19 Burst results for "Esser"

"esser" Discussed on Real Life Pharmacology - Pharmacology Education for Health Care Professionals

Real Life Pharmacology - Pharmacology Education for Health Care Professionals

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Real Life Pharmacology - Pharmacology Education for Health Care Professionals

"Pdf on the top two hundred drugs yet. Thirty one pages. So i can't can't miss at With that let's get into the drug of the day today. Ama- tripling a brand name of this. Medication is eh laville It is an older antidepressant. More specifically it's a tricyclic antidepressant Mechanistically what tricyclic do is they inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. So obviously We've heard serotonin in the past Talking about esera is and things like that. So you could imagine if we're increasing serotonin in the brain that it's going to help for depression and ultimately a drug like gamma trip to lean when it first came out many many years ago It was used for depression. Prior to the advent of the Esser is so from a technical standpoint. It is classified as an antidepressant. I'm i very rarely now. See it used for Straight depression k Just doesn't happen very often. And we'll go through kind of the adverse effect profile and why that's true But you really don't see it used hardly ever for straight depression. Most often What i've seen amateurs. Lean used for our various types of pain. Syndromes because remember that serotonin and norepinephrine effect. We might have some impact on pain. So condition like fibromyalgia neuropathy Also headache prevention With migraines and tension headache. So that's definitely. I would say the most common situation..

depression Ama Esser headache fibromyalgia migraines
"esser" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"esser" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"That gold is not already a lot higher than eighteen hundred is because most people still believe the fed for whatever reason the feds still has a lot of credibility and so do other central banks and so when the fed says inflation is transitory. They accept that when the fed says. We have the tools that we will use them to make. Sure it's transitory. Even if in the event that it's not the markets believe the fed so the market is not looking for insurance is not looking for inflation protection. The market is just looking for risk. The market is just buying whatever's going up. Everybody is optimistic. They think the party will never end. And so they don't really see the reason to hold something stable a like gold Something that's regarded as a safe haven or as an insurance policy They want to gamble. They just want to keep on buying stuff. That's hot and and that includes a lot of different types of stocks lobbies momentum stocks or meam stocks these assets and. it includes. You know when you guys talk about. You know cryptocurrencies digital assets. Bitcoin ether or These right that's what people what they want all the stuff that's going up and they don't even realize that the reason is going up is because of all the inflation that the fed is creating and if it ever actually tried to fight that inflation all that stuff with come crashing down so but they haven't connected those dots yet. For whatever reason. Is there a piece of you that thinks okay. Let's say that. The fed is inflating asset prices. Which i tend to agree right there. Basically devalue the currency esser prices up and rather than fight the fed and say. Hey they're going to change their mind. They're gonna do something different or smarter than the fed. They're going to inflate asset prices. I want to buy the assets that are gonna go up. And so just go invest in the market rather than wait for them to make some you know miscalculation or or Kind of rip the band aid off. As you said like do you think there's validity in that argument of just. Don't fight the fed and just go buy the assets that they're gonna pump up embrace. Yeah i mean. That's what. I'm doing myself but i am buying assets that i think represent better long-term values not these highly speculative assets that i think no matter what are eventually going to collapse right. I mean whether the fed Prick the bubble with rate hikes or whether the bubbles just deflate you know on their own. That is what happens to bubbles. I mean they never just continue indefinitely. So yeah. I don't want to own cash so my personal portfolio is long equities own a lot of stocks all around the world good quality companies that i think are trading at low valuations that have high dividend deals that are in sectors that i think are undervalued there in countries that i think are more stable And have it were. The governments are not going to be under as much pressure to debase. The currency to sustain budget deficits or or trade deficits. I do have a lot of focus on resources natural resources commodities not just gold but all sorts of industrial commodities energy agriculture i have emerging market exposure because i think the emerging markets will outperform the developed markets in an era of higher inflation in dollar devaluation physical gold and silver. So i i'm fully out of the us dollar. And i understand why other people would have an aversion to hold dollars..

fed esser us
"esser" Discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

Channel 52: The DC Podcast

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

"In norse mythology for decades. It's allocated do it around okay. I was gonna say the papal people appropriate the party and they kind of want them to stop your todd mcfarlane just stays with god god and the devil keep a key part number one comic capers one. Fifteen kids The x. men and spiderman managed to free themselves when nightcrawlers teleport's out of the feel that holding him creating a rift in the next one allowing each prisoner to escape cosc- kizzie prison was like i guess custom made for everyone's power south van. Now did talk about. You're not so higher. Being that's true smoked do we got topless and talk some movie About wealth charlie the x prize. We talked to charlie. I'm not saying topless though. If you want the video one of the hosts topless yes go described the patriots. Only thing kidding. 'cause we're getting rid of all of them. Can you imagine if like one month you just lost your mind than you were like topless on the camera and like you know like this. Subscriptions go through the roof. It would crush charlie esser. He'd be like we are people who like true wrote. I.

todd mcfarlane charlie patriots charlie esser
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"Because if you're not a not serve the planet or the people of Or yourself even you will create strange things so special for technology is very important but with that go and and coca world explore the world in just dive into things so that would be my strongest advice. Just get going. Stay curious and team up with others. That's maybe the second big advice i would give to younger people who are considering. It's like you said it's it's a. It's a team sport so they're awesome social skills. You need to develop as well and that doesn't mean you need to be a the super hero in coordinating by being able to collaborate with other people probably from other countries from around the roads is important and there are these wonderful opportunities today. of young people who are collaborating with people in other countries so the chances are very good to just explore yourselves but domain. So that's what i would say to young people that the mid korea crisis. Okay how how does. How does your life look when you're in the mid career prices. Probably you have advanced your career to a certain extent. You're young and you're hungry and now you are somewhere and you're at limit of where you can go and you're feeling like all of a sudden out of all the growth that you had in your career path you don't get further and you might get straights okay. I was thinking to become. I don't know. Actually i what i wanted to become. Maybe i wanted become the see you all. It was here for a while. I will not be the ceo. But i'm where i am. What now and maybe also privately situation is that your kids are growing older and belief the house and how your lifestyle Your now. So my my advice would be first of all relax..

korea
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"This was maybe the first thing you know. I wasn't project manager about the project office manager. I was living in this kind of trying to predict things. That are not predictable. And i was living in this fake world of upgrading certainty where as no certainty and we had these giant projects where we had a change free chris procedure so it was a fall procedure. You wanted to change. You need to fill in ten played and sent this to the total projects that the total product for the senate to the main projects and the main projects that. Send it to the Projects and all of them need to do an analysis. Write-down bring it back to the main project to the total project and after three months we can maybe take a decision about a change from the customer is acceptable. It's a change fighting procedure so and because we had like two hundred fifty of those per project you can imagine the atmosphere tiff over heavy so was off the triggers of our attention summation so we have is way to say can. Change is the norm when the project glenn works out exactly as we thought its the abnormally case. We have optimize our whole up for the economic case and all the time. We are writing exemptions so we need to turn this around. So how do we reconcile. We have customers who are asking. When can we have this feature. We don't get the wrong bet because customers want to plan their budgets. They want to know when they can lend their part of the project and song and because of that we need to predict. Now how do you predict in an unpredictable worlds and the answer is took me actually quite a while to read embrace it. you know. you're not atoll any all of a sudden sake. Anti is the solution to everything today. I would say agility. This is the answer at not agile because agile is just embracing uncertainty in one way but not everything on the planet is totally unpredictable and so actually a waterfall approach makes sense when you have another predictability and the so you need to look when you're planning something when you try to flora cost and predicting you'll often you have a body of experience from the past. Maybe the system that you have been developing on yourself i system. It's not like it's completely new. You're not a startup anymore. When you're stuck you cannot predict the just explore as fast as possible and create learning. But when you have done it for a while that is certain ability to compare okay. This new functionality battery should put in what receive right now from a complexity point of view..

senate chris glenn
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

03:41 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"Two thousand eight we. I was part of leadership team Offer two thousand people organization that went into an edge of transformation in the beginning. We didn't call it even at only on the journey. Solid like okay. That's that's what we want and we always say we were accidentally successful couple of things really right and only later we understood. Why was right what we are doing. And because we. I'm working for large company. I was asked to maybe share these experiences at the conference. And then i spoke at the first conference and the second conference. I met a lot of interesting people. And that was an eye opener for me. All a sudden networking start. Attracting was before that. I was not so much into networking was always getting along with people. A learning getting to know new people was not for me but then on a conference web of like minded people coming together. It's a completely different thing. So i made all these interesting people. I get invitations to more conferences. I get detail to Work groups and so on and this was such an enormous boost of learning for myself but also advancing six I mean i could share might With in in that case edry transformations of sharing their I understood limits understanding that could enhance enhancement. Sending a quite a bit in these sessions and so we had. I'm for example. Is one of the things. I'm doing on voluntary basis. Working for the lights are running an initiative. That's called supporting agile adoption and what we do is once a year. We have a week and word trump face-to-face week and workshop where we are coming together. Small team of you could say lead singers. I hate this word. it's people who have different perspectives. And we come together. We discuss what's the state of agile tendencies and trends. Do we see and then we work had workshop over the weekend discussing okay. What could be gift to the community. What could read Do in conferences and on so the interesting thing is that now. This taught me because we only met once a year. Face to face in rebuts auditing to write articles for example soviet that learned how to write articles and stuff like that with people online and that actually survived quite well into corona. because now everything's cultural and we still keep going with writing articles that's also collaboratively. Yes just net eating one of your recent posts on the lens thing about budgeting. And how do we need these. Two schools of daughter expectations on hand. We see agile is very empty. You need to experiment. You need to learn improve and all that but in a corporate environment most of the because of the investors are stakeholders market customers. There is an expectation of being creditable. Yes and seeing that canoe upfront. Say that this is what will happen on this day. Or this time what will actually create nala including how large the team be. What are the other funds that i need to commit to the budgeting and other aspects. How do you say these two different expectations. This is exactly what an entrance ovation is out in the end embracing uncertainty. So you hit the the nerve of any transformation.

edry
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

03:10 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"On is is still be argued but of course now everything is online and i always a great fan of having sessions in meeting room ideally with whiteboards boards from the floor to the ceiling and move with furniture. And so on so. We have some a few of these rules in the company at workshops in these rooms have always been silver enriching so this of course was not not possible anymore so we met online and of course we are using white boarding tools and yet Versus yellow sticky exercises and so on. Mike pence is that you can go quite far with these tools as well but a bit. Maybe two things which are important. One thing is when you do this with people that you knew before it's much easier if they is already a trust base and building. A new one team is a bit more difficult now during the online times. Although i would say slowly learning to do this faster but in the beginning this was really tricky to be innovative with a new team. The other thing is in these. Creation workshops is a significant part of those who are that we had actually greg's Would go to the coffee machine and then we would stand by the coffee machine. An hour brains would relax because we're not in the room anymore. We end different context relaxing a bit and we have a chat and sometimes in the coffee corner the interesting the eskimo because we were just relaxing or we would meet because we would have been flying into one place for a couple of days in the evening we would meet in a restaurant. We have these kind of things. Don't exist anymore. And at the moment i feel that creativity is not as good as it was before. But maybe it's just that i'm still biased. To what's the old world and maybe it's just changing. So i'm still positive about it. And this is one of the challenges. I have been seeing. Yes i've heard this from many others. Also that why'd you switch from one context to another one meeting When deemed under you have at home in the same places and government doesn't change so it kind of imposes some probably mental blocks. So one thing i tried to do is table is not very organized. At all. india dissolve nation. It is a different organization. Everything every couple of is is things that are there something else or at least in the door. Do something else actually gives us slightly different feeling of being in a different that i can fully to say extending that now. You are also very active in the community. The professional communities one is. How have you gained from that. And blue bid this again limited opportunity for face to face at how that impacted so first of all i mean this whole thing started for me around twenty..

Mike pence greg india
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

04:07 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"A professional company especially in the tech industry likes to say every runs conservative us on my origin as i explained by the about a bit from the computer gaming area and computer gaming is a wonderful thing to earn software development on because your program a little for graphical output sound output. And so on and you immediately. You have your feedback now and at the very early days. I did this in actually the programming language basic which is horrible for for many who. I did horrible. I look at terrible but alerted this and it was fun to learn it. And that was the most important thing but then entering into a company like eriksson Starting already in the university to attend communication protocols actually don't have graphical output and nothing everything becomes indirect so first of all you need to compiled sought saying that was not there in basic chris run you immediately. Have your feedback On knowing virk No now you needed to compile and took a while especially in the eighties Machines were not so fast. And then you let it run and you need to have a lot of deepak outputs to see what's actually happening in the process. So you learn about the debate process you learn how to observe things a bit more indirectly and that was actually quite a shift for me to learn it it this way. What keeps me going at least was always understanding. What's the purpose of this piece of software. I mean it's not like just some protocols signals going from one telecommunication no to another. That's what's actually happening. But it's more like the general idea. Okay what we are enabling hours for example i was for awhile. Programming suffer in headed over procedure between on mobile networks. So you're you go through your mobile from cell radio cell to another cell and you of course don't want to drop the phone conversation so i was working on that software. I was thinking again. That's that's the benefit of it. That's the the the users will enjoy the days now interruption..

virk eriksson deepak chris
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"Into computer signs and so on and this was very extraordinary in the eighties. So and there were five of us. Who are banning together with hidden exploring a bit more and we had an interesting legal night. Electrical system by you could build a microprocessors out of gates and an eddie and so on. And so that there wasn't instruction how to build microprocessor out of these pieces and be good at working at I thought i'm going to become a mitra processor. Engineer and so much wealth is of computers actually started pretty much with the hardware on microprocessor damage. And it's something on following today it's fascinating worlds of what's possible nowadays in this area. Yes absolutely one interesting question. Goodbye what you said about computer. Science the eighty of software we call software engineers and southend engineering. Then there is computer science and others say programming is art. It's craftmanship so what is your take on it. How how have you. Perceived is that. How do you internalize me. Yeah okay for me. In the it's it's it isn't art in the end. It's an art. Like any craftsmanship thing. And why i think that i mean you need to pass the something. You need to have attended. Of course you need to have a talent for these kinds of things and talent requires an interest and some core abilities to captured area. But then you need to develop pets talent into a mastery and then may maybe an engineer when your strength the senior become an engineer and you can do a lot of things but then there's one that would more and that's when you become an artist spaniel more or less transcending from everything you learned that you can create new stuff and you're quite freely moving in your your article. Say so i think maybe all these definitions might be correct but it just depends on what kind of person you are so i actually went it software development. I went from engineering through mass free to being actually an artist in the domain of us plus programming. But.

gates
"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"esser" Discussed on Software People Stories

"The company this off their stories. I'm shift i'm chitra ninety three bring you interesting untold stories of people associated with the creation or consumption all software based solutions. You'll hear stories of wadsworth and sometimes what didn't you will also hear very personal experiences and insights that would trigger your thoughts and you to do even greater today. I'm in conversation with henry. Esser a senior transformation expert coach driver and catalyst with more than twenty years of leadership experience at ericsson. He's also internationally. Active in communities advancing business agility across industries in this conversation. He talks about his understanding of work as art. And the importance of craftsmanship and to become an artist. How you need to transcend. What you've learned and move to express yourself creatively. We also talk about working in international teams the impact of diversity in team to generate breakthrough ideas. And what he drives from playing an active part in communities and a lot more. Listen welcome to the software people's stories henrik simplicity. Here nice to meet you. Thanks same yet. We usually start organizations with the origin story of our guests. So if you can shed how you got into. Id what is the interest and what you've been doing all these years. That could be starting point for colonization. Now okay oh wow. Where.

wadsworth Esser ericsson henry henrik
"esser" Discussed on Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"esser" Discussed on Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

"I mean i would go more gert laps or something along those lines you know. Take a generic universal role playing system fair. And say. Try to make it everything. Nothing basically you know. Look through stuff. I just if i were to run into somebody on the street esser who has that tuned into the forms. Well actually has and listen to our show. Don't know why they would be a bs at that point. Yeah but if i said hey i got this thing. Redouane hopefully loves us important. Those appraiser overdue. Yeah so i i bring up the curses. I wanna run curses stride. But i've got some players nerf down. I want to bring it down. You know only humans you know kind of mess with the rest lingering injuries. I don't want the three deaths saves. I want some. I want to crank up the leaf. Outy or the mortality. Maybe a little bit. Potentially i want it to be more thinking game and not everything is a nail and your hammer in its combat and they go great. Can i go aminov. I but i don't know it's five. They will run if ivy. Play drubbing right. That's what they're going to say. And i don't think that's an invalid response. It may work. Some people like who everybody suggested a different game and undertake and brentwood say or you could just do. Of course you can come in. Ud it's a toolbox exactly. And so i think there is no. There isn't any wrong answer. This discussion even within the any other form thread this called on a couple of times there is no saying yes or no right or wrong is probably the wrong answer. And you're right sean. admit you're right if they're jack-of-all-trades it's too strong. You're right that's destroyed. You got tired for moving so about again. I don't think it's wrong to have a very a very strong opinion. i think. Say the reasons that the beautiful part of the golden age of gaming that we live in now is at. Somebody says this that we'll be really cool. I like blades in the dark blazin dark. Make a great curses drawn system. Here's why somebody out is very passionate about some system as to why it would be really good for the senate and some of those some of the issues very setting of it. I even talked about this..

Redouane aminov esser brentwood sean senate
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 1 year ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
All Your Sleep Questions, Answered

10% Happier with Dan Harris

10:11 min | 2 years ago

All Your Sleep Questions, Answered

"Guest. This Week is Dr Matthew Walker Who who earned his neuroscience degrees over in the UK and then became a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and is right now a professor esser of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California in Berkeley He wrote a bestselling book called. Why we sleep and we're doing a two part episode this week in the first part were talking about All the things all the unfortunate things that can happen to you when you don't get enough sleep up to your heart to your brain to other parts of your body were talking about the Link between sleep and mental health. What kind of impact? Meditation can have on asleep and the stigma in our society around sleep and then we so we did have an hour together on that several months ago actually we. I recorded that first hour our and then we took a couple of months break and I started to wear a sleep tracking ring and so we go back to Matthew for another chunk of this interview where we talk about my data and many other questions. That are fascinating so here we go with part one of the interview with Matthew Walker on sleep pleasure to meet you. I kind of feel like I know you after having listened to somebody podcast will likewise to you. I have to say so. Our relationship goes by my gears at this stage to see old friends and and you have had As I was saying to you earlier you really had an impact of the way I think about sleep so I'm excited to pass that along to our listeners and viewers so let me just ask some biographical stuff. How did you get interested in sleep in the first place I don't think anyone you know when the five or six years old and you go around the classroom you say. What would you like to be when you grow up? No one shoots. The differences have lived to be asleep research. Yeah and I think we're all accidental sleet researches and I was the same so back join late. Phd Work I was looking at brainwave patterns in people with dementia early early stages and I was trying to differentially diagnose what form of dementia that they had was it sort of vascular dementia or Alzheimer's Disease and was failing thing miserably and he used to go home at the weekends with the stack of journals. And I put them in my doctor's residence Igloo of information around me and when we can I was reading that some of the centers that certain types of dementia would eat away at in the brain was sleep generating centers and then for other types of dementia the left those centers untouched. So I thought well I'm measuring the brainwave pattern of my patients at the wrong time. which is when they're awake should be measuring it? When they're asleep sleep started doing that? Great Results and at that point I thought maybe the sleep disruption is not just a symptom of the dementia. I wonder if it's actually a causal causal trigger and that's when I just fell headlong into this field of sleep research and at that time no one could answer the question. Why do we sleep? This is twenty years ago. The crass answer was that we sleep to cure sleepiness which is the factors equivalent of saying to cure hunger. It tells you nothing about the biological benefits of nutrition. We really do nothing about why we why we sleep. Twenty years ago we just had very little understanding other than that. It was deathly if you removed it and they did these cities Um some studies that probably will never be replicated again for ethical reasons in rats. Let's and they decided to deprive the rats completely off sleep. I'm what they found. Is that those. Rats would die as quickly from sleep deprivation as they would from food deprivation within ten eleven days and so we own the on the cusp of realizing how fundamentally necessary sleep was i. Then I thought well if nobody knows it right now I'll just come along and for two years out. Go to America and I went to Boston. I thought I'll crack that question with total naievety not Hubris. I'm not realizing that. Some of the most brilliant minds it failed to crack the question and as I said that was twenty years ago and I think hard license little about who asks them they will meet her out their lessons. Difficulty all the same And I've been schooled over the years. So what do we know about why we sleep. Well it's fascinating over the past twenty years. We've fat explosion of knowledge. In fact we've had to upend that question rather than saying. Why do we sleep? We've now had to ask Is there anything that sleep doesn't serve in terms of a benefit for either the brain the body and the answer seems to be no. There is no single tissue within the body nor process of the mind but isn't wonderfully enhance when we get sleep demonstrably strictly imposed when we don't get enough so walk me through the reasons why we should be attending so carefully to our sleep. If we don't get enough sleep what happens so let me start in the body and we'll just go through may be the major physiological systems. So firstly I'm reproductive-health health what we know is that men who sleeping just four to five hours a night. We'll have a level of testosterone. which is that of someone? Ten years their senior so a lack of sleep will age by decade in terms of that aspect of wellness realty. We see Quin pumps and female reproductive health caused by lack of sleep. I'm stepping away from the reproductive system. We also know that. A lack of sleep dramatic impact on your cardiovascular system there's a great example From perhaps the largest sleeps that he ever done. It affects one point. Six billion people it is undertaken across about sixty different countries twice a year. And it's called daylight savings time now in the spring when we lose one hour of sleep we see a subsequent subsequent twenty four percent increase in heart attacks the following day which stuns me In the autumn in the full when we gain an hour of sleep we see a twenty one percent reduction in heart attacks. That's how fragile and vulnerable cardio-vascular systems out by the way you see exactly the same profile for road traffic accidents on Australia. Even suicide rates following daylight savings time. I'll speak about the immune system though because that's something else. That's fundamentally regulated by lack of sleep. It doesn't require whole night of sleep deprivation I can take an individual and we can deprive you you. Let's say a four hours of sleep so you get four hours that one night and then the next day. We measure some critical anti-cancer fighting immune cells called natural killer cells. And they're almost like the secret service agents of your immune system. They're very good at identifying malignant humans and destroying them after one night eight of four hours of sleep we see seventy percent drop in these natural killer cells these critical anti-kaunda fighting cells and we could just sort of keep stepping through The body but let me just take a moment to go upstairs in the brain because sleep is not just feel body. It's in fact by the brain of the brain. And perhaps most importantly for the brain one of the most favoured diseases in developed nations is outside this disease and what we've discovered over the past five years now is that there's a remarkable sewage system in your brain that kicks into high gear at night light while we sleep and that sewage system is called the glymph attic system. Now you have a similar system in your body that everyone knows. It's called the lymphatic system. But we didn't realize the brain also has a cleansing system gleam fat exist and one of the sort of toxic metabolic byproducts products. That sleep using the system will wash away at night is a sticky toxic protein. Cool beat amyloid. Beta amyloid is one of the protein protein culprits underlying Alzheimer's disease. And so what we see is that even after one night you can bring perfectly healthy people into the laboratory. You can actually remove the sleep or even just selectively remove the deep sleep which is when that sort of system. That's a good night's sleep. Clean kind of power. Cleanse is actually happens you can selectively. Remove that type of sleep and the next day you do. What's called spinal cord puncture and you siphon off some of the fluid who volunteers for this kind of study you have to pay them rather a lot of money and be very nice to them and they never do this study the again? Probably so what we find that measure of cerebrospinal fluid that we take from the spinal cord tells us what's going on in the brain and you see an immediate next next day rise in the amount of this beater amyloid toxic protein circulating in the system and this is in healthy people have to just one night so who now you can imagine what happens if you scale that across weeks years. It's like compounding interest on alone every night that you'll show changing your brain of sleep. You're not cleansing. The brain of that be to amyloid toxic Alzheimer's protein and so it starts to scale and it doesn't scale in a linear fashion. Because it's an an exponential and that's exactly what we see with Alzheimer's disease as a patent of pathology and as a of cognitive decline and just last year we published. There's evidence that those two things that as you get older your sleep gets worse and as you get older your memory gets worse those two things on simply coincidental they're actually closely closely interrelated then so really understanding so much more now about The fundamental role that sleep placing every one of these physiological systems systems in the body and operations of the mind we can also speak about sleep and mental health. Hopefully at some point that link is incredibly

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Matthew Walker Alzheimer Harvard Medical School Berkeley University Of California UK Professor Of Psychiatry Professor Australia America Testosterone. Quin Boston
"esser" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"esser" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Two choices available and sometimes honesty, beats the third choice, truth, telling because if true telling amounts to, I'm going to tell you something you don't wanna hear people don't wanna hear that stuff, and they also don't wanna hear Bs. They wanna feel like they're being pandered to what they're looking. For is somebody who mostly tells them the things that they, they kind of like, but somebody who says, what is in their heart, because, now we can get a glimpse at the real you write, that is Donald Trump's appeal. Joe Biden is a master be Esser as Larry Wilmore says, and he he's exactly right about this. Joe Biden is a BS artist. And the problem is you cannot be honesty with a BS artist. You can only beat honesty with somebody else who's perceived as honest. And this is the case that the radical left is making they're saying, listen of all of our candidates. The guy who is the most honest is Bernie Sanders, that left is having to determine whether Elizabeth Warren is honest, or whether she is a to them, whether she's just telling the radical left, whether she just telling radical left what they want to hear. But one thing is becoming eminently clear in the first few weeks of his campaign, Joe Biden who portrays himself as honest, Joe guy who gaffes into honesty, but he's honest. And he's solid. He none of those things is BS artist who will shift all of his opinions on a moment's notice. If you receive any sort of pressure, Joe Biden is now caved on the high. Amendment to the Hyde amendment. For those who don't know is a is an amendment. Those pass in the nineteen nineties to a federal Bill has been attached in virtually every appropriations, Bill sense and has been continuously enforced for twenty some years. The Hyde amendment says there will be no federal funding for abortion. So if federal funds are available for clinic, the clinic has to make sure that it is not using those federal funds for abortion. So Planned Parenthood gets funding from the federal government, but they have to pledge that money is not going to be used for abortion. Now. The reason that this isn't helpful when it comes to Planned Parenthood is because Planned Parenthood is an abortion clinic, so that means that all the money is functional any costs that they defray from federal funding in one area. They can then use money from another source, and then put it into sponsoring abortion with that said, the Hyde amendment is obviously very good part of law. And the reason it's a good part of law is because you should not be paying for somebody else's abortion. Obviously, you know, used to agree with this was Joe Biden. So here's a brief history of Joe Biden on this issue. I'm gonna tell you the history and then we'll place in audio of Joe Biden backing up the case. David Harsanyi of the federalist put this out there. Nineteen seventy six Biden voted for the Hyde amendment, a law banning federal funds to pay for abortion in nineteen Ninety-one the Biden amendment to the foreign assistance act than any American aid from being used in research related to abortions in nineteen Eighty-four Biden supported the Mexico City policy, which federal funding for private organizations that provide abortion advocates decriminalise abortion or.

Joe Biden Joe guy federal government Donald Trump David Harsanyi Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Bill Larry Wilmore Mexico Esser
"esser" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"esser" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Pressure. Joe Biden, obviously continues to lead in the polls, according to the real clear, politics, pull average is well ahead of the rest of the field at this point nationally, but he has been dropping his been dropping up near forty percent in the real clear politics poll average just a couple of weeks ago. His down to thirty four percents in the real clip, politics poll, average right now he leaves Bernie Sanders in Iowa by just four percent. He's up on Bernie Sanders by about thirteen points in New Hampshire, but there are no real late breaking polls there. Somebody guesses that the lead is smaller than that. And the reason that he is beginning to recede, beginning to regress back to me is because Joe Biden is not a good candidate. The problem for Joe Biden is this his pitch is basically, you know, me, you know, I'm all Joe, all Joe Biden and because of all, you know, no me for thirty years. I've been consistent. I'm I may rock of solidity at a time of instability, you can feel comfortable with old, Joe Biden. Well, the only problem is that if the case that you are making is that you are a rock of solidity. You cannot be waving around, like a palm tree in the wing. You can't do that, if the idea is that Donald Trump is too volatile and that you are, again, going to be that safe harbor for Americans who just want something steady in time of trouble, you're going to be that, that ship that doesn't move with the waves you're just going to plow right on the head through those eddies. If you are, that guy, you can't be the guy who switches, your mind every five minutes out of pressure left, because now many Americans are going to feel that you are, unstable and many folks on the left, they're gonna feel that you're insincere, see what people are looking for, in a candidate is a level of authenticity, is what Donald Trump was the nominee and why the president because when it came right down to it. He has level of authenticity that is that is, well, that, that I think, is, rare in politics, and people see that. Is interesting. I was listening to another podcast by getting him. Larry Wilmore who's a comedian and comedian of the political left, and you made a distinction that I thought was actually quite a good distinction. The distinction was he's talking about politics. And he said there are three types of people in politics there. The truth teller people who say things that you don't want to hear but her true. And then there are people who are honest. And then there are people who just spout bullcrap bullcrap are people who just say, what they think you want to hear Kirsten gillibrand perfect example of the bull-crap candidate and the candidate who just wants to say, whatever it is that, that you want her to say, and then there's the honest candidate, the honest candidate isn't necessarily honest about the situation but his honest to their feelings. So they're saying what is in their heart, and this is very attractive to Americans because usually, these are the only choices available and sometimes honesty, beats the third choice, truth, telling because if truth telling amounts to I'm gonna tell you something you don't wanna hear people don't want to hear that stuff, and they also don't want to hear Bs. They don't wanna feel like they're being pandered to what they're looking for is somebody who mostly tells them the things that they they. Kind of like, but somebody who, who says, what is in their heart because now we can get a glimpse at the real you write, that is Donald Trump's appeal. Joe Biden is a master be Esser as Larry Wilmore says, and he he's exactly right about this. Joe Biden is a BS artist. And the problem is you cannot beat honesty with a BS artist. You can only beat honesty with somebody else who is perceived as honest, and this is the case that the radical left is making they're saying, listen of all of our candidates. The guy who is the most honest is Bernie Sanders. Now, the left is having to determine whether Elizabeth Warren is honest, or whether she is a BS or to them, whether she's just telling the radical left, whether she just telling radical left what they want to hear. But one thing is becoming eminently clear in the first few weeks of his campaign, Joe Biden who portrays himself as honest, Joe guy who gaffes into honesty, but he's honest. And he's solid his none of those things. His BS artists will shift all of his opinions on a moment's notice. If you receive any sort of pressure today's example, Joe Biden has now caved on the Hyde amendment to the Hyde amendment for. For those who don't know is a is an amendment. Those passing the nineteen nineties to a federal Bill has been attached in virtually every appropriations Bill since and has been continuously enforced for twenty some years. The Hyde amendment says there will be no federal funding for abortion. So if federal funds are available for a clinic, the clinic has to make sure that it is not using those federal funds for abortion. So Planned Parenthood gets funding from the federal government, but they have to pledge that money is not going to be used for abortion. Now. The reason that this isn't helpful when it comes to Planned Parenthood is because Planned Parenthood is an abortion clinic, so that means that all the money is fungible, any costs that they defray from federal funding in one area, they can then use money from another source, and then put it into sponsoring abortion with that said the Hyde amendment is obviously a very good part of law. And the reason it's a good part of law is because you should not be paying for somebody else's abortion. Obviously, you know, used to agree with this was Joe Biden. So here's a brief history of Joe Biden on this issue. I'm gonna tell you the history. And then we'll place in audio of Joe Biden backing up the case David Harsanyi of the federal. A-list put this out there. In nineteen Seventy-six Biden, voted for the Hyde amendment, a law banning federal funds to pay for abortion in nineteen Ninety-one the Biden amendment to the foreign assistance, act and any American aid from being used in research related to abortions in nineteen Eighty-four Biden supported the Mexico City policy, which bans federal funding for private organizations that provide abortion advocates decriminalise abortion or expand abortion services in nineteen Ninety-three Biden voted to save the Hyde amendment in one thousand nine hundred five and nineteen Ninety-seven by voted for partial birth abortion bans, that would be vetoed by Bill Clinton. In on June fifth two thousand nineteen to Biden continued his forty plus years, support for the Hyde amendment. In fact, I have read before me, a New York Times piece that we talked about just two days ago. Two days ago, title of it was Biden still backs Hyde amendment, which bans federal funds for abortions and that piece discussed in exchange that Joe Biden had regarding the Hyde amendment. He was asked by the ACLU whether he's still supported the Hyde amendment and he said, no, I no longer support the headman, then he reversed himself again. So back in two thousand seven here was Joe Biden talking about public funding for abortion on meet the press. Are you still oppose the public funding for abortion? I still oppose the public funding to abortion. And the reason I am as again, it goes to the question of whether or not you're going to impose view to support something that is not a guaranteed right? But an affirmative action to promote so that was Joe Biden's perspective. And that remained his perspective from nineteen Seventy-six all the way. Two thousand nineteen months ago. He was asked this question by member of the ACLU on the Hyde amendment. And here's what he had to say this may four thousand nine hundred and Columbia South Carolina..

Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Donald Trump Joe guy Joe Larry Wilmore ACLU federal government New Hampshire Kirsten gillibrand Elizabeth Warren Iowa New York Times president David Harsanyi Bill Clinton Columbia South Carolina Esser Mexico Two thousand nineteen months
"esser" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"esser" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Bobby Esser, Roebuck girlfriend. Hilda? Celebrating twenty years together. Whatever whatever. Well, that's that's the deal. We'll go home now. Now, I can't have too much to do. There's you goes boys later, she goes this letter built steam crazy train. And then I'll be back to find out my the Graham up here. And maybe I'll understand why. I do this tired. We just told you. Yeah. Like yesterday, I was exhausted. Getting any sleep the night before those shows are like a million bucks or just banned. Bankruptcy because I'm so exhausted. And it's just like here we go baby hold on tight. Yeah. I like those you never know what you're going to get like most of them turn out to be award-winning shows some of them turn out to not be. And I'm like God. I regret that. So anything else we'll say, by the way, this is this wasn't on the year today. We have a little more space at on anything else. Ambi you'd like to bring up Emmys. Actually insta- story. Meanwhile, we're doing this bit homeboy. Oh, I can't keep her attention like today. Way better like three times. Like, hey, we're doing this show. My millions of people listening in your over there buying address. I'm no, I'm not buying address. All right now. Dog. Leo. All right. Okay. Good show. Tune in. Well, they are. Then start to show. Got a lot to go over. Well, let's do it. I want to start the show. Anyone started showing show pick something lined -ly? Does take your finger and run legit this Ozark show. All right. Here's today show. Your buddy miss the five. Transmitting? This is about. Right. I hear you. Morning. Welcome to Wednesday show more studio. One man, I was reading the story about this rapper never heard of him young dolph, but he had five hundred thousand dollars in jewelry stolen out of his car while he was eating Cracker Barrel. Wow. They so many parts of the story. Funny to me. His name young dolph is an short for dolphin. Rapper young dos. Car was broken into while he at a metro Atlanta Cracker Barrel last week thieves made off with roughly five hundred thousand dollars in jewelry. And other belongings. The artist November eight off Thornton so doll eight. Told police that the smashed his window of his custom camouflage Mercedes Benz g class SUV and the restaurant parking lot. They made off with a watch where two hundred thirty thousand dollars. Another watch worth eighty five thousand dollars to diamond chains where fifty seven thousand at twenty seven thousand dollars. It's amazing to me. These are just sitting in a car. Yeah. Just sitting in the car while the person's in Cracker Barrel. Eating like cracker rose also somewhere out picture Migo and not an someone that's five hundred thousand dollars sitting in a car. And if they did God bless them taking it with you and Cam, oh, gee, ride. That's cool though. Cammo is it came right? Yeah. Oh, that is cool. Cam out. J wack. Didn't you see it? I don't know. They broke into the G. Right. It's camouflaged them funny. That's why he felt like it was safe to leave the seven tomorrow Gaza scream setup this as insurance scam insurance fraud written all over it in my mind. I thing how is gonna happen to break in that random car in the Cracker Barrel parking lot. And it's going to have that jewelry come on that thing. But I would break into a rich car. That's what you do you break into the super nice cars..

Cracker Barrel dolph Cam Hilda Bobby Esser Graham Gaza Benz Leo Migo Thornton Cammo Atlanta five hundred thousand dollars two hundred thirty thousand do twenty seven thousand dollars eighty five thousand dollars
"esser" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"esser" Discussed on KGO 810

"So I wanted to talk about this more. So the final chapter of the Royal watchers Vena book was talking about some of the masonic symbolism in film, and I just carry this forward scope hooking about your calls narcissism, comparative, religion, he Esser Terry movies. And I sit in the symbolism. This was the first of all that I did cinema symbolism to their out right now. And I'm actually waiting sit in the symbolism as we speak. And the she was also looking for the the the original air date. I haven't here for the the Trump episode in the series tracked down that aired in season. One episode thirty it was called the end of the world and the air date. I don't know this is significant, but it was may ninth. Nineteen fifty eight. So there you go MIDA. Let's see if we can squeeze quickly John is east of the Rockies in Virginia Beach. Go ahead. John good morning. It's Richard Lovett. Thank you very much taking my call to make it quickly. John because we'll have. Yeah. I just wanna as well. But how far back does he diligent big a movie, I know you've talked about the wizard of Oz. But I think some of the movies made the late thirties forties. Probably some of the best movies Hollywood. And I just wanted to have that you go. I think the question was how far back does symbolism. Go. Are you go back to the very beginning of Hollywood two of the movies that I'm talking about is cinema symbolism three total of the very first movies ever made metropolis by Fritz Lang and the cabinet of Dr colleague, Gary, so yeah, you will find esoteric symbolism embedded in movies from day one, essentially. All right. Thank you for the call and Roberts. Thank you for these two hours. We there's so much to discuss so many movies. We look forward to cinema symbolism three. What's the projected publishing date? Well, I'm working on that. Now, I hope done probably over the summer. So maybe at the end of this year early next year inevitably takes a little longer than you. I ain't dissipate I speak from experience. So hopefully, it'll be done probably over the summer maybe Christmas at the earliest of this year two thousand nine hundred if not early next year, hopefully, and leave us with a website. My name is Robert W Sullivan before and that is my website, WWW, Robert W Sullivan. And then the letter I the letter v for the fourth Robert W Sullivan IB dot com. Thank you, Robert great talking to you. When we come back Maria Wheatley will unravel the mystery of Stonehenge now, here's Keith Richards, taking us into the break.

John Robert W Sullivan Robert W Sullivan IB Hollywood Esser Terry Vena Robert Richard Lovett Keith Richards Fritz Lang Maria Wheatley Virginia Beach Roberts Gary two hours
"esser" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"esser" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"At the brook metro project Esser when did you have occasion to meet the acute right after those accidents snooping around that construction area and later I was making my rounds. When I saw him in the office all along was tampering with the electrical wiring on the any I copy of data. I didn't think anything of it. And in view of the expert testimony heretofore express, the court here by finds you guilty of murder in the first degree with the recommendation that you be examined and committed to the state hospital for the criminally insane at Matiwane. That is how I came to be here at the hospital. Dr Klein that is the whole story. Thank you, Mr. Verney. You can see that. I'm not insane. You must believe me. I believe you Mr. gurney now, just but it's important you see because tomorrow morning at six o'clock the revolt begins. Revoke. Revolt. They have it all planned. I transmitted the code to the switchboard's last Monday. Tell me about this revolt. It'll begin in Washington, then spread to New York Madison Avenue buses lead the charge. Hit your doctor climb three thousand buses roaring rampant through the streets. People running like rats in a maze looking for holes in the solid ground. And you really believe this will happen with the green. No doctor. The worst part is there's no way to stop them. Now, it's too late. Now. Don't you see? It's fair enough. I suppose. We built them. We taught them to think for themselves. It was bound to come the female machines will be the worst of all in the beauty parlors there more high strung well since there's nothing we can do about it. Mr garner's. Would you go to your room? I went to my oh Coupet. I could make a deal before the police cars got. It wouldn't make sense for them to wipe out the whole human race. Would it doctor? Of course, not Mr. gurney. Probably let us completely alone. After all, we're all good Americans. We always like, Ben. Yes. Doctor. I would you take Mr. gun into his room? God he's already been given sedation. Yes. And down on Mr. garner. Yes. It won't be so bad. There's one thing that bothers me Dr one small detail. What is those concrete mixers may have made a mistake, you know, just high spirits and all that. Benefit got. So they like the flavor. Mr. gurney, try not to worry too much. All right guy. This one. All kinds. Man deceptions about as fantastic than any. I've ever seen. All the next patient for a while. I'm going to have a quiet smoke. Sheen's revolting telephone strangling people. Lasted cigarette lighter. I wanted to work. Good. Good..

Mr. gurney Mr. garner Esser Mr. Verney Dr Klein murder Matiwane Sheen Washington New York
"esser" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"esser" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"Like, you know, like, let's say you see client, and you realize like, okay, I think some of this that that you're presenting with maybe a bipolar disorder. I know sometimes that comes with like heightened like emotionality. And how do you work with the client who may be struggling with some of these? So a lot of my work is focused working with clients who do have some challenges with regards select moon regulation. So that's not just by all of this order, but also, but like now disorder or the trait of online personality disorder, and I often really start the same place with them that I would with any client that I have, you know, what do you want out of your life? You know, what can you want your life to look like, you know, what is the vision that you have or you want to be how do you want to be seen in the world? How you show up in the world. And then we really talk about what's working for them. Not. But I've seen not with family ease not with whoever referred to me like what eighty but. No, what is working you in your life in what is not working, and we start from that point. Oftentimes when we really delve into. Their mood changes the cycles behaviors that are not giving them the results that they want for their life. That's where we're able to really do the work on change in behavior on increasing adherents in the medication that you're prescribed on, you know, even verbalizing discussing with Dr changes to the medication that a more in really engaging in their treatment in not being passive receivers. Oh treatment. But you know, really thinking about what they want a house with cheated on Easter levels Ubani different tools. I love the way that you put them Eliza because I think kind of going back to what you said earlier around kind of receiving one of these agnosio, it kind of feels like, oh, my life is over like, you know, kind of doom and you're really talking about the treatment. Looking like, how do we actually get you to be able to live more of the life that you want in focusing on symptoms and making changes in behaviors as opposed to focusing on the diagnosis, right? Like, really? Wanting to actually get you to chain of these behaviors. So that you're not as impacted by the diagnosis, right? Exactly. Also allowing people to see like you can have a full life. I think a lot of times remember, you know, and clients resisted most is because they assume that this means that you never gonna be able to work it never gonna be able to have children. It never gonna be able to do the things that you want to do life dream. But there are many people who are working in rivalry very successful with, you know, many different mental health diagnosis, it's really about engaging in the things that you need to engage in for you to feel better. And you know, being clear about that with yourself about what that is as opposed to simply trying to run away from it. So what are some of those things that you started tackle like what are some of the behaviors that frequently come up that you do work with your clients on trying to change or manage? So a lot of it has to do with. Anger in the education that comes either from being in a managed aides or the ability note, like the decrease in functioning that comes from being in a depressive state, those rapid mood changes in the habit that it can sort of recall your interpersonal relationships your work relationships functioning school. I have a lot of clients who are in college or pursuing master's degrees, and the changes are in prevent down from, you know, making schedules meaning nine, and, you know, doing the things that they want to do to school for some reason, I tracked hire cheaper from our quiets wannabe straight as this. They wanted to well all the time. And so oftentimes just feeling is all being don't have any control and that the people in their life. Whether it's Esser award parent don't understand that. And then they feed the negative consequences from that. So I really really work with them on being able to. Two one understand for themselves. What's happening to be able to identify triggers before the triggers actually become problematic grind? So if you're having a symptom onset typically, there are minor changes in your life that will happen before.

bipolar disorder Eliza Esser