know, artists sign ups fan sign up sales through the side. Physical music? Yeah. And I know that last year you started something called Band Camp Fridays. Where I think you started pretty pretty soon after the like the shutdown San Francisco, which was march 17th. I think that Friday you you, basically, um Had this band camp Friday, which which was a day where all of the proceeds except for the processing fees go to the artist. So you guys wave your commission? And it was huge. Like you sold like $4.5 million worth of music in like 24 hours. Yeah, it was crazy. I mean, we and it happened very, very quickly. You know, the pandemic hits the shutdown happened. We realized okay, artists are losing a huge part of their many artists are losing a huge part of their income. What can you know? This is our community. What can we do to help? We've had successful fundraisers in the past. Like when the the former president had the Muslim travel ban, We had a really successful fundraiser for a C L U. The former president had the transgender military band and we held a very successful fundraiser for the transgender Law Center. We've done others, and it just felt like okay, well, what's what are we going to do? What's the organization that we should support this time? Should it be something and, um Helping support the venues that are shut down, helping maybe support artists, Healthcare and ultimately, what we settled on was something very simple, which is yes, waving our revenue share and we scrambled to do that. We had our first one on March 20th of last year. And you know it was it was huge. It was, uh, it was about 15. Times are normal Friday sales, which for the systems team for support for developers, it was a really big effort to keep the site running and have it. Keep up with all of that, But, you know, obviously, the benefit to artist was enormous and Just on those days. Fans have paid artists $50 million in this house. I mean, it is amazing and incredible and obviously aligned with your mission. But you're also running a company that has to how many employees do you have about 100 now? So you have to pay 100 people and obviously helps sustain their lives. So you have to be profitable and I imagine Doing that. Having those band camp Fridays where you You guys are getting no money, But you're still processing the fees and you still have to work right to make that happen that that's that can't be easy financially for the company to absorb. You know, we were concerned at the beginning it was, you know, it was the first one we did. We didn't know how it was going to go at all. And we didn't know that we were going to do another one. And we didn't call it bank on Friday. That's something that just happened. You know, on on social media, people started pulling it down, and we're like, Yeah, that sounds great. Let's faith embrace that and and use that for all of the future ones as well. But you know what we saw after that first one Is that it resulted in a lot of artists driving awareness to their fans that hey, here's a way to directly support me. And that extends past that day of the month, right? You know, on band camp Friday, 93% of what a fan spends gets to the artist. On the other days of the year, right? It's 82% on Adam's All days are good days right to support an artist and and so the effect of these days has been Big positive. I think for artists overall and then because of this alignment of our business model with the interests of the artists, it actually is a huge benefit to band camp as well the company So once we wave our revenue share on those days, But I feel like the numbers prove out that it's been a net benefit for the company Overall. What what advice would you give to an entrepreneur who wants to run an ethical business? A mission focused business like yours. But has the opportunity to grow it very quickly into scale it if only They would shift their business model or their values ever so slightly. What would you say to them? Well, I guess it just completely depends on what that slight shift Looks like. I think you know my my advice and what has served us really, really well has been aligning the business model with the community that we're here to serve. And if the shift still allows you to do that, then the only risk really, I think is that, um, you know, the priorities of a major investor aren't necessarily going to be the exact same priorities. You may have find yourself in a situation where your push to sell the company or push to, um, to grow quickly in a way that risks your mission, right? But, yeah, I think that at the core, the problem that I've seen in previous companies that I've worked at is when there's that misalignment. And you know what your apparently I here to do versus how you actually make money so that and that's typically a problem. There were like an advertising based business is where, you know, the sales team on the advertising side wants to encroach on the interface as much as possible and get people to see as many ads as possible. And you're, you know, maybe trying to, you know, make a mail program, for example, you know where you're just trying to Make the best possible product that people say subscribe to or something like that. So when, when that misalignment occurs, I feel like that's when when anybody, uh, gets into trouble, But that's I think the majority also businesses, right? That's an excerpt from my live conversation with Ethan Diamond, the CEO and co founder of Band Camp. This episode was produced by Liz Metzger, with help from.

Liz Metzger Ethan Diamond 2020 $4.5 million 93% $50 million march 17th 82% last year 100 people 24 hours Friday Band Camp San Francisco Adam first one March 20th of about 100 C L U. transgender Law Center
"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on WBUR

"And mattress, foam and refrigerators and Used cars. Today's show was produced by Dan Girma and Alexi Horowitz, Ghazi and it was mastered by Gilli Moon. I'm Keith Romer. I'm Amanda around. Thanks for listening. You mean this apocryphal vision of Jacob Roy's used car breaking down on a long stretch of deserted road in Texas? I'm really I'm really hoping it all works out for him. Yeah, me, too. Fingers crossed. Guy Ross. What is coming up next on how I built this Well today, Amanda, we're going to meet Ethan Diamond. He's the co founder and CEO of Band camp, And he believes that we should support musicians and artists but paying them a larger percentage of the revenue for their music. And during the pandemic, that mission became more important than ever. The good news is that I think a lot of people have rethought how to support artists during the pandemic, and there's been a lot of conversation about like, okay if artists are touring or aren't doing shows what is the way to keep, you know, keep part alive And how should we be compensating artists? And, uh, that's a conversation that you know, I feel like that's why we started. Band Camp writes it because of that. Those issues stick around because after the break, it's my conversation with Ethan Diamond on how I built this Resilience edition from NPR. This is 90.9. W b u r n w.

Dan Girma Gilli Moon Ethan Diamond Keith Romer Alexi Horowitz Jacob Roy Amanda Ghazi Guy Ross Texas today Band camp Band Camp Today NPR 90.9. pandemic
"ethan diamond" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"88 7. For NPR comes from this station and from the NPR Wine club, bringing the wine world to people's homes with stories on each bottle and wines inspired by NPR's shows like Planet Money, Malbec. Available to adults, 21 years or older at NPR wine club dot org. And from Fidelity Wealth Management, helping clients develop investing strategies for tax efficiency more at fidelity dot com slash wealth Investment minimums apply. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. Hey, everyone, and Welcome to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. I'm Guy Raz. And on these episodes we're hearing from entrepreneurs and other interesting people about how they've been building resilience into their businesses during this very challenging time. And today, my conversation with Ethan Diamond, the CEO and co founder of Band Camp Band Camp, describes itself as an online record store and music community. Any band or musician can post their music on the site, sell it and also offer merchandise and tickets for live performances and the artists keep more than 80% of the prophet. Band camp had been steadily growing since its launch in 2000 and seven but last year was its biggest. Yet traffic to the site surged as concerts and festivals mostly shut down. You know, as you said, we're essentially an online record store and use a community where.

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"It's eighty two <Speech_Male> percent on <Speech_Male> all days. <Speech_Male> Good straight <Speech_Male> disappointing artist. <Speech_Male> And and so. <Speech_Male> The effect of <Speech_Male> these days has <Speech_Male> been <Speech_Male> a big positive. <Speech_Male> I think for artists overall. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> because of this alignment <Speech_Male> our business <Speech_Male> model with <Speech_Male> the interests of the artist. <Speech_Male> It actually is <Speech_Male> a huge benefit to ban <Speech_Male> camp as well <Speech_Male> the company <Speech_Male> so whilst <Speech_Male> we wave our revenue share <Speech_Male> on those days but <Speech_Male> i feel like <Speech_Male> the numbers prove <Speech_Male> out that <Speech_Male> It's been a net benefit <Speech_Male> for <SpeakerChange> the company <Speech_Male> overall. What <Speech_Male> what advice would <Speech_Male> you give to an entrepreneur <Speech_Male> who wants to run <Speech_Male> an ethical business <Speech_Male> mission <Speech_Male> focused business like <Speech_Male> yours but <Speech_Male> has the opportunity <Speech_Male> to grow at <Speech_Male> very quickly <Speech_Male> into scale it if <Speech_Male> only <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> would shift their business <Speech_Male> model or their values <Speech_Male> ever <Speech_Male> so slightly. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What <SpeakerChange> would you <Speech_Male> say to them. <Speech_Male> Well i guess it just completely <Speech_Male> depends on what <Speech_Male> slight shift <Speech_Male> looks like. <Speech_Male> I think you know my <Speech_Male> my advice. <Speech_Male> In what has served <Speech_Male> us really really <Speech_Male> well. It <Speech_Male> has been aligning <Speech_Male> the business <Speech_Male> model <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> the community that <Speech_Male> we're here to a serve <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> if the shift <Speech_Male> stole allows you to do that <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> the only risk <Speech_Male> really is i <Speech_Male> think is <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the priorities <Speech_Male> of a major investor <Speech_Male> aren't necessarily <Speech_Male> going to be your exact same <Speech_Male> priorities. You <Speech_Male> may have find yourself <Speech_Male> in a situation where you're <Speech_Male> push to <Speech_Male> sell the company <Speech_Male> or push to <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> grow quickly in <Speech_Male> a way that risk <Speech_Male> your mission <Speech_Male> right. But <Speech_Male> i think that <Speech_Male> at the core <Speech_Male> the problem that i've seen <Speech_Male> in previous companies <Speech_Male> that i've worked out <Speech_Male> win. There's that <Speech_Male> misalignment in <Speech_Male> what you're <Speech_Male> apparently <Speech_Male> here to <Speech_Male> do versus how <Speech_Male> you actually make money <Speech_Male> so that and that's typically <Speech_Male> a problem. They <Speech_Male> we're like an advertising <Speech_Male> based businesses <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> the sales team <Speech_Male> on the advertising <Speech_Male> side wants to encroach <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> the interface as much as <Speech_Male> possible and get <Speech_Male> people see as many <Speech_Male> ads as possible in your <Speech_Male> maybe trying to <Speech_Male> make <Speech_Male> a male program <Speech_Male> for example. You know <Speech_Male> where you're just trying to <Speech_Male> make the best <Speech_Male> possible product <Speech_Male> that people say <Speech_Male> subscribe to or something <Speech_Male> like that so when <Speech_Male> not misalignment <Speech_Male> occurs. I feel like that's <Speech_Male> when when anybody <Silence> <Speech_Male> Gets into <Speech_Male> trouble. But <Speech_Male> that's i think the majority also <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> businesses <Speech_Male> right. <Speech_Male> That's an excerpt <Speech_Male> from my live conversation <Speech_Male> with ethan <Speech_Male> diamond the ceo <Speech_Male> and co founder <Speech_Male> of band. Camp <Speech_Male> if you wanna <Speech_Female> see the full interview <Speech_Female> or any of

ethan eighty two
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:28 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"World. Where band camp in a post pandemic world enters that space and somehow creates than us For you know or partners with people to create more independent venues for for live events. We've thought about it for sure. And i think it would be really interesting to get into you. Know our our our guest toe dip into this world is our new live streaming service that we really just launched. We've rolled out now to it's in about a hundred thousand artists have been enabled with this and it allows you to stream to anybody so you know you. Can you publish show. It goes out to all of your followers you can have an integrated merge table can some of those early shows. It's very exciting to me because people are buying the merge there's a chat That's very active and when something it shows up in the chat. Hey this person actually just bought this vinyl record and then that kind of triggers more people to do that. And when i think about how. Many artists are on van kampen. It seems inevitable that will get to this point where all these there will be show's happening constantly and you'll be able to have that experience of you know when you go to a town that's music town like austin or orleans right and you walk down the street and you just hear music everywhere around you off your head and see what's going on and potentially fall in love with the new artists that's the experience that That i think we'll soon have on is that feature. Something you ruled out that you would plan to roll out last year or or was that feature a response to what was going on in the pandemic world one hundred percent of response. Yeah we weren't thinking about entering that at all. And in retrospect it was kind of crazy that we weren't it was conceived designed and built in a very short period of time. We moved several people of other projects to get that done. I know that last year was a a huge year for you but by the way. What kind of growth did you see in. Twenty twenty in terms of yeah just overall growth It was enormous. It was a everything more or less doubled in in twenty twenty Artists sign ups. Fans sign up sales through the site digital physical music. And i know that last year you started something called band camp fridays. Where i think he started pre p- pretty soon after the shutdown san francisco which was march seventeenth. I think that friday you you basically Had this band camp. Friday which which was a day were all of the proceeds except for the processing fees. Go to the artist so you guys wave your commission and it was huge like you sold like four and a half million dollars worth of music in.

four and a half million march seventeenth Friday friday last year austin orleans one hundred percent band camp about a hundred thousand artis fridays twenty twenty Artists san francisco Twenty twenty kampen
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"There were enough artists on the site where people started to say you know. Hey could you tell me. what are the other like. Math rock bands. That are on band camp and my reaction at i was you know why do i don't understand why you care you know. Just use google type math rock into google and go all other vans right and then once you know once we'd gone for maybe ten thousand bands. Two hundred thousand bands. It started to really make sense to me that there was an opportunity here that there is a group of people of like minded fans who want to directly support artists directly. Connect with them in this way and that we have a chance to help facilitate that right so we started building the community up but very carefully and around the idea that the community is your ticket to participate in. This community is that you are an actual supporter of these artists. So you don't you know. Click a like button or a heart. Add something to collection. You have you transact right now to create a collection and that gives the collection so much more meaning right because you actually spent a limited resource right your money to create this collection. So you know that's become Just an incredibly important part of the business drive something like thirty plus percent of the sales so meaning if you as an artist or adding your music to the site you can expect that that community to find you and dry and that you benefit from that in a way that would be very different from you just setting up your own standalone site. So yeah i feel like the community has gone from something that you know. I thought you know it's just an annoyance to at first again based on my space to something. That is really a key to the entire thing. How do you think ethan. The music industry will change in in a post pandemic world. If if at all. I think there's a good news and bad news about that..

Two hundred thousand bands thirty plus percent ten thousand bands google
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:28 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"Gift for anyone looking for ideas inspiration wisdom and encouragement to have the courage to put out an idea into the world. it's filled with tons of stories. You haven't heard about how some of the greatest entrepreneurs you know and respect started out at the very bottom. Check out how i built this the book available wherever you buy your books. Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition. And i'm talking with ethan diamond. He's the ceo and co founder of band camp and line record store and music community. I know that your growth has been slow and steady and consistent over time and last year was a huge growth. Here we'll talk about in a moment but it seems to me that would you built is a company. That is sustainable. Where you're able to pay people you know a decent salary knowns billionaire out of band camp But i have to imagine that there have been times over over the past ten years where you have been approached by bigger companies at one a by your investors who want to pump more money into the company to grow it And that can be tempting for an entrepreneur. Because you know you've got people who work for you and there's a lot of pressure to grow and build and scale and i wonder how you have resisted that kind of pressure to do that. Well yes you know. Before the pandemic hits we had regular meet ups all the time with artists and labels Around the around the world really and the the most common thing that that i heard From people direct from artists and labels Do those meetings were things like you know. Hey i just wanted to come over and say please don't ever sell the company your last hope things like bat and you know i take that responsibility that the service that we are now providing artists labels to take. It's a really. it's a responsibility. i take very very seriously so you know we would. I think really only align ourselves with another company that that had the welfare of the artists in mind in this in the same way. And enya i you know taking money it can. Sometimes it's the Sometimes change change your goals. Change them to you. Know growth at all costs and so getting as said to getting to profitability. That was a really important milestone for us. We wanted to make wanted to do that. Because we wanted to be able to retain control company and know that this mission that we have Would be around long term. Yeah a lot of entrepreneurs are looking to build community around their products. And there's a whole you know..

ethan diamond last year tons of stories past ten years
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"Sustaining themselves. And that's that is great. I love. I love hearing that. But you know the focus for us has never been on like measuring how many people are making over this amount. How many were this amount. Because part of what makes bank camp is that anybody can sign up for you can sign up for it tomorrow and start five different bands and thinking about what that would mean for the average that each artist makes it just starts to not make any sense that that you would The we would measure it that way instead what we really are measuring the total amount. That fans are paying artists through the site. Is that going up. And and the i. That's that's generally been the focus ethan. It's it's so interesting because when you when you guys came up with this concept in two thousand seven. The conventional wisdom was that no one is going to pay for music in the future. This was just the sort of post napster era and it was sort of pre spotify but the idea was a no one was going to pay for music in the future that it was going to be something that you just got an and to some extent. That is true right. I mean i mean the sort of the major label. Artists make most of their money. Off live touring and and they're they're very few of them are making a lot of money off spotify. Obviously the biggest ones are. How did you know how i mean. How did you know that people would be willing to pay for this music or did you know i mean. Were you ever at any point worried. That people wouldn't wouldn't pay for it. Yeah definitely the hunch at the beginning. Because i that's what i wanted personally. You know i wanted to have that direct relationship with an artist and directly support them and i figured there's gotta be other people out there who want to do it this way and who want to directly Just there's no way to do it. It's not easy to do. And there was a moment On that i think where everything clicked and that was When we were looking at the search terms that people were using to get to band camp that ultimately ended in a sale and we found Again two thousand eight two thousand nine so we were competing with As you said was like lime wire right hope share so we looked at those search terms and it was the name of an album. Plus the word torrent or the name of an artist. Plus you know free. Mp three or something. like that. and so. I don't know that the people who were using the search terms were necessarily thinking to themselves. I want to get this music for free or steel this music but when they got to a place band camp where it was clear that they if they bought here they were directly. Supporting an artist actually lead to a sale so that moment where we saw those kinds of search terms resulting in money getting to artists was really the moment where it felt like. Oh yeah this is gonna work when we come back in just a moment more of my conversation with ethan diamond and why artists and labels have told ethan. Please don't sell the company. Stay with us guy rise. And you're listening to how i built this resilience edition from npr. The new york times bestselling book. How i built. This is now available. It's a great read and a great.

spotify tomorrow ethan five different bands two thousand each artist new york ethan diamond three Mp eight two thousand nine seven wire torrent
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"And easily and then it would say like powered by movable type in the body accurate right but it was yours right. It just seems so weird that if you're artistic output was words you had all those options of your artistic output music you know. You're you're out of luck. So i wanted to solve that problem. Not just for you know this. One artist that i ran into every artist. The cravings about your business is that it's actually been profitable. I think since two thousand twelve and it's actually quite amazing because if you think about and we'll talk about spotify moment but if you think about spotify spotify value i don't like fifty billion dollars or something like that and they've never been profitable right. It's never they've never turned a profit And it's a company that is growing and focuses on growth and has a a growth strategy What do you guys is that part of your strategy is growth and scale and all these terms urine san francisco you know. Do all those terms matter to you to your to your vision for band camp. No they don't know we're really just. I focused on our mission of serving artists. That's what inspires me. That's why you know what i get excited about doing and i would say. The company has grown and succeeded as a as a side effect of focusing on that mission. That we really have and not to me is just. That's that's a lot more satisfying than if we took the approach of yob. We were focused on what our mission here is actually grow the company get to this size. Go public solid whatever. It is a bad just hasn't really been the focus Ever yeah and i mean basically from the perspective of an artist right you you put your music up on it and these are artists. Who don't generally want to work for with a with a label. Presumably these are artists. Who who want to retain all the rights all the master recordings. They wanna control their careers. Those are the people who put their music on band camp..

spotify fifty billion dollars One artist francisco urine san two thousand twelve every artist
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"Performances and the artists keep more than eighty percent of the profit band. Camp had been steadily growing since its launch in two thousand seven but last year was its biggest yet. Traffic to the site surged as concerts and festivals. Mostly shut down. You know as you said. We're essentially an online record store and use a community where fans connect with artists and directly. Support them and about half. The business is physical record. So vinyl cassettes cds. A lot of t-shirts as well and then half the business is a digital music. So people buying Digital and digital tracks directly from the artist and we also recently launched live streaming. So now tickets are part of it as well but You know. I would say that the thing that really sets us apart is that we just built the whole company and the welfare of the artist. So we don't we don't sell advertising. We don't really focus on subscriptions. We just help. Artists sell their music. And then we take a small revenue share on every sale. So what to say is that we only make money. If artists make a lot more money and sort of alignment of interest that we have built into our business model is really just everything about i would were. I would say an artist. I music company and something like eighty. Five percent on average of the revenue goes directly to the artist right. Yeah it's it ends up being There's payment processing fees Fee so on our and it varies by transactions is comes out to about eighty two percents that goes directly to the to the artist and then we pay that out every it usually takes about twenty four to forty eight hours. I've heard it described a little bit like esi for independent music. Is that a fair comparison. Totally yeah i and which i take is a complimentary. I think that that's i think it's a really good comparison at ca and banker both really large marketplaces that I think really focus on supporting the creators..

Five percent last year eighty forty eight hours two thousand both more than eighty percent about twenty four ca about half Camp half the business seven about eighty two percents banker
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:25 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"And today my conversation with ethan diamond the ceo and co founder of band camp band camp describes itself as an online record store and music community. Any band or musician can post their music on the site sell it and also offer merchandise and tickets for live performances and the artists keep more than eighty percent of the profit band. Camp had been steadily growing since its launch in two thousand seven but last year was its biggest yet. Traffic to the site surged as concerts and festivals. Mostly shut down. You know as you said. We're essentially an online record store and use a community where fans connect with artists and directly. Support them and about half. The business is physical record. So vinyl cassettes cds. A lot of t-shirts as well and then half the business is a digital music. So people buying Digital and digital tracks directly from the artist and we also recently launched live streaming. So now tickets are part of it as well but You know. I would say that the thing that really sets us apart is that we just built the whole company and the welfare of the artist. So we don't we don't sell advertising. We don't really focus on subscriptions. We just help. Artists sell their music. And then we take a small revenue share on every sale. So what to say is that we only make money. If artists make a lot more money and sort of alignment of interest that we have built into our business model is really just everything about i would were. I would say an artist. I music company and something like eighty. Five percent on average of the revenue goes directly to the artist right. Yeah it's it ends up being There's payment processing fees Fee so on our and it varies by transactions is comes out to about eighty two percents that goes directly to the to the artist and then we pay that out every it usually takes about twenty four to forty eight hours. I've heard it described a little bit like esi for independent music. Is that a fair comparison. Totally yeah i and which i take is a complimentary. I think that that's i think it's a really good comparison at ca and banker both really large marketplaces that I think really focus on supporting the

Five percent last year eighty forty eight hours two thousand both more than eighty percent about twenty four ca about half Camp half the business seven about eighty two percents banker
Interview With Ethan Diamond Of Bandcamp

How I Built This

02:25 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Ethan Diamond Of Bandcamp

"And today my conversation with ethan diamond the ceo and co founder of band camp band camp describes itself as an online record store and music community. Any band or musician can post their music on the site sell it and also offer merchandise and tickets for live performances and the artists keep more than eighty percent of the profit band. Camp had been steadily growing since its launch in two thousand seven but last year was its biggest yet. Traffic to the site surged as concerts and festivals. Mostly shut down. You know as you said. We're essentially an online record store and use a community where fans connect with artists and directly. Support them and about half. The business is physical record. So vinyl cassettes cds. A lot of t-shirts as well and then half the business is a digital music. So people buying Digital and digital tracks directly from the artist and we also recently launched live streaming. So now tickets are part of it as well but You know. I would say that the thing that really sets us apart is that we just built the whole company and the welfare of the artist. So we don't we don't sell advertising. We don't really focus on subscriptions. We just help. Artists sell their music. And then we take a small revenue share on every sale. So what to say is that we only make money. If artists make a lot more money and sort of alignment of interest that we have built into our business model is really just everything about i would were. I would say an artist. I music company and something like eighty. Five percent on average of the revenue goes directly to the artist right. Yeah it's it ends up being There's payment processing fees Fee so on our and it varies by transactions is comes out to about eighty two percents that goes directly to the to the artist and then we pay that out every it usually takes about twenty four to forty eight hours. I've heard it described a little bit like esi for independent music. Is that a fair comparison. Totally yeah i and which i take is a complimentary. I think that that's i think it's a really good comparison at ca and banker both really large marketplaces that I think really focus on supporting the

Ethan Diamond Band Camp Band Camp
"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on How I Built This

"This message comes from. Npr sponsor salesforce dedicated to helping growing businesses connected their teams share information and automate processes all in a single app learn more at salesforce dot com slash. Smb hates guy here calling on all of you to join us. This may for the how i built this summit at home for may twenty four th to the twenty seventh will be bringing you four days of incredible interviews with people like brunei brown gary v troy carter and many more and opportunities to connect with other entrepreneurs in our global community. Thanks to go daddy. The presenting sponsor of the how. I built this summit for more information head to summit dot. Npr dot org. And i cannot wait to see you there..

"ethan diamond" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

19:30 min | 1 year ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Well not that Taylor's lors costs no that is not the one it so that you know just the act consuming a song would share that out united someone's always listening to this and we wanted to kind of do the opposite and set up some we do is in support of the artist and the effect and it's really about the effect of that it's about the the the musical arts that's what motivates me but every decision we really make comes back down to is this going to be a good thing for UH for the artist and so just as a side effect for that of that you know it's it's GonNa be good for the business so everything that we're doing right now is it's about improving the discovery tools inside of band camp it's about giving fans knew and interesting ways to support artists and solving the problems that we hear about coming to you know our artists and labels so you know the vinyl pressing service that we're launching soon it's it's right now we're still in the pilot phase with that but it'll be it'll be all of our is just another example of that we've sent me saw that of the albums that are selling on band camp only about it's less than ten percent of them have L. addition it's not because you know more wouldn't like that it's because pressing vinyl is really risky because it's expensive it's complicated it's a kind of a lot of folks it's a pretty mysterious process we saw an opportunity to make that a lot easier so yeah we're we're going to soon be crossing filling vinyl for artists listen I think that's just one example of the kinds of services that that we can build and an art building I'm excited to see that happen Marie Liam Wall Tatum cool good well thank you thank you thanks for your time Mandelson than slurs spike spike that was ethan diamond he's the CO founder and CEO Band camp and of course like you all we're talking about fan engagement is thing finding little micro genres another cool thing so you call it uh UH Shock Avi greer who's a journalist rights for band camp but is also a mega fan of band camp just to get an idea about how other people discover music right yeah shocker is a journalist based out of Toronto in one of the fun things she told me is that band camp actually helped her find music within our own backyard that's amazing and we also talked about how she digs for new music she loved soul music and was kind of missing a lot of the the sound the she loved and she founded on this platform I think I am very rudimentary I'm very simple about it I kind of pick genre and I- curious and I go into it that way I'm often attracted by covers of albums I'm very visual so I'll the worked at a lot of artists choose on their album draws me in and I kind of just follow we're goes and oftentimes find an artist who's interesting listen to their salad I'll I'll maybe google them and read about them a bit and they'll usually mention artists that influence them who they've worked with and that usually leads me back to bank camp to discover other voices you talked about how album artwork can appeal to and the same with me and what I'm and I'm curious a few years band camps they have a feed of like if you follow other fans if you fall record labels or bands and just feels like a a large feet of like everything that they've recently uploaded and sometimes I'll just go through that and if I see some album artwork that particularly strikes me I'll hit play it's good Oh yes I do that all the time it's funny because I find that when you delve in one way you do get caught in the rabbit hole because you see how either and artists have grown or have not grown and who they've worked with but I find the album cover can be very deceptive and I've learned that especially being a sole calmest because I literally try to listen to all the soul albums released during that month so I've come to just click on everything I listen to everything I give it a two three song tryout and if it doesn't grab me I move forward so let's let's let's keep going with that you are a music journalist and you write.

Taylor ten percent
"ethan diamond" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"ethan diamond" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"If I'm GonNa give him tried to gastronomic console there are the white and blue vinyls are gone there are sixty nine nice remaining versions of special edition in chips out in three day I mean that's a cool thing that you could buy hard physical stuff trait which I actually I don't usually do but I love the fact that you can do that yeah and then when you when you buy those things you have like a fan page and it shows your collection and it's just it's a nice little way out and you get to show it off to anybody who wants to look at Folks WanNa follow you they do it by total vibrate shen that's where you can find me on if you go to band camp dot com slash total population we can find over think twelve hundred things I yeah so let's get into this you got to talk to the CEO of Band camp philosophy in all sorts of stuff yeah in Ethan diamond he founded band camp in two thousand eight ever since its existence up bands have paid artists four hundred and twenty five million dollars over band camp and just eight point one million dollars in the last thirty days which is incredible and another low funnel fans by about forty one thousand records each day or one eight one every two seconds which is pretty wild to think about but I I talked to Ethan diamond con about the priorities that went into creating band camp in two thousand eight and how it evolved to make it drag connection between the artist and the listener so you've told the story many times uh-huh about a frustrating experience buying in downloading an album from one of your favorite bands which inspired the genus band camp what were the priorities when you first made band camp but lists the mission will the mission from the beginning was to help our to succeed and and it was to do that in the financial sense to make you know help him actually some money there are quite a few services that were trying to help artists exceeding sort of the promotional sense but yeah the time we started band camp doing something as simple as you know and you're using directly to your fans was was really difficult it was it was surround the time of my space and there was a a plug in called I think snowcap did you to do that but it was pretty it was pretty clunky and the deal with space is really that you you know the music was essentially just content against the show advertising and we wanted to prioritize something really different to be able to sell directly defense and have nothing really get in the way of that so let's say I spend ten dollars on an album from band camp how much does artists make from that ten dollar purchase typically about eighty percent goes to the artist a a dollars so the way it works is our share is fifteen percent on digital and ten percent on physical goods and then processor fees payment processor fees are usually another sometimes it's closer to five percent sometimes seven percent distance depending on the circumstances I went on the way back machine to to load up in camp just to kind of remind me of what it looks like early on and apart from the the landing h which was very two thousand eight I was surprised that not much has changed about the function of the player itself. What are the things you need to add to that early design to accommodate artists over the last decade so when we first started default was to make this essentially table service for artists who want to to sell direct to fans and so really the inspiration was the logging tools that existed at the time onto things like tight pad and move type and a blogger and the thought being that you know if you're a writer to be able to create a site that was you know totally own featured your your writing and do that totally you know for free I was really easy to do but if you're musical yeah if you're artistic output was music was it was really challenging so we wanted to kind of step to the background have this sort of you know powered by band camp footer we didn't even need to be in the url you could customize the l. but over time what happened is people started asking us like Hey I wanna find other I wanNA find more like math rock on the site and I you know action to that was well why why do you buy you care you know you just look up math rock and Google and and then you know once there were I think ten thousand artists or somewhere out there and started to make sense to me that you hey you know I maybe people want to have the same sort of experience the forgiving for this one artist for all the music browsing and then once they were you know one hundred thousand artists on the site it really became clear that there's an opportunity to take advantage of the community that was building guarantee to have it be not just under the art aside that to be on the fan site as well build up a community and use that to to drive a lot else to artists so one of the biggest things I say that we've changed is building out that community and now a man can have the collection you can follow ben so that you can discover music by you know what they're buying you can see you know people who bought this also about this the artists themselves can recommend other bands so yeah I I think other than that you know visually you're right not much it's changed I think we moved we moved to cover art from the left side to the to the right side in the last eleven years and I think there used to be like visualize her or something right for when you hit right back when you know that was back guy in the flash days unfortunately start time or make marginally yeah that no no longer well the kind of like brings up a like a little bit of a bigger like philosophical idea behind band camp on why I've been such a fan of it for a while is that when so much at the Internet thout and still feels overloaded by choice this motion to launch fan accounts and for you to be able to follow the artists and half light that connection fell quietly radical to me because they're so in could share them if they chose to buy with friends and curious onlookers and it felt like a record collection that you could just throw out the entire world yeah I think that at the time we initially launched a fan accounts this was right around when there was some social networks I think it was facebook was making agents assay you know this is the music that you care enough about to actually spend money on and that gives it a lot more weight obviously and makes ultimately the collection a lot more interesting and I think a lot more valuable for other people as a as a discovery tool fair artists who deeply align themselves with certain streaming services usually for financial means but for also much more exposure like I think of like Frank Ocean with apple music and he has a show on beats in where he plays music that he likes also premieres new material but I think the same could be said of artists who self identify with band camp and oftentimes ban that's the only place these artists choose to upload their music what inspires that devotion to you think well I think it's probably the direct connection to the fact that we provide I think what we've always tried to do is present somebody's presence on band camp has been not us right so it's just this is where somebody can set up shop interact with their their fans and it's not about you know uh-huh uh-huh it's not it's about Ben and so I think you know for the same reason that you know anybody wants to just play music and represent themselves in their music that we just give them a platform to do that I think that's a lot of I think that's really refreshing so in recent years band camp has launched a crowdfunding options for pressing vinyl and artists can offer fans subscriber only music that's you know dipping talent different forms of competition and music space but what do vision for the the next decade of band camp what what is the motivation behind what's next so what we done and since the beginning was made it so that our interests are aligned with the artist interests and that's that's what the you know that's the beauty of a revenue share based business right as we only are gonNA make money the artist is making a lot more money so everything that.

twenty five million dollars one million dollars fifteen percent eighty percent seven percent eleven years five percent ten dollars ten percent thirty days two seconds ten dollar three day